Bio

PROF. MWEA SIXTUS KINYUA

Registered Consulting Engineer

Interest in Geotechnical, Higways and Structural Engineering at research and practice. Has been a team leader for several civil and structural Projects Currently (2009) Chairman of the Kenya Urban Roads Authority.

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Publications


2015

2014

Ong’ayo E.O., S.K. M, S.O A.  2014.  Determination of basic mean hourly wind speeds for structural design in Nairobi County. International Journal of Engineering Sciences & Emerging Technologies . Vol 7 (Issue 2 )
Onyancha, C, Mathu E, Mwea S, Ngecu W.  2014.  Geophysical resistivity survey in subsurface characterization for underground excavation and heavy construction in Nairobi City, Kenya. International Journal of Geophysics.. (605176)mwea.pdf

2013

Adoyo, FO, Mwea SK.  2013.  INVESTIGATION OF INTERIOR STRESS RELATIONSHIPS ON RIGID PAVEMENTS ALONG MBAGATHI ROAD, KENYA. Icastor Journal of Engineering. Vol. 6(No. 2):pp53-63.

2012

S, O, SK M, FJ G.  2012.  Pull-Out Resistance Of 3 Different Plant Species And Their Application In Slope Stabilization Works. Journal Of Engineering Indian Centre For Advanced Scientific And Technological Research ” (Icastor ) . Volume 5( No. 1 )pull-out_resistance_of_3_different_plant_species_and.pdf
C, O, E M, SK M, Ngechu.  2012.  Variation of ground water static levels in Nairobi City Since 1927.. At the regional conference of the international network of Women in Science and Engineering organized by women in science and Engineering . , New Delhi India

2011

Onyancha, CK, Eliud M. Mathu, Mwea SK, Ngecu WM.  2011.  DEALING WITH SENSITIVE AND VARIABLE SOILS IN NAIROBI CITY. International Journal of Research and Reviews in Applied Sciences. Vol. 9(No. 2):pp282-291.dealing_with_sensitive_and_variable_soils_in_nairobi_city.pdf
C, O, E EM, SK M, W N.  2011.  A study on the engineering behaviour of Nairobi subsoil. Asian Research Publishing Network, Journal of Engineering and Applied Sciences. 6(7)a_study_on_the_engineering_behaviour_of.pdf

2008

Mwea, SK.  2008.  The way forward in civil engineering training. Abstract

The civil engineering teaching involves provision of sound professional education so that upon graduation the student is able to fit into the various disciplines of civil engineering. These disciplines can be broadly described as transportation, structural, water and waste water engineering. This paper suggests that besides instilling the core engineering knowledge, the teaching of civil engineering should include other subjects which have a big impact in the work of civil engineers. These areas include entrepreneurship, environmental, and social studies. Additionally a study abroad is recommended for those students who are likely to work outside their counties of birth.

KINYUA, PROFMWEASIXTUS.  2008.  Gitau AN, Gumbe LO, Mwea SK, (2008) Mechanical Behavior of a Hard-Setting Luvisol Soil as Influenced by Soil Water and Effective Confining Stress. Agricultural Engineering International:. CIGR Ejournal LW o7 021 Vol. X March 2008. : Longhorn Abstract
Kenya experienced extraordinarily heavy rainfall between May 1997 and February 1988 due to the El Nino weather phenomenon. This period of about 10 Months of heavy rainfall caused widespread landslides and floods in various parts of the country. An enormous number of landslides occurred in Central, Western and to the Coast Provinces. This triggered a nation-wide crusade to plant trees in an effort to counter future landslide phenomenon. However, little quantitative research has been conducted to assess the impact of plant roots on soil strength. As a result, planting of trees tend to be more empirical without consideration of the structural measures for reinforcing soil that combine the ecological benefits of vegetation. This paper describes the contribution of plant roots of various species to soil shear strength. Soil samples with roots of various plant species were tested in a large modified direct shear apparatus in a laboratory set-up. Shear stress results of rooted soils were compared with results of soil without roots of similar soil types. The contribution of roots to soil strength was estimated by comparing the difference between the maximum shear stress of the shear-displacement curves obtained for soils with and without roots for the different species tested. Results suggested that the rooted soils contributed more to soil strength than rootless soils. However there was varying degree of shear strength contribution for different root species suggesting that for each species, contribution of shear strength was governed by root density. The results suggested that a composite soil-root system consumes energy while resisting shear displacement. This feature could be included in stability analysis of vegetated hillslopes in terms of energy associated with shearing in a soil-root system.
KINYUA, PROFMWEASIXTUS.  2008.  Osano S N Mwea, S. K (2008), The effect of vegetation roots in slope stability, 2nd Civil Engineering International Conference on Civil Engineering and Sustainable Development held in Mombasa between 25h and 28th September 2008. 1st International Symposium on RE-Orienting Civil Engineering Education and Training held in Mombasa between 25th and 26th September 2008. : Longhorn Abstract
Kenya experienced extraordinarily heavy rainfall between May 1997 and February 1988 due to the El Nino weather phenomenon. This period of about 10 Months of heavy rainfall caused widespread landslides and floods in various parts of the country. An enormous number of landslides occurred in Central, Western and to the Coast Provinces. This triggered a nation-wide crusade to plant trees in an effort to counter future landslide phenomenon. However, little quantitative research has been conducted to assess the impact of plant roots on soil strength. As a result, planting of trees tend to be more empirical without consideration of the structural measures for reinforcing soil that combine the ecological benefits of vegetation. This paper describes the contribution of plant roots of various species to soil shear strength. Soil samples with roots of various plant species were tested in a large modified direct shear apparatus in a laboratory set-up. Shear stress results of rooted soils were compared with results of soil without roots of similar soil types. The contribution of roots to soil strength was estimated by comparing the difference between the maximum shear stress of the shear-displacement curves obtained for soils with and without roots for the different species tested. Results suggested that the rooted soils contributed more to soil strength than rootless soils. However there was varying degree of shear strength contribution for different root species suggesting that for each species, contribution of shear strength was governed by root density. The results suggested that a composite soil-root system consumes energy while resisting shear displacement. This feature could be included in stability analysis of vegetated hillslopes in terms of energy associated with shearing in a soil-root system.
KINYUA, PROFMWEASIXTUS.  2008.  Mwea, S. K (2008), The Way forward in Civil Engineering Training. 1st International Symposium on RE-Orienting Civil Engineering Education and Training held in Mombasa between 25th and 26th September 2008. : Longhorn Abstract
The civil engineering teaching involves provision of sound professional education so that upon graduation the student is able to fit into the various disciplines of civil engineering. These disciplines can be broadly described as transportation, structural, water and waste water engineering. This paper suggests that besides instilling the core engineering knowledge, the teaching of civil engineering should include other subjects which have a big impact in the work of civil engineers. These areas include entrepreneurship, environmental, and social studies. Additionally a study abroad is recommended for those students who are likely to work outside their counties of birth.

2006

2005

2004

KINYUA, PROFMWEASIXTUS.  2004.  Mwea S K and Helen N. 2004, Difficulties experienced in the planning of transportation facilities in unplanned settlements.. Accepted for presentation in the Conference for Sustainable Building 2004: Africa Stellenbosch, South Africa, 13th to 18th September 2004.. : Longhorn Abstract
The development of transportation infrastructure in unplanned settlements is a major prerequisite to both economic growth and poverty alleviation. This is largely so because they promote livable environments and contribute to the reduction of adverse external effects and production costs. Transportation planning within Kibera Settlements is concerned with the design of transportation systems that will maximise accessibility for essential movements between linked activities, giving due consideration to safety, comfort, amenity, economy and hygiene. Given the many roles that such transportation systems play in the congested and unhygienic settlements, proper planning of these transportation systems will enable the households in the settlements better access to there daily livelihoods and promote service delivery. In the long run, the improvement of the transportation systems in the Kibera slum settlements will indirectly lead to improved housing conditions, minimising the frequent fire hazard costs and other related environmental losses. There is also an element of gender and human rights, as the poor and often neglected majority urban residents will receive some attention. This paper highlights some difficulties experienced in planning of transportation facilities in Kibera. In addition it makes some proposals on how to overcome some of the difficulties experienced
KINYUA, PROFMWEASIXTUS.  2004.  2004 An Elasto plastic constitutive model for soil tillage Journal of Civil Engineering, Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology. Accepted for presentation in the 8th Conference on asphalt pavements for Southern Africa Sun City South Africa, 12th to 16th September 2004. : Longhorn Abstract
Kenya experienced extraordinarily heavy rainfall between May 1997 and February 1988 due to the El Nino weather phenomenon. This period of about 10 Months of heavy rainfall caused widespread landslides and floods in various parts of the country. An enormous number of landslides occurred in Central, Western and to the Coast Provinces. This triggered a nation-wide crusade to plant trees in an effort to counter future landslide phenomenon. However, little quantitative research has been conducted to assess the impact of plant roots on soil strength. As a result, planting of trees tend to be more empirical without consideration of the structural measures for reinforcing soil that combine the ecological benefits of vegetation. This paper describes the contribution of plant roots of various species to soil shear strength. Soil samples with roots of various plant species were tested in a large modified direct shear apparatus in a laboratory set-up. Shear stress results of rooted soils were compared with results of soil without roots of similar soil types. The contribution of roots to soil strength was estimated by comparing the difference between the maximum shear stress of the shear-displacement curves obtained for soils with and without roots for the different species tested. Results suggested that the rooted soils contributed more to soil strength than rootless soils. However there was varying degree of shear strength contribution for different root species suggesting that for each species, contribution of shear strength was governed by root density. The results suggested that a composite soil-root system consumes energy while resisting shear displacement. This feature could be included in stability analysis of vegetated hillslopes in terms of energy associated with shearing in a soil-root system.
KINYUA, PROFMWEASIXTUS.  2004.  (July 1991). A review of lectures conducted by Prof. Shamsher Prakash in the Department of Civil Engineering, Kenya Engineer, Nairobi. Accepted for presentation in the 8th Conference on asphalt pavements for Southern Africa Sun City South Africa, 12th to 16th September 2004. : Longhorn Abstract
Kenya experienced extraordinarily heavy rainfall between May 1997 and February 1988 due to the El Nino weather phenomenon. This period of about 10 Months of heavy rainfall caused widespread landslides and floods in various parts of the country. An enormous number of landslides occurred in Central, Western and to the Coast Provinces. This triggered a nation-wide crusade to plant trees in an effort to counter future landslide phenomenon. However, little quantitative research has been conducted to assess the impact of plant roots on soil strength. As a result, planting of trees tend to be more empirical without consideration of the structural measures for reinforcing soil that combine the ecological benefits of vegetation. This paper describes the contribution of plant roots of various species to soil shear strength. Soil samples with roots of various plant species were tested in a large modified direct shear apparatus in a laboratory set-up. Shear stress results of rooted soils were compared with results of soil without roots of similar soil types. The contribution of roots to soil strength was estimated by comparing the difference between the maximum shear stress of the shear-displacement curves obtained for soils with and without roots for the different species tested. Results suggested that the rooted soils contributed more to soil strength than rootless soils. However there was varying degree of shear strength contribution for different root species suggesting that for each species, contribution of shear strength was governed by root density. The results suggested that a composite soil-root system consumes energy while resisting shear displacement. This feature could be included in stability analysis of vegetated hillslopes in terms of energy associated with shearing in a soil-root system.
KINYUA, PROFMWEASIXTUS.  2004.  2004 Triaxial testing of a cemented agricultural soil . Journal of Civil Engineering, Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology. Accepted for presentation in the 8th Conference on asphalt pavements for Southern Africa Sun City South Africa, 12th to 16th September 2004. : Longhorn Abstract
Kenya experienced extraordinarily heavy rainfall between May 1997 and February 1988 due to the El Nino weather phenomenon. This period of about 10 Months of heavy rainfall caused widespread landslides and floods in various parts of the country. An enormous number of landslides occurred in Central, Western and to the Coast Provinces. This triggered a nation-wide crusade to plant trees in an effort to counter future landslide phenomenon. However, little quantitative research has been conducted to assess the impact of plant roots on soil strength. As a result, planting of trees tend to be more empirical without consideration of the structural measures for reinforcing soil that combine the ecological benefits of vegetation. This paper describes the contribution of plant roots of various species to soil shear strength. Soil samples with roots of various plant species were tested in a large modified direct shear apparatus in a laboratory set-up. Shear stress results of rooted soils were compared with results of soil without roots of similar soil types. The contribution of roots to soil strength was estimated by comparing the difference between the maximum shear stress of the shear-displacement curves obtained for soils with and without roots for the different species tested. Results suggested that the rooted soils contributed more to soil strength than rootless soils. However there was varying degree of shear strength contribution for different root species suggesting that for each species, contribution of shear strength was governed by root density. The results suggested that a composite soil-root system consumes energy while resisting shear displacement. This feature could be included in stability analysis of vegetated hillslopes in terms of energy associated with shearing in a soil-root system.
KINYUA, PROFMWEASIXTUS.  2004.  Effect of temperature on properties of bituminous mixtures.. Accepted for presentation in the 8th Conference on asphalt pavements for Southern Africa Sun City South Africa,. : Longhorn Abstract
Kenya experienced extraordinarily heavy rainfall between May 1997 and February 1988 due to the El Nino weather phenomenon. This period of about 10 Months of heavy rainfall caused widespread landslides and floods in various parts of the country. An enormous number of landslides occurred in Central, Western and to the Coast Provinces. This triggered a nation-wide crusade to plant trees in an effort to counter future landslide phenomenon. However, little quantitative research has been conducted to assess the impact of plant roots on soil strength. As a result, planting of trees tend to be more empirical without consideration of the structural measures for reinforcing soil that combine the ecological benefits of vegetation. This paper describes the contribution of plant roots of various species to soil shear strength. Soil samples with roots of various plant species were tested in a large modified direct shear apparatus in a laboratory set-up. Shear stress results of rooted soils were compared with results of soil without roots of similar soil types. The contribution of roots to soil strength was estimated by comparing the difference between the maximum shear stress of the shear-displacement curves obtained for soils with and without roots for the different species tested. Results suggested that the rooted soils contributed more to soil strength than rootless soils. However there was varying degree of shear strength contribution for different root species suggesting that for each species, contribution of shear strength was governed by root density. The results suggested that a composite soil-root system consumes energy while resisting shear displacement. This feature could be included in stability analysis of vegetated hillslopes in terms of energy associated with shearing in a soil-root system.
KINYUA, PROFMWEASIXTUS.  2004.  Effect of voids on hardening of asphaltic concrete on flexible road and airport pavements .. East African Journal of Engineering. : Longhorn Abstract
Kenya experienced extraordinarily heavy rainfall between May 1997 and February 1988 due to the El Nino weather phenomenon. This period of about 10 Months of heavy rainfall caused widespread landslides and floods in various parts of the country. An enormous number of landslides occurred in Central, Western and to the Coast Provinces. This triggered a nation-wide crusade to plant trees in an effort to counter future landslide phenomenon. However, little quantitative research has been conducted to assess the impact of plant roots on soil strength. As a result, planting of trees tend to be more empirical without consideration of the structural measures for reinforcing soil that combine the ecological benefits of vegetation. This paper describes the contribution of plant roots of various species to soil shear strength. Soil samples with roots of various plant species were tested in a large modified direct shear apparatus in a laboratory set-up. Shear stress results of rooted soils were compared with results of soil without roots of similar soil types. The contribution of roots to soil strength was estimated by comparing the difference between the maximum shear stress of the shear-displacement curves obtained for soils with and without roots for the different species tested. Results suggested that the rooted soils contributed more to soil strength than rootless soils. However there was varying degree of shear strength contribution for different root species suggesting that for each species, contribution of shear strength was governed by root density. The results suggested that a composite soil-root system consumes energy while resisting shear displacement. This feature could be included in stability analysis of vegetated hillslopes in terms of energy associated with shearing in a soil-root system.
KINYUA, PROFMWEASIXTUS.  2004.  ., 2004, Deflection characteristics for flexible road and airport pavements in Kenya.. Accepted for presentation in the 8th Conference on asphalt pavements for Southern Africa Sun City South Africa, 12th to 16th September 2004. : Longhorn Abstract
Kenya experienced extraordinarily heavy rainfall between May 1997 and February 1988 due to the El Nino weather phenomenon. This period of about 10 Months of heavy rainfall caused widespread landslides and floods in various parts of the country. An enormous number of landslides occurred in Central, Western and to the Coast Provinces. This triggered a nation-wide crusade to plant trees in an effort to counter future landslide phenomenon. However, little quantitative research has been conducted to assess the impact of plant roots on soil strength. As a result, planting of trees tend to be more empirical without consideration of the structural measures for reinforcing soil that combine the ecological benefits of vegetation. This paper describes the contribution of plant roots of various species to soil shear strength. Soil samples with roots of various plant species were tested in a large modified direct shear apparatus in a laboratory set-up. Shear stress results of rooted soils were compared with results of soil without roots of similar soil types. The contribution of roots to soil strength was estimated by comparing the difference between the maximum shear stress of the shear-displacement curves obtained for soils with and without roots for the different species tested. Results suggested that the rooted soils contributed more to soil strength than rootless soils. However there was varying degree of shear strength contribution for different root species suggesting that for each species, contribution of shear strength was governed by root density. The results suggested that a composite soil-root system consumes energy while resisting shear displacement. This feature could be included in stability analysis of vegetated hillslopes in terms of energy associated with shearing in a soil-root system.
CANNY, PROFMULAKUGALCANO, KINYUA PROFMWEASIXTUS, KINYUA PROFMWEASIXTUS.  2004.  GIS for highway engineering in developing countries.. Journal of Civil Engineering, research and practice Vol.1 Number 1 PP 75-88,. : Longhorn Abstract
Kenya experienced extraordinarily heavy rainfall between May 1997 and February 1988 due to the El Nino weather phenomenon. This period of about 10 Months of heavy rainfall caused widespread landslides and floods in various parts of the country. An enormous number of landslides occurred in Central, Western and to the Coast Provinces. This triggered a nation-wide crusade to plant trees in an effort to counter future landslide phenomenon. However, little quantitative research has been conducted to assess the impact of plant roots on soil strength. As a result, planting of trees tend to be more empirical without consideration of the structural measures for reinforcing soil that combine the ecological benefits of vegetation. This paper describes the contribution of plant roots of various species to soil shear strength. Soil samples with roots of various plant species were tested in a large modified direct shear apparatus in a laboratory set-up. Shear stress results of rooted soils were compared with results of soil without roots of similar soil types. The contribution of roots to soil strength was estimated by comparing the difference between the maximum shear stress of the shear-displacement curves obtained for soils with and without roots for the different species tested. Results suggested that the rooted soils contributed more to soil strength than rootless soils. However there was varying degree of shear strength contribution for different root species suggesting that for each species, contribution of shear strength was governed by root density. The results suggested that a composite soil-root system consumes energy while resisting shear displacement. This feature could be included in stability analysis of vegetated hillslopes in terms of energy associated with shearing in a soil-root system.

2003

KINYUA, PROFMWEASIXTUS.  2003.  Preliminary and Final Design of irrigation dams for the Kimira and Oluch Irrigation Schemes in Nyanza Province- Kenya. 2003. Accepted for presentation in the Conference for Sustainable Building 2004: Africa Stellenbosch, South Africa, 13th to 18th September 2004.. : Longhorn Abstract
The development of transportation infrastructure in unplanned settlements is a major prerequisite to both economic growth and poverty alleviation. This is largely so because they promote livable environments and contribute to the reduction of adverse external effects and production costs. Transportation planning within Kibera Settlements is concerned with the design of transportation systems that will maximise accessibility for essential movements between linked activities, giving due consideration to safety, comfort, amenity, economy and hygiene. Given the many roles that such transportation systems play in the congested and unhygienic settlements, proper planning of these transportation systems will enable the households in the settlements better access to there daily livelihoods and promote service delivery. In the long run, the improvement of the transportation systems in the Kibera slum settlements will indirectly lead to improved housing conditions, minimising the frequent fire hazard costs and other related environmental losses. There is also an element of gender and human rights, as the poor and often neglected majority urban residents will receive some attention. This paper highlights some difficulties experienced in planning of transportation facilities in Kibera. In addition it makes some proposals on how to overcome some of the difficulties experienced

2002

KINYUA, PROFMWEASIXTUS.  2002.  , 2002. Engineering properties of common sub grade soils below pavement structures in Kenya. Journal of Civil Engineering, Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology Vol.7 PP 1- 8, March 2002. Journal of Civil Engineering, Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology Vol.7 PP 1- 8,. : Longhorn Abstract
 Journal of Civil Engineering, Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology Vol.7 PP
KINYUA, PROFMWEASIXTUS.  2002.  Engineering properties of common sub grade soils below pavement structures in Kenya.. Journal of Civil Engineering, Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology Vol.7 PP 1- 8,. : Longhorn Abstract
 Journal of Civil Engineering, Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology Vol.7 PP

2001

Mwea, Sixtus, K;, Gichaga FP(S).  2001.  Studies of flexible road and airport pavements in Kenya .

2000

KINYUA, PROFMWEASIXTUS.  2000.  Investigation Report into the course of failure of an earth dam in Limuru 3 months after commissioning. 2000. Journal of Civil Engineering, Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology Vol.7 PP 1- 8,. : Longhorn Abstract
 Journal of Civil Engineering, Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology Vol.7 PP

1999

1996

KINYUA, PROFMWEASIXTUS.  1996.  Suitability of the Kipwen River dam basin soils with respect to earth dam construction.. Discovery and Innovation Vol.8 Number 2 PP 11-131, African Academy of Sciences, Nairobi. : Longhorn Abstract
 Journal of Civil Engineering, Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology Vol.7 PP
KINYUA, PROFMWEASIXTUS.  1996.  (1996). Suitability of the Kipwen River dam basin soils with respect to earth dam construction. Discovery and Innovation Vol.8 Number 2 PP 11-131, African Academy of Sciences, Nairobi. Discovery and Innovation Vol.8 Number 2 PP 11-131, African Academy of Sciences, Nairobi. : Longhorn Abstract
 Journal of Civil Engineering, Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology Vol.7 PP

1994

KINYUA, PROFMWEASIXTUS.  1994.  Effect of Ageing of Bitumen of performance of Asphalt pavements in Tropical Environments,. 6th conf. On Asphalt pavements for Southern Africa , Vol. 1 PP 77-95 Cape Townv. : Longhorn Abstract

Bovine foscioliosis coused by F. giganticais widespread in   There is a large collection of reports of fasciolosis in Kenya based on  abattoir data records from veterinary investigation laboratories (VILS) as well as reports on a few farm study was carried out to improve on the reports. 
Diagnosis of fasciola infection has traditionally been based on detection of typical eggs in the faeces.  A variety of other techniques are now available eg enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), which has shown to be sensitive and useful.
Three agro-ecological zoned were defined depending on the reported prevalence; high risk, medium risk and low risk zones.  Two study districts were picked at random from each zone.  The study farms were selected using the two stage cluster sampling.
Faecal and blood samples were collected on the farm.  Serum was later harvested.  ELISA and faecal sedimatation tests (FST) were carried out.
A total of 2434 faecal and blood samples were screened.  ELISA achieved the highest (66%) positive rate of the samples from Kwale district and the lowest (23%) rate in Nakuru.  An overall positive prevalence of (43%) for fasciolosis was achieved.  The faecal sedimentation test showed prevalence of 19%.  In both tests high prevalence were observed in Kwale and Kilifi districts.  ELSA was always positive when FST was positive but not the converse.
The on-famr survey utilizing two reliable diagnostic tests was meant to improve on existing abattoir reports.  Both tests showed fair to good agreements.  The higher detection by ELISA might be due to deworming and other reasons.  It was concluded that on-farm surveys are better than retrogressive studies; thought the latter are cheaper and faster.,  the current prevalence of fasciolosis are different from past reports with coastal showing higher than expected prevalences.

1992

KINYUA, PROFMWEASIXTUS.  1992.  (1992). Syllabus and regulations for diploma in Civil Engineering, Technical Education Programme Kenya Institute of Education, Nairobi. Discovery and Innovation Vol.8 Number 2 PP 11-131, African Academy of Sciences, Nairobi. : Longhorn Abstract
 Journal of Civil Engineering, Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology Vol.7 PP
KINYUA, PROFMWEASIXTUS.  1992.  (992) Final Design report on the Kipwen River Dam Ministry of Water Development, Nairobi. Discovery and Innovation Vol.8 Number 2 PP 11-131, African Academy of Sciences, Nairobi. : Longhorn Abstract
 Journal of Civil Engineering, Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology Vol.7 PP

1990

KINYUA, PROFMWEASIXTUS.  1990.  . (1990) Structural strength condition for some flexible road and aircraft pavements under tropical conditions. Proceedings of 3rd Int. Conf. On bearing capacity of roads and airfields PP 743-756, Trondeihm, Norway.. Proceedings of 3rd Int. Conf. On bearing capacity of roads and airfields PP 743-756, Trondeihm, Norway. : Longhorn Abstract
 Journal of Civil Engineering, Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology Vol.7 PP
KINYUA, PROFMWEASIXTUS.  1990.  Structural strength condition for some flexible road and aircraft pavements under tropical conditions.. Proceedings of 3rd Int. Conf. On bearing capacity of roads and airfields PP 743-756, Trondeihm, Norway. : Longhorn Abstract
 Journal of Civil Engineering, Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology Vol.7 PP
KINYUA, PROFMWEASIXTUS.  1990.  Structural Strength Condition for Some Flexible Road and Airfield Pavements Under Tropical Environment. Third International Conference on Bearing Capacity of Roads and Airfields, held in Trondheim, Norway,. : Longhorn Abstract

Bovine foscioliosis coused by F. giganticais widespread in   There is a large collection of reports of fasciolosis in Kenya based on  abattoir data records from veterinary investigation laboratories (VILS) as well as reports on a few farm study was carried out to improve on the reports. 
Diagnosis of fasciola infection has traditionally been based on detection of typical eggs in the faeces.  A variety of other techniques are now available eg enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), which has shown to be sensitive and useful.
Three agro-ecological zoned were defined depending on the reported prevalence; high risk, medium risk and low risk zones.  Two study districts were picked at random from each zone.  The study farms were selected using the two stage cluster sampling.
Faecal and blood samples were collected on the farm.  Serum was later harvested.  ELISA and faecal sedimatation tests (FST) were carried out.
A total of 2434 faecal and blood samples were screened.  ELISA achieved the highest (66%) positive rate of the samples from Kwale district and the lowest (23%) rate in Nakuru.  An overall positive prevalence of (43%) for fasciolosis was achieved.  The faecal sedimentation test showed prevalence of 19%.  In both tests high prevalence were observed in Kwale and Kilifi districts.  ELSA was always positive when FST was positive but not the converse.
The on-famr survey utilizing two reliable diagnostic tests was meant to improve on existing abattoir reports.  Both tests showed fair to good agreements.  The higher detection by ELISA might be due to deworming and other reasons.  It was concluded that on-farm surveys are better than retrogressive studies; thought the latter are cheaper and faster.,  the current prevalence of fasciolosis are different from past reports with coastal showing higher than expected prevalences.

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