The emergence of Taenia solium cysticercosis in Eastern and Southern Africa as a serious agricultural problem and public health risk

Citation:
Phiri IK, Ngowi H, Githigia S. "The emergence of Taenia solium cysticercosis in Eastern and Southern Africa as a serious agricultural problem and public health risk." International Action Planning Workshop. 2003;87(1):13-23.

Abstract:

Pig production has increased significantly in the Eastern and Southern Africa (ESA) region during the past decade, especially in rural, resource-poor, smallholder communities. Concurrent with the increase in smallholder pig keeping and pork consumption, there have been increasing reports of porcine cysticercosis in the ESA region. This article reviews the findings concerning the presence and impact of porcine cysticercosis in seven ESA countries. Most of the reported findings are based on surveys utilizing lingual palpation and post-mortem examination, however, some also used serological assays. In Tanzania, community-based studies on porcine cysticercosis indicate a prevalence of 17.4% in the northern highlands district of Mbulu and a prevalence range of 5.1 – 16.9 in the southern highlands.

In Kenya recent surveys in the southwestern part of the country where smallholder pig keeping is popular indicate that of 10 – 14% of pigs are positive for cysticercosis by lingual examination. Uganda has the most pigs in Eastern Africa, most of which are kept under stallholder conditions. Preliminary surveys in 1998 and 1999 at slaughterhouses in Kampala indicated a prevalence of porcine cysticercosis between 0.12 and 1.2%, however, a rural survey in northern Uganda in 1999 indicated 34 – 45%, of pigs slaughtered in selected villages were infected.

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