AKAMA M.K., CHINDIA, M.L., GUTHUA, S.W., and NYONG'O, A. Extra-abdominal fibromatosis invading the mandible: A case report. East Afr. Med. Journal, 79 (1), 49-50, 2002.

Citation:
W PROFGUTHUASYMON. "AKAMA M.K., CHINDIA, M.L., GUTHUA, S.W., and NYONG'O, A. Extra-abdominal fibromatosis invading the mandible: A case report. East Afr. Med. Journal, 79 (1), 49-50, 2002.". In: A case report. East Afr. Med. Journal, 79 (1), 49-50. Elsevier; 2002.

Abstract:

Although military conflicts are common on the African continent, there is a paucity of data regarding bomb-blast injuries in this region and in Kenya in particular.  This paper describes the pattern of maxillofacial injuries sustained after the august 1998 bomb blast that occurred in Nairobi, Kenya.  A retrospective cross-sectional study was carried out using hospital-based records of 290 bomb-blast survivors admitted at the Kenyatta national Referral and Teaching Hospital in Nairobi.  Using a self-designed form to record information about variables such as the sex and age of the survivors and type of location of soft and hard tissue injuries, it was found that of the 290 bomb-blast survivors, 78% had sustained one or more maxillofacial injuries.  Soft-tissue injuries (cuts, lacerations or bruises) were the most common, constituting 61.3% of all injuries in the maxillofacial region: 27.6% had severe eye injuries, while 1.4% had fractures in the cranio-facial region.  This paper concludes that the effective management of bomb-blast injuries as well as those caused by other types of disaster requires a multidisciplinary approach.  The high percentage of maxillofacial injuries confirm that maxillofacial surgeons should form an integral part of this multidisciplinary team.

Notes:

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