Publications

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2019
Joseph, S. K. (2019).  An Investigation on Sustainability Compliance in the Kenyan Construction Industry (A Perspective of Key Interior Design Professionals in Nairobi City County). , Nairobi: University of Nairobi Abstract

This study investigated sustainability compliance in the Kenyan construction industry focusing on the interior design market segment. This focus was informed by the need to have all market segments involved in sustainable construction endeavours. From past literature, independent variables were identified as sustainability literacy, uptake and assessment with the moderating and dependent variables as market segment peculiarities and sustainable construction compliance respectively. The study had hypothesized, in the alternative, the impact of independent variables individually and jointly on dependent variable in the Kenyan construction industry was above average. The phrase above average was based on threshold which for this study was set at a mean of three [Average]. Additionally, the study sought to assess the extent of independent variables, individually and jointly, as key contributors to sustainable construction compliance in Nairobi City County. The targeted population were key practitioners in the Kenyan construction industry. These were identified as architects/interior designers, electrical engineers, mechanical engineers, quantity surveyors and contractors being the typical core team required for a professionally executed interior design project in Kenya. They have the potential to influence project lifecycle towards improved sustainable construction compliance. Sampling frame was defined as actively practicing key professionals as above identified in Nairobi City County. The Yamane (1967) formula was used to compute sample size which was adjusted for non-response resulting in 60 respondents. For the research instruments, structured questionnaires, appropriate measures were taken to ensure their validity and reliability. Lastly, appropriate research ethics considerations were observed. The unit of analysis and observation was the individual key professional. For data analysis, descriptive statistics were mainly through computation of means and standard deviations and inferential statistics through t-statistic p-value score calculations. Resulting data was presented in form of charts, tables and graphs. Out of the 60 targeted respondents, valid responses were 46 representing a 77% response rate. On hypotheses testing, individually and jointly, sustainable construction literacy, transition/uptake and assessment/evaluation had an above average impact on sustainable construction compliance in the Kenyan construction industry. The findings also established the impact of independent variables on dependent variable in the Kenyan construction industry individually and jointly as above average in Nairobi City County. Additionally, the study highlighted improvement measures for the three independent variables as a means of achieving improved sustainability compliance in the Kenyan construction industry both at policy and practice levels. Recommendations for future research based on the findings of this study were also outlined.

Joseph, S. K. (2019).  Sustainable Construction - An Individual and Collective Call to Action. Building Today. 36-38.
2020
Joseph, S. K., & Ralwala A. O. (2020).  Sustainable construction literacy: A study of the Kenyan interior design market segment of the construction industry. Africa Habitat Review. 14(3), 1999-2009. AbstractWebsite

Due to the widespread calls for the construction industry to adopt sustainable approaches, the various stakeholders are now engaging in the sustainability agenda more than before. This study investigated how the Kenyan construction industry is engaging the sustainability agenda. Specifically, this study sought to establish sustainable construction (SC) literacy levels, key sustainability considerations and SC literacy avenues in the interior design market segment of the Kenyan construction industry. Key project stakeholders in the interior design market segment of the Kenyan construction industry were the target population. A total of 60 (12 architects/interior designers, 12 electrical engineers, 12 mechanical engineers,12 quantity surveyors and 12 contractors) structured questionnaires were distributed, out of which 46 (10 architects/interior designers, 9 electrical engineers, 9 mechanical engineers, 8 quantity surveyors and 10 contractors) were received back. Collected data was analysed using frequencies, percentages, mean item scores (MIS) and standard deviations (SD). The study revealed an average level of sustainability literacy with a composite mean score of 3.7102 and mismatch between SC literacy levels and key sustainability considerations in interior design projects. Additionally, the respondents rated standard SC approaches, legislation, policies and construction trade associations as the least effective contributors to their current SC literacy levels. On the other hand, informal learning, construction professional associations influence, collaboration amongst firms, and formal learning were largely attributed to the respondent’s SC literacy levels. The implication of the findings was that there is need to fine-tune SC literacy drives to the peculiarities of the various industry market segments to ensure their effectiveness in informing practice. Additionally, there is the need to leverage standard SC approaches, legislation, policies and construction trade associations as avenues to improve the overall sustainability literacy levels.

Joseph, S. K., & Ralwala A. O. (2020).  Sustainable construction transition: A Kenyan interior design market segment perspective. Africa Habitat Review. 14(3), 2035-2044. AbstractWebsite

Construction industry has been identified as key to the sustainability agenda. Efforts towards improved sustainability compliance in the construction industry involve a socio-technical transformation. Such transitions are said to be purposive, of a wider perspective, multi-dimensional in nature and are influenced by numerous factors. This paper focused on establishing sustainable construction (SC) uptake levels, including identification of key SC drivers and barriers with specific reference to the interior design market segment of the Kenyan construction industry. The study employed a quantitative research approach. For quantitative attributes, the study employed structured questionnaires to collect data from actively practicing architects/interior designers, electrical engineers, mechanical engineers, quantity surveyors and contractors drawn from the interior design market segment of Kenyan construction industry in Nairobi City County. Data analysis employed the descriptive statistics of distribution (frequencies), proportions (percentages), central tendency (mean) and dispersion (standard deviation). Generally, the respondents ranked the overall uptake of the three dimensions of sustainability (economic, environmental and social) as average- ranking as social, environment and economic in a decreasing order of uptake levels. The study findings ranked sustainability driver categories as organization related drivers, stakeholder related drivers, economic related drivers and management related drivers; in order of decreasing influence. Lastly, barrier categories were ranked as economic related barriers, professional/capacity related barriers, technology related barriers and societal/cultural related barriers, in order of decreasing influence. With the average sustainable construction practices uptake in the Kenyan construction industry, there is an implied call to action to leverage known sustainability drivers, while at the same time suppressing the known barriers. This implies significant room for improvement and an appropriate starting point for key construction project stakeholders as above identified.

2021
Joseph, S. K., & Ralwala A. O. (2021).  Sustainable construction assessment: A Kenyan interior design market segment perspective. Africa Habitat Review. 15(1), 

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