Palpable lingual cysts, a possible indicator of porcine cysticercosis in Teso District Western Kenya Mutua, F.K., Randoph, T.E., Arimi, S.M., Kitala, P.M., Githigia, S.M. Willingham, A.L. and Njeru, F.M

Citation:
MAINA DRGITHIGIASAMUEL. "Palpable lingual cysts, a possible indicator of porcine cysticercosis in Teso District Western Kenya Mutua, F.K., Randoph, T.E., Arimi, S.M., Kitala, P.M., Githigia, S.M. Willingham, A.L. and Njeru, F.M." Journal of swine health and production July and August 2007, pp 206 . 2007;15(4):206-212.

Abstract:

Summary
Objectives: To estimate the prevalence of palpable lingual cysts in pigs in Western Kenya, a possible indicator of porcine cysticercosis, and to study the potential risk factors associated with this clinical finding.
Methods: During a cross-sectional survey, 316 randomly selected small-scale farms were visited, from which a case-control study of 31 case farms and 93 randomly selected control farms was constructed. Information on potential risk factors for Taenia solium cysticercosis-taeniosis was obtained using questionnaires administered via personal interviews.
Results: Farm prevalence of palpable lingual cysts was estimated at 9.8% (31 of 316) (95% confidence interval [CI], 6.5%-13.1%). Total number of pigs testing positive was 33, resulting in a pig prevalence of 6.5% (95% CI, 4%-9%). Pigs were kept as a source of income (98%) and for home consumption (2%). Sources of pigs included local purchases (94%; 117 of 124), and purchases from Uganda (6%; seven of 124). Most farmers (95%; 118 of 124) kept their pigs on free range. Pork was sourced from local butcheries (85%) and home slaughtering (15%). Most households slaughtering pigs at home had their pork “inspected” by household friends (five of nine). Absence of latrines was more common in case households (42%; 13 of 31) than in controls (18%; 17 of 93) (P = .01; OR = 3.2; 95% CI, 1.2%-8.55).
Implications: Palpable lingual cysts are prevalent in the locally raised pigs of Western Kenya. Further studies using more sensitive diagnostic tests are required to confirm the risk of porcine cysticercosis.

Notes:

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