Bio

PROF. KIBERA LUCY WAIRIMU

Professor,

Department of Educational Foundations College of
Education and External Studies,

Teaching Sociology of Education and Gender Issues in Education and Coordination of the latter

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Publications


2011

2009

Kibera, LW, Kibera FN.  2009.  Guidelines for Writing Academic Research Projects.

2007

Kibera, LW, Kimokoti A.  2007.  Fundamentals of sociology of Education African Perspective. Abstract

In an academic field, research project and/or thesis is an integral and mandatory component of the higher degree programmes. The guidelines on how to write research proposals are therefore expected to assist a student to identify and choose a viable research problem. Many research proposals are turned down each year because of content and methodological deficiencies. The research proposal serves to present the research question or problem to be researched on; discuss its importance to society; the research efforts of others who have worked on related research; suggests sources of data pertinent to solving the research question and how the data will be gathered, analysed and interpreted. A good research proposal is concise and focused although its length is dependent on regulations of different universities; it often ranges between ten and forty double-spaced pages inclusive of appendices. A research proposal has three main chapters or sections namely introduction, titerature review and research methodology. Kibera, loW. and Kibera F.N. (2009). Guidelines for Writing Academic Research Projects in Fountain, Journal of Faculty of Education, November 3, pp 117-129. Abstract The social changes being experienced worldwide cannot be overemphasized. Children are growing up in several and different environments at home, school and community and religious organizations are the settings for social and intellectual experiences from which children acquire and develop the skills, attitudes and attachments which characterize them as individuals and shape their choice and performance of adult roles. This book is about practices and processes involved in socialization and education, particularly the agencies concerned about the ways in which schools, through their teachers, curricula and organization, deliberately and/or informally influence the young. Among all agencies of socialization, schools are in a strong position to exert influence upon the young. This stems in part from their specialized functions and expertise concerning scholastic and technical instruction. Schools introduce to students forms of authority, social and working relationships and occupational roles. Some of this influence is specific and overt, operating through deliberate instruction to more or less determined objectives. Although there is much emphasis on schools and their students, it would make little sense to discuss schools in isolation from the other agencies of socialization. Consequently, we have approached each of our topics through a broad discussion of practices and processes. By doing this we hope that the influence of each socialization agent has been put in its proper perspective and that its limitations can be appreciated. The first chapter on sociology discusses the development of sociology as a discipline and some of its various branches. Chapter 2 deals specifically with the origins and development of sociology of education and its concerns. Sociological theories and their application to education are contained in Chapter 3. Chapter 4 looks at socialization particularly, the agents of socialization and the relationships between socialization and education. To appreciate formal education, indigenous education cannot be overlooked. Chapter 5 and 6 therefore discuss the role and purpose of indigenous education. Chapter 7 examines the relationship between culture and education. Culture basically is seen as the main content of curriculum of any education system while education is always seen as the major agent of development. However, as much as education means well for the society it has detriments, for instance creating social classes. Chapter 8 discusses education and social stratification. Chapter 9 looks at the sociology of the classroom and examines its complex environment. Chapter 10 highlights the factors affecting the education of girls while chapter 11 discusses the teacher and teaching profession and the changing multiple roles of the teacher in response to societal changes. Finally, chapter 12 is a case study of the Kenya's undergraduate students' attitudes and perceptions towards the teaching profession.

2005

2002

Kibera, LW, Kibera FN.  2002.  Guidelines for developing a thesis research proposal.
WAIRIMU, PROFKIBERALUCY.  2002.  "Factors militating against education of women" The Fountain, Journal of Faculty of Education, No. 1. The Foundation, Journal of Faculty of Education, No. 1. : AIDS 24(6):891-7 Abstract
Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Imperial College School of Medicine, London, UK. Previous attempts to determine the interactions between filariasis transmission intensity, infection and chronic disease have been limited by a lack of a theoretical framework that allows the explicit examination of mechanisms that may link these variables at the community level. Here, we show how deterministic mathematical models, in conjunction with analyses of standardized field data from communities with varying parasite transmission intensities, can provide a particularly powerful framework for investigating this topic. These models were based on adult worm population dynamics, worm initiated chronic disease and two major forms of acquired immunity (larval- versus adult-worm generated) explicitly linked to community transmission intensity as measured by the Annual Transmission Potential (ATP). They were then fitted to data from low, moderate and moderately high transmission communities from East Africa to determine the mechanistic relationships between transmission, infection and observed filarial morbidity. The results indicate a profound effect of transmission intensity on patent infection and chronic disease, and on the generation and impact of immunity on these variables. For infection, the analysis indicates that in areas of higher parasite transmission, community-specific microfilarial rates may increase proportionately with transmission intensity until moderated by the generation of herd immunity. This supports recent suggestions that acquired immunity in filariasis is transmission driven and may be significant only in areas of high transmission. In East Africa, this transmission threshold is likely to be higher than an ATP of at least 100. A new finding from the analysis of the disease data is that per capita worm pathogenicity could increase with transmission intensity such that the prevalences of both hydrocele and lymphoedema, even without immunopathological involvement, may increase disproportionately with transmission intensity. For lymphoedema, this rise may be further accelerated with the onset of immunopathology. An intriguing finding is that there may be at least two types of immunity operating in filariasis: one implicated in anti-infection immunity and generated by past experience of adult worms, the other involved in immune-mediated pathology and based on cumulative experience of infective larvae. If confirmed, these findings have important implications for the new global initiative to achieve control of this disease.

2001

WAIRIMU, PROFKIBERALUCY.  2001.  "Analysis Characterizations of Female Gender in Selected Fictions and Textbooks in Contemporary Kenya" Adult Educator, The Kenya Adult Educator Vol. 5 No. 2, 2001. The Kenya Adult Educator Vol. 5 No. 2, 2001. : AIDS 24(6):891-7 Abstract
Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Imperial College School of Medicine, London, UK. Previous attempts to determine the interactions between filariasis transmission intensity, infection and chronic disease have been limited by a lack of a theoretical framework that allows the explicit examination of mechanisms that may link these variables at the community level. Here, we show how deterministic mathematical models, in conjunction with analyses of standardized field data from communities with varying parasite transmission intensities, can provide a particularly powerful framework for investigating this topic. These models were based on adult worm population dynamics, worm initiated chronic disease and two major forms of acquired immunity (larval- versus adult-worm generated) explicitly linked to community transmission intensity as measured by the Annual Transmission Potential (ATP). They were then fitted to data from low, moderate and moderately high transmission communities from East Africa to determine the mechanistic relationships between transmission, infection and observed filarial morbidity. The results indicate a profound effect of transmission intensity on patent infection and chronic disease, and on the generation and impact of immunity on these variables. For infection, the analysis indicates that in areas of higher parasite transmission, community-specific microfilarial rates may increase proportionately with transmission intensity until moderated by the generation of herd immunity. This supports recent suggestions that acquired immunity in filariasis is transmission driven and may be significant only in areas of high transmission. In East Africa, this transmission threshold is likely to be higher than an ATP of at least 100. A new finding from the analysis of the disease data is that per capita worm pathogenicity could increase with transmission intensity such that the prevalences of both hydrocele and lymphoedema, even without immunopathological involvement, may increase disproportionately with transmission intensity. For lymphoedema, this rise may be further accelerated with the onset of immunopathology. An intriguing finding is that there may be at least two types of immunity operating in filariasis: one implicated in anti-infection immunity and generated by past experience of adult worms, the other involved in immune-mediated pathology and based on cumulative experience of infective larvae. If confirmed, these findings have important implications for the new global initiative to achieve control of this disease.

2000

WAIRIMU, PROFKIBERALUCY.  2000.  "Launching of Literacy Materials Workshop".. UNE SCO/UNESCO/UNIT WIN CHAIR Workshop , 26 th - 28 th July,2000. : AIDS 24(6):891-7 Abstract
Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Imperial College School of Medicine, London, UK. Previous attempts to determine the interactions between filariasis transmission intensity, infection and chronic disease have been limited by a lack of a theoretical framework that allows the explicit examination of mechanisms that may link these variables at the community level. Here, we show how deterministic mathematical models, in conjunction with analyses of standardized field data from communities with varying parasite transmission intensities, can provide a particularly powerful framework for investigating this topic. These models were based on adult worm population dynamics, worm initiated chronic disease and two major forms of acquired immunity (larval- versus adult-worm generated) explicitly linked to community transmission intensity as measured by the Annual Transmission Potential (ATP). They were then fitted to data from low, moderate and moderately high transmission communities from East Africa to determine the mechanistic relationships between transmission, infection and observed filarial morbidity. The results indicate a profound effect of transmission intensity on patent infection and chronic disease, and on the generation and impact of immunity on these variables. For infection, the analysis indicates that in areas of higher parasite transmission, community-specific microfilarial rates may increase proportionately with transmission intensity until moderated by the generation of herd immunity. This supports recent suggestions that acquired immunity in filariasis is transmission driven and may be significant only in areas of high transmission. In East Africa, this transmission threshold is likely to be higher than an ATP of at least 100. A new finding from the analysis of the disease data is that per capita worm pathogenicity could increase with transmission intensity such that the prevalences of both hydrocele and lymphoedema, even without immunopathological involvement, may increase disproportionately with transmission intensity. For lymphoedema, this rise may be further accelerated with the onset of immunopathology. An intriguing finding is that there may be at least two types of immunity operating in filariasis: one implicated in anti-infection immunity and generated by past experience of adult worms, the other involved in immune-mediated pathology and based on cumulative experience of infective larvae. If confirmed, these findings have important implications for the new global initiative to achieve control of this disease.

1999

WAIRIMU, PROFKIBERALUCY.  1999.  "Challenges and Prospects of Female Entrepreneurship in Small Scale Enterprises in Kenya" in African Entrepreneurship and Small Business Development edited by Lettice Kinunda - Rutashoby and Donath Raphael Olemi. Dar. UNE SCO/UNESCO/UNIT WIN CHAIR Workshop , 26 th - 28 th July,2000. : AIDS 24(6):891-7 Abstract
Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Imperial College School of Medicine, London, UK. Previous attempts to determine the interactions between filariasis transmission intensity, infection and chronic disease have been limited by a lack of a theoretical framework that allows the explicit examination of mechanisms that may link these variables at the community level. Here, we show how deterministic mathematical models, in conjunction with analyses of standardized field data from communities with varying parasite transmission intensities, can provide a particularly powerful framework for investigating this topic. These models were based on adult worm population dynamics, worm initiated chronic disease and two major forms of acquired immunity (larval- versus adult-worm generated) explicitly linked to community transmission intensity as measured by the Annual Transmission Potential (ATP). They were then fitted to data from low, moderate and moderately high transmission communities from East Africa to determine the mechanistic relationships between transmission, infection and observed filarial morbidity. The results indicate a profound effect of transmission intensity on patent infection and chronic disease, and on the generation and impact of immunity on these variables. For infection, the analysis indicates that in areas of higher parasite transmission, community-specific microfilarial rates may increase proportionately with transmission intensity until moderated by the generation of herd immunity. This supports recent suggestions that acquired immunity in filariasis is transmission driven and may be significant only in areas of high transmission. In East Africa, this transmission threshold is likely to be higher than an ATP of at least 100. A new finding from the analysis of the disease data is that per capita worm pathogenicity could increase with transmission intensity such that the prevalences of both hydrocele and lymphoedema, even without immunopathological involvement, may increase disproportionately with transmission intensity. For lymphoedema, this rise may be further accelerated with the onset of immunopathology. An intriguing finding is that there may be at least two types of immunity operating in filariasis: one implicated in anti-infection immunity and generated by past experience of adult worms, the other involved in immune-mediated pathology and based on cumulative experience of infective larvae. If confirmed, these findings have important implications for the new global initiative to achieve control of this disease.

1997

WAIRIMU, PROFKIBERALUCY.  1997.  The Challenges and Future Prospects of Female Entrepreneurial Activities in Kenya. University of Dar-es- Salaam from 23 rd to 24 th October, 1997.. : AIDS 24(6):891-7 Abstract
  
WAIRIMU, PROFKIBERALUCY.  1997.  Gender Issues in Publishing: Content Analysis of Children's Fiction Books. .. Kenya Publishers Association Workshop on Gender Issues in Publishing held at Kenyatta International Conference Centre, Nairobi,: 26th to 27th May,1997. : AIDS 24(6):891-7 Abstract
  
WAIRIMU, PROFKIBERALUCY.  1997.  "The State of the Art of Adult Education and Didactic Materials in Kenya: A Gender Perspective" Journal of Kenya Adult Education Association Vol. 3 No. 2 1997. UNESCO/UNITWIN CHAIRS STRATEGIC planning workshop at University of Nairobi- 15-17 July ,1997. : AIDS 24(6):891-7 Abstract
  
WAIRIMU, PROFKIBERALUCY.  1997.  "Women Education and Life Skills".. UNESCO/UNITWIN CHAIRS STRATEGIC planning workshop at University of Nairobi- 15-17 July ,1997. : AIDS 24(6):891-7 Abstract
  
WAIRIMU, PROFKIBERALUCY.  1997.  "Gender, Education and Occupational Prestige in Kenya". UNESCO/UNITWIN CHAIRS STRATEGIC planning workshop at University of Nairobi- 15-17 July ,1997. : AIDS 24(6):891-7 Abstract
  
WAIRIMU, PROFKIBERALUCY.  1997.  "Female Characterization in Contemporary Kenyan Fiction".. Women Writers Symposium held at Sunset Hotel Kisumu, 3rd to 7 th December, 1997. : AIDS 24(6):891-7 Abstract
  
WAIRIMU, PROFKIBERALUCY.  1997.  "Gender and Politics in Kenya". College of Education and External Studies, University of Nairobi, Kenya- November, 1997. : AIDS 24(6):891-7 Abstract
  
WAIRIMU, PROFKIBERALUCY.  1997.  "The Challenges and Future Prospects of Female Entrepreneurial Activities in Kenya". University of Dar-es- Salaam -23 rd to 24 th October, 1997.. : AIDS 24(6):891-7 Abstract
  
WAIRIMU, PROFKIBERALUCY.  1997.  The Influence of Ecology and Ethnicity on Educational Aspirations of Secondary School Students in Kenya".. Kenyatta University-1997. : AIDS 24(6):891-7 Abstract
  

1996

WAIRIMU, PROFKIBERALUCY.  1996.  University Student's Attitudes and Perceptions Towards the Teaching Profession and the Teaching ractice, Kenya Journal of Education, Vol. 6 No. 13, Bureau of Educational Research, Kenyatta University.. Kenya Journal of Education, Vol. 6 No. 13, Bureau of Educational Research, Kenyatta University.. : AIDS 24(6):891-7 Abstract
  

1995

WAIRIMU, PROFKIBERALUCY.  1995.  "Gender Equity and Education. The Situation of Kenya". Adult Educator, The Journal of the Kenya Adult Education Association. Vol. 2 Number 1.. Adult Educator, The Journal of the Kenya Adult Education Association. Vol. 2 Number 1.. : AIDS 24(6):891-7 Abstract
  
WAIRIMU, PROFKIBERALUCY.  1995.  "The Role of Culture and Education in the Development of Creativity", Adult Educator, The journal of the Kenya Adult Education Association. Vol. 2 No. 2.. Adult Educator, The journal of the Kenya Adult Education Association. Vol. 2 No. 2.. : AIDS 24(6):891-7 Abstract
  
WAIRIMU, PROFKIBERALUCY.  1995.  "Sexually, Health and Reproductive Rights of Women. ". Guest Lecturer at Gender Institute, 1995, Dakar, Senegal.- 13 th July to 31 st July,1995. : AIDS 24(6):891-7 Abstract
  
WAIRIMU, PROFKIBERALUCY.  1995.  Youth and Morality". Presented paper to Secondary School Students of Kikuyu Day in Kikuyu Division in Kenya.-16 th October,1995. : AIDS 24(6):891-7 Abstract
  

1994

WAIRIMU, PROFKIBERALUCY.  1994.  The Role of Culture and Education in the Department of Creativity: Perspectives from Kenya.. The Third International Social Studies and Environmental Programme held at Hotel International, Nairobi, Kenya - 27 th - 29 th June,1994. : AIDS 24(6):891-7 Abstract
  
WAIRIMU, PROFKIBERALUCY.  1994.  Literacy and Post Literacy Print and Visual Materials with a Gender Perspective,. UNESCO sub-regional seminar Arusha, Tanzania.- 3 rd to 13 th October, 1994. : AIDS 24(6):891-7 Abstract
  
WAIRIMU, PROFKIBERALUCY.  1994.  "Gender and Education in Kenya".. All Africa Conference in Nairobi, Kenya s sponsored by Kenya Comparative Education Society -14 th - 17 th June,1994. : AIDS 24(6):891-7 Abstract
  

1990

WAIRIMU, PROFKIBERALUCY.  1990.  The 8-4-4 system on Education and its implications on career and educational aspirations of students.. Staff Seminar Paper to the Department of Educational Foundations. : AIDS 24(6):891-7 Abstract
  

1987

WAIRIMU, PROFKIBERALUCY.  1987.  "The Role of Philosophy of Education in the Education of Teachers".. Seminar Paper at Kenya Technical Teachers College,in Nairobi, Kenya.. : AIDS 24(6):891-7 Abstract
  
WAIRIMU, PROFKIBERALUCY.  1987.  Children's Riddles by Kenya Literature Bureau. Kenya Literature Bureau.. : AIDS 24(6):891-7 Abstract
  

1985

WAIRIMU, PROFKIBERALUCY.  1985.  Children's Wisdom Stories by Kenya Literature Bureau. Kenya Literature Bureau.. : AIDS 24(6):891-7 Abstract
  
WAIRIMU, PROFKIBERALUCY.  1985.  Children's Home Made Toys by Kenya Literature Bureau.. Kenya Literature Bureau.. : AIDS 24(6):891-7 Abstract
  

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