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Okalebo FA, Rabah HA, Guantai AN, C.K. M, Kibwage IO, J.W. M, Masengo W. "The antimalarial and antimicrobial and Brine shrimp toxicity of Clematis brachiata extract. ." East Cent. Afri. J. Pharm. Sci.. 2002;5:15-18.
N PROFGUANTAIA, N PROFGUANTAIA. "The Antimalarial and Antimicrobial Activity and Brine Shrimp Toxicity of Clematis Brachiata Extracts.". In: East and Central African Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences Vol. 5. F.A. OKALEBO*, H.A. RABAHI, A.N. GUANTAII, C.K. MALTA', I.0. K1BWAGE, J.W. MWANGI AND W. MASENGO; 2002. Abstract

The in vitro antimalarial activity of the root extract in partly supports the ethnobotanical use of the plant to manage malaria. Clematis brachiata Thunberg (Ranunculaceae) is used in Kenya for the management of headaches, malaria and other febrile illnesses, abdominal disorders, yaws and for skin disorders. Old stems and leaves are chewed for the management of toothaches and sore throats. Extracts of the plant were subjected to tests for antimalarial, antibacterial and antifungal activity. The toxicity of the extracts was assessed using the brine shrimp lethality bioassay. The root extract gave the highest in vitro antimalarial activity against the inulitidrug resistant strain, Plasmodium falciparum VI/S (IC50=39.24 jig/nil). The stem and leaf extracts had insignificant antiplasmodial activity. The leaf, stein and root extracts had no bacterial or fungal inhibitory effects even at very high concentrations of 10 mg/ml. The Lll50 values of the stem and leaf methanol extracts against the brine shrimp larvae was 365.60 and 66.5 jig/ml, respectively. Key Words: Clematis brachiata, Ranuneulaceae, antimalarial, antibacterial, antifungal, brine shrimp.

Okalebo FA, Rabah HA, A.N.Guantai, Maitai CK, Kibwage IO, Mwangi JW, Masengo W. "The Antimalarial and Antimicrobial Activity and Brine Shrimp Toxicity of Clematis Brachiata Extracts." East Cent. Afri. J. Pharm. Sci.. 2002;5(1):18.
Koch, A. SDMDPBC, et al. "Antimalarial Albietane ditetane diterpene from Fuerstia africana T.C.E. ." Biochemistry Systematics and Ecology . 2010;(270).
Gakunju DM, Mberu E, Dossaji SF, Gray I, Waigh RD, Waterman PG, Watkins WM. "Antimalarial Activity of the Alkaloid Nitidine, isolated from a Kenyan Herbal remedy." Antimicrobial Agents & Chemotherapy, (39), 2606.. 1995;39:2606.-2609. AbstractWebsite

Bioassay guided fractionations of extracts of Toddalia asiatica, a plant used by Pokot tribe in Kenya to treat fevers, has yielded the alkaloid nitidine as the major antimalarial component. Fractions containing nitidine have in vitro 50% inhibitory concentrations against Plasmodium falciparum in the range of 9 to 108 ng/ml for range of chloroquine-susceptible and resistant strains. The results show a lack of cross-resistance between chloroquine and nitidine

N PROFGUANTAIA. "Antimalarial activity of some plants traditionally used in treatment of malaria in Kwale district of Kenya.Muthaura CN, Rukunga GM, Chhabra SC, Omar SA, Guantai AN, Gathirwa JW, Tolo FM, Mwitari PG, Keter LK, Kirira PG, Kimani CW, Mungai GM, Njagi EN.J Et.". In: J Ethnopharmacol. 2007 Jul 25;112(3):545-51. Epub 2007 May 5. FA Okalebol , L Wiesner, AN Guantai, K Chibale, P Smith; 2007. Abstract

Methanolic and water extracts of five medicinal plant species used for treatment of malaria in traditional/cultural health systems of Kwale people in Kenya were tested for antimalarial activity against Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium berghei, respectively and for their cytotoxic effects. The most active extracts (IC(50)<10 microg/ml) screened against chloroquine (CQ) sensitive (D6) and resistant (W2) P. falciparum clones, were the water and methanol extracts of Maytenus undata (Thunb.) Blakelock (Celasteraceae), methanol extracts of Flueggea virosa (Willd.) Voigt (Euphorbiaceae), Maytenus putterlickioides (Loes.) Excell and Mendoca (Celastraceae), and Warburgia stuhlmannii Engl. (Canellaceae). These extracts showed various cytotoxic levels on Vero E6 cells with the water extract of M. undata exhibiting least cytotoxicity. At least one of the extracts of the plant species exhibited a high chemo suppression of parasitaemia >70% in a murine model of P. berghei infected mice. These results indicate that there is potential for isolation of a lead compound from the extracts of the five plants. W. stuhlmannii and M. putterlickioides have not been reported before for antiplasmodial activity.

N PROFGUANTAIA. "Antimalarial activity of some plants traditionally used in Meru district of Kenya.Muthaura CN, Rukunga GM, Chhabra SC, Omar SA, Guantai AN, Gathirwa JW, Tolo FM, Mwitari PG, Keter LK, Kirira PG, Kimani CW, Mungai GM, Njagi EN.Phytother Res. 2007 Sep;21(9).". In: Phytother Res. 2007 Sep;21(9):860-7. FA Okalebol , L Wiesner, AN Guantai, K Chibale, P Smith; 2007. Abstract

Ten plant extracts commonly used by the Meru community of Kenya were evaluated for the in vitro antiplasmodial, in vivo antimalarial, cytotoxicity and animal toxicity activities. The water and methanol extracts of Ludwigia erecta and the methanol extracts of Fuerstia africana and Schkuhria pinnata exhibited high antiplasmodial activity (IC(50) < 5 microg/mL) against chloroquine sensitive (D6) and resistant (W2) Plasmodium falciparum clones. The cytotoxicity of these highly active extracts on Vero E6 cells were in the range 161.5-4650.0 microg/mL with a selectivity index (SI) of 124.2-3530.7. In vivo studies of these extracts showed less activity with chemosuppression of parasitaemia in Plasmodium berghei infected mice of 49.64-65.28%. The methanol extract of Clerodendrum eriophyllum with a lower in vitro activity (IC(50) 9.51-10.56 microg/mL) exhibited the highest chemosuppression of 90.13%. The methanol and water extracts of Pittosporum viridiflorum were toxic to mice but at a lower dose prolonged survival of P. berghei infected mice (p < 0.05) with no overt signs of toxicity. However, the extracts were cytotoxic (SI, 0.96-2.51) on Vero E6 cells. These results suggest that there is potential to isolate active non-toxic antimalarial principles from these plants.

Oketch-Rabah HA, Dossaji SF, Mberu EK. "Antimalarial Activity of Some Kenyan Medicinal Plants." Pharmaceutical Biology (formerly International Journal of Pharmacognosy). 1999;37(5):329-334. Abstract

This paper describes the in vitro antimalarial activity of eight species of plants popularly used traditionally to treat malaria in Kenya. Organic and aqueous extracts from different parts of the plants were tested. Generally, a stronger antimalarial activity was observed in the organic extracts. The most active extracts were of Vernonia brachycalyx O. Hoffm. Schreber. (Compositae) leaves which showed an IC 50 of 6.6 g/ml for methylene chloride: ethyl acetate (1:1) extracts, while the aqueous and more polar methanolic extracts gave IC 50 values of 29.6 and 30 g/ml, respectively. The findings of this study support the use of this plant as a traditional remedy for malaria. The rest of the plants tested gave IC 50 values between 30–100 g/ml.

Murithi CK, Dossaji SF, Nguta JM, w. Lukhoba C. "Antimalarial activity and in vivo toxicity of selected medicinal plants naturalised in Kenya." International Journal of Education and Research. 2014;2(4):395-406.published_paper_june_2014.pdf
Murithi CK, Fidahusein DS, Nguta JM, Lukhoba CW. "Antimalarial activity and in vivo toxicity of selected medicinal plants naturalised in Kenya." Int J Edu Res. 2014;2:395-406.
Murithi CK, Dossaji SF, Nguta JM, Lukhoba CW. "Antimalarial activity and in vivo toxicity of selected medicinal plants naturalised in Kenya." International Journal of Education and Research. 2014;2(5).
Ochora DO, Dossaji SF, Nguta JM, Akunda EM. "Antimalarial activity and acute toxicity of four plants traditionally used in treatment of malaria in Msambweni District of Kenya." European International Journal of Science and Technology. 2014;3(7):31-40.publication_sept_2014.pdf
Ochora DO, Dossaji SF, Nguta JM, Akunda EM. "Antimalarial activity and acute toxicity of four plants traditionally used in treatment of malaria in Msambweni District of Kenya." European International Journal of Science and Technology. 2014;3(7).
Andima M, Ndakala A, Derese S, Biswajyoti S, Hussain A, Yang LJ, Akoth E, Coghi P, Pal C, Heydenreich M, Wong VK-W, Yenesew A. "Antileishmanial and Cytotoxic Activity of Secondary Metabolites from Taberneamontana ventricosa and Two Aloe Species." Natural Product Research. 2021.
Andima M, Ndakala A, Derese S, Biswajyoti S, Hussain A, Yang LJ, Akoth OE, Coghi P, Pal C, Heydenreich M, Wong VK-W, Yenesew A. "Antileishmanial and cytotoxic activity of secondary metabolites from Taberneamontana ventricosa and two aloe species." Natural Product Research. 2021:1-5. AbstractNatural Product Research

Description
In this study, the antileishmanial and cytotoxic activities of secondary metabolites isolated from Tabernaemontana ventricosa Hochst. ex A. DC., Aloe tororoana Reynolds, and Aloe schweinfurthii var. labworana Reynolds were investigated. Overall, nineteen known compounds were isolated from the three plant species. The compounds were characterized based on their spectroscopic data. Voacristine and aloenin were the most active compounds against promastigotes of antimony-sensitive Leishmania donovani (IC50 11 ± 5.2 μM and 26 ± 6.5 µM, respectively) with low toxicity against RAW264.7, murine monocyte/macrophage-like cells. The in silico docking evaluation and in vitro NO generation assay also substantially support the antileishmanial effects of these compounds. In a cytotoxicity assay against cancer and normal cell lines, ursolic acid highly inhibited proliferation of lung cancer cells, A549 …

N PROFKAMAUGEOFREY. "The antihypertensive Effect of an extract from the Bark of Podocarpus Sp",.". In: Submitted, East Africa Medical Journal. Survey Review; Submitted. Abstract
n/a
"Antihyperglycemic activity of Zanthoxylum chalybeum stem bark extracts in diabetic rats. ." The Journal of Phytopharmacology (Pharmacognosy and Phytomedicine Research. 2015;4(3):183-189.
BUERS DRAWUORJOHN. "Antigravity in a Composite Spacetime Model.". In: Proc. Int. Conf. Phys, Tehran, (January 2004) pp.171-178. Journal of British Ceramic Transactions, 99 [5], 206-211.; 2004.
Nyaga PN;, Kasiiti J;, Macharia, J M;, Shimanter E;, Panshim, A;, Lipkin M. "Antigenic characterisation of Avian paramyxoviruses (APMV) Isolated in Kenya."; 1996.
Nanteza A, Obara I, Kasaija P, Mwega E, Kabi F, Salih DA, Njahira M, Joyce Njuguna, Odongo D, Bishop RP, Skilton RA, Ahmed J, Clausen P-H, Lubega GW. "Antigen gene and variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) diversity in Theileria parva parasites from Ankole cattle in south-western Uganda: Evidence for conservation in antigen gene sequences combined with extensive polymorphism at VNTR loci." Transbound Emerg Dis. 2020;67 Suppl 1:99-107. Abstract

Theileria parva is a tick-transmitted apicomplexan protozoan parasite that infects lymphocytes of cattle and African Cape buffalo (Syncerus caffer), causing a frequently fatal disease of cattle in eastern, central and southern Africa. A live vaccination procedure, known as infection and treatment method (ITM), the most frequently used version of which comprises the Muguga, Serengeti-transformed and Kiambu 5 stocks of T. parva, delivered as a trivalent cocktail, is generally effective. However, it does not always induce 100% protection against heterologous parasite challenge. Knowledge of the genetic diversity of T. parva in target cattle populations is therefore important prior to extensive vaccine deployment. This study investigated the extent of genetic diversity within T. parva field isolates derived from Ankole (Bos taurus) cattle in south-western Uganda using 14 variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) satellite loci and the sequences of two antigen-encoding genes that are targets of CD8+T-cell responses induced by ITM, designated Tp1 and Tp2. The findings revealed a T. parva prevalence of 51% confirming endemicity of the parasite in south-western Uganda. Cattle-derived T. parva VNTR genotypes revealed a high degree of polymorphism. However, all of the T. parva Tp1 and Tp2 alleles identified in this study have been reported previously, indicating that they are widespread geographically in East Africa and highly conserved.

Mdodo R, Moser SA, Jaoko W, Baddley J, Pappas P, Kempf M-C, Aban I, Odera S, Jolly P. "Antifungal susceptibilities of Cryptococcus neoformans cerebrospinal fluid isolates from AIDS patients in Kenya." Mycoses. 2011;54:e438-e442. Abstract
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Mdodo R, Moser SA, Jaoko W, Baddley J, Pappas P, Kempf MC, Aban IB, Odera S, Jolly P. "Antifungal susceptibilities of Cryptococcus." Mycoses. 2011;54. Abstract
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Odhiambo JA, Dossaji SF, Lukhoba CW, Abiy Y. "Antifungal activity, brine shrimp cytotoxicity and phytochemical screening of Gladiolus watsonoides Baker (Iridaceae)." Journal of Pharmacy Research. 2014;8(9):1218-1222.gw_publication_2014.pdf
Odhiambo J., Dossaji S. LYCA. "Antifungal activity, brine shrimp cytotoxicity and phytochemical screening of Gladiolus watsonoides Baker (Iridaceae)." Journal of Pharmcy Research. 2014;8(9):1218-1222.pubn7.pdf
Judith O, Saffudin D, Catherine L, Abiy Y. "Antifungal activity, brine shrimp cytotoxicity and phytochemical screening of Gladiolus watsonoides Baker (Iridaceae)." Journal of Pharmacy Research Vol. 2014;8(9):1218-1222.
Judith O, Saffudin D, Catherine L, Abiy Y. "Antifungal activity, brine shrimp cytotoxicity and phytochemical screening of Gladiolus watsonoides Baker (Iridaceae)." Journal of Pharmacy Research Vol. 2014;8(9):1218-1222.
Fulano AM, Muthomi JW, Wagacha JM, Mwang’ombe AW. "Antifungal Activity of Local Microbial Isolates against Snap Bean Pathogens." International Journal of Current Microbiology and Applied Sciences. 2016;5(12):112-122.
and Gakuubi MWAWJM 4. "Antifungal activity of essential oil of Eucalyptus camaldulensis Dehnh. against selected Fusarium spp.". 2017. Abstracthttps://profiles.uonbi.ac.ke/mainawagacha/

The objective of this study was to evaluate the antifungal activity of essential oil (EO) of
Eucalyptus camaldulensis Dehnh. against five Fusarium spp. commonly associated with
maize. The essential oil had been extracted by steam distillation in a modified Clevenger-
type apparatus from leaves of E. camaldulensis and their chemical composition
characterized by gas chromatography mass spectrometry. Poisoned food technique was
used to determine the percentage inhibition of mycelial growth, minimum inhibitory …

Odhiambo JA, Siboe GM, Lukhoba CW, Dossaji SF. "Antifungal activity of crude extracts of selected medicinal plants used in combinations in Lake Victoria Basin, Kenya." Plant Product Research Journal. 2009;13:35-43. Abstractpublication_2009.pdfWebsite

Use of herbs as combinations is a common practice with many herbal practitioners. The main idea behind this usually is the synergistic action expected to take place by the traditional healer hence being able to give better results as compared to one herb and also treat more than one ailment, even those not mentioned by the patient. However, other interactions such as additive and antagonism too take place when herbs are used in combinations. In this study, anti-aspergillus and anti-candida efficacy of crude extracts of five plants used in combination to treat malaria were investigated. Toddalia asiatica (root), Rhamnus staddo (root) , Momordica foetida (shoot), Podocarpus falcatus (bark), Aloe sp (secculent leaves) used by traditional health practitioners in the Kalenjin community were extracted using water and dichloromethane/methanol (1:1) and the crude extracts tested for in vitro antifungal activity singly and in combinations against Aspergillus niger and Candida albicans. Dichloromethane/methanol extracts of P. falcatus showed the highest activity (77.77% inhibition) against A.niger while M. foetida showed the highest activity (77.78% inhibition) against C. albicans. Aloe sp. Showed no activity against A. niger when tested singly. A.niger was more sensitive to the plants extracts than C.albicans. Aqueous extracts did not show any activity. Antagonism, additive and synergism were observed when combinations of the herbal plants were assayed. Findings in this study are a preliminary verification of the usefulness of using herbal plants in combinations as a prevalent practice among the traditional healers.

Keywords:
Traditional medicine, herbal combinations, C. albicans, A.niger.

Odhiambo JA, Siboe GM, Lukhoba CW, Dossaji SF. "ANTIFUNGAL ACTIVITY OF CRUDE EXTRACTS OF SELECTED MEDICINAL PLANTS USED IN COMBINATIONS IN LAKE VICTORIA BASIN, KENYA." Plant Product Research Journal. 2009;13:35-43. Abstract

ABSTRACT
Use of herbs as combinations is a common practice with many herbal practitioners. The main idea behind this usually is the synergistic action expected to take place by the traditional healer hence being able to give better results as compared to one herb and also treat more than one ailment, even those not mentioned by the patient. However, other interactions such as additive and antagonism too take place when herbs are used in combinations. In this study, anti-aspergillus and anti-candida efficacy of crude extracts of five plants used in combination to treat malaria were investigated. Toddalia asiatica (root), Rhamnus staddo (root) , Momordica foetida (shoot), Podocarpus falcatus (bark), Aloe sp (secculent leaves) used by traditional health practitioners in the Kalenjin community were extracted using water and dichloromethane/methanol (1:1) and the crude extracts tested for in vitro antifungal activity singly and in combinations against Aspergillus niger and Candida albicans. Dichloromethane/methanol extracts of P. falcatus showed the highest activity (77.77% inhibition) against A.niger while M. foetida showed the highest activity (77.78% inhibition) against C. albicans. Aloe sp. Showed no activity against A. niger when tested singly. A.niger was more sensitive to the plants extracts than C.albicans. Aqueous extracts did not show any activity. Antagonism, additive and synergism were observed when combinations of the herbal plants were assayed. Findings in this study are a preliminary verification of the usefulness of using herbal plants in combinations as a prevalent practice among the traditional healers.

Odhimabo JA, Siboe GM, Lukhoba CW, Dossaji SF. "Antifungal activity of crude extracts of Gladiolus dalenii Van Geel (Iridaceae)." African Journal of Traditional, Complementary and Alternative medicine. 7 (1): 53-58, 2010. 2010;7(1):53-58. Abstractajtcam_publication.pdfWebsite

 
Bulb extracts of Gladiolus dalenii reportedly used in the treatment of fungal infections in HIV/AIDS patients in the Lake Victoria region were tested for antifungal activity using the disc diffusion assay technique. Commercially used antifungal drugs, Ketaconazole and Griseofulvin (Cosmos Pharmaceuticals) were used as standards. Dichloromethane (CH2CL2)/Methanol (MeOH) in the ratio 1:1. Soluble extracts showed antifungal activity against Aspergillus niger. Direct bioautography on silica gel Thin Layer Chromatography (TLC) and appropriate spraying agents were used to identify the active component in the extract. The activities of both the extracts were higher than that of Griseofulvin. CH2CL2 soluble extract in addition showed ability to delay sporulation in A.niger. The active group of compounds in the extracts was identified as alkaloids, which offer immense potential for development of new and valuable pharmaceutical products.
Key words: G. dalenii, Aspergillus niger, Antifungal activity

Odhiambo J.A, Siboe G.M LDCWSF. "Antifungal activity of crude extracts of Gladiolus dalenii Van Geel (Iridaceae)." African journal of Traditional, Complementary and Alternative medicine. 2010;7(1):53-58.pubn_1.pdf
Odhiambo JA, Siboe GM, Lukhoba CW, Dossaji SF. "Antifungal Activity of Crude Extracts of Gladiolus Dalenii van Geel (Iridaceae.". 2010.Website
"Antifolate drugs target dihydrofolatereductase-thymidylate synthase of Babesia gibsoni.". In: The 146th Japanese Society of Veterinary Science (JSVS) Symposium. Japan; 2008.
Oguge NO, Barrell GK. "Antifertility effects of oral medroxyprogesterone acetate in rabbits." Reprod. Fert. Dev. 8:1185-1192; 1996. Abstract
n/a
Wanjala W Cornelius, Teresa Akeng'a, George O Obiero, Lutta KP. "Antifeedant Activities of the Erythrinaline Alkaloids from Erythrina latissima against Spodoptera littoralis (Lepidoptera noctuidae)." Records of Natural Products. 2009;3(2):96. Abstract

The antifeedant activities of the Erythrina alkaloids from the seeds, seed pods and flowers of Erythrina latissima were investigated in laboratory dual-choice bioassays using third-instar Spodoptera littoralis (Boisduval) larvae. The new compound (+)-11β-methoxy-10-oxoerysotramidine (1) from the flowers, showed potent dose dependant activity at concentration 500≥ ppm while (+)-10, 11-dioxoerysotramidine (2) also new from the flowers showed potent dose dependant activity at concentration 100≥ ppm. Three known compounds (+)-erysotrine,(+)-erysotramidine,(+)-erythraline,(+)-11β-hydroxyerysotramidine showed potent dose dependant antifeedant activity at concentrations 100≥ ppm while (+)-10, 11-dioxoerysotrine and (+)-11βhydroxyerysotramidine also a known compounds showed potent dose dependant antifeedant activity at concentrations 300≥ ppm. Three known compounds (+)-11β-methoxyerysotramidine,(+)-8-oxoerythraline and (+)-15 (16) β-D-glucoerysodine showed no appreciable change in antifeedant activity with concentration change.

Ndurumo MS;, Mande JD;, Kihurani D;, Abuom TO. "Antidrool Cheiloplasty; Plastic Surgery Of The Canine Lip. Poster Presentation.".; 2006.
Ndurumo MS;, Mande JD;, Kihurani D;, Abuom TO. "Antidrool Cheiloplasty; Plastic Surgery Of The Canine Lip. Poster Presentation.".; 2006.
Ndurumo MS;, Mande JD;, Kihurani D;, Abuom TO. "Antidrool Cheiloplasty; Plastic Surgery Of The Canine Lip. Poster Presentation.".; 2006.
Nyaga SN, Mathiu PM, Onyango CM, Areba GO. "Antidiabetic properties of Solanum villosum and Solanum nigrum var.sarrachoides in a streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice model." International Journal of Basic & Clinical Pharmacology. 2019;8(11):2396-2402.
Mukundi MJ, Piero MN, Mwaniki NE, Murugi NJ, Daniel AS, Gathumbi PK, Muchugi AN. Antidiabetic Effects of Aqueous Leaf Extracts of Acacia nilotica in Alloxan Induced Diabetic Mice. Mukundi et al; 2015.mukundi-_acacia_nilotica_2015.pdf
Armah FA, Henneh IT, Amponsah IK, Biney RP, F M, J A, W A, Ahmed MA, Adokoh CK, Adukpo G, O AD, Gathumbi PK. "Antidepressant and Anxiolytic Effects and Subchronic Toxicity of the Aerial Parts of Psychotria ankasensis J.B.Hall (Rubiaceae) in Murine Models." Hindawi Veterinary Medicine International. 2021;Volume 2021, Article ID 5543320, 18 pages.armah_et_al_2021.pdf
Kavoi BM, Makanya AN, Kiama SG. "Anticancer drug vinblastine sulphate induces transient morphological changes on the olfactory mucosa of the rabbit.". 2012. Abstract2012.anticancer_drug_vinblastine_sulphate_induces_transient_morphological_changes_on_the_olfactory_mucosa_of_the_rabbit..pdf

Vinblastine sulphate (VBS) is an anticancer drug that acts by disrupting microtubule dynamics of highly mitotic tissue cells. The consequences of VBS on the olfactory mucosa (OM), a tissue with high mitotic numbers, are not clearly understood. We used qualitative and quantitative methods to determine the structural changes that may be produced on the rabbit OM by VBS. Following a single dose (0.31 mg/kg) of this drug, the structure of the mucosa was greatly altered on the first 3-5 days. The alteration was characterized by disarrangement of the normal layering of nuclei of the epithelia, degeneration of axonal bundles, occurrence of blood vessels within the bundles, localized death of cells of Bowman's glands and glandular degeneration. Surprisingly on or after day 7 and progressively to day 15 post-exposure, the OM was observed to regenerate and acquire normal morphology, and the vessels disappeared from the bundles. Relative to control values, bundle diameters, olfactory cell densities and cilia numbers decreased to as low as 53.1, 75.2 and 71.4%, respectively, on day 5. Volume density for the bundles, which was 28.6% in controls, decreased to a lowest value of 16.8% on day 5. In contrast, the volume density for the blood vessels was significantly lower in controls (19.9%) than in treated animals at day 2 (25.8%), day 3 (34.3%) and day 5 (31.5%). These findings suggest that the changes induced on the rabbit OM by VBS are transient and that regenerative recovery leads to the restoration of the normal structure of the mucosa.

© 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.
PMID:
22443492
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Kavoi BM, Makanya AN, Kiama SG. "Anticancer drug vinblastine sulphate induces transient morphological changes on the olfactory mucosa of the rabbit." Anat Histol Embryol. 2012;41(5):374-87. Abstract

Vinblastine sulphate (VBS) is an anticancer drug that acts by disrupting microtubule dynamics of highly mitotic tissue cells. The consequences of VBS on the olfactory mucosa (OM), a tissue with high mitotic numbers, are not clearly understood. We used qualitative and quantitative methods to determine the structural changes that may be produced on the rabbit OM by VBS. Following a single dose (0.31 mg/kg) of this drug, the structure of the mucosa was greatly altered on the first 3-5 days. The alteration was characterized by disarrangement of the normal layering of nuclei of the epithelia, degeneration of axonal bundles, occurrence of blood vessels within the bundles, localized death of cells of Bowman's glands and glandular degeneration. Surprisingly on or after day 7 and progressively to day 15 post-exposure, the OM was observed to regenerate and acquire normal morphology, and the vessels disappeared from the bundles. Relative to control values, bundle diameters, olfactory cell densities and cilia numbers decreased to as low as 53.1, 75.2 and 71.4%, respectively, on day 5. Volume density for the bundles, which was 28.6% in controls, decreased to a lowest value of 16.8% on day 5. In contrast, the volume density for the blood vessels was significantly lower in controls (19.9%) than in treated animals at day 2 (25.8%), day 3 (34.3%) and day 5 (31.5%). These findings suggest that the changes induced on the rabbit OM by VBS are transient and that regenerative recovery leads to the restoration of the normal structure of the mucosa.

KAVOI M. BONIFACE ET AL. "Anticancer Drug Vinblastine Sulphate Induces Transient Morphological Changes on the Olfactory Mucosa of the Rabbit." Anatomia Histologia Embryologia. 2012;41:374-387, 2012.
Forthal DN, Landucci G CRBAMCRSJBOBWC. "Antibody-Dependent Cell-Mediated Virus Inhibition Antibody Activity Does Not Correlate With Risk of HIV-1 Superinfection." J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr.. 2013;63(1):31-33.
Forthal DN, Landucci G CRBASMCJBOBRW. "Antibody-dependent cell-mediated virus inhibition (ADCVI) antibody activity does not correlate with risk of HIV-1 superinfection." Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome. 2013; 63(1): 31-3.
Plummer FA, Chubb H, Simonsen JN, Bosire M, Slaney L, Maclean I, Ndinya-Achola JO, Waiyaki P, Brunham RC. "Antibody to Rmp (outer membrane protein 3) increases susceptibility to gonococcal infection.". 1993. AbstractWebsite

The severe adverse effects of gonococcal infection on human fertility suggests that Neisseria gonorrhoeae would exert powerful selection for the development of a protective immune response in humans. N. gonorrhoeae is an obligate human pathogen and must persist in humans to survive. Since it is an ecologically successful organism, it must have evolved strategies to evade any human immune response it elicits. In a longitudinal study among 243 women working as prostitutes and experiencing frequent gonococcal infection, younger women, women with HIV infection, and women with antibody to the gonococcal outer membrane protein 3 (Rmp) were at increased risk of infection (adjusted odds ratio 3.4, CI95% 1.1-10.4, P < 0.05). Rmp is highly conserved in N. gonorrhoeae and the blocking of mucosal defences may be one of its functions. As similar proteins occur in many gram negative mucosal pathogens, the enhancing effect of such proteins may be a general strategy whereby bacteria evade human immune responses.

PIP:

Between March 1985 and July 1986 researchers enrolled 243 female prostitutes in Pumwani community of Nairobi, Kenya, in a longitudinal study to examine the relationship between the antibody to the gonococcal outer membrane protein 3 (Rmp Ab) and gonococcal mucosal infection. Few women used condoms. 69% were HIV-1 seropositive. Just 9.5% (23) of the women had not had any gonococcal infections, despite probable exposure to them, indicating the possibility of some acquired protective immunity to Neisseria gonorrhoea. 90.5% had had at least 1 gonococcal infection. Women with Rmp Ab faced a greater risk of gonococcal infection than those who were Rmp Ab negative (OR = 3.4;l p .05), denoting that Rmp Ab increases susceptibility to gonococcal mucosal infections. Women older than 29 years were at lower risk of gonococcal infection than those younger than 29 years (odds ratio [OR] = 0.3; p .03). Women who used oral contraceptives (OCs) were also likely to be infected with N. gonorrhoea (OR = 3; p = .062). Further, 31% of OC users had cervical ectopy compared to just 14% of nonusers (OR = 2.8; p .005), suggesting that the effect of OCs on the cervix make it more susceptible to gonococcal infection. Rmp Ab also exists in many other gram-negative mucosal pathogens, often playing the same role as it does in N. gonorrhoea infection. Thus, Rmp Ab may be a common scheme bacteria used to elude human immune responses. These findings provide more understanding as to why N. gonorrhoea is an ecologically successful human pathogen

JOAB PROFBWAYOJOB. "Antibody to Haemophilus ducreyi among trucking company workers in Kenya. Rakwar J; Jackson D; Maclean I; Obongo T; Bwayo JJ; Smith H; Mandaliya K; Moses S; Ndinya-Achola J; Kreiss JK. Sex Transm Dis. 1997 May;24(5):267-71.". In: Sex Transm Dis. 1997 May;24(5):267-71. Asian Economic and Social Society; 1997. Abstract
In an effort to identify an immunological basis for natural resistance to HIV-1 infection, we have examined serum antibody responses to HLA class I antigens in female prostitutes of the Nairobi Sex Workers Study. Anti-HLA antibodies are known to block HIV infectivity in vitro and can be protective against SIV challenge in macaques immunized with purified class I HLA. Thus, it was postulated that broadly cross-reactive alloantibodies recognizing common HLA alleles in the client population might contribute to the prevention of heterosexual transmission of HIV. In fact, 12% of the women were found to have serum IgG antibodies against class I alloantigens. However, this alloantibody did not correlate with the HIV status of the women and was found in a similar proportion of HIV-positive and HIV-resistant women. The observed levels of alloantibody did not increase with HIV infection in susceptible individuals, suggesting that potential antigenic mimicry between HIV and host HLA class I antigens does not significantly increase levels of anti-class I antibodies. The lack of correlation between serum anti-allo-class I HLA antibodies and the risk of sexual transmission indicates that this humoral immune response is unlikely to be the natural mechanism behind the HIV-resistance phenotype of persistently HIV-seronegative women. This result, however, does not preclude the further investigation of alloimmunization as an artificial HIV immunization strategy.
JOAB PROFBWAYOJOB. "Antibody to chlamydial hsp60 predicts an increased risk for chlamydial pelvic inflammatory disease. Peeling RW; Kimani J; Plummer F; Maclean I; Cheang M; Bwayo JJ; Brunham RC. J Infect Dis. 1997 May;175(5):1153-8.". In: J Infect Dis. 1997 May;175(5):1153-8. Asian Economic and Social Society; 1997. Abstract
{ OBJECTIVE: To establish a cohort of high-risk individuals suitable for HIV-prevention trials, and to measure changes in sexual behaviour and sexually transmitted disease (STD) incidence after a behavioural intervention. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study in trucking company depots in Mombasa, Kenya. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 556 male HIV-seronegative employees of trucking companies. INTERVENTIONS: HIV serological testing, individual counselling, condom promotion, STD diagnosis and management. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Sexual risk behaviour and symptomatic STD incidence. RESULTS: Using time-trend modelling, significant declines in self-reported high-risk sexual behaviour were demonstrated during a 1-year follow-up. The percentage of men reporting any extramarital sex during the 3-month period prior to a follow-up visit decreased from 49% durig the first quarter of follow-up to 36% during the last quarter (P < 0.001). The decline in reported female sex worker contact was from 12% to 6% (P = 0.001). Approximately 30% of men reported consistent condom use during extramarital sex and this percentage remained unchanged during the study period. The incidence of STD declined from 34 per 100 person years (PY) during the first quarter to 10 per 100 PY during the last quarter (P = 0.001). Significant reductions in gonorrhoea (15 to five cases per 100 PY
Kilelu ES. "Antibody responses to new."; 1979.
M.O.C. Ota, C. Oluwalana a HGOM-GOSRCM, a M.W. Mureithi, J. Townend SASAOMJS. "Antibody and T cell responses during acute and convalescent stages of Invasive Pneumococcal Disease." International Journal of Infectious Diseases. 2011;15:282-288.
Plummer F, Chubb H, Simonsen JN, Bosire M, Slaney L, Nagelkerke NJ, Maclean I, Ndinya-Achola JO, Waiyaki P, Brunham RC. "Antibodies to opacity proteins (Opa) correlate with a reduced risk of gonococcal salpingitis."; 1994. Abstract

Acute salpingitis complicating cervical gonococcal infection is a significant cause of infertility. Relatively little data are available concerning the pathophysiologic mechanisms of this disease. A cohort of 243 prostitutes residing in Nairobi were followed between March 1985 and April 1988. Gonococcal cultures were performed at each visit, and acute salpingitis was diagnosed clinically. Serum at enrollment was tested by immunoblot for antibody to gonococcal outer membrane proteins. 8.6% (146/1689) of gonococcal infections were complicated by salpingitis. Increased risk of salpingitis was associated with younger age, shorter duration of prostitution, HIV infection, number of gonococcal infections, and episodes of nongonococcal salpingitis. Rmp antibody increased the risk of salpingitis. Antibody to Opa decreased the risk of salpingitis. By logistic regression analysis, antibody to Opa was independently associated with decreased risk of gonococcal salpingitis (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 0.35; 95% confidence interval [95%CI], 0.17-0.76); HIV infection (adjusted OR, 3.5; 95% CI, 0.96-12.8) and episodes of nongonococcal salpingitis (adjusted OR, 3.4; 95% CI, 1.8-6.4) were independently associated with an increased risk of salpingitis. Antibody to Opa appears to protect against ascending gonococcal infection, perhaps by interfering with Opa mediated adherence and endocytosis. The demonstration of natural immunity that protects against upper genital tract infection in women suggests that a vaccine to prevent gonococcal salpingitis is possible.

B. PROFESTAMBALEBENSON. "Antibodies in the serum of golden hamsters experimentally infected with the intestinal trematode Echinostoma caproni. J Helminthol. 1991 Dec;65(4):239-47. Erratum in: J Helminthol 1992 Mar;66(1):78.". In: J Helminthol. 1991 Dec;65(4):239-47. Erratum in: J Helminthol 1992 Mar;66(1):78. Taylor & Francis; Submitted. Abstract
The serum antibody response in golden hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus) infected with the intestinal trematode Echinostoma caproni was examined with ELISA, SDS-PAGE and Western blot, and IFAT techniques. All methods showed that the hamsters responded slowly but developed a clear positive humoral response to the infection. In most hamsters, an antibody response to infection could not be detected earlier than 11-13 weeks after infection with 6 or 25 metacercariae, and responses were weak when compared to previous results from mice infected with the same parasite. IFAT with positive hamster sera on live juvenile E. caproni showed only fluorescence at the posterior tip, which is a different pattern from that seen using from infected mice, indicating a different response to antigens on the juvenile parasites by these two hosts. The results are discussed in relation to the limited selfcure and development of resistance which is observed in golden hamsters infected with E. caproni.
Simonsen PE, Estambale B, Agger M. "Antibodies in the serum of golden hamsters experimentally infected with the intestinal trematode Echinostoma caproni.". 1991. AbstractWebsite

The serum antibody response in golden hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus) infected with the intestinal trematode Echinostoma caproni was examined with ELISA, SDS-PAGE and Western blot, and IFAT techniques. All methods showed that the hamsters responded slowly but developed a clear positive humoral response to the infection. In most hamsters, an antibody response to infection could not be detected earlier than 11-13 weeks after infection with 6 or 25 metacercariae, and responses were weak when compared to previous results from mice infected with the same parasite. IFAT with positive hamster sera on live juvenile E. caproni showed only fluorescence at the posterior tip, which is a different pattern from that seen using from infected mice, indicating a different response to antigens on the juvenile parasites by these two hosts. The results are discussed in relation to the limited selfcure and development of resistance which is observed in golden hamsters infected with E. capron

Magale HI, Kassim IA, Odera SA, Omolo MJ, Jaoko WG, Jolly PE. "Antibiotic susceptibility of organisms causing urinary tract infection in patients presenting at Kenyatta national hospital, Nairobi." East African medical journal. 2015;92:333-337. Abstract
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Magale HI, Kassim IA, Odera SA, Omolo MJ, Jaoko WG, Jolly PE. "Antibiotic susceptibility of organisms causing urinary tract infection in patients presenting at Kenyatta National Hospital, Nairobi." East African medical journal. 2015;92:333-337. Abstract
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Shenoy S, Baliga S, Saldanha DR, Prashanth HV, others. "Antibiotic sensitivity patterns of {Pseudomonas} aeruginosa strains isolated from various clinical specimens." Indian journal of medical sciences. 2002;56:427. AbstractWebsite
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GB B, F B, JF O, FM M, E D. "Antibiotic Sensitivity Patterns of Aerobic Bacterial Agents in Post-Surgical Orofacial Infections." The annals of African Surgery. 2015.
Barasa GB, Butt F, Onyango JF, Mutua FM, Dimba E. "Antibiotic sensitivity patterns of aerobic bacterial agents in post-surgical orofacial infections." Annals of African Surgery. 2015;12. Abstract
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Jafferji SS, 2Ilako DR 2KKHM 2KMM 3SUC. "The antibiotic sensitivity pattern of s. aureus; an ocular normal fl ora." East African Journal of Ophthalmology. 2008.antibiotic_sensitivity_of_s.aureus.pdf
DR I, SS J, KHM K, MM K, UC S. "The antibiotic sensitivity pattern of s. aureus; an ocular normal fl ora." East African journal of ophthalmology . 2008;14(2). Abstract

Objective: To determine the changing of drug sensitivity patterns for s. aureas
as the second commonest bacteria of the conjunctival normal fl ora in Nairobi,
Kenya

Design: Descriptive retrospective study

Setting: University of Nairobi, Department of Ophthalmology and Kikuyu Eye Unit
Subjects: 37 (28%) asymptomatic volunteers at KNH and KEU with no signs of
ocular infections or ocular surface abnormalities from January 1994 to December
1997 were selected.

Results: A total of 37 cases were tested positive for S. aureus. The micro
organism showed high resistance to amoxtcillin, aminoglycosides, 1st and 2nd
generation Flouroquinolones except Ofl oxacin and tetracycline. It was sensitive
to carbenocillin, polymyxin B and chloramphenocol and highly sensitive to
Cephalexin and ciprofl oxacin.

Conclusion: The percentage of positive fi nding of S. aureus of the conjunctival
normal flora is comparable to that in other regions of the world. We found a high
resistance to most of the commonly locally prescribed antibiotics.

A DRINDALOANNE. "Antibiotic sale behaviour in Nairobi: a contributing factor to antimicrobial drug resistance.East Afr Med J. 1997 Mar;74(3):171-3.". In: East Afr Med J. 1997 Mar;74(3):171-3. The Indian Journal of Animal Sciences; 1997. Abstract

A survey of antibiotic sale behaviour in retail chemist shops in Nairobi revealed that about 64% of chemists sell antibiotics without prescriptions from doctors. Most shops sold underdose drugs according to the request of the patient. The practice is more common in peri-urban than city centre chemists. Out of the 128 chemist shops visited, 82 sold the antibiotic, 33 sent the patients to go and see the doctors while 13 did both. Sixty eight per cent of the chemists in the city centre recommended the taking of full antibiotic course to the patients while only 46% in peri-urban centres did so. Even after the recommendation, some of the chemists still sold under dose drugs. Some of the drugs were sold in envelopes without any instruction at all and none of the drugs sold were fully labelled. Only seven chemists sold septrin, the brand of co-trimoxazole requested by the patients, the rest sold various brands of the drug some of whom still labelled the brands 'septrin'.

NYARONGI PROFOMBUIJ. "Antibiotic resistance in milk received by Dairy Cooperative Societies in Kiambu District, Kenya.". In: journal. University of Nairobi Press; 1994. Abstract
A survey of antibiotic inhibitors in milk received by dairy cooperative societies in Kiambu District was done qualitatively using microbiological assay method.  No antimicrobial inhibitors were detected in all the samples tested. Informal discussions indicated a high level of awareness of withdrawal requirements of veterinary drugs after animal treatment in both farmers and the management staff of dairy cooperative societies. The results show that milk from this area is free of antibiotic residues and farmers could be adhering to the withdrawal requirements of veterinary drugs. Such milk therefore does not pose a risk to the public and dairy industry.
Igizeneza A, Bebora LC, Nyaga PN, Njagi LW. "Antibiotic resistance in bacteria isolated from indigenous slaughter chicken in Nairobi, Kenya." East African Medical Journal . 2018;95(10).
Mbindyo SN, Abuom TO, KITAA JAFREDMA. "Antibiotic Resistance and Stewardship in Small Animal Practice-A Review." Journal of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Sciences. 2022;5(1):1102.
KAAYA GP. "Antibiotic properties of insect antibacterial factors.". In: Proceedings of the 8th Annual Joint Scientific Conference. Arusha, Tanzania; 1989.
Wanja DW, Mbuthia PG, Waruiru RM, Bebora LC, Nyaga PN, Ngowi, H. "Antibiotic and disinfectants susceptibility patterns of bacterial pathogens recovered from farmed fish in Kirinyaga County, Kenya." Hindawi International Journal of Microbiology. 2020;2020(Article ID 8897338. https://doi.org/10.1155/2020/8897338).
W. PROFMWANGOMBEAGNES. "Antibiotic Activity of some plant extracts on Pseudomonas syringae pv. Phaseolicola (Burk , 1926) Young ,Dye and Wilkie and Xanthomonas campestris pv. phaseoli (Smith) Dowson. Kenya Journal of Sciences Series B.". In: Proceedings of the 1st Workshop . J Hum Ecol, 26(3): 163-173 (2009).; 1926. Abstract
Fusarium wilt caused by Fusarium udum Butler, is an economically important disease of pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan (L.) Mill). Information on the mechanisms of resistance to this disease in pigeonpea is limited. To study the role of vascular occlusion in wilt resistance, isolates of F.udum were inoculated onto resistant and susceptible varieties of pigeonpea and observed under light and transmission electron microscopes. The presence of F. udum in wilt susceptible plants was characterized by mycelia and conidia in the xylem vessels, plugging in some vessels, disintegration of xylem parenchyma cells in the infected areas, and the formation of cavities due to heavy colonization in the pith cortex vascular bundle. Resistance to F. udum in the roots and stems of wilt resistant plants was associated with low fungal colonization and high occlusion due to tyloses and gels in the xylem vessels. There were significant differences (P = 0:05) in the number of xylem vessels occluded by tyloses in resistant and susceptible plants with a maximum of 22.5% and 8.0% occlusion, respectively. It is probable that tyloses and gels formed as a result of F. udum interaction in wilt resistant plants are part of a resistance mechanism. Key words: Fusarium wilt,cajanus cajan, resistance, tylose, vascular occlusion
ES Mitema KJ. "AntibacterialActivity of Isometamidium (Veridium')." Kenya Veterinarian. 2002;23. Abstract
n/a
Jepkoech C, Omosa LK, Nchiozem-Ngnitedem V-A, Kenanda EO, Guefack M-GF, Mbaveng AT, Kuete V, Heydenreich M. "Antibacterial secondary metabolites from Vernonia auriculifera Hiern (Asteraceae) against MDR phenotypes." Natural Products Research. 2021:https://doi.org/10.1080/14786419.2021.1953024.jepkoech_et_al_2021_natural_products_research.pdf
C. WG, W. GD, O. NM, K. NF, G. N, M. MJ. "Antibacterial and cytotoxic activity of some Kenyyan medicinal plants.". In: 6th Biennial Scientific Conference.; 2008.
Wagate CG, Gakuya DW, Nanyingi MO, Njonge FK, Mbaria JM. "Antibacterial and Cytotoxic Activity of some Kenyan Medicinal plants." Memorias de Instituto Oswaldo Cruz. 2008; 103( 7).
Wagate GC, Gakuya DW, Nanyingi MO, Njonge FK, G Nduhiu, Mbaria JM. "Antibacterial and Cytotoxic Activity of some Kenyan Medicinal plants.". In: . Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Nairobi. Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Nairobi, Kenya; 2008.
Wagate CG, Gakuya D, Nanyingi W;, Mark O, Njonge, Francis K, Mbaria JM. "Antibacterial and cytotoxic activity of Kenyan medicinal plants.". 2008. Abstract

Seven medicinal plant extracts traditionally used in Kenya, mainly for management of infectious conditions, were chosen and screened for their antibacterial activity against Gram-negative (Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli) and Gram-positive (Bacillus cereus and Staphylococcus aureus) bacteria. Antibacterial activity was tested using the broth dilution method. Harrisonia abyssinica and Terminalia kilimandscharica extracts showed significant activity against Gram+ and Gram- bacteria. The methanolic extracts of T. kilimandscharica bark and H. abyssinica bark and leaves showed minimum inhibitory activity against all tested bacteria, with minimal inhibitory concentrations ranging from 25-150 mg/mL. Ajuga remota and Amaranthus hybridus, which are lethal to brine shrimp nauplii, showed significantly lower antibacterial activity than those that were relatively non-toxic.

WG C, GW D, MO N, FK N, JM M. "Antibacterial and cytotoxic activity of Kenyan medicinal plants." Mem Inst Oswaldo Cruz. 2008;103(7):650-2.
Ndwigah SN, Amugune BK, Thoithi GN, Mwangi JW, Mugo HN, Kibwage IO. "Antibacterial and antifungal study of Dombeya torrida (J.F. Gmel) and Hydnora abyssinica (A. Braun). ." Afr. J. Pharmacol. Ther. . 2014;3(1):14-18.
Kibwage IO, Ndwigah SN, Amugune BK, Thoithi GN, Mwangi JW, Mugo HN. "Antibacterial and Antifungal Activity of Dombeya torrida (J.F. Gmel) and Hydnora abyssinica (A. Braun)." African Journal of Pharmacology and Therapeutics. 2014;3(2303-9841):14-18.abstract.pdf
Ndwigah SN, Amugune BK, Thoithi GN, Mwangi JW, Mugo HN, Kibwage. IO. "Antibacterial and Antifungal Activity of Dombeya torrida ( J. F. Gmel) and Hydnora abyssinica (A. Braun)." Afr. J. Pharmacol. Ther. . 2014;3(1):14-18.
Musila, F.M., Nguta, CM, Lukhoba CW, S.F. D. "Antibacterial and antifungal activities of 10 Kenyan Plectranthus species in the Coleus clade." Journal of Pharmacy Research . 2017;11(8):1003-1014.
Musila FM, Lukhoba CW, Dossaji SF. "Antibacterial and antifungal activities of 10 Kenyan Plectranthus species in the Coleus clade." Journal of Pharmacy Research. 2017;Vol. 11,(Issue 8):pp 1003-1014.
Musi, C, MIRIKAU, N, D. "Antibacterial and antifungal activities of 10 Kenyan Plectranthus species in the Coleus clade." Journal of Pharmacy Research. 2017;11(8):1003-1014 . Abstractantibacterial_antifungal_plectranthus_2017.pdfWebsite

Background Information: Plectranthus L’Hér. is an economically important genus with horticultural, medicinal and food uses. Most Plectranthus species are used in traditional medicine and have attracted the interest of researchers who have studied them in attempt to explore the bioactivities of their phytoconstituents.
Materials and Methods: The current study investigated the antimicrobial activities of 10 Kenyan Plectranthus species through disc diffusion and broth dilution method.
Results:Results indicated that, dichloromethane/methanol (1:1) total leaf extracts from Plectranthus barbatus displayed the highest antimicrobial activity compared to the other nine Plectranthus species with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of 25, 40, 100, 50, and 100 mg/ml against methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Bacillus cereus, Escherichia coli, Candida albicans, and Aspergillus niger, respectively. At a concentration of 200 mg/ml, the antibacterial activity of total leaf extracts of P. barbatus (MIC value = 25 mg/ml) and Plectranthus lanuginosus (MIC value = 40 mg/ml) againstMRSA was not significantly different from positive control drug; amoxicillin. Similarity, at a concentration of 200 mg/ml,total leaf extracts from Plectranthus ornatus (MIC value= 50 mg/ml) and P. barbatus (MIC value = 50 mg/ml) exhibited antifungal activity against C. albicans which was not significantly different from that of the positive control; ketoconazole.
Conclusion: The study reports for the first time, the antimicrobial activity of Plectranthus pseudomarrubioides, Plectranthus edulis, Plectranthus aegyptiacus, Plectranthus Otostegioides, and Plectranthus lanuginosus. The study has demonstrated broad bacteriostatic activity of P. barbatus and thus recommends further studies on this plant aimed at discovery of novel antimicrobial agents.
KEY WORDS: Antimicrobial activity, Bioguidance, Minimum inhibitory concentration, Plectranthus

Musila FM, Nguta JM, Lukhoba CW, Dossaji SF. "Antibacterial and antifungal activities of 10 Kenyan Plectranthus species in the Coleus clade." Journal of Pharmacy Research| Vol. 2017;11(8):1003.
Musau JK, Mbaria JM, Gakuya DW. "The antibacterial activity of some medicinal plants used in Meru Central District, Kenya." The Kenya Veterinarian . 2011;35(1):18-24.
Musau JK, Mbaria JM, Gakuya DW. "The antibacterial activity of some medicinal plants used in Meru Central District, Kenya.". 2011. Abstract

Five medicinal plants used by traditional medical health practitioners (TMP) in Meru central district namely: Piliostigma thonningii, Ajuga remota, Ocimum suave, Erythrina abyssinica and Harissonia abyssinica were investigated for their antibacterial activity against standard bacterial cultures namely; Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The antibacterial activity of the methanolic and water extracts was determined using the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). Gram positive bacteria (S. aureus and B. cereus) were more susceptible to the plant extracts than Gram negative bacteria (E. coli and P. aeruginosa). The MIC and MBC of the positive control antibiotics (Ampicillin for gram positive and Gentamycin for gram negative) were less than 1mg/ml. The most susceptible bacteria was S. aureus followed by B. cereus while the most resistant was E. coli followed by P.aeruginosa. Methanolic extracts of P. thonningii stem and Ocimum suave leaves had the best antibacterial activity against the four bacterial species. There was no significant difference between the water and methanolic extracts of all the plants. These results justify the use of these plants by the traditional medical practitioners for management of bacterial conditions and further investigation on their safety and phytochemistry is needed.

K DRKARIUKIDAVID. Antibacterial Activity of Selected Plants used by the Maasai People in Kenya. Vaccine 26:2788- 2795; 2014. AbstractWebsite

OBJECTIVE: To determine the bacteriology and antibiotic sensitivity of the bacterial isolates in chronic maxillary sinusitis patients seen at the Kenyatta National Hospital. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING: Kenyatta National Hospital, ENT department. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Seventy-three patients had bilateral sntral washout done and the lavage submitted for culture and anti-microbial sensitivity between January and June 1996. RESULTS: Antral lavage yielded secretions in 63% of patients but bacteria were cultured in only 28.8% of the specimens. The isolates included Streptococcus pneumonia (22.2%), Staphylocococus albus (18.5%), Staphylocococus aureus (11.1%) and Enterobactericiae (11.1%). Anaerobic bacteria were cultured in 22.2% of the specimens. Of the commonly used antibiotics, there was high sensitivity to erythromycin, cefadroxyl, chloramphenicol and amoxicillin and poor sensitivity to ampicillin, cotrimoxazole and perfloxacin. CONCLUSION: The bacteriology of chronic maxillary sinusitis at Kenyatta National Hospital is generally similar to that found elsewhere. The bacteria are susceptible to relatively affordable antibiotics like amoxicillin, erythromycin and cefadroxyl.

Miaron DJO, Kariuki DDK, Mugweru J, Kerubo LO. "ANTIBACTERIAL ACTIVITY OF FIVE MEDICINAL PLANT EXTRACTS USED BY THE MAASAI PEOPLE OF KENYA." international journal of humanities. 2014;2(7):1-6.miaron012.pdf
Kariuki DK, Miaron JO, Mugweru J, Kerubo LO. "Antibacterial Activity of Five Medicinal Plant Extracts Used by the Maasai People of Kenya." BEST: International Journal of Humanities, Arts, Medicine and Sciences (BEST: IJHAMS) . 2014;2(7):1-6.kariuki_et_al__2014.pdf
MATUMBARA-MABVENI ARS, KAAYA GP. "Antibacterial activity in Crop- borers haemolymph: Implications for biological control.". In: Proceedings of third International Conference on Tropical Entomology. Nairobi, Kenya; 1994.
Omosa LK, Midiwo JO, Mbaveng AT, Tankeo SB, Seukep JA, Voukeng IK, Dzotam JK, Isemeki J, Omolle RA, Efferth T, Kuete V. "Antibacterial Activity and Structure-Activity Relationships of a Panel of 48 Compounds from Kenyan Plants against Multidrug Resistant Phenotypes." SpringerPlus. 2016;5:901.omosa_et_al._springerplus_paper.pdf
Djeussi DE, Sandjo LP,.Noumedem JAK, Omosa LK, Ngadjui BT, Kuete V. "Antibacterial Activities of the Methanol Extracts and Compounds from Erythrina sigmoidea against Gram-negative Multi-drug Resistant Phenotypes." BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine. 2015;15:453.bmc_2015_djeussi_et_al._erythrina1.pdf
Omosa LK, Midiwo JO, Mbaveng AT, Tankeo SB, Seukep JA, Voukeng IK, Dzotam JK, Isemeki J, Derese S, Omolle RA, Efferth T, Kuete V. "Antibacterial activities and structure–activity relationships of a panel of 48 compounds from Kenyan plants against multidrug resistant phenotypes." SpringerPlus. 2016;5(1):1-15.
Omosa LK, Midiwo JO, Mbaveng AT, Tankeo SB, Seukep JA, Voukeng IK, Dzotam JK, Isemeki J, Derese S, Omolle RA, Efferth T, Kuete V. "Antibacterial activities and structure–activity relationships of a panel of 48 compounds from Kenyan plants against multidrug resistant phenotypes." SpringerPlus. 2016;5(1):1-15. AbstractFull text link

In the current study forty eight compounds belonging to anthraquinones, naphthoquinones, benzoquinones, flavonoids (chalcones and polymethoxylated flavones) and diterpenoids (clerodanes and kauranes) were explored for their antimicrobial potential against a panel of sensitive and multi-drug resistant Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) determinations on the tested bacteria were conducted using modified rapid INT colorimetric assay. To evaluate the role of efflux pumps in the susceptibility of Gram-negative bacteria to the most active compounds, they were tested in the presence of phenylalanine arginine β-naphthylamide (PAβN) (at 30 µg/mL) against selected multidrug resistance (MDR) bacteria. The anthraquinone, emodin, naphthaquinone, plumbagin and the benzoquinone, rapanone were active against methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains of bacteria with MIC values ranging from 2 to 128 μg/mL. The structure activity relationships of benzoquinones against the MDR Gram-negative phenotype showed antibacterial activities increasing with increase in side chain length. In the chalcone series the presence of a hydroxyl group at C3′ together with a methoxy group and a second hydroxyl group in meta orientation in ring B of the chalcone skeleton appeared to be necessary for minimal activities against MRSA. In most cases, the optimal potential of the active compounds were not attained as they were extruded by bacterial efflux pumps. However, the presence of the PAβN significantly increased the antibacterial activities of emodin against Gram-negative MDR E. coli AG102, 100ATet; K. pneumoniae KP55 and KP63 by >4–64 g/mL. The antibacterial activities were substantially enhanced and were higher than those of the standard drug, chloramphenicol. These data clearly demonstrate that the active compounds, having the necessary pharmacophores for antibacterial activities, including some quinones and chalcones are substrates of bacterial efflux pumps and therefore should be combined to efflux pump inhibitors in the fight against MDR bacterial infections.

Keywords:

Anthraquinones Benzoquinones Chalcones Antibacterial activities Multidrug resistance Efflux pump inhibitor

Hashim I, Omosa LK, Nchiozem-Ngnitedem V-A, Onyari JM, Maru SM, Guefack M-GF, Mbaveng AT, Kuete V. "Antibacterial Activities and Phytochemical Screening of Crude Extracts from Kenyan Macaranga Species Towards MDR Phenotypes Expressing Effux Pumps." Pharmacognosy Communications. 2021;11(2):119-126.hashim_et_al_2021_pharmacognosy_communications.pdf
"Antibacterial Activities and Phytochemical Screening of Crude Extracts from Kenyan Macaranga Species Towards MDR Phenotypes Expressing Efflux Pumps." Pharmacognosy Communications. 2021;11(2). AbstractPharmacognosy Communications

Description
Introduction:
Macaranga species are traditionally used for the treatment and management of coughing, fungal infection, and wounds. In this study, the phytochemical screening and antibacterial activities of nine crude extracts from Macaranga conglomerata, Macaranga kilimandscharica and Macaranga capensis were determined against 13 bacterial strains expressing multi-drug resistance (MDR) phenotypes.
Methods:
Phytochemical screening of the extracts were carried out according to the standard methods, while the iodonitrotetrazolium chloride (INT) colorimetric assay was used to determine the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC) of the plants extracts.
Results:
Flavonoids, terpenoids, saponins and coumarins were the major secondary metabolites found in all the plant extracts. The results of antibacterial studies revealed that all the plant extracts displayed good activities with MIC values ranging from 4–128 µg/mL against the tested micro-organisms. Most of the extracts exhibited a bactericidal effect against E. coli, E. aerogenes, K. pneumoniae, P. stuartii, P. aeruginosa, and

VM M, O MJ, J Z, BM G, R M, LK O, FT W, MR J, LA W, I M. "Anti-Vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium and E. faecalis activities of (-)-gossypol and derivatives from Thespesia garckeana." Natural Product Communications (NPC). 2015;10(4):613-616.masila_et_al.pdf
Kuria DJ. "Anti-thyroid antibodies in Kenya." East Africa Med. Journal. 2008;85 (9):459-462.
Waiganjo N, Yole D, Ochanda H. "Anti-schistosomal activity of five plant extracts on Swiss white mice infected with Schistosoma mansoni." IOSR Journal of Pharmacy and Biological Sciences. 2014;9 :49-53.
Waiganjo N, Yole D, Ochanda H. Anti-Schistosomal activity of five plant extracts on Swiss white mice infected with Schistosoma mansoni.; 2016. AbstractWebsite

Schistosomiasis in humans is a major public health problem worldwide. Schistosomiasis occurs
in 76 tropical countries and it is estimated that 85% of the infections are in Africa. In Kenya, it is estimated that
3 million people are infected. The Conventional drugs are effective in the treatment of the disease but very little
progress has been achieved on treatment of Schistosomiasis in Kenya. Any effort towards developing alternative
drugs for the disease is worthwhile. Praziquantel is the most effective drug against all adult stages of human
Schistosomiasis, being the drug of choice for morbidity control of Schistosomiasis. However it is not a satisfying
situation to have one drug used for the treatment. Ideally other drugs should be availed in order to avoid
development of drug resistance. The use of plant extracts in treatment of diseases is universal. The results
obtained showed that Ocimum americanum and Bridelia micrantha plant extracts had antischistosomal activity
as indicated by high worm reduction and reduced gross pathology. Histopathology showed no or few
granuloma in the liver tissue. Further work should be done on the efficacious extracts, towards drug
development.
Keywords: Antischistosomal activity, Pathology, Plant extracts, Praziquantel, Schistosomiasis

Otedo AEO, Otieno CF, Oyoo GO, Omonge EO. "Anti-Retroviral Therapy Related Liver Injury (ARLI): A Series of 11 Cases." East African Medical Journal. 2013;90(12):40-47.
SOLOMON DRDERESE. "Anti-plasmodial flavonoids from the stem bark of Erythrina abyssinica." Phytochemistry. 2004;65(22):3029-32. AbstractWebsite

Phytochemistry. 2004 Nov;65(22):3029-32.

Anti-plasmodial flavonoids from the stem bark of Erythrina abyssinica.

Yenesew A, Induli M, Derese S, Midiwo JO, Heydenreich M, Peter MG, Akala H, Wangui J, Liyala P, Waters NC.

The ethyl acetate extract of the stem bark of Erythrina abyssinica showed anti-plasmodial activity against the chloroquine-sensitive (D6) and chloroquine-resistant (W2) strains of Plasmodium falciparum with IC(50) values of 7.9+/-1.1 and 5.3+/-0.7 microg/ml, respectively. From this extract, a new chalcone, 2',3,4,4'-tetrahydroxy-5-prenylchalcone (trivial name 5-prenylbutein) and a new flavanone, 4',7-dihydroxy-3'-methoxy-5'-prenylflavanone (trivial name, 5-deoxyabyssinin II) along with known flavonoids have been isolated as the anti-plasmodial principles. The structures were determined on the basis of spectroscopic evidence.

Yenesew A. "Anti-plasmodial Flavonoids from the roots of Erythrina abyssinica." Phytochemistry. 2004; 65:3029-3032. Abstractpaper_35_yenesew_et_al_phyto_2004-erythrina_abyssinica.pdf

The ethyl acetate extract of the stem bark of Erythrina abyssinica showed anti-plasmodial activity against the chloroquine-sensitive (D6) and chloroquine-resistant (W2) strains of Plasmodium falciparum with IC50 values of 7.9 ± 1.1 and 5.3 ± 0.7 lg/ml, respectively. From this extract, a new chalcone, 20,3,4,40-tetrahydroxy-5-prenylchalcone (trivial name 5-prenylbutein) and a new flavanone, 40,7-dihydroxy-30-methoxy-50-prenylflavanone (trivial name, 5-deoxyabyssinin II) along with known flavonoids have been isolated as the anti-plasmodial principles. The structures were determined on the basis of spectroscopic evidence.

Yenesew A. "Anti-plasmodial activities of flavonoids from Erythrina sacleuxii." Planta Medica . 2006;72:187-189. Abstractpaper_39_andayi_et_al_planta_med.-_2006_antiplasmodial_flavonoids_from_erythrina_sacleuxii.pdf

The acetone extracts of the root bark and stem bark of Erythrina sacleuxii showed antiplasmodial activities against the chloroquine-sensitive (D6) and chloroquine-resistant (W2) strains of Plasmodium falciparum. Chromatographic separation of the acetone extract of the root bark afforded a new isoflavone, 7-hydroxy-4'-methoxy-3'-prenylisoflavone (trivial name 5-deoxy-3'-prenylbiochanin A) along with known isoflavonoids as the antiplasmodial principles. Flavonoids and isoflavonoids isolated from the stem bark of E. sacleuxii were also tested and showed antiplasmodial activities. The structures were determined on the basis of spectroscopic evidence.

SOLOMON DRDERESE. "Anti-plasmodial activities and X-ray crystal structures of rotenoids from Millettia usaramensis subspecies usaramensis .". In: Chemical Sciences Journal Vol. 2012: CSJ-56. Elsevier; 2003. Abstract

The dichloromethane extract of the stem bark of Millettia usaramensis subspecies usaramensis showed anti-plasmodial activity against the chloroquine sensitive (D6) and chloroquine resistant (W2) strains of Plasmodium falciparum. Chromatographic separation of the extract led to the identification of a new rotenoid, (6aR,12aS)-2,3-methylenedioxy-9-methoxy-8-(3,3-dimethylallyl)-12a-hydroxyrotenoid (trivial name, usararotenoid C) along with known flavonoids (usararotenoid A, 12a-epimillettosin, 6a,12a-dehydromillettone, barbigerone and 4′-O-geranylisoliquiritigenin) as the anti-plasmodial principles. The structures were determined by spectroscopic analyses. CD and X-ray analyses established absolute configurations.

RAI MRVYASYASHWANT. "Anti-Monopoly Policy and the Structure - Conduct - Performance Paradigm: The Kenyan Approach, 10 (1) Eastern Africa Economic Review.". In: Journal of the Kenyan Economic Assocation, Nairobi, 11-38.; 1994. Abstract
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Tarkang PA, Okalebo FA, Ayong LS, Agbor GA, Guantai AN. "Anti-malarial activity of a polyherbal product (Nefang) during early and established Plasmodium infection in rodent models." Malaria Journal. 2014;13:DOI: 10.1186/1475-2875-13-456. Abstract2014_-_antimalarial_activity_of_polyherbal_nefang.pdf

Background: The emerging resistance of Plasmodium species to currently available anti-malarials remains a public health concern, hence the need for new effective, safe and affordable drugs. Natural products remain a reliable source of drugs. Nefang is a polyherbal anti-malarial of the Cameroonian folklore medicine with demonstrated in vitro antiplasmodial and antioxidant activities. It is composed of Mangifera indica (bark and leaf), Psidium guajava, Carica papaya, Cymbopogon citratus, Citrus sinensis, Ocimum gratissimum (leaves). This study aimed at investigating the suppressive, prophylactic and curative activities of Nefang in Plasmodium infected rodent models.

Methods: Systemic acute oral toxicity of Nefang aqueous and ethanol extracts was assessed in mice up to a
dose of 5,000 mgkg−1 body weight. BALB/c mice and Wistar rats were inoculated with Plasmodium chabaudi
chabaudi and Plasmodium berghei, respectively, and treated with Nefang, the Mangifera indica bark/Psidium
guajava combination and a Psidium guajava leaf aqueous extracts (75, 150, 300 and 600 mgkg−1 bwt). Their
schizonticidal activity was then evaluated using the Peter’s 4-day suppressive test). The prophylactic and curative (Rane’s Test) activity of Nefang was also evaluated by determining the parasitaemia, survival time, body weight and temperature in pre-treated rodents.

Results: Acute oral toxicity of the extract did not cause any observed adverse effects. Percent suppressions of
parasitaemia at 600 mgkg−1 bwt were as follows (P. berghei/P. chabaudi): Nefang – 82.9/86.3, Mangifera indica bark/Psidium guajava leaf combination extract – 79.5/81.2 and Psidium guajava leaf – 58.9/67.4. Nefang exhibited a prophylactic activity of 79.5% and its chemotherapeutic effects ranged from 61.2 – 86.1% with maximum effect observed at the highest experimental dose.

Conclusion: These results indicate that Nefang has excellent in vivo anti-malarial activities against P. berghei
and P. chabaudi, upholding earlier in vitro antiplasmodial activities against multi-drug resistant P. falciparum
parasites as well as its traditional use. Hence, Nefang represents a promising source of new anti-malarial
agents.

Keywords: Medicinal Plants, Nefang, Acute toxicity, Malaria, In vivo antiplasmodial activity, Suppressive
activity, Prophylactic activity, Curative activity, Combination phytotherapy

Kenanda EO, Omosa LK. "Anti-leishmanial activity of some surface compounds of Tarchonanthus camphoratus." Investigational Medicinal Chemistry & Pharmacology. 2019;2 (2):30.kenanda_et_al_05082019.pdf
Ngugi M. "Anti-Kikuyuism, Media and the New Bills." Nairobi Law Monthly Jan 1996 (1996).
Nchiozem-Ngnitedem V-A, Omosa LK, Bedane KG, Derese S, Brieger L, Strohmann C, Spiteller M. "Anti-inflammatory Steroidal Sapogenins and a Conjugated Chalcone-stilbene from Dracaena usambarensis Engl." Fitoterapia. 2020;146:104717.alexe_et_al_2020_fitoterapia.pdf
Mukavi J, Omosa LK, Nchiozem-Ngnitedem V-A, Nyaga J, Omole R, Bitchagno GTM, Spiteller M. "Anti-inflammatory norhopanes from the root bark of Fagaropsis angolensis (Engl.) H. M. Gardner." Fitoterapia. 2020;146:104690.mukavi_et_al_2020_fitoterapia.pdf
Derese S. "Anti-inflammatory Flavanones and Flavones from Tephrosia linearis." Journal of natural products. 2020. AbstractWebsite

Anti-inflammatory Flavanones and Flavones from Tephrosia linearis
Richard Oriko Owor, Kibrom Gebreheiwot Bedane, Sebastian Zühlke, Solomon Derese, George Otieno Ong’amo, Albert Ndakala, Michael Spiteller
Abstract
Phytochemical analysis of a methanol–dichloromethane (1:1) extract of the aerial parts of Tephrosialinearis led to the isolation of 18 compounds. Seven of these, namely, lineaflavones A–D (1–4), 6-methoxygeraldone (5), 8″-acetylobovatin (6), and 5-hydroxy-7-methoxysaniculamin A (7) are new compounds. The compounds were characterized based on their NMR and HRMSn data. The anti-inflammatory effects of the crude extract and isolated compounds were evaluated by measuring the levels of interleukins (IL-1β, IL-2, and IL-6), granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). The crude extract inhibited the release of all cytokines except IL-1β, which slightly increased in comparison to the LPS control. All the tested compounds suppressed the production of IL-2, GM-CSF, and TNF-α. Whereas compounds 1, 2, 4–8, 10–15, 17, and 18 decreased production of IL-6, compounds 1, 2, 4, 7, 10, 13–15, and 17 inhibited the release of IL-1β. It is worth noting that most of the compounds tested showed a superior reduction in cytokines release compared to the reference drug ibuprofen.

Owor RO, Bedane KG, Zühlke S, Derese S, Ong’amo GO, Ndakala A, Spiteller M. "Anti-inflammatory Flavanones and Flavones from Tephrosia linearis." Journal of Natural Products. 2020;83(4):996-1004. AbstractJournal of Natural Products

Description
Phytochemical analysis of a methanol–dichloromethane (1:1) extract of the aerial parts of Tephrosialinearis led to the isolation of 18 compounds. Seven of these, namely, lineaflavones A–D (1–4), 6-methoxygeraldone (5), 8″-acetylobovatin (6), and 5-hydroxy-7-methoxysaniculamin A (7) are new compounds. The compounds were characterized based on their NMR and HRMSn data. The anti-inflammatory effects of the crude extract and isolated compounds were evaluated by measuring the levels of interleukins (IL-1β, IL-2, and IL-6), granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). The crude extract inhibited the release of all cytokines except IL-1β, which slightly increased in comparison to the LPS control. All the tested compounds suppressed the production of IL-2, GM-CSF, and …

Kamau FN, Kibwage IO, Muriuki G, Munenge R. "Anti-inflammatory and Anti-diarrhoeal Activities of a Steroidal Indoxyl." East Cent.Afr.J.Pharm.Sci.. 2003;6:26-29.
Kimondo J, Mutai P, Njogu P, Kimwele C. "Anti-inflammatory activity of selected plants used by the Ilkisonko Maasai, Kenya." Afr. J. Therapeut. Pharmacol. 2020;9(2):39-43.
N PROFGUANTAIA. "Anti-infiammatory and Anti-Diarrimeai Activities of a Steroidal indoxy.". In: East and Central African Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences 6. F. N. KAMAU., 1.0. KIBWAGE, A. N. GUANTAI, G. MURIUKI R. MUNENGE; 2003. Abstract

The anti-inflammatory and antidiarrhoeal activities of 3(1-Hydroxy-16. 17-seco-16- nor-5-androsten-15-(2-indoxyliden)-17-oic acid (I) are reported. After intraperitoneal administration, compound (I) gave an ED50 of 9.5 mg/kg using the carrageenan induced rat paw oedema anti-inflammatory assay method. Indomethacin had an ED50 of 5.8 mg/kg in this assay. Compound (I) and indomethacin caused comparable and dose-dependent varying degrees of delay in diarrhoea and also significantly reduced net colonic water flux into the colon of rats induced by castor oil. Key words: Steroidal Indoxyl, Anti-Inflammatory, Antidiarrhoeal.

JOAB PROFBWAYOJOB. "Anti-HLA alloantibody is found in children but does not correlate with a lack of HIV type 1 transmission from infected mothers. Luscher MA; Choy G; Embree JE; Nagelkerke NJ; Bwayo JJ; Njenga S; Plummer FA; Barber BH; MacDonald KS. AIDS Res Hum Retroviruse.". In: AIDS Res Hum Retroviruses. 1998 Jan 20;14(2):99-107. Asian Economic and Social Society; 1998. Abstract
To determine the effect of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection upon pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), a laparoscopic study of acute PID was conducted in Nairobi, Kenya. Subjects underwent diagnostic laparoscopy, HIV-1 serology, and testing for sexually transmitted diseases. Of the 133 women with laparoscopically verified salpingitis, 52 (39%) were HIV-1-seropositive. Tubo-ovarian abscesses (TOA) were found in 33% of HIV-1-infected and 15% of HIV-1-uninfected women (odds ratio [OR], 2.8; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.2-6.5). Among seropositive women, TOA was found in 55% of those with CD4 cell percent <14% vs. 28% with CD4 cell percent>14% (OR 3.1, 95% CI 0.6-15.3). Neisseria gonorrhoeae was detected in 37 women (28%) and Chlamydia trachomatis in 12 (9%); neither was significantly related to HIV-1 seropositivity. Length of hospitalization was not affected by HIV-1 serostatus overall but was prolonged among HIV-1-infected women with CD4 cell percent <14%. Among patients with acute salpingitis, likelihood of TOA was related to HIV-1 infection and advanced immunosuppression. In general, HIV-1-seropositive women with acute salpingitis responded well to treatment.
Drannik AG, Nag K, Yao X-D, Henrick BM, Jain S, Ball BT, Plummer FA, Wachihi C, Kimani J, Rosenthal KL. "Anti-HIV-1 Activity of Elafin Is More Potent than Its Precursor's, Trappin-2, in Genital Epithelial Cells.". 2012. AbstractWebsite

Cervicovaginal lavage fluid (CVL) is a natural source of anti-HIV-1 factors; however, molecular characterization of the anti-HIV-1 activity of CVL remains elusive. In this study, we confirmed that CVLs from HIV-1-resistant (HIV-R) compared to HIV-1-susceptible (HIV-S) commercial sex workers (CSWs) contain significantly larger amounts of serine antiprotease trappin-2 (Tr) and its processed form, elafin (E). We assessed anti-HIV-1 activity of CVLs of CSWs and recombinant E and Tr on genital epithelial cells (ECs) that possess (TZM-bl) or lack (HEC-1A) canonical HIV-1 receptors. Our results showed that immunodepletion of 30% of Tr/E from CVL accounted for up to 60% of total anti-HIV-1 activity of CVL. Knockdown of endogenous Tr/E in HEC-1A cells resulted in significantly increased shedding of infectious R5 and X4 HIV-1. Pretreatment of R5, but not X4 HIV-1, with either Tr or E led to inhibition of HIV-1 infection of TZM-bl cells. Interestingly, when either HIV-1 or cells lacking canonical HIV-1 receptors were pretreated with Tr or E, HIV-1 attachment and transcytosis were significantly reduced, and decreased attachment was not associated with altered expression of syndecan-1 or CXCR4. Determination of 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50) of Tr and E anti-HIV-1 activity indicated that E is ~130 times more potent than its precursor, Tr, despite their equipotent antiprotease activities. This study provides the first experimental evidence that (i) Tr and E are among the principal anti-HIV-1 molecules of CVL; (ii) Tr and E affect cell attachment and transcytosis of HIV-1; (iii) E is more efficient than Tr regarding anti-HIV-1 activity; and (iv) the anti-HIV-1 effect of Tr and E is contextual

Zheng Y, Mulinge M, Counson M, Yang X, Steinmetz A, Schmit J-C, Devaux C. "Anti-HIV activities in an African plant extract." Planta Medica. 2014;80(10).
Johns T, Fambert GM, Kokwaro JO, Mahunnah R, Kimanani E. "Anti-giardial activity of gastrointestinal remedies of the Luo of East Africa." Journal of Ethnopharmacology. 1995;46(1):1-17.
O PROFMIDIWOJACOB. "Anti-feedant effects of surface accumulated flavonoids of Polygonum senegalense.". In: Bull. Chem. Soc. Ethiop. (1990), 4(2), 123.; 1990. Abstract
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RAI MRVYASYASHWANT. ""Anti-Competitive Trade Practices and the Law Relating to Contracts in Restraint of Trade.". In: The Kenya Perspective, The University of Nairobi Law Journal, 118-130, Vol.1.; 2003. Abstract
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RAI MRVYASYASHWANT. ""Anti-Competitive Trade Practices and the Law Relating to Contracts in Restraint of Trade.". In: The Kenya Perspective", The University of Nairobi Law Journal, 118-130, Vol. 1. 2003.; 2003. Abstract
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omoni DG. "The anti-carcinogenic and anti-atherogenic effects of lycopene: a review ." Trends in Food Science & Technology. 2005;16(8):344-350.
Milugo T, Masila VM, Owuor B, Bulimo W, Julius Oyugi, Ochanda J, Wamunyokoli F, Omosa LK. "Anti-cancer activities of crude extracts from medicinal plants Moringa oleifera Lam and Rauwolfia caffra against selected cancer cell lines." IOSR Journal of Pharmacy and Biological Sciences. 2016;11(3):59-64.milugo_et_al._2016.pdf
Kamatenesi-Mugisha M, Makawiti DW, Oryem-Origa H, Odyek O. "The anti-bacterial bioactivity of some medicinal lants used in productive healthcare from western,Uganda.". 2000. AbstractWebsite

Bacterial infections in rural western Uganda,particularly in women are treated using herbal medicine.The ethanolic crude plant extracts of tetradenia riparia,tithonia diversifolia and geniosporum rotundifolium some of the medicinal plants used traditionally in treating bacterial infections were tested for their activity against microorganism.Test organism used were three species of gram-positive bacteria namely staphylococcus aureus,Bacillus pumilus and Bacillus subtilis and gram-negative bacteria escherichia coli and pseudomonas aeruginosa were used for bioassay.Disk diffusion method was used to carry out the antimicrobial test and the inhibitory concentrations of both the MIC and IC of the herbal extracts were calculated Tetradenia riparia,Tithonia diversifolia and geniosprum rotundifolium showed promising results as antibacterial potential drugs. Thus plants used in traditional medicine for particular ailments are sometimes potential leads in drug discovery and development

H DRONYANGOWALTER. "Anti Pollution Poster Exhibition United Nations.". In: University of Lodz, Poland. IPPNW; 1985. Abstract
Although military conflicts are common on the African continent, there is a paucity of data regarding bomb-blast injuries in this region and in Kenya in particular. This paper describes the pattern of maxillofacial injuries sustained after the August 1998 bomb blast that occurred in Nairobi, Kenya. A retrospective cross-sectional study was carried out using hospital-based records of 290 bomb-blast survivors admitted at the Kenyatta National Referral and Teaching Hospital in Nairobi. Using a self-designed form to record information about variables such as the sex and age of the survivors and type of location of soft- and hard-tissue injuries, it was found that of the 290 bomb-blast survivors, 78% had sustained one or more maxillofacial injuries. Soft-tissue injuries (cuts, lacerations or bruises) were the most common, constituting 61.3% of all injuries in the maxillofacial region; 27.6% had severe eye injuries, while 1.4% had fractures in the cranio-facial region. This paper concludes that the effective management of bomb-blast injuries as well as those caused by other types of disaster requires a multidisciplinary approach. The high percentage of maxillofacial injuries confirm that maxillofacial surgeons should form an integral part of this multidisciplinary team.
Murage M.Wanjiku, Mbatia B.Nyambura MEKMMW. "Anti - oxidative potential of honey and ascorbic acid in yoghurt fortified with Omega - 3 fatty acids." Journal of Microbiology, Biotechnology and Food Sciences. 2016;6:702-706. Abstract
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Obel AO. "Anti - mycotic agents and their relevance to HIV – infected patients." Medicine in Africa. 1993;(2):6-8.
Tohamy SA, Abdel Malek AK, Hassan FZ, Abdel Baky A. "Anthropometric characteristics of the mentally retarded children.". 1990.Website
Nyamongo IK. "The Anthropology of Infectious Diseases: International Health Perspectives. Edited by Marcia C. Inhorn and Peter J. Brown. xv + 495 pp. Amsterdam: Gordon and Breach. 1997.". In: American Journal of Human Biology, Vol. 12: 143-144. Wiley Interscience; 2000. Abstract

The author illustrates how qualitative data from open-ended interviews, pile sorts, and triad sorts can be used to test quantitatively for intracultural variation in norms. Specifically, the author tests whether Gusii men and women in the Suneka Division of Kisii District in southwest Kenya have developed a common set of standards in response to symptoms of malaria. In this small sample, the focus is on internal, rather than external, validity. While the findings about Gusii responses to malaria are not generalizable beyond the village where the data were collected, the method described may be used to study cultural similarities across socioeconomic, gender, and other groups.

ONYANGO-OUMA DRW. "Anthropology at home: Perspectives and ethical dilemmas. Mila (N.S.) 5: 90-97.". In: Nordic Journal of African Studies 15 (3): 393-40. Population Council; 2003. Abstract
Anthropology at home: Perspectives and ethical dilemmas. Mila (N.S.) 5: 90-97.
Nyamongo IK. "Anthropolgy: A Social Science in the Control of HIV Transmission in Africa.". In: African Anthropology, Vol. 2(1): 45-58. Wiley Interscience; 1995. Abstract

The author illustrates how qualitative data from open-ended interviews, pile sorts, and triad sorts can be used to test quantitatively for intracultural variation in norms. Specifically, the author tests whether Gusii men and women in the Suneka Division of Kisii District in southwest Kenya have developed a common set of standards in response to symptoms of malaria. In this small sample, the focus is on internal, rather than external, validity. While the findings about Gusii responses to malaria are not generalizable beyond the village where the data were collected, the method described may be used to study cultural similarities across socioeconomic, gender, and other groups.

FRANKLIN DROPIJAH. "Anthropogenic Energy Component and Climate Change in Nairobi Metro-area.". In: Experimewntal Mechanics. Kenya Meteorological Society; 2007.
Odada E, Williams M, Zalasiewicz JA, Waters CN, Edgeworth M, Bennett CE, Barnosky AD, et al. "The Anthropocene: a conspicuous stratigraphical signal of anthropogenic changes in production and consumption across the biosphere.". 2015. AbstractFull Text

Biospheric relationships between production and consumption of biomass have been
resilient to changes in the Earth system over billions of years. This relationship has increased in its com-
plexity, from localized ecosystems predicated on anaerobic microbial production and consumption
to a global biosphere founded on primary production from oxygenic photoautotrophs, through the
evolution of Eukarya, metazoans, and the complexly networked ecosystems of microbes, animals, fungi,
and plants that characterize the Phanerozoic Eon (the last∼541 million years of Earth history). At present,
one species,
Homo sapiens, is refashioning this relationship between consumption and production in the
biosphere with unknown consequences. This has left a distinctive stratigraphy of the production and
consumption of biomass, of natural resources, and of produced goods. This can be traced through stone
tool technologies and geochemical signals, later unfolding into a diachronous signal of technofossils and
human bioturbation across the planet, leading to stratigraphically almost isochronous signals developing
by the mid-20th century. These latter signals may provide an invaluable resource for informing and
constraining a formal Anthropocene chronostratigraphy, but are perhaps yet more important as tracers
of a biosphere state that is characterized by a geologically unprecedented pattern of global energy flow
that is now pervasively influenced and mediated by humans, and which is necessary for maintaining the
complexity of modern human societies.

Odada E, Waters CN, Zalasiewicz J, Summerhayes C, Barnosky AD, et al. "The Anthropocene is functionally and stratigraphically distinct from the Holocene." Science. 2016;351(6269):aad2622. AbstractFull Text

BACKGROUND

Humans are altering the planet, including long-term global geologic processes, at an increasing rate. Any formal recognition of an Anthropocene epoch in the geological time scale hinges on whether humans have changed the Earth system sufficiently to produce a stratigraphic signature in sediments and ice that is distinct from that of the Holocene epoch. Proposals for marking the start of the Anthropocene include an “early Anthropocene” beginning with the spread of agriculture and deforestation; the Columbian Exchange of Old World and New World species; the Industrial Revolution at ~1800 CE; and the mid-20th century “Great Acceleration” of population growth and industrialization.
ADVANCES

Recent anthropogenic deposits contain new minerals and rock types, reflecting rapid global dissemination of novel materials including elemental aluminum, concrete, and plastics that form abundant, rapidly evolving “technofossils.” Fossil fuel combustion has disseminated black carbon, inorganic ash spheres, and spherical carbonaceous particles worldwide, with a near-synchronous global increase around 1950. Anthropogenic sedimentary fluxes have intensified, including enhanced erosion caused by deforestation and road construction. Widespread sediment retention behind dams has amplified delta subsidence.

Geochemical signatures include elevated levels of polyaromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, and pesticide residues, as well as increased 207/206Pb ratios from leaded gasoline, starting between ~1945 and 1950. Soil nitrogen and phosphorus inventories have doubled in the past century because of increased fertilizer use, generating widespread signatures in lake strata and nitrate levels in Greenland ice that are higher than at any time during the previous 100,000 years.

Detonation of the Trinity atomic device at Alamogordo, New Mexico, on 16 July 1945 initiated local nuclear fallout from 1945 to 1951, whereas thermonuclear weapons tests generated a clear global signal from 1952 to 1980, the so-called “bomb spike” of excess 14C, 239Pu, and other artificial radionuclides that peaks in 1964.

Atmospheric CO2 and CH4 concentrations depart from Holocene and even Quaternary patterns starting at ~1850, and more markedly at ~1950, with an associated steep fall in δ13C that is captured by tree rings and calcareous fossils. An average global temperature increase of 0.6o to 0.9oC from 1900 to the present, occurring predominantly in the past 50 years, is now rising beyond the Holocene variation of the past 1400 years, accompanied by a modest enrichment of δ18O in Greenland ice starting at ~1900. Global sea levels increased at 3.2 ± 0.4 mm/year from 1993 to 2010 and are now rising above Late Holocene rates. Depending on the trajectory of future anthropogenic forcing, these trends may reach or exceed the envelope of Quaternary interglacial conditions.

Biologic changes also have been pronounced. Extinction rates have been far above background rates since 1500 and increased further in the 19th century and later; in addition, species assemblages have been altered worldwide by geologically unprecedented transglobal species invasions and changes associated with farming and fishing, permanently reconfiguring Earth’s biological trajectory.
OUTLOOK

These novel stratigraphic signatures support the formalization of the Anthropocene at the epoch level, with a lower boundary (still to be formally identified) suitably placed in the mid-20th century. Formalization is a complex question because, unlike with prior subdivisions of geological time, the potential utility of a formal Anthropocene reaches well beyond the geological community. It also expresses the extent to which humanity is driving rapid and widespread changes to the Earth system that will variously persist and potentially intensify into the future.

Yenesew A., and E. Dagne MSMW. "An anthrone, anthraquinone and two oxanthrones from Kniphofia foliosa." Phytochemistry . 1994;37:525-528. Abstractpaper_15_yenesew_et_al_phyto_1994_37_525.pdf

The compounds isoknipholone, isoknipholone anthrone, foliosone and isofoliosone were isolated from the stem of Kniphofia foliosa and their structures determined by spectral analyses. In addition, the known compounds, aloesaponol Ill, aloesaponol III-8-methyl ether and 4,6-dihydroxy-2-methoxyacetophenone were isolated and identified.

- Paul K. Muoria, Philip Muruthi WKBHDMNOKAO. "Anthrax outbreak among Grevy’s zebra (Equus grevyi) in Samburu, Kenya." African Journal of Ecology (online); 2007. Abstract
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Yenesew A, Endale M, M., Erdelyi, Ekberg A, HM A, Ndakala A, A., Sunnerhagen. "Anthraquinonesof the roots of Pentas micrantha." Molecules . 2013;18,:311-321. Abstractpaper_61_endale_et_al_molecules-2013-18-00311.pdf

Pentas micrantha is used in the East African indigenous medicine to treat malaria. In the first investigation of this plant, the crude methanol root extract showed moderate antiplasmodial activity against the W2- (3.37 μg/mL) and D6-strains (4.00 μg/mL) of Plasmodium falciparum and low cytotoxicity (>450 μg/mL, MCF-7 cell line). Chromatographic separation of the extract yielded nine anthraquinones, of which 5,6-dihydroxylucidin-11-Omethyl ether is new. Isolation of a munjistin derivative from the genus Pentas is reported
here for the first time. The isolated constituents were identified by NMR and mass spectrometric techniques and showed low antiplasmodial activities.

Keywords: anthraquinone; malaria; Pentas micrantha; Rubiaceae; 5,6-dihydroxylucidin-11-O-methyl ether 1.

Yenesew A., and E. Dagne, S. Asmellash DMSS. "Anthraquinones, pre-anthraquinones and Isoeleutherol in the roots of Aloe species." Phytochemistry . 1994;35:401-406. Abstractpaper_14_dagne_et_al_phyto_1994_35_401.pdf

Comparative TLC analysis of the root extracts of 32 Aloe species showed that chrysophanol, asphodelin, chrysophanol-8-methyl ether, aloechrysone, helminthosporin, aloesaponol III, aloesaponarin I, aloesaponol I, aloesaponarin II, aloesaponol II and laccaic acid D-methyl ester are widely distributed in these plants. Isoeleutherol, which is reported here for the first time as a natural product, occurs only in the Saponariae series of Aloe. The chemotaxonomic implication of the distribution of these compounds for the genus Aloe is discussed.

Derese S, Yenesew A, Midiwo JO, Heydenreich, Peter MG. "Anthraquinones, Pre-anthraquinones And Isoeleutherol In The Roots Of Aloe Species."; 1994.
Endale M, Ekberg A, Alao JP, Akala HM, Ndakala A, Sunnerhagen P, Erdelyi M, Yenesew A. "Anthraquinones of the roots of Pentas micrantha." Molecules. 2013;18:311-321.
Yenesew A., Dagne E. "Anthraquinones and the chemotaxonomy of the Asphodelaceae." Pure & Appl. Chem. . 1994;66: 2395-2398. Abstractpaper_16_dagne_et_al_pure__appl_chem-1994.pdf

Phytochemical investigations on three genera of the Asphodelaceae, Aloe, KniphoJla and Bulbine showed that 1-methyl-8-hydroxyanthraquinones and anthrone-C-glycosides are characteristic constituents of the genus Aloe, while knipholone-type compounds distinguish fiiphoja and Bulbine.

MICHIRA DRIMMACULATENYAMBURA. "Anthracene sulfonic acid-doped polyanilines: Electrodynamics and Application as amperometric peroxide biosensor.". In: International Journal of Polymeric Materials. Research signpost, T.C 37166(2), Fort Post Office, Trivandrum, Kerala, India; 2007. Abstract
Vertex epidural haematomas (VEDH) are rare and difficulties are encountered in diagnosis and management. This is a case report of a patient with a vertex epidural haematoma who presented with signs of severe head injury with upper limb decerebrate posture. We discuss the challenges of radiological investigation and neurosurgical management of VEDH.
Wanjala C. "Anthologies in East Africa.". In: The Companion to African Literatures. Oxford: James Currey; 2000.
PROF. ADUDA BERNARD O, M. PROFMWABORAJULIUS, JUSTUS DRSIMIYU. "Anthocyanin Sensitized Nanoporous TiO2 PEC Solar Cells Prepared by Sol Gel Process.". In: Progr Colloid Polym Sci. 125, 34-37. University of Nairobi; 2004. Abstract
The role of pastoralist women in conflict resolution and management (study funded by SIDA though IMPACT)
PROF. ADUDA BERNARD O, M. PROFMWABORAJULIUS, JUSTUS DRSIMIYU. "Anthocyanin Sensitized Nanoporous TiO2 PEC Solar Cells Prepared by Sol Gel Process.". In: Progr Colloid Polym Sci. 125, 34-37. Physica Status Solidi; 2004. Abstract
This study investigated the effectiveness of three physical-chemical methods namely; pH adjustment, precipitation with alum and the use of polyelectrolytes. In the treatment of diary wastewater from Brookeside milk processing plant. It also investigated the drainability of the sludge produced by each of the three methods. Laboratory tests were carried out in three different batches, one for each of the three methods. In the alum method enough alum was added to the wastewater samples to cause precipitation by sweep floc. In the pH adjustment method, the pH of samples were lowered to the iso-electric point of the casein proteins of approximately pH 4.5 leading to their precipitation as a result of solubility changes. The polyelectrolytes method involved the use of two polyelectrolytes, Sudfloc 3820 and Sudfloc 3860 each of which was used to coagulate the dirty wastewater. For each of the three methods, the samples were taken in one-litre beakers and subjected to Jar tests to determine the optimum dosages. After one hour of settling the supernatants were decanted and subjected to standard Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) tests, turbidity and pH measurements. The settled sludge was subjected to drainability studies. Results showed the treatment of dairy wastewater by the three physical-chemical methods to be effective. There were COD removals of between 60% and 90% and turbidity reduction of over 90%. The use of the sudfloc polyelectrolytes was found to be the least demanding in terms of effluent quality control as no pH adjustments of either the wastewater or the effluent was required. The use of polyelectolytes produced the least volumes of sludge and also the better drainability and solids concentration. Sudfloc 3820 was found to achieve better results than Sudfloc 3860 in terms of COD reduction and the drainability of sludge produced although both achieved the same drainability studies. This study showed that each of the three physical-chemical methods can be used effectively to remove the white colour of dairy wastewater as well as the bulk of the proteins and fats, hence, enabling the discharge of the effluents into natural waters to be of good assimilative capacity.
"Simiyu, J. ", "Mwabora, M. J. ", "Aduda, B. O. ". "Anthocyanin Sensitized Nanoporous TiO2 PEC Solar Cells Prepared by Sol Gel Process." Progr. Colloid Polym. Science. 2004;125(1):34-37.
Oglesby L, Ananga A, Obuya J, Ochieng J, Cebert E, Tsolova V. "Anthocyanin accumulation in muscadine berry skins is influenced by the expression of the MYB Transcription factors, MybA1, and MYBCS1." Antioxidants. 2016;5(4):35.
Oglesby L, Ananga A, Obuya J, Ochieng J, Cebert E, Tsolova V. "Anthocyanin accumulation in muscadine berry skins is influenced by the expression of the MYB Transcription factors, MybA1, and MYBCS1." Antioxidants. 2016;5(4):35.
Kahiu Ngugi*, Jerono Cheserek, Muchira C, Dept GC’wa. "Anthesis to Silking Interval Usefulness in Developing Drought Tolerant Maize." Journal of Renewable Agriculture. 2013;1(5):84-88.anthesis_to_silking_interval_usefulness_in_developing_drought_tolerant_maize.pdf
Ngugi K, Jerono Cheserek, Muchira C, Chemining’wa G. "Anthesis to silking interval usefulness in developing drought tolerant." Journal of Renewable Agriculture . 2013;, 1(50):84-90.anthesis_to_silking_interval_usefulness_in_developing_drought.pdf
N MRMAINGIELIUD. "Anthelmintics usage in Kenya and its implications. Bulletin of Animal Health and Production in Africa. 42:71-73.". In: Tidsskrift for Dansk Fareavl (Danish Sheep Breeders Journal) 60: 19-20. Kisipan, M.L.; 1994. Abstract

Isolated mouse interstitial cells were incubated with different concentrations of khat (Catha edulis) extract (0.06 mg/ml, 0.6 mg/ml. 6 mg/ml. 30 mg/ml and 60 mg/ml) and cell viability as well as testosterone concentration measured at 30 min intervals over a 3 h incubation period. High concentrations of khat extract (30 mg/ml and 60 mg/ml) significantly inhibited testosterone production while low concentrations (0.06 mg/ml. 0.6 mg/ml and 6 mg/ml) significantly stimulated (P < 0.05) testosterone production by mouse interstitial cells. Similarly, at concentrations of 30 mg/ml and 60 mg/ml, there was a significant decrease in interstitial cell viability, whereas at 0.06 mg/ml, 0.6 mg/ml and 6 mg/ml there was no significant decrease. There was only a weak correlation (r= 0.39) between testosterone production and viable interstitial cells. We postulate that khat extract at high concentrations may cause reproductive function impairment in the user but at low concentrations. may enhance testosterone production with accompanying effects on reproductive functions in male mice. @2006 Publishedby Elsevier Ireland Ltd. Kel'lVords: In dtro; Khat; Testosterone; Interstitial cells; Mouse

Kinoti, G.K., Maingi N, Coles GC. "Anthelmintics usage in Kenya and its implications." Bulletin of Animal Health and Production in Africa. 1994;42:71-73.1994._anthelmintics_usage_in_kenya_and_its_implications.pdf
N MRMAINGIELIUD. "Anthelmintic resistance in nematode species of goats on some farms in Kenya. Bulletin of Animal Health and Production in Africa 41: 195-201.". In: Tidsskrift for Dansk Fareavl (Danish Sheep Breeders Journal) 60: 19-20. Kisipan, M.L.; 1993. Abstract

Isolated mouse interstitial cells were incubated with different concentrations of khat (Catha edulis) extract (0.06 mg/ml, 0.6 mg/ml. 6 mg/ml. 30 mg/ml and 60 mg/ml) and cell viability as well as testosterone concentration measured at 30 min intervals over a 3 h incubation period. High concentrations of khat extract (30 mg/ml and 60 mg/ml) significantly inhibited testosterone production while low concentrations (0.06 mg/ml. 0.6 mg/ml and 6 mg/ml) significantly stimulated (P < 0.05) testosterone production by mouse interstitial cells. Similarly, at concentrations of 30 mg/ml and 60 mg/ml, there was a significant decrease in interstitial cell viability, whereas at 0.06 mg/ml, 0.6 mg/ml and 6 mg/ml there was no significant decrease. There was only a weak correlation (r= 0.39) between testosterone production and viable interstitial cells. We postulate that khat extract at high concentrations may cause reproductive function impairment in the user but at low concentrations. may enhance testosterone production with accompanying effects on reproductive functions in male mice. @2006 Publishedby Elsevier Ireland Ltd. Kel'lVords: In dtro; Khat; Testosterone; Interstitial cells; Mouse

Maingi, N., Gichanga EJ, Gichohi VM. "Anthelmintic resistance in nematode species of goats on some farms in Kenya." Bulletin of Animal Health and Production in Africa. 1993;41:195-201.1993._anthelmintic_resistance_in_nematode_species_of_goats_on_some_farms_in_kenya.pdf
Maingi N, Bjørn H, Thamsborg SM, Bøgh HO, Nansen P. "Anthelmintic resistance in nematode parasites of sheep in Denmark." Small Ruminant Research. 1997;23:171-181.1997._anthelmintic_resistance_in_nematode_parasites_of_sheep_in_denmark.pdf
Bjørn, H., Maingi N, Thamsborg SM. "Anthelmintic resistance in nematode parasites of sheep and goats in Denmark.". In: 24th Inter Norden Sheep Conference. .Aarhus, Denmark.; 1996.
Thoithi, G.N., Maingi N, Karume D, Gathuma PK, J.W. M, Kibwage IO. "Anthelmintic and other pharmacological activities of the root bark extracts of Albizia anthelmintica Brongn. ." East Cent. Afri. J. Pharm. Sci.. 2002;5(3):60-66.
Thoithi, G.N., Maingi, N., Karume, D., Gathumbi, P.K., Mwangi JW, Kibwage IO. "Anthelmintic and other pharmacological activities of the root bark extracts of Albizia anthelmintica Brongn." The East and Central African Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences. 2003;5:60-66.2003._anthelmintic_and_other_pharmacological_activities_of_the_root_bark_extracts_of_albizia_anthelmintica_brongn.pdf
Thoithi GN, Maingi N, Karume D, Gathumbi PK, Mwangi JW, Kibwage IO. "Anthelmintic and other pharmacological activities of the root bark extracts of Albizia anthelmintica Brongn." East Cent. Afr. J. Pharm. Sc.. 2002;5:60-66.
Karumi EW, Maitai CK, Okalebo FA, Mungai NN, Ndwigah SN, Mutai PC, Mukungu NA. "Anthelmintic and Antimicrobial Activity of Hageniaabyssinica (Bruce) J. F. Gmel (Rosaceae)." East Cent. Afri. J. Pharm. Sci.. 2013;16(4):77-82.

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