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Publications


2011

Furukawa, T, Fujiwara K, Kiboi S, Mutiso P.  2011.  Threshold change in forest understory vegetation as a result of selective fuelwood extraction in Nairobi, Kenya. . Forest Ecology and Management. 262:962–969.
Furukawa, T, Fujiwara K, Kiboi S, Mutiso P.  2011.  Can stumps tell what people want: Pattern and preference of informal wood extraction in an urban forest of Nairobi, Kenya.. Biological Conservation. 144:3047–3054.
Otieno, NE, Gichuki N, Farwig N, Kiboi S.  2011.  The role of farm structure on bird assemblages around a Kenyan tropical rainforest.. African Journal of Ecology. 49:410–417.

2007

Lankinen, A, Kiboi S.  2007.  Pollen Donor Identity Affects Timing of Stigma Receptivity in Collinsia heterophylla (Plantaginaceae): A Sexual Conflict during Pollen Competition? The American Naturalist. 170(6):854–863.: 2003 AbstractWebsite

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Theory predicts that, during pollen competition, selection may favor a pollen trait that increases donor competitive ability at the expense of the female reproductive function. One such pollen trait could be manipulation of the onset of stigma receptivity. We evaluated the potential occurrence of this kind of sexual conflict by testing female control of the timing of stigma receptivity in the self-compatible annual Collinsia heterophylla. By performing one-donor crosses in the greenhouse, we found that differences in both recipients and pollen donors influenced when stigmas became receptive. Because we did not detect an interaction effect, our result suggests that some donors were consistently better than others at germinating pollen and siring seeds earlier. Unexpectedly, self-pollen was able to fertilize seeds earlier during floral development compared with outcross pollen. These results suggest that female control on timing of stigma receptivity is not complete in this species. In addition, fertilizations that occurred early during floral development resulted in fewer seeds than later fertilizations, possibly indicating a cost of lost control over the onset of receptivity. The ability of pollen donors to influence the timing of stigma receptivity might reflect a conflict between the sexual functions in C. heterophylla.

2006

Kiboi, S, Skogsmyr I.  2006.  Pathogen infection and selection on fertilization success in Cucumis sativus. Sexual Plant Reproduction. 19:1-6.: 2003 AbstractWebsite

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We investigated whether resistant pollen genotypes can be selected for when the maternal plants are infected and whether infection can result to changes in the pistil nutrient level influencing reproductive outcome. Both resistance and susceptibility come with costs that may affect pre- and post-fertilization reproductive functions. We performed the study by crossing zucchini yellow mosaic virus resistant and susceptible pollen (from a hybrid donor) to infected and healthy maternal plants. We also analysed the pistil nutrient content in both treatments and found an increase of the susceptible and not resistant genotypes when maternal plants were infected. The level of nutrients K, P and S was higher in the pistils of the infected maternal plants than the healthy ones. Pistil nutrient level did not affect pollen tube growth rates, as indicated by seed siring patterns along the fruit. We propose that the effect on the siring ability of pollen carrying the susceptible and resistant alleles occurred at the post-fertilization stage, possibly as an indirect result of different growth rates of the two embryo genotypes under elevated nutrient conditions. We discuss our results with respect to possibilities of differential selection, costs and reproductive implications.

2002

and Waldensröm, J., Bensch S, Kiboi S, Hasselquist D, Ottoson U.  2002.  Cross-species infection of blood parasites between resident and migratory songbirds in Africa.. Molecular Ecology. 11:1545-1554.: 2003 AbstractWebsite

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We investigated whether resistant pollen genotypes can be selected for when the maternal plants are infected and whether infection can result to changes in the pistil nutrient level influencing reproductive outcome. Both resistance and susceptibility come with costs that may affect pre- and post-fertilization reproductive functions. We performed the study by crossing zucchini yellow mosaic virus resistant and susceptible pollen (from a hybrid donor) to infected and healthy maternal plants. We also analysed the pistil nutrient content in both treatments and found an increase of the susceptible and not resistant genotypes when maternal plants were infected. The level of nutrients K, P and S was higher in the pistils of the infected maternal plants than the healthy ones. Pistil nutrient level did not affect pollen tube growth rates, as indicated by seed siring patterns along the fruit. We propose that the effect on the siring ability of pollen carrying the susceptible and resistant alleles occurred at the post-fertilization stage, possibly as an indirect result of different growth rates of the two embryo genotypes under elevated nutrient conditions. We discuss our results with respect to possibilities of differential selection, costs and reproductive implications.

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