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Muthaura CN, Keriko JM, Mutai C, Yenesew A, Heydenreich M, Atilaw Y, Gathirwa JW, Irungu BN, Derese S. "Antiplasmodial, Cytotoxicity and Phytochemical Constituents of Four Maytenus Species Used in Traditional Medicine in Kenya." The Natural Products Journal. 2017;7(2):144-152.
Muthaura CN, Keriko JM, Mutai C, Yenesew A, Heydenreich M, Atilaw Y, Gathirwa JW, Irungu BN, Derese S. "Antiplasmodial, Cytotoxicity and Phytochemical Constituents of Four Maytenus Species Used in Traditional Medicine in Kenya." The Natural Products Journal. 2017;7(2):144-152. AbstractJournal article

Description
Background:
In Kenya, several species of the genus Maytenus are used in traditional medicine to treat many diseases including malaria. In this study, phytochemical constituents and extracts of Maytenus undata, M. putterlickioides, M. senegalensis and M. heterophylla were evaluated to determine compound/s responsible for antimalarial activity.
Objective:
To isolate antiplasmodial compounds from these plant species which could be used marker compounds in the standardization of their extracts as a phytomedicine for malaria.
Methods:
Constituents were isolated through activity-guided fractionation of the MeOH/CHCl3 (1:1) extracts and in vitro inhibition of Plasmodium falciparum. Cytotoxicity was evaluated using Vero cells and the compounds were elucidated on the basis of NMR spectroscopy.
Results:
Fractionation of the extracts resulted in the isolation of ten known compounds. Compound 1 showed …
Total citations
Cited by 1
2018
Scholar articles
Antiplasmodial, Cytotoxicity and Phytochemical Constituents of Four Maytenus Species Used in Traditional Medicine in Kenya
CN Muthaura, JM Keriko, C Mutai, A Yenesew… - The Natural Products Journal, 2017
Cited by 1 Related articles

Njenga D, Irungu B, Mbaria J, Mutai C, Nguta JM. "Antiplasmodial, Cytotoxic and Acute Toxicity Activities of Vernonia lasiopus O. Hoffman." African Journal of Pharmacology and Therapeutics. 2015;4(1):16-20.
SOLOMON DRDERESE. "Antiplasmodial β-hydroxydihydrochalcone from seedpods of Tephrosiaelata." Phytochemistry Letters. 2009;2(3):99-102. AbstractWebsite

Muiva, L.M. Yenesew, A., Solomon Derese, Heydenreich, M., Peter, M.G., Akala, H.M., F. Eyase, Waters, N.C., Mutai, C., Keriko, J.M., Walsh, D. Phytochemistry Letters, 2009, pp. 99-102.

From the seedpods of Tephrosia elata, a new β-hydroxydihydrochalcone named (S)-elatadihydrochalcone was isolated. In addition, the known flavonoids obovatachalcone, obovatin, obovatin methyl ether and deguelin were identified. The structures were determined on the basis of spectroscopic evidence. The crude extract and the flavonoids obtained from the seedpods of this plant showed antiplasmodial activities. The literature NMR data on β-hydroxydihydrochalcones is reviewed and the identity of some of the compounds assigned β-hydroxydihydrochalcone skeleton is questioned.

Yenesew A., Martha Induli, Meron Gebru NAHAIWRBMHSM. "Antiplasmodial Quinones from the Rhizomes of Kniphofia foliosa." Natural Products Comunications . 2013;8:1261-1264. Abstractpaper_64_induli_et_al-npc-2013.pdf

Extracts of the rhizomes of Kniphofia foliosa exhibited antiplasmodial activities against the chloroquine-sensitive (D6) and chloroquine-resistant (W2) strains of Plasmodium falciparum with IC50 values of 3-5 microg/mL. A phenyloxanthrone, named 10-acetonylknipholone cyclooxanthrone (1) and an anthraquinone-anthrone dimer, chryslandicin 10-methyl ether (2), were isolated from the rhizomes, along with known quinones, including the rare phenylanthraquinone dimers, joziknipholones A and B. The structures of these compounds were determined based on spectroscopic data. This is the second report on the occurrence of the dimeric phenylanthraquinones in nature. In an in vitro antiplasmodial assay of the isolated compounds, activity was observed for phenylanthraquinones, anthraquinone-anthrone dimers and dimeric phenylanthraquinones, with joziknipholone A being the most active. The new compound, 10-acetonylknipholone cyclooxanthrone, also showed anti-plasmodial activity. In an in vivo assay, knipholone anthrone displayed marginal antimalarial activity.

SOLOMON DRDERESE. "Antiplasmodial Quinones from Pentas longiflora and Pentas lanceolata." Planta Medica. 2012; 78:31-35. AbstractWebsite

Milkyas Endale, John Patrick Alao, Hoseah M. Akala, Nelson K. Rono, Fredrick L. Eyase, Solomon Derese,
Albert Ndakala, Martin Mbugua, Douglas S.Walsh, Per Sunnerhagen, Mate Erdelyi, Abiy Yenesew

Planta Med 2012; 78: 31–35

The dichloromethane/methanol (1 :1) extracts of the roots of Pentas longiflora and Pentas lanceolata showed low micromolar (IC50 = 0.9–3 μg/mL) in vitro antiplasmodial activity against chloroquineresistant (W2) and chloroquine-sensitive (D6) strains of Plasmodium falciparum. Chromatographic separation of the extract of Pentas longiflora led to the isolation of the pyranonaphthoquinones pentalongin (1) and psychorubrin (2) with IC50 values below 1 μg/mL and the naphthalene derivative mollugin (3), which showed marginal activity. Similar treatment of Pentas lanceolata led to the isolation of eight anthraquinones (4–11, IC50 = 5–31 μg/mL) of which one is new (5,6-dihydroxydamnacanthol, 11), while three – nordamnacanthal (7), lucidin-ω-methyl ether (9), and damnacanthol (10) – are reported here for the first time from the genus Pentas. The compounds were identified by NMR and mass spectroscopic techniques.

Endale M, Alao JP, Akala HM, Rono NK, Eyase FL, Solomon D, Ndakala A, Mbugua M, Walsh DS, Erdelyl M, Yenesew A. "Antiplasmodial Quinones from Pentas longiflora and Pentas lanceolata." Planta Medica . 2012;78(1):31-35.
N. MM. "Antiplasmodial Quinones from Pentas longiflora and Pentas lanceolata." Planta medica. 2012; 78 :31-35. Abstract

The dichloromethane/methanol (1:1) extracts of the roots of Pentas longiflora and Pentas lanceolata showed low micromolar (IC(50) = 0.9-3 µg/mL) IN VITRO antiplasmodial activity against chloroquine-resistant (W2) and chloroquine-sensitive (D6) strains of PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM. Chromatographic separation of the extract of PENTAS LONGIFLORA led to the isolation of the pyranonaphthoquinones pentalongin (1) and psychorubrin (2) with IC(50) values below 1 µg/mL and the naphthalene derivative mollugin (3), which showed marginal activity. Similar treatment of Pentas lanceolata led to the isolation of eight anthraquinones ( 4-11, IC(50) = 5-31 µg/mL) of which one is new (5,6-dihydroxydamnacanthol, 11), while three--nordamnacanthal (7), lucidin-ω-methyl ether (9), and damnacanthol (10)--are reported here for the first time from the genus Pentas. The compounds were identified by NMR and mass spectroscopic techniques.

Yenesew A., Endale, M. AAREDNMWSJPHM. "Antiplasmodial Quinones from Pentas longiflora and Pentas lanceolata." Planta medica . 2012;78:31-35. Abstractpaper_53_endale_et_al_planta_medica_2012-78-31-35.pdf

The dichloromethane/methanol (1 : 1) extracts of the roots of PENTAS LONGIFLORA and PENTAS LANCEOLATA showed low micromolar (IC (50) = 0.9-3 µg/mL) IN VITRO antiplasmodial activity against chloroquine-resistant (W2) and chloroquine-sensitive (D6) strains of PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM. Chromatographic separation of the extract of PENTAS LONGIFLORA led to the isolation of the pyranonaphthoquinones pentalongin ( 1) and psychorubrin ( 2) with IC (50) values below 1 µg/mL and the naphthalene derivative mollugin ( 3), which showed marginal activity. Similar treatment of PENTAS LANCEOLATA led to the isolation of eight anthraquinones ( 4-11, IC (50) = 5-31 µg/mL) of which one is new (5,6-dihydroxydamnacanthol, 11), while three - nordamnacanthal ( 7), lucidin- ω-methyl ether ( 9), and damnacanthol ( 10) - are reported here for the first time from the genus PENTAS. The compounds were identified by NMR and mass spectroscopic techniques.

Mbogua M. "Antiplasmodial Quinones from Pentas longiflora and Pentas lanceolata.". 2011. AbstractFull Text Link

The dichloromethane/methanol (1 : 1) extracts of
the roots of Pentas longiflora and Pentas lanceolata
showed low micromolar (IC50 = 0.9–3 µg/mL) in
vitro antiplasmodial activity against chloroquineresistant
(W2) and chloroquine-sensitive (D6)
strains of Plasmodium falciparum. Chromatographic
separation of the extract of Pentas longiflora
led to the isolation of the pyranonaphthoquinones
pentalongin (1) and psychorubrin (2)
with IC50 values below 1 µg/mL and the naphthalene
derivative mollugin (3), which showed marginal
activity. Similar treatment of Pentas lanceolata
led to the isolation of eight anthraquinones
(4–11, IC50 = 5–31 µg/mL) of which one is new
(5,6-dihydroxydamnacanthol, 11), while three –
nordamnacanthal (7), lucidin-ω-methyl ether (9),
and damnacanthol (10) – are reported here for
the first time from the genus Pentas. The compounds
were identified by NMR and mass spectroscopic
techniques.

Derese S. "Antiplasmodial prenylated flavanonols from Tephrosia subtrifloran ." Natural product research. 2018;32(12):1407-1414. Abstract

The CH2Cl2/MeOH (1:1) extract of the aerial parts of Tephrosia subtriflora afforded a new flavanonol, named subtriflavanonol (1), along with the known flavanone spinoflavanone B, and the known flavanonols MS-II (2) and mundulinol. The structures were elucidated by the use of NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The absolute configuration of the flavanonols was determined based on quantum chemical ECD calculations. In the antiplasmodial assay, compound 2 showed the highest activity against chloroquine-sensitive Plasmodium falciparum reference clones (D6 and 3D7), artemisinin-sensitive isolate (F32-TEM) as well as field isolate (KSM 009) with IC50 values 1.4–4.6 μM without significant cytotoxicity against Vero and HEp2 cell lines (IC50 > 100 μM). The new compound (1) showed weak antiplasmodial activity, IC50 12.5–24.2 μM, but also showed selective anticancer activity against HEp2 cell line …

Derese S. "Antiplasmodial prenylated flavanonols from Tephrosia subtriflora." Natural Product Research. 2017;2017:1-8. AbstractWebsite

The CH2Cl2/MeOH (1:1) extract of the aerial parts of Tephrosia subtriflora afforded a new flavanonol, named subtriflavanonol (1), along with the known flavanone spinoflavanone B, and the known flavanonols MS-II (2) and mundulinol. The structures were elucidated by the use of NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The absolute configuration of the flavanonols was determined based on quantum chemical ECD calculations. In the antiplasmodial assay, compound 2 showed the highest activity against chloroquine-sensitive Plasmodium falciparum reference clones (D6 and 3D7), artemisinin-sensitive isolate (F32-TEM) as well as field isolate (KSM 009) with IC50 values 1.4–4.6 μM without significant cytotoxicity against Vero and HEp2 cell lines (IC50 > 100 μM). The new compound (1) showed weak antiplasmodial activity, IC50 12.5–24.2 μM, but also showed selective anticancer activity against HEp2 cell line (CC50 16.9 μM).

Muiva-Mutisya LM, Atilaw Y, Heydenreich M, Koch A, Akala HM, Cheruiyot AC, Brown ML, Irungu B, Okalebo FA, Derese S, Mutai C, Yenesew A. "Antiplasmodial prenylated flavanonols from Tephrosia subtriflora." Natural product research. 2018;32(12):1407-1414. AbstractJournal article

Abstract
The CH2Cl2/MeOH (1:1) extract of the aerial parts of Tephrosia subtriflora afforded a new flavanonol, named subtriflavanonol (1), along with the known flavanone spinoflavanone B, and the known flavanonols MS-II (2) and mundulinol. The structures were elucidated by the use of NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The absolute configuration of the flavanonols was determined based on quantum chemical ECD calculations. In the antiplasmodial assay, compound 2 showed the highest activity against chloroquine-sensitive Plasmodium falciparum reference clones (D6 and 3D7), artemisinin-sensitive isolate (F32-TEM) as well as field isolate (KSM 009) with IC50 values 1.4–4.6 μM without significant cytotoxicity against Vero and HEp2 cell lines (IC50 > 100 μM). The new compound (1) showed weak antiplasmodial activity, IC50 12.5–24.2 μM, but also showed selective anticancer activity against HEp2 cell line (CC50 16.9 μM).

Keywords: Tephrosia subtriflora, Leguminosae, prenylated flavanonol, subtriflavanonol, antiplasmodial, cytotoxicity

CN M, Keriko JM, Mutai C, A Y, Gathirwa JW, Irungu BN, Nyangacha R, Mungai GM, s. D. "Antiplasmodial potential of traditional phytotherapy of some remedies used in treatment of malaria in Meru-Tharaka Nithi County of Kenya." J Ethnopharmacol.. 2015;175(3):15-23. Abstract

J Ethnopharmacol. 2015 Dec 4;175:315-23. doi: 10.1016/j.jep.2015.09.017. Epub 2015 Sep 25.
Antiplasmodial potential of traditional phytotherapy of some remedies used in treatment of malaria in Meru-Tharaka Nithi County of Kenya.
Muthaura CN1, Keriko JM2, Mutai C3, Yenesew A4, Gathirwa JW5, Irungu BN5, Nyangacha R5, Mungai GM6, Derese S4.
Author information
Abstract
ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE:
Medicinal plants play a major role in many communities across the world, in the treatment and prevention of disease and the promotion of general health. The aim of the study was to escalate documentation from an earlier study of medicinal plants, traditionally used to combat malaria by the Ameru community of Imenti Forest area and Gatunga in Eastern Region of Kenya, and validate their ethnopharmacological claims by evaluating their antiplasmodial efficacies.
MATERIALS AND METHODS:
The study was carried out in Meru County at Imenti Forest Game Reserve and in Tharaka Nithi County at Gatunga. Traditional health practitioners (THP) were interviewed with a standard questionnaire to obtain information on medicinal plants traditionally used for management of malaria. Group interviews were also held among THPs and members of the community. The antiplasmodial activities of the crude extracts against chloroquine sensitive (D6) and resistant (W2) Plasmodium falciparum were determined using the semi-automated micro-dilution technique that measures the ability of the extracts to inhibit the incorporation of (G-3H) hypoxanthine into the malaria parasite.
RESULTS:
Ninety nine (99) species in eighty one (81) genera and forty five (45) families were documented and evaluated for in vitro antiplasmodial activity. Compositae, Fabaceae, Meliceae, Rubiaceae, Rutaceae and Verbenaceae had the highest number of species mentioned in treatment of malaria in Meru/Tharaka Nithi study area. Twenty four (24.2%) species showed antiplasmodial efficacy of IC50≤5µg/ml and were considered to have potential for isolation of antimalarial compounds. Eight plant (8) species with moderate antiplasmodial activity namely; Cordia africana, Commiphora africana, Elaeodendron buchananii, Gomphocarpus semilunatus, Tarena graveolens, Plectranthus igniarius, Acacia senegal and Ziziphus abyssinica were documented from this region for the first time for the treatment of malaria. The antiplasmodial activity of MeOH root bark extract of Maytenus obtusifolia was very promising (IC50<1.9µg/ml) and this is the first report on traditional use of M. obtusifolia for treatment of malaria and antimalarial activity.
CONCLUSIONS:
The results seem to indicate that ethnopharmacological inquiry used in search for new herbal remedies as predictive and could be used as the basis for search of new active principles. Eight plant (8) species are documented from this region for the first time for the treatment of malaria. This is the first report on traditional use of M. obtusifolia for treatment of malaria and evaluation of its antiplasmodial activity.

Muthaura CN, Keriko JM MYGJWIBNNMGMDCAR. "Antiplasmodial potential of traditional antimalarial phytotherapy remedies used by the Kwale community of the Kenyan coast." Journal of ethnopharmacology. 2015;170:148-157. Abstract

Antiplasmodial potential of traditional antimalarial phytotherapy remedies used by the Kwale community of the Kenyan Coast.

Muthaura CN, Keriko JM, Mutai C, Yenesew A, Gathirwa JW, Irungu BN, Nyangacha R, Mungai GM, Derese S
Kenya Medical Research Institute, P.O. Box 54840, 00200 Nairobi, Kenya. Electronic address: cmuthaura@yahoo.com.
Journal of Ethnopharmacology [2015, 170:148-157]

ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: In Kenya, 22 million people are at risk of malaria, 70% of them are in rural areas and most of these people use traditional plant based medicines to treat malaria. The aim of the study was to escalate documentation, from an earlier study of medicinal plants, traditionally used to treat malaria by the Digo community of Kwale County, taking cognizance of their pharmacological information by evaluating their antiplasmodial efficacies.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study was carried out in Kwale County at Shimba Hills Game Reserve and adjoining part of Kinango. Traditional health practitioners (THP) were interviewed with a standard questionnaire to obtain information on medicinal plants traditionally used for management of malaria. Group interviews were also held among THPs and members of the community. The plant samples collected were tested for antiplasmodial activity against chloroquine sensitive (D6) and resistant (W2) Plasmodium falciparum using the ability of extracts, prepared from the plant species, to inhibit the incorporation of [G-3H] hypoxanthine into the malaria parasites.

RESULTS: Fifty seven (57) species in forty eight (48) genera and thirty (30) families were documented and evaluated for in vitro antiplasmodial activity. Apocynaceae, Euphorbiaceae, and Rubiaceae families had each about 12% of the plant species reported as antimalarial remedy and represented the species that are most commonly used. Twelve species (21.1%) showed antiplasmodial efficacy of IC50<5µg/ml and these were Boscia salicifolia, Cissampelos mucronata, Clerodendrum myricoides, Commiphora schimperi, Flueggea virosa, Maytenus undata, Maytenus senegalensis, Maytenus putterlickioides, Vernonia amygdalina, Warburgia stuhlmannii, Zanthoxylum chalybeum and Tabernaemontana pachysiphon.

CONCLUSIONS: These results seem to indicate that ethnopharmacological inquiry used in search for new herbal remedies as predictive and could form the basis of an ethnopharmacopoeia and search for new active principles. This is the first report on traditional use of T. pachysiphon for malaria and its antiplasmodial activity.

Andayi AW, Yenesew A, Derese S, Midiwo JO, Gitu PM, Jondiko OJI, Akala H, Liyala P. "Antiplasmodial Flavonoids from Erythrina sacleuxii.". 2006.Website
Andayi AW, Yenesew A, Derese S, Midiwo JO, Gitu PM, Jondiko OJI, Akala H, Liyala P. "Antiplasmodial Flavonoids from Erythrina sacleuxii.". 2006.Website
Omole RA, Moshi MJ, Heydenreich M, Malebo HM, Gathirwa JW, Oriko RO, Omosa LK, Midiwo JO. "Antiplasmodial Biflavanones from the Stem Bark of Garcinia buchananii Engl." Pharmacognosy Communications. 2019;9(3):96-99.
Omole RA, Moshi MJ, Heydenreich M, Malebo HM, Gathirwa JW, Oriko RO, Omosa LK, Midiwo JO. "Antiplasmodial Biflavanones from the Stem Bark of Garcinia buchananii Engl." Pharmacognosy Communications. 2019;9(3):96-99. AbstractJournal article

Description
Introduction: Plants of the genus Garcinia are traditionally used treat a range of infectious and non-infectious diseases. Garcinia species are reported to have been shown to have a range of biological activities including cytotoxicity antimicrobial, antifungal, antioxidant, antimalarial and HIV-1 protease inhibitory activity among others. Methods: Solvent extraction was done using CH2Cl2: MeOH (1: 1). Isolation was done using column chromatography with silica gel as the stationery phase and ethyl acetate and n-hexane used as mobile phase in increasing polarity. Thin layer chromatography was used to monitor the isolation. Structure elucidation was done using nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectroscopic techniques. Chloroquine resistant (W2) and chloroquine sensitive (D6) P. falciparum strains were used for antiplasmodial assay. Results: Further bioassay guided fractionation of a CH2Cl2: MeOH (1: 1) extract of Garcinia buchananii led to the isolation of two already reported biflavanones, isogarcinol (1) and guttiferone (2) with promising antiplasmodial activity against a chloroquine resistant (W2) Plasmodium falciparum strain with an IC50 of 2.8
±0.90 µg/mL for compound 1 and IC50 of 3.94±0.38 µg/mL for compound 2. Compounds 1 and 2 also exhibited moderate activity against the chloroquine sensitive (D6) Plasmodium falciparum strain with IC50 of 7.03±0.60 and 10.64±4.50 µg/mL, respectively. Conclusion: The results provide proof to support the use of G. buchananii by the indigenous community for antimalarial therapy.
Scholar articles
Antiplasmodial Biflavanones from the Stem Bark of Garcinia buchananii Engl.
RA Omole, MJ Moshi, M Heydenreich, HM Malebo… - Pharmacognosy Communications, 2019
All 4 versions

Yenesew A. "Antiplasmodial b-hydroxydihydrochalcone from seedpods of Tephrosia elata." Phytochemistry Letters . 2009;2:99-102. Abstractpaper_46_muiva_et_al_phytol-2009.pdf

From the seedpods of Tephrosia elata, a new b-hydroxydihydrochalcone named (S)-elatadihydrochalcone
was isolated. In addition, the known flavonoids obovatachalcone, obovatin, obovatin methyl ether
and deguelin were identified. The structures were determined on the basis of spectroscopic evidence.
The crude extract and the flavonoids obtained from the seedpods of this plant showed antiplasmodial
activities. The literature NMR data on b-hydroxydihydrochalcones is reviewed and the identity of some
of the compounds assigned b-hydroxydihydrochalcone skeleton is questioned.

Yenesew A. "The Antiplasmodial and Radical Scavenging Activities of Flavonoids of Erythrina burttii." Acta Tropica . 2012;123:123-127. Abstract

The acetone extract of the root bark of Erythrina burttii showed in vitro antiplasmodial activity against
the chloroquine-sensitive (D6) and chloroquine-resistant (W2) strains of Plasmodium falciparum with
IC50 values of 0.97 ± 0.2 and 1.73 ± 0.5 g/ml respectively. The extract also had radical scavenging activity against 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical with an EC50 value of 12.0 g/ml. The isoflav-3-enes burttinol-A and burttinol-C, and the 2-arylbenzofuran derivative burttinol-D were identified as the most active antiplasmodial (IC50 < 10 M) and free radical scavenging (EC50 ca. 10 M) principles. The acetone extract of E. burttii at 800 mg/kg/day, in a 4-day Plasmodium berghei ANKA suppressive test, showed in vivo antimalarial activity with 52% hemosuppression. In the same in vivo test, marginal activities were also
observed for the extracts of the root and stem bark of Erythrina abyssinica and the root bark of Erythrina
sacleuxii.

Yenesew A, Twinomuhwezi H, Kabaru JM, Akala HM, Kiremire BT, Heydenreich M, Peter. "Antiplasmodial and larvicidal flavonoids from Derris trifoliata.". 2009.Website
Yenesew A, Twinomuhwezi H, Kabaru JM, Akala HM, Kirimire B, Heydenreich M, Peters MG, Eyase FL, Waters NC, Walsh DS. "Antiplasmodial and larvicidal flavonoids from Derris trifoliata." Bull. Chem. Soc. Ethiop. 2009;23(3):001-006.
Yenesew A. "Antiplasmodial and larvicidal activities of flavonoids of Derris trifoliata." Bull. Chem. Soc. Ethiopia . 2009;23:409-414. Abstractpaper_48_yenesew_et_al_bull_chem_soc_ethiop-2009-23-409.pdf

From the dichloromethane-methanol (1:1) extract of the seed pods of Derris trifoliata, a new flavanone derivative (S)-lupinifolin 4´-methyl ether was isolated. In addition, the known flavonoids lupinifolin
and rotenone were identified. The structures were determined on the basis of spectroscopic evidence. Lupinfolin showed moderate in vitro antiplasmodial activity against the D6 (chloroquine-sensitive) and W2 (chloroquineresistant) strains of Plasmodium falciparum. The different parts of this plant showed larvicidal activities against Aedes aegypti and rotenoids were identified as the active principles.

KEY WORDS: Derris trifoliata, Leguminosae, Flavanone, (S)-Lupinifolin 4´-methyl ether, Lupinifolin,
Antiplasmodial, Rotenoid, Larvicide, Aedes aegypti

Irungu BN, Adipo N, Orwa JA, Kimani F, Heydenreich M, Midiwo JO, Björemark PM, Håkansson M, Yenesew A, Erdélyi Máté. "Antiplasmodial and cytotoxic activities of the constituents of Turraea robusta and Turraea nilotica." Journal of Ethnopharmacology. 2015;174:419-425. AbstractJournal Article

Ethnopharmacological relevance
Turraea robusta and Turraea nilotica are African medicinal plants used for the treatment of a wide variety of diseases, including malaria. The genus Turraea is rich in limonoids and other triterpenoids known to possess various biological activities.

T-S. F, M. DRGUANTAIERIC, M. N, et al. "Antiplasmodial and antitumor activity of dihydroartemisinin analogs derived via the aza-Michael addition reaction." Bioorg. Med. Chem. Lett.. 2011;21 :2882-2886. Abstract

A series of dihydroartemisinin derivatives were synthesized via an aza-Michael addition reaction to a dihydroartemisinin-based acrylate and were evaluated for antiplasmodial and antitumor activity. The target compounds showed excellent antiplasmodial activity, with dihydroartemisinin derivatives 5, 7, 9 and 13 exhibiting IC50 values of 610 nM against both D10 and Dd2 strains of Plasmodium falciparum. Derivative 4d was the most active against the HeLa cancer cell line, with an IC50 of 0.37 lM and the highest tumor specificity.

Chepkirui C, Ochieng PJ, Sarkar B, Hussain A, Pal C, Yang LJ, Coghi P, Akala HM, Derese S, Ndakala A, Heydenreich M, Wong VKW, Erdélyi Máté, Yenesew A. "Antiplasmodial and antileishmanial flavonoids from Mundulea sericea." Fitoterapia. 2020;149:104796. AbstractFitoterapia

Abstract
Five known compounds (1–5) were isolated from the extract of Mundulea sericea leaves. Similar investigation of the roots of this plant afforded an additional three known compounds (6–8). The structures were elucidated using NMR spectroscopic and mass spectrometric analyses. The absolute configuration of 1 was established using ECD spectroscopy. In an antiplasmodial activity assay, compound 1 showed good activity with an IC50 of 2.0 μM against chloroquine-resistant W2, and 6.6 μM against the chloroquine-sensitive 3D7 strains of Plasmodium falciparum. Some of the compounds were also tested for antileishmanial activity. Dehydrolupinifolinol (2) and sericetin (5) were active against drug-sensitive Leishmania donovani (MHOM/IN/83/AG83) with IC50 values of 9.0 and 5.0 μM, respectively. In a cytotoxicity assay, lupinifolin (3) showed significant activity on BEAS-2B (IC50 4.9 μM) and HePG2 (IC50 10.8 μM) human cell lines. All the other compounds showed low cytotoxicity (IC50 > 30 μM) against human lung adenocarcinoma cells (A549), human liver cancer cells (HepG2), lung/bronchus cells (epithelial virus transformed) (BEAS-2B) and immortal human hepatocytes (LO2)

Graphical abstract
Unlabelled Image

Chepkirui C, Ochieng PJ, Sarkar B, Hussain A, Pal C, Yang LJ, Coghi P, Akala HM, Derese S, Ndakala A, Heydenreich M, Wong VKW, Erdélyi Máté, Yenesew A. "Antiplasmodial and antileishmanial flavonoids from Mundulea sericea." Fitoterapia. 2020;149:104796. AbstractFitoterapia

Description
A new flavanonol, 3-hydroxyerythrisenegalone (1), and four known compounds (2–5) were isolated from the extract of Mundulea sericea leaves. Investigation of the roots of this plant afforded an additional three known compounds (6–8). The structures were elucidated using NMR spectroscopic and mass spectrometric analyses. The absolute configuration of 1 was established using ECD spectroscopy. In an antiplasmodial activity assay, compound 1 showed good activity with an IC50 of 2.0 μM against chloroquine-resistant W2, and 6.6 μM against the chloroquine-sensitive 3D7 strains of Plasmodium falciparum. Some of the compounds were also tested for antileishmanial activity. Dehydrolupinifolinol (2) and sericetin (5) were active against drug-sensitive Leishmania donovani (MHOM/IN/83/AG83) with IC50 values of 9.0 and 5.0 μM, respectively. In a cytotoxicity assay, erythrisenegalone (3) showed significant …

Chepkirui C, Ochieng PJ, Sarkar B, Hussain A, Pal C, Yang LJ, Coghi P, Akala HM, Derese S, Ndakala A, Heydenreich M, Wong VKW, Erdélyi Máté, Yenesew A. "Antiplasmodial and antileishmanial flavonoids from Mundulea sericea." Fitoterapia. 2021;149:104796. AbstractView Website

Description
Five known compounds (1–5) were isolated from the extract of Mundulea sericea leaves. Similar investigation of the roots of this plant afforded an additional three known compounds (6–8). The structures were elucidated using NMR spectroscopic and mass spectrometric analyses. The absolute configuration of 1 was established using ECD spectroscopy. In an antiplasmodial activity assay, compound 1 showed good activity with an IC50 of 2.0 μM against chloroquine-resistant W2, and 6.6 μM against the chloroquine-sensitive 3D7 strains of Plasmodium falciparum. Some of the compounds were also tested for antileishmanial activity. Dehydrolupinifolinol (2) and sericetin (5) were active against drug-sensitive Leishmania donovani (MHOM/IN/83/AG83) with IC50 values of 9.0 and 5.0 μM, respectively. In a cytotoxicity assay, lupinifolin (3) showed significant activity on BEAS-2B (IC50 4.9 μM) and HePG2 (IC50 10.8 μM …

Derese S. "Antiplasmodial and antileishmanial flavonoids from Mundulea sericea." Fitoterapia . 2021;149:104796.
Njenga D, Irungu B, Mbaria J, Mutai C, Nguta J. "Antiplasmodial activity, cytotoxicity and acute toxicity of Zanthoxylum Chalybeum Engl. World Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences,." World Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences,. 2016;5(11), :208-217.
Mark O. Nanyingi, Lagat BK, Wagate CG, Adanyi FN, Koros KB, Rono BC, Asaava LL. "Antiplasmodial Activity of Some Plants Traditionally used in Treatment of Malaria in Samburu District, Kenya.". In: Proceedings of the 1st National Conference and Exhibition of Research Results and Review of Innovations.Ministry of Science and Technology. K.I.C.C. Nairobi ; 2008.
"Antiplasmodial activity of some plants traditionally used in treatment of malaria in Samburu district of Kenya.". In: Presented in the 1st National conference and Exhibition for Dissemination of Research Results and Review of innovations. Kenyatta International Conference Centre; 2008.
Derese S. "Antiplasmodial activity of compounds from the surface exudates of Senecio roseiflorus." Natural product communications. 2013;8(2):175-6. Abstract

Antiplasmodial activity of compounds from the surface exudates of Senecio roseiflorus.

Leonidah Omosa Kerubo, Jacob Ogweno Midiwo, Solomon Derese, Moses K Langat, Hosea M Akala, Norman C Waters, Martin Peter, Matthias
Natural Products Communications: 2013; 8(2):175-6.

From the surface exudates of Senecio roseiflorus fourteen known methylated flavonoids and one phenol were isolated and characterized. The structures of these compounds were determined on the basis of their spectroscopic analysis. The surface exudate and the flavonoids isolated showed moderate to good antiplasmodial activity with 5,4'-dihydroxy-7-dimethoxyflavanone having the highest activity against chloroquine-sensitive (D6) and resistant (W2) strains of Plasmodium falciparum, with IC50 values of 3.2 +/- 0.8 and 4.4 +/- 0.01 microg/mL respectively.

Kerubo L, Midiwo JO, Derese S, Langat MK, Akala HM, Waters NC, Peter M, Heydenreich M. "Antiplasmodial activity of compounds from the surface exudates of Senecio roseiflorus." Natural Products Communications. 2013;7:1-2.kerubo_et_al_3_npc.pdf
Omosa LK, RW M, O MJ, EK O, R M, B N, R B, Heydenreich M, H A, E K, EK O, RA O, A Y. "Antiplasmodial activities of the stem bark extract and compounds of Zanthoxylum gilletii (De wild) P.G. Waterman." Pharmacognosy Communications. 2017;7(1):41-46.
SOLOMON DRDERESE. "Antiplasmodial activities of flavonoids from Erythrina sacleuxii." Planta Medica. 2006;72(2):187-9. AbstractWebsite

Andrew .W. Andayi, A. Yenesew, Solomon Derese, Jacob O. Midiwo, Peter M. Gitu, Ogoche I. Jondiko, Norman Waters, Pamela Liyala, Hosea Akala, Matthias Heydenreich, Martin G Peter. (2006): Planta medica, 72 (2), pp. 187-189.

The acetone extracts of the root bark and stem bark of Erythrina sacleuxii showed antiplasmodial activities against the chloroquine-sensitive (D6) and chloroquine-resistant (W2) strains of Plasmodium falciparum. Chromatographic separation of the acetone extract of the root bark afforded a new isoflavone, 7-hydroxy-4'-methoxy-3'-prenylisoflavone (trivial name 5-deoxy-3'-prenylbiochanin A) along with known isoflavonoids as the antiplasmodial principles. Flavonoids and isoflavonoids isolated from the stem bark of E. sacleuxii were also tested and showed antiplasmodial activities. The structures were determined on the basis of spectroscopic evidence.

Yenesew A. "Antiplasmodial activities and X-ray crystal structures of rotenoids from the stem bark of Millettia usaramensis subspecies usaramensis." Phytochemistry. 2003;64:773-779. Abstractpaper_34_yenesew_et_al_phyto_2003_64_773.pdf

The dichloromethane extract of the stem bark of Millettia usaramensis subspecies usaramensis showed anti-plasmodial activity against the chloroquine sensitive (D6) and chloroquine resistant (W2) strains of Plasmodium falciparum. Chromatographic separation of the extract led to the identification of a new rotenoid, (6aR,12aS)-2,3-methylenedioxy-9-methoxy-8-(3,3-dimethylallyl)-12ahydroxyrotenoid (trivial name, usararotenoid C) along with known flavonoids (usararotenoid A, 12a-epimillettosin, 6a,12a-dehydromillettone, barbigerone and 40-O-geranylisoliquiritigenin) as the anti-plasmodial principles. The structures were determined by spectroscopic analyses. CD and X-ray analyses established absolute configurations.

Barasa AK;, Gontier CS;, Kitonyi GW;, Mwanda WO;. "Antiphospholipid antibodies in patients with venous thrombosis at Kenyatta National Hospital." African Journal of Rheumatology. 2013;1.
OW M, KA B, GK K, er CS G. "Antiphospholipid antibodies in patients with venous thrombosis at Kenyatta National Hospital." Afr J Rheumatol . 2013;2013(1(2): ):52-56.
Schröder H. "Antipassive and ergativity in Western Nilotic and Surmic." Annual Publications in African Linguistics . 2006;4::91-110.
Schröder H. "Antipassive and ergative origins in Southern and Eastern Nilotic.". In: 10th Nilo-Saharan Colloquium. Paris, France, 22-24 August; 2007.
Machumi F, Yenesew A, Midiwo JO, Heydenreich M, Kleinpeter E, Khan S, Tekwani BL, Walker LA, Muhammad I. "Antiparasitic and anticancer carvotacetone derivatives from Sphaeranthus bullatus.". 2012.Website
Mbatia B, Ogonda LA, Muge EK, Mulaa FJ, others. "Antioxidative and functional properties of Rastrineobola argentea (dagaa) fish protein hydrolysate." Discourse Journal of Agriculture and Food Sciences. 2014;2:180-189. Abstract
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betty M, Awuor OL, Kirwa ME, Jackim MF. "Antioxidative and Functional Properties of Rastrineobol aargentea (Dagaa) Fish Protein Hydrolysate." Discourse Journal of Agriculture and Food Sciences. 2014;2(6):180-189.
Babiaka SB, Nia R, Abuga KO, Mbah JA, Nziko VN, Paper DH, Ntie-Kang F. "Antioxidant potential of flavonoid glycosides from Manniophyton fulvum Müll. (Euphorbiaceae): Identification and molecular modeling." Scientic African. 2020;8(e00423):1-7. Abstract

Chemical investigation of the leaves of Manniophyton fulvum led to the isolation of seven flavonoid glycosides: myricetin-3-O-β-Dd-rhamnoside (1), kaempferol-3-O-β-d-rhamnoside (2), quercetin-3-O-β-d-glucoside (3), quercetin-3-O-β-d-rhamnoside (4), quercetin-3-O-β-d-galactoside (5), rutin (6) and quercetin (7). The structures of the compounds were established by spectroscopic analyses as well as by comparison with published data. Some of the compounds showed strong antioxidant activity which validates the traditional use of the plant. An attempted correlation between the computed HOMO-LUMO energies and the measured antioxidant activities was established. We have also estimated the cardiotoxicity of the compounds by calculating the predicted logarithm of the human Ether-`a-go-go Related Gene (loghERG) using the QikProp program. These purified flavonoids are new potential lead compounds for the development of antioxidant drugs.

Tarkang PA, Atchan APN, Kuiate J-R, Okalebo FA, Guantai AN, Agbor G. "Antioxidant Potential of a Polyherbal Antimalarial as an Indicator of Its Therapeutic Value." Adv. Pharmacol. Sci.. 2013;Article ID 678458.
Vellingiri V;, Kunyanga CN, Biesalski HK. "Antioxidant Potential And Type II Diabetes-related Enzyme Inhibition Of Cassia Obtusifolia L.: Effect Of Indigenous Processing Methods.". 2012. Abstract

The methanolic extract of Cassia obtusifolia L. (Sicklepod) seed, an underutilized food legume from India, was analyzed for antioxidant and health relevant functionality. The total free phenolic content of the raw seeds was 13.33 ± 1.73 g catechin equivalent/100 g extract. The extract exhibited 1,292 mmol Fe[II] per milligram extract of ferric reducing/antioxidant power, 49.92% inhibition of ß-carotene degradation, 65.79% of scavenging activity against DPPH, and 50.78% of superoxide radicals. The in vitro starch digestion bioassay of the extract showed 79.80% of α-amylase and 81.04% of α-glucosidase enzyme inhibition characteristics. Sprouting + oil frying caused an apparent increase on the total free phenolic content with significant improvement on the antioxidant and free radical scavenging capacity of C. obtusifolia seeds, while soaking + cooking as well as open-pan roasting treatments show diminishing effects. Inhibition of α-amylase and α-glucosidase enzyme activity was 23.81% and 42.36%, respectively, following sprouting + oil-frying treatment. These enzyme inhibition values were similar to that of synthetic antidiabetic agent acarbose.

KUNYANGA MSCATHERINENKIROTE. "Antioxidant Potential and type II Diabetes Related Enzyme Inhibition of Cassia obtusifolia L.: Effect of Indigenous Processing Methods.". In: Food Bioprocess Technology. Vadivel, V., Kunyanga C.N., and Biesalski, H.K.; 2011. Abstract
                                    Abstract
KUNYANGA MSCATHERINENKIROTE. "Antioxidant and Type II Diabetes Related Functional Properties of Phytic Acid Extract from Kenyan Indigenous Food Ingredients: Effects of Traditional Processing Methods.". In: Ecology of Food Nutrition.; 2011. Abstract

Emerging scientific evidences reveal that phytic acid has several positive ef fects on human health. The antioxidant and type 2 diabetes related enzyme inhibition pr operties of phytic acid extract prepar ed from raw and traditionally processed local grains and vegetables collected from Kenya were evaluated. Phytic acid content of raw grains and vegetables ranged between 2.81–3.01 and 0.29–3.23 g/100 g DM, respectively. The phytic acid extract from raw s amples revealed 59%–89% of DPPH radical scavenging capacity, 27–3,526 mmol Fe(II)/g e xtract of reducing power, 20%–72% ofα-amylase inhibition activity and 8%–91% of α-glucosidase inhibition activity. Cooking and roasting impr oved the antioxidant and health relevant functionality of phytic acid extracts obtained from Kenyan local vegetables and grains, respectively

KUNYANGA MSCATHERINENKIROTE. "Antioxidant and Antidiabetic properties of condensed tannins in acetonic extract of raw and processed food ingredients from Kenya.". In: Journal of Food Science.; 2011. Abstract
                                    Abstract
KUNYANGA MSCATHERINENKIROTE. "Antioxidant activity of phenolics in indigenous foods.". In: International Conference on .; 2010. Abstract
                                    Abstract
N. KC, K. BH, V. S, V. V, K. IJ, W. OM. "Antioxidant activity of phenolics in indigenous foods.". In: International Conference on “African Nutritional Epidemiology” organized by Centre for Public Health Research, Kenya Medical Research Institute. Nairobi, Kenya; 2010.
Awas E, Omosa LK, Midiwo JO, Ndakala A, Mwaniki J. "Antioxidant Activities of Flavonoid Aglycones from Kenyan Gardenia ternifolia Schum and Thonn." IOSR Journal of Pharmacy and Biological Sciences (IOSR-JPBS). 2016;11(3):136-141. Abstract

Phytochemical investigation of surface exudates of the leaves of Gardenia ternifolia resulted to
characterization of four flavonoids; 3,5,3′-trihydroxy-7,4′-dimethoxyflavone (1), 5,7-trihydroxy-4′-
methoxyflavone (2), 5,7-dihydroxy-3,4′-dimethoxyflavone (3), 5,4′-dihydroxy-7-methoxyflavanone (4) and two
tritepenoids; β-sitosterol (6) and stigmasterol (7). Compound 1 exhibited the highest antioxidant activity with
IC50 = 40.3± 1.55 μΜ. The rest of the flavonoids showed minimal activities with IC50 values of 75.5±1.75,
89±0.22, 94±0.11 μΜ for 2-4, respectively. The antioxidant activities of 1 was substantially lower than the
standard, quercetin (IC50 = 20.1±1.34 M). Methoxylation of quercetin at 7 and 4′-position in 1 substantially
reduced antioxidant potential. Lack of oxygenation at 3′ position, as observed for kaempferol derivatives was
responsible for further reduction in the radical scavenging potential as observed for 2 and 3. Furthermore,
methylation of 3-OH position in kaempferol derivatives further reduced the antioxidant activities as exhibited by
3 with an oxygenation pattern similar to 2 except for the methylation at 3-position. The results of this study are
consistent with previous findings that revealed that flavonols, exhibited better anti-oxidant activities as
compared to 3-methoxyflavones. Acetylation of 3 at the 5 and 7 positions resulting to 3,4′dimethoxy-5,7-
diacetylflavone (5), substantially reduced the activity of this compound. The triterpenoids exhibited were
inactive as expected.
Keywords: Antioxidant activities, Gardenia ternifolia, surface exudates

Erick A, Omosa L, Midiwo J, Ndakala A, Mwaniki J. "Antioxidant Activities of Flavonoid Aglycoes from Kenyan Gardenia ternifolia Schum and Thonn." IOSR Journal of Pharmacy and Biological Sciences. 2016;11(3):136-141.
Kariuki HN;, Kanui TI;, Yenesew A;, Patel NB;, Mbugua PM. "Antinocieptive activity of Toddalia asiatica (L) Lam. in models of central and peripheral pain." Phytopharmacology. 2012;3(1):122-129.
Yenesew A. "Antinocieptive activity of Toddalia asiatica (L) Lam. in models of central and peripheral pain." Phytopharmacology . 2012;3(1):122-129. Abstractpaper_60_kariuki_et_al_phytopharmacology_2012.pdf

Toddalia asiatica within the context of traditional African medicine is a commonly used medicinal plant in East Africa for the management of pain and inflammatory conditions. It is used by the Masai in both Kenya and Tanzania for management of rheumatism among others. The present study was undertaken to investigate the antinociceptive activities of T. asiatica in Swiss albino mice in acetic acid-induced writhing, tail-flick and hot plate pain tests. The extract solvent (vehicle), morphine and aspirin were employed as negative and positive controls respectively. The acetic acid -induced writhing test was used as the screening test and as the root bark extract was found to be more potent than the leaf extract, the former was investigated using the hot plate and the tail flick tests. The root bark extract (200 mg / kg) showed highly significant (p < 0.001) antinociceptive activity in the hot plate and the tail flick tests. The 100mg/kg dose showed significant (p < 0.05) activity in the tail flick test but not significant in the hot plate test. The present study, therefore lends support to the anecdotal evidence for use of T. asiatica in the management of painful conditions.

Yenesew A, KARIUKI HELLENN, Patel NB, Mbugua PM, Kanui TI. "Antinocieptive activity of Toddalia asiatica (L) Lam. in models of central and peripheral pain.". 2012.
Kariuki HN;, Kanui, Titus, et al. "Antinocieptive activity of the root extracts of Rhus natalensis Kraus and Senna singueana." Phytopharmacology. 2012;2(2):312-317.
Yenesew A. "Antinocieptive Activities of the Root Extracts of Rhus natalensis Kraus and Senna singueana." Phytopharmacology . 2012;2:1-6. Abstractpaper_59_karuki_et_al-2012.pdf

Rhus natalensis and Senna singuaenae are traditional African plants commonly used as medicinal plant in East Africa for the management of pain. The plants are used for management of rheumatism among others. This study investigated the antinociceptive activities of R. natalensis and S. singuaenae in Swiss albino mice using the tail-flick and hot plate tests. Extract solvent (vehicle), morphine and aspirin were employed as controls. Root extract of R. natalensis (100 and 200 mg /kg) and 100 mg /kg of S. singuaenae showed no significant antinociceptive activity in the hot plate while the 200mg /kg of S. singuaenae showed significant antinociceptive activity (p<0.05). In the tail flick tests, root extract of R. natalensis (100 and 200 mg / kg) showed highly significant antinociceptive activity (p<0.01) while 200mg / kg of S. singuaenae showed significant antinociceptive activity (p<0.05) compared to the controls. The 100 mg /kg of S. singuaenae showed no significant antinociceptive activity in the tail flick. This study lends support to the anecdotal evidence for use of R. natalensis and S. singuaenae in the management of painful conditions.

Keywords: Rhus natalensis; Senna singuaenae; analgesic; Rhus natalensis; Senna singuaenae; rheumatism

S.N.Wambugu, Mwangi PW, Mwonjoria J, Mathiu PM, Gakuya DW, Kanui TI, Kiama SG. "Antinociceptive properties of selected medicinal plants used in the treatment of chronic joint pains in Eastern Kenya.". In: 9th Faculty of Veterinary Medicine Biennial Scientific conference and Exhibition. PHPT Auditorium,CAVS,University of Nairobi; 2014.
Okalebo FA, Ngaruiya MN, Changwony P, Oluka MO, Karume DW, Maloba KN. "The antinociceptive effects of Hydrazinocurcumin." Afr. J. Pharmacol. Ther.. 2013;2(2):66-69.
Okalebo FA, Ngaruiya MN, Changwony P, Oluka MN, Karume DW, Maloba KN. "The antinociceptive effects of Hydrazinocurcumin." Afr. J. Pharmacol. Ther.. 2013;2(2):66-69.
N. DRKARIUKIHELLEN. "The Antinociceptive Antipyretic Effects of Solanum incanum (Linneaus) in Animal Models Mwonjoria J. K, Kariuki H N, and Waweru FN. International Journal of Phytopharmacology. 2011, 2(1), 22-26.". In: Pan African Medical Journal 12, 28, 10 June 2012. International Journal of Phytopharmacology; 2011. Abstract
The root of Solanum incanum is used by some Kenyan communities as a folklore remedy for fever, wounds, toothache, and stomach ache. However studies have not been done to validate these claims. The aim of this study was to investigate antinociceptive and antipyretic effects of Solanum incanum root extract using animal models. The antinociceptive assays were carried out using tail flick and hot plate tests on CBA mice. The 100 and 200 mg doses of Solanum incanum root extract showed significant antinociceptive activity (p < 0.05) in both hot plate and tail flick tests. In the antipyretic, assay fever was induced in Sprague Dawley rats using lipopolysacharide (LPS). The 50 mg dose of Solanum incanum extract exhibited significant antipyretic effect (p < 0.05) at 180 minutes while the 100 mg dose of S. incanum exhibited significant antipyretic effect (p < 0.05) at 120 and 180 minutes after the lipopolysaccharide pyrogen injection. The results obtained renders support to folklore use of Solanum incanum root extract for pain and fever. Keywords: Solanum incanum, Antinociceptive, Analgesic, Antipyretic, Fever.
Kariuki1 HN, Kanui TI, Yenesew A, Patel N, Mbugua PM. "Antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of Toddalia asiatica (L) Lam. (Rutaceae) root extract in Swiss albino mice." Pan African Medical journal. 2013;14( ):133.
Mwangi PW, Wambugu S, Kariuki DK, Mbugua PM, Kanui TI. "Antinociceptive activities of the ethanolic extracts of ocimum kilimandscharicum baker ex gürke and ocimum kenyense ayob. ex a.j. paton leaves.". 2012. Abstract

Ocimum kilimandscharicum and Ocimum kenyense are two closely related species endemic to Kenya. They find wide application in a diverse array of medicinal applications, including pain relief. The present investigation was carried out to study their antinociceptive activity using the radiant tail-flick test in mice. At 100, 200, 400 and 800 (mg/kg Bwt) dosages, the ethanolic leaf extracts of both O. kilimandscharicum and kenyense exhibited statistically significant antinociceptive activities (p < 0.01), in a dose dependent manner. The experimental results obtained in this study therefore validate the traditional uses of these plant species as analgesics. Further, this study provides a springboard into future phytochemical and pharmacological studies of these plant species.

KARIUKI HELLENNYAMBURA. ANTINOCICEPTIVE ACTIVITIES OF SOME MEDICINAL PLANT EXTRACTS USING ANIMAL MODELS. Titus I. Kanui PD, ed. Nairobi: University of Nairobi; 2013. Abstract

ABSTRACT
Pain represents the symptom for the diagnosis of several diseases conditions and is widely accepted as one of the most important determinants of quality of life. Plants have been claimed to have analgesic effects by several communities in East Africa and a great number of the people use plants for management of painful conditions.

The aim of this study was to establish the antinociceptive activities of nine plants used in traditional medicine as a painkiller using tail flick test.

Of the nine plants tested in the tail flick test, the root extracts of Toddalia asiatica, Senna singueana and Rhus natalensis showed significant antinociceptive effects at dose 200 mg / kg while T. asiatica at 100 mg / kg dose exhibited highly significant effect (p < 0.001) compared to the control animals and this was comparable to the reference drug morphine (5 mg / kg).

In the hot plate test Senna singuaenae at 200 mg / kg dose showed significant (p < 0.05) antinociceptive effect while Toddalia asiatica roots extract showed a highly significant (p < 0.001) compared to the vehicle treated mice. The antinociceptive effect of T. asiatica was comparable to that of morphine (5 mg / kg) and of acetyl salicylic acid (ASA) (100 mg / kg).
In this study the acetic acid induced writhing test was used to screen the roots and leaves of T. asiatica, plant parts that are commonly used in traditional medical practice. The percentage inhibition was higher (56.3%) at 100 mg / kg of the roots compared to (46.21%) the dose of 200 mg /kg of the leaf extract suggesting that the roots is more potent than the leaf extract. The results also indicated that T. asiatica has peripheral pain modulatory effect.
Roots extract of T. asiatica at 200 mg / kg caused significant antinociceptive effects in the early phase of the formalin test while the 100 mg / kg extract caused a highly significant antinociceptive effect in the late phase. This was comparable to that of the reference drugs indomethacin (50 mg / kg) and ASA (100 mg / kg). The formalin test results suggest that T. asiatica roots extract has both peripheral and central sites of action.
The results of the present study indicate that the roots extracts of T. asiatica possess antinociceptive activity in chemical, thermal, and inflammatory models of pain and that the effects of the extract showed dose-dependent antinociceptive effects. The effects were comparable to those of the reference drugs used ASA, morphine and indomethacin.
The observed antinociceptive effects of T. asiatica roots extract are due to the presence of biologically active chemical compounds in the extracts. In order to identify the active compounds, the roots extract of T. asiatica was fractionated by column chromatography roots and the fractions tested for activity. The polar and non-polar fractions both exhibiting similar antinociceptive activities. The antinociceptive effects of the fractions were comparable to the effects of the morphine and ASA in the tail flick test. The hexane/ dichloromethane (1:1) fraction showed very highly significant antinociceptive effects (p < 0.001) with 50 mg / kg and the 100 mg / kg doses compared to the vehicle treated animals. This effect was comparable to that of ASA and morphine which were used as positive controls. The antinonociceptive effects of the polar fractions (dichloromethane / methanol; 1:1) were also highly significant (p < 0.001) with the 50 mg / kg while the 100 mg / kg dose being highly significant (p < 0.01). However, the fractions with moderate polarity (the fraction eluted with dichloromethane) did not show significant effect compared to the vehicle treated animals.
The roots extract of T. asiatica fractions were purified and yielded seven compounds, four alkaloids and three coumarins. The coumarins, labeled as HK 3 (Isopimpinellin) and HK 5 (6-(3-methylbut-2enyloxy)-8-methoxy2h-chromen-2-one), showed no significant antinociceptive activity in the tail flick test while HK 6 (6,7-dimethoxy-5-(3-methyl-2-oxobutyl) HK7 (8-Acetonyldihydrochelerythrine) and HK 18 (6-(2, 3-dihydroxy-3-methylbutyl)-5,7-dimethoxy-2H-chromen-2-one)) had significant antinociceptive effects compared to the vehicle treated animals. The alkaloids HK 15 (8-oxochelerythrine) and HK 13 (dihydrochlerythrine) showed very highly significant antinociceptive effects with HK 13 showing the most potent antinociceptive effects in the tail flick test. The structure elucidation of compounds of Toddalia asiatica was done using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy.
The compound HK 6 is a new compound and it exhibited significant antinociceptive effects when compared to the vehicle treated controls. Compound HK13 (dihydrochlerythrine) was for the first time isolated from T. asiatica and the structure ellucidated. It is also the first time the compound has been assayed for antinociception and exhibited very highly significant effects. No motor, neurological, or other behavioral deficits were observed with the extracts as well as the compounds of T. asiatica.
Data obtained from this study established the analgesic properties of the crude extracts of which the roots of T. asiatica was he most active. From this plant the active compounds have been isolated and identified withdihydrochlerythrine, being the most active compound. More tests to evaluate on the safety and toxicity on dihydrochlerythrine and related compounds need to be conducted in animals before conventional clinical trials can be undertaken.
This study therefore authenticates the use of Toddalia asiatica in the management of pain since it contains compounds which have shown antinociceptive activities.

Key words:
Antinociception, Toddalia asiatica, mice, alkaloid, coumarin, antinococeptive, dihydrochlerythrine

Mwangi PW, Wambugu S, Kanui TI, Mbugua PM, K.Kariuki D. "The antinoceptive activity of butelinic acid isolated from Ocimum masainese root extract.". 2012.
Kama-Kama F, Omosa LK, Nganga J, Maina N, Osanjo G, Yaouba S, Ilias M, Midiwo J, Naessens J. "Antimycoplasmal Activities of Compounds from Solanum aculeastrum and Piliostigma thonningii against Strains from the Mycoplasma mycoides Cluster." Frontiers in Pharmacology. 2017;9:920.
Kama-Kama F, Omosa LK, Nganga J, Maina N, Osanjo G, Yaouba S, Ilias M, Midiwo J, Naessens J. "Antimycoplasmal Activities of Compounds from Solanum aculeastrum and Piliostigma thonningii against Strains from the Mycoplasma mycoides Cluster." Frontiers in pharmacology. 2017;8:920. Abstract

Infections caused by Mycoplasma species belonging to the ‘mycoides cluster’ negatively affect the agricultural sector through losses in livestock productivity. These Mycoplasma strains are resistant to many conventional antibiotics due to the total lack of cell wall. Therefore there is an urgent need to develop new antimicrobial agents from alternative sources such as medicinal plants to curb the resistance threat. Recent studies on extracts from Solanum aculeastrum and Piliostigma thonningii revealed interesting antimycoplasmal activities hence the motivation to investigate the antimycoplasmal activities of constituent compounds. The CH2Cl2/MeOH extracts from the berries of S. aculeastrum yielded a new β-sitosterol derivative (1) along with six known ones including; lupeol (2), two long-chain fatty alcohols namely undecyl alcohol (3) and lauryl alcohol (4); two long-chain fatty acids namely; myristic acid (5) and nervonic acid (6) as well as a glycosidic steroidal alkaloid; (25R)-3β-{O-α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→2)-O-[α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→4)]-β-D-glucopyranosyloxy-22α-N-spirosol-5-ene (7) from the MeOH extracts. A new furan diglycoside, (2,5-D-diglucopyranosyloxy-furan) (8) was also characterized from the CH2Cl2/MeOH extract of stem bark of P. thonningii. The structures of the compounds were determined on the basis of spectroscopic evidence and comparison with literature data. Compounds 1, 3, 4, 7 and 8 isolated in sufficient yields were tested against the growth of two Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides (Mmm), two M.mycoides. capri (Mmc) and one M. capricolum capricolum (Mcc) using broth dilution methods, while the minimum …

Nguta JM, Appiah-Opong R, Nyarko AK, Yeboah-Manu, D., Addo GA, Otchere, I., Kissi-Twum A. "Antimycobacterial and cytotoxic activity of selected medicinal plant extracts." Journal of Ethnopharmacology. 2016;182, :10-15.
Omwenga I, Aboge GO, Mitema ES, Obiero G, Ngaywa C, Ngwili N, Wamwere G, Wainaina M, Bett B. "Antimicrobial Usage and Detection of Multidrug-Resistant , Including Methicillin-Resistant Strains in Raw Milk of Livestock from Northern Kenya." Microb Drug Resist. 2020. Abstract

The association of antimicrobial usage (AMU) with prevalence of antimicrobial-resistant (AMR) , including methicillin-resistant (MRSA) in livestock raw milk consumed by pastoralists in Kenya remains unclear. We investigated the relationship between AMU and emergence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) , including MRSA in raw milk of livestock. AMU data were obtained using sales records from veterinary pharmacies. was isolated from 603 milk samples from various livestock species, including sheep, goat, cow, and camel reared in Isiolo and Marsabit counties in Kenya. Resistant phenotypes and genotypes were determined by disc diffusion and molecular methods, respectively. Correlation between AMU and occurrence of resistance was determined by Pearson's correlation coefficient () method. The consumption of various antimicrobial classes were as follows; 4,168 kg of oxytetracycline, 70 kg of sulfonamides, 49.7 kg of aminoglycosides, 46 kg of beta-lactams, 39.4 kg of macrolides, and 0.52 kg for trimethoprim. The isolates were mainly resistant to tetracycline (79%), ampicillin (58%), and oxacillin (33%), respectively. A few isolates (5-18%) were resistant to clindamycin, cephalexin, erythromycin, kanamycin, and ciprofloxacin. Most of the MDR- isolates were MRSA (94%). The genetic determinants found in the AMR isolates included K/M (96.5%/19%) for tetracycline, (79%) for penicillin, (53%) for aminoglycosides, A (41%) for oxacillin, and A/A (24%/7%) for macrolides. Oxytetracycline usage was correlated to K/M ( = 0.62/1) detection, penicillins to A/ ( = 0.86/0.98), aminoglycoside to ( 0.76/-13), and macrolide usages for detection of A/A ( = 0.94/0.77). AMU appeared to be associated with occurrence of MDR-SA and the M detection. Consumption of raw milk contaminated with MRSA could pose a serious public health risk in pastoral communities in northern Kenya.

P K, G K, W.E M, A.N K, D M, J K, A T. "Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of Mastitis staphylococcus aureus from bovine and caprine in peri-urban Nairobi, Kenya." East African Health Research Journal. 2017;1.
Weinberg GA, Spitzer ED, Murray PR, Ghafoor A, Montgomery J, Tupasi TE, Granoff DM, EM W. "Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of Haemophilus isolates from children in eleven developing nations. BOSTID Haemophilus Susceptibility Study Group." Bull. World Health Organ.. 1990;68(2):179-84. Abstract

The antimicrobial susceptibilities of 426 isolates of Haemophilus species, which were collected as part of a worldwide study of the etiology of acute respiratory disease in children in selected developing countries, were determined. Eleven antibiotics were tested using the recently described Haemophilus Test Medium. There was a low prevalence of antibiotic resistance; 6% of strains were resistant to ampicillin, and 1.6% were resistant to chloramphenicol. Strains resistant to both ampicillin and chloramphenicol were recovered only from Thailand. Susceptibility to penicillin G was also determined; the minimum inhibitory concentrations for penicillin and ampicillin were concordant within one 2-fold dilution in 97% of the isolates. Thus, Haemophilus isolates were as susceptible to penicillin G as they were to ampicillin, and penicillin resistance was infrequent overall. These data provide support for the current protocols for the management of acute respiratory infections in children in developing countries, in which penicillin G is a first-line agent.

O DROGARAWILLIAM. "Antimicrobial susceptibility of non-sorbitol fermenting Escherichia coli isolated from cattle feaces and milk samples.". In: Journal. African Journal of Microbiology Research; Submitted.
O DROGARAWILLIAM. "Antimicrobial susceptibility of non-sorbitol fermenting Escherichia coli isolated from cattle feaces and milk samples.". In: Journal. African Journal of Microbiology Research; Submitted.
O DROGARAWILLIAM. "Antimicrobial susceptibility of non-sorbitol fermenting Escherichia coli isolated from cattle feaces and milk samples.". In: Journal. African Journal of Microbiology Research; Submitted.
ORUNGO DRONONOJOSHUA. "Antimicrobial susceptibility of non-sorbitol fermenting Escherichia coli isolated from cattle feaces and milk samples.". In: African Journal of Microbiology Research. Academic Journals; 2010.
Onono JO, Kangethe EK, Ogara WO. "Antimicrobial susceptibility of non-sorbitol fermenting Escherichia coli isolated from cattle feaces and milk samples.". 2010. Abstract

The objective was to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility of the non-sorbitol fermenting Escherichia coli colonies from cattle feaces and milk samples collected from Dagoretti division in Nairobi. A total of 285 feacal and 260 milk were collected from urban dairy farming households while non-dairy households provided 137 milk samples. The samples were used for culture and isolation of E. coli and the colonies isolated using standard microbiological methods. 23% (66) and 8.8% (23) of feacal and milk samples from urban dairy farming households had non sorbitol fermenting colonies, while 8.8% (12) of non-dairy farming household neighbours had non sorbitol fermenting colonies in milk samples. Antibiotic susceptibility patterns showed that isolates of E. coli were resistant to various antibiotics. There was a high percentage resistance to sulphamethoxazole in feacal samples isolates (14.4%), milk sample isolates (10%) from dairy farming household and milk sample isolates (11.7%) nondairy households. The feacal isolates had a low resistance to ampicilin (1.4%), but the resistance in isolates from milk samples of urban dairy household (6.5%) and non-dairy household’s milk samples (7.3%) were high. The other antibiotics showed varied resistance pattern with feacal isolates having a high percentage resistance to tetracyclines (6.7%) while most bacterial isolates were susceptible to gentamicin. Multiple antibiotic resistances was observed in feacal sample isolates (6.7%), dairy farming household milk isolates (4.2%) and non- dairy farming household milk isolates (7.3%). Non-sorbitol fermenting E. coli colonies from cattle feaces and milk samples were resistant to most of the antibiotics tested and the higher percentage resistance to sulphamethoxazole, ampicilin and tetracyclines requires further investigation to isolate, identify and compare the genes responsible for development of resistance.

Claeys G, Taelman H, Gichangi P, Tyndall M, Ombete J, Verschraegen G, Temmeperman M. "Antimicrobial susceptibility of Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolates from men with urethritis in Kenya." Sex Transm Infect. 1998;74(4):294-5.
Gichuki H.K., Nyamu DG, Amugune BK, T M. "Antimicrobial susceptibility of bacteria that infect diabetic foot ulcers at Kenyatta National Hospital, Kenya." Afr. J. Pharmacol. Ther.. 2018;7(2):34-40.
BAARO DRGATHURAPETER. "Antimicrobial susceptibility and plasmids isolated from Escherichia coli isolated from rats. E.A.M.J. 78: 518-522.". In: journal. International Journal of BiochemiPhysics; 2001. Abstract
The microbiological quality of ground water (boreholes) and domestic tanks in five locations of Kikuyu Division, Kiambu District, was determined. Two boreholes and twelve domestic tanks were sampled from each location. Seven (70%) out of 10 boreholes were contaminated with faecal coliforms. Total bacterial counts ranged from 1 to 6280 per ml of water while the coliform counts ranged from 0 to 161. Out of 70 water samples screened for faecal coliforms, 63 (90%) were positive. Faecal Streptococci were isolated in 71% of the samples.
BAARO DRGATHURAPETER. "Antimicrobial susceptibility ahd plasmids isolated from E. coli in rats. East African Medical Journal 78: 518 - 522.". In: journal. International Journal of BiochemiPhysics; 2001. Abstract
The microbiological quality of ground water (boreholes) and domestic tanks in five locations of Kikuyu Division, Kiambu District, was determined. Two boreholes and twelve domestic tanks were sampled from each location. Seven (70%) out of 10 boreholes were contaminated with faecal coliforms. Total bacterial counts ranged from 1 to 6280 per ml of water while the coliform counts ranged from 0 to 161. Out of 70 water samples screened for faecal coliforms, 63 (90%) were positive. Faecal Streptococci were isolated in 71% of the samples.
T.M.Munyao. ANTIMICROBIAL SENSITIVITY IN CHOLERA IN KENYA.. NAIROBI: NAIROBI; 1986.
Munyao TM. Antimicrobial sensitivity in cholera in Kenya.; 1986. Abstract

Investigations were carried out with a view to
establishing vibrio cholerae susceptibility to
various antimicrobial agents. Tetracycline,
chlorampenicol, co-trimoxazole, Erythromycin,
Ampicillin, Minocycline, Amoxycillin and Nalidixic
acid were included.
Vibrio cholerae strains tested from 178 isolates were
found to be completely resistant to Co-trimoxazole
and amoxycillin. Complete resistance was encountered
to Tetracycline, in Kirinyaga district (N=124) and
highly resistant in Nyanza Province 67%(N=33).
Variable high resistance was also encountered to
Erythromycin 65.2% (N=178) and ampicillin 99.3%(N=l78)

The V. cholerae strains were 100% sensitive to
Minocycline and Nalidixlc acid, and 84.3% sensitive to
chloramphenicol.
The multiple drug resistance encountered is
usually confered by plasmids.

Ngaywa C, O.Aboge G, Obiero G, Omwenga I, Ngwili N, Wamwere G, Wainaina M, Bett B. "Antimicrobial resistant Escherichia coli isolates detected in raw milk of livestock in pastoral areas of northern Kenya." Food Control. 2019;102:173-178.
Juma M, Sankaradoss A, Ndomb R, Mwaura P, Damodar T, Nazir J, Pandit A, Khurana R, Masika M, Chirchir R, Gachie J, Krishna S, Sowdhamin R, Anzala O, Iyer MS. "Antimicrobial resistance profiling and phylogenetic analysis of Neisseria gonorrhoeae clinical isolates from Kenya in resource limited setting." Frontiers in Microbiology. 2021. AbstractWebsite

Background: Africa has one of the highest incidences of gonorrhea. Neisseria gonorrhoeae is gaining resistance to most of the available antibiotics, compromising treatment across the world. Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) is an efficient way of predicting AMR determinants and their spread in the population. Recent advances in next-generation sequencing technologies like Oxford Nanopore Technology (ONT) have helped in the generation of longer reads of DNA in a shorter duration with lower cost. Increasing accuracy of base-calling algorithms, high throughput, error-correction strategies, and ease of using the mobile sequencer MinION in remote areas lead to its adoption for routine microbial genome sequencing. To investigate whether MinION-only sequencing is sufficient for WGS and downstream analysis in resource-limited settings, we sequenced the genomes of 14 suspected N. gonorrhoeae isolates from Nairobi, Kenya.

Methods: Using WGS, the isolates were confirmed to be cases of N. gonorrhoeae (n = 9), and there were three co-occurrences of N. gonorrhoeae with Moraxella osloensis and N. meningitidis (n = 2). N. meningitidis has been implicated in sexually transmitted infections in recent years. The near-complete N. gonorrhoeae genomes (n = 10) were analyzed further for mutations/factors causing AMR using an in-house database of mutations curated from the literature.

Results: We observe that ciprofloxacin resistance is associated with multiple mutations in both gyrA and parC. Mutations conferring tetracycline (rpsJ) and sulfonamide (folP) resistance and plasmids encoding beta-lactamase were seen in all the strains, and tet(M)-containing plasmids were identified in nine strains. Phylogenetic analysis clustered the 10 isolates into clades containing previously sequenced genomes from Kenya and countries across the world. Based on homology modeling of AMR targets, we see that the mutations in GyrA and ParC disrupt the hydrogen bonding with quinolone drugs and mutations in FolP may affect interaction with the antibiotic.

Conclusion: Here, we demonstrate the utility of mobile DNA sequencing technology in producing a consensus genome for sequence typing and detection of genetic determinants of AMR. The workflow followed in the study, including AMR mutation dataset creation and the genome identification, assembly, and analysis, can be used for any clinical isolate. Further studies are required to determine the utility of real-time sequencing in outbreak investigations, diagnosis, and management of infections, especially in resource-limited settings.

Mutua J, Gitao C, Bebora L, Mutua F. "Antimicrobial Resistance Profiles of Bacteria Isolated from the Nasal Cavity of Camels in Samburu, Nakuru, and Isiolo Counties of Kenya." Hindawi Journal of Veterinary Medicine. 2017;(doi.org/10.1155/2017/1216283):1-6.mutua_antmicrobial_resistance.pdf
Mbindyo CM, Gitao CG, Plummer PJ, Kulohoma BW, Mulei CM, Bett R. "Antimicrobial Resistance Profiles and Genes of Staphylococci Isolated from Mastitic Cow’s Milk in Kenya." Antibiotics. 2021;10(772):https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics10070772.antibiotics-10-00772_1.pdf
Mbindyo CM, Gitao GC, Plummer PJ, Kulohoma BW, Mulei CM, Bett R. "Antimicrobial Resistance Profiles and Genes of Staphylococci Isolated from Mastitic Cow’s Milk in Kenya." Antibiotics. 2021;10. AbstractWebsite

Increasing numbers of potentially zoonotic multidrug-resistant (MDR) staphylococci strains, associated with mastitis in dairy cows, are being reported globally and threaten disease management in both animal and human health. However, the prevalence and antimicrobial resistance profiles of these strains, including methicillin-resistant staphylococci (MRS), in Kenya is not well known. This study investigated the drug resistance profiles and genes carried by 183 staphylococci isolates from 142 dairy cows representing 93 farms recovered from mastitis milk of dairy cows in two selected counties in Kenya. Staphylococci isolates were characterized by phenotypic characteristics, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification, partial sequencing and susceptibility testing for 10 antimicrobial drugs. Detection of seven resistance genes to the various antimicrobial drugs was conducted using PCR. Overall, phenotypic resistance among the staphylococci ranged between 66.1% for ampicillin and 3.5% for fluoroquinolones. Twenty-five percent (25%) of S. aureus and 10.8% of the coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) isolates, were methicillin-resistant staphylococci phenotypically (defined as resistance to cefoxitin disk diffusion). The most common genes found in S. aureus and CoNS were blaZ and strB at 44.3% and 26%, and 78% and 50%, respectively. MDR was observed in 29.67% and 16.3% of S. aureus and CoNS, respectively. These findings pose a threat to bovine mastitis treatment and management as well as human health.

NYARONGI PROFOMBUIJ. "Antimicrobial resistance patterns and plasmid profiles of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from milk and meat.". In: journal. University of Nairobi Press; 2000. Abstract
Objectives: To determine the frequency of resistance of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) to various antimicrobial agents, and the relationship between antimicrobial resistance of the isolates and carriage of plasmids. Design: A random sampling of milk and meat samples was carried out. Setting: Milk was collected from various dairy cooperative societies in Nairobi and Kiambu Districts. Minced meat samples were purchased from various outlets in the city of Nairobi. Subjects: Ninety six S. aureus isolates from milk (seventy five isolates) and minced meat (twenty one isolates) samples. Main outcome measures: Plasmid profiles and antimicrobial susceptibility tests to lincomysin, pencillin, erthromycin, methicillin, minocycline, cotrimoxazole and  chloramphenicol, cotrimoxazole and chloamphenicol. Results: Seventy one percent of the isolates carried between one and six plasmids of molecular sizes ranging from 0.1 to 14.5 kilobases. High frequency of resistance was observed with lincomycin (67.7%), penicillin (66.7%) and cotrimoxazole (51%). A high percentage (76%) of isolates were susceptible to minocycline followed by erythromycin (57.3%). Most (80.2%) of the isolates were multiply resistant to between two and six antibiotics. Conclusions: Most S. aureus isolates were multiply resistant to various antimicrobial agents, but there was no apparent relationship between carriage of plasmids and antimicrobial resistance. Milk and meat may contain resistant S. aureus posing a potential risk to consumers.
M DRSENERWADANIEL. "ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE OF ENTEROPATHOGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI STRAINS FROM A NOSOCOMIAL OUTBREAK IN KENYA.". In: East African Journal of Ophthalmology. Nyenze E, Ilako D, Kimani K; 1989. Abstract
isolated from preterm neonates during the outbreak of gastroenteritis in hospital in Nairobi, Kenya, were resistance to trimethoprin-sulfathoxaxole, Chloramphenicol, oxytetracycline and ampicilin, but only a few strains were resistant to cefazolin, cefamandole, cefataximine, amikacin and nalidixic acid. Fourteen different antimicrobial resistance patterns were observed in the 229 strains of E.coli analyzed. Eighty-two percent of the EPEC strains belonged to two resistance patterns. There was no consistent relationship between palsmid profile group and antimicrobial resistance pattern, although one resistance pattern was more frequently observed in EAF-positive strins belonging to the dominant plasmid profile group. Nine percent of the EPEC strins were resistant to gentamicin compared to 37% in the non-EPEC group. No correlation was observed between administration of gentamicin and percentage of resistant strains isolated. None of the nine neonates receiving gentamicin died during the outbreak. Gentamicin resistance was observed in E.coli strains from six out of these nine neonates. Five out of fourteen neonates who received other antimicrobials, or no antibiotic at all, died. Key words: Enteropathogenic Escherichia Coli; antimicrobial resistance;
Senerwa D, Mutanda LN, Gathuma JM;, Olsvik O. "Antimicrobial resistance of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli strains from a nosocomial outbreak in Kenya.". 1991. Abstract

The majority of the 78 enteropathogenic (EPEC) and the 151 non-EPEC Escherichia coli strains isolated from preterm neonates during an outbreak of gastroenteritis in a hospital in Nairobi, Kenya, were resistant to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxaxole, chloramphenicol, oxytetracycline and ampicillin, but only a few strains were resistant to cefazolin, cefamandole, cefotaxime, amikacin and nalidixic acid. Fourteen different antimicrobial resistance patterns were observed in the 229 strains of E. coli analysed. Eighty-two percent of the EPEC strains belonged to two resistance patterns compared with 79% of non-EPEC strains which exhibited three resistance patterns. There was no consistent relationship between plasmid profile group and antimicrobial resistance pattern, although one resistance pattern was more frequently observed in EAF-positive strains belonging to the dominant plasmid profile group. Nine percent of the EPEC strains were resistant to gentamicin compared to 37% in the non-EPEC group. No correlation was observed between administration of gentamicin and percentage of resistant strains isolated. None of the nine neonates receiving gentamicin died during the outbreak. Gentamicin resistance was observed in E. coli strains from six out of these nine neonates. Five out of fourteen neonates who received other antimicrobials, or no antibiotic treatment at all, died.

BAARO DRGATHURAPETER. "Antimicrobial resistance of bacterial organisms isolated from rats. E.A.M.J. 78: 646-649.". In: journal. International Journal of BiochemiPhysics; 2001. Abstract
The microbiological quality of ground water (boreholes) and domestic tanks in five locations of Kikuyu Division, Kiambu District, was determined. Two boreholes and twelve domestic tanks were sampled from each location. Seven (70%) out of 10 boreholes were contaminated with faecal coliforms. Total bacterial counts ranged from 1 to 6280 per ml of water while the coliform counts ranged from 0 to 161. Out of 70 water samples screened for faecal coliforms, 63 (90%) were positive. Faecal Streptococci were isolated in 71% of the samples.
BAARO DRGATHURAPETER. "Antimicrobial resistance of bacterial organisms isolated form rats. East African Medical Journal 78: 646 - 649.". In: journal. International Journal of BiochemiPhysics; 2001. Abstract
The microbiological quality of ground water (boreholes) and domestic tanks in five locations of Kikuyu Division, Kiambu District, was determined. Two boreholes and twelve domestic tanks were sampled from each location. Seven (70%) out of 10 boreholes were contaminated with faecal coliforms. Total bacterial counts ranged from 1 to 6280 per ml of water while the coliform counts ranged from 0 to 161. Out of 70 water samples screened for faecal coliforms, 63 (90%) were positive. Faecal Streptococci were isolated in 71% of the samples.
Kikuvi GM, Ole-Mapenay, I. M; Mitema ES, Ombui JN. "Antimicrobial resistance in Escherichia coli isolates from faeces and carcass samples of slaughtered cattle, swine and chickens in Kenya.". 2013. Abstract

Two hundred and thirty five Escherichia coli isolates from cattle, pigs and chickens were investigated for their resistance to seven antimicrobials by the disc diffusion method. Minimum inhibitory concentrations were determined for 154 isolates showing resistance to at least one of the antimicrobials tested. Resistance was found in 65.5% and multi-resistance (resistance to = 2 antibiotics) in 37.9% of the isolates. Resistance was highest in the isolates from chickens (74.0%), followed by pigs (64.8%) and cattle (61.3%). The most common resistance was to ampicillin, streptomycin, tetracycline, sulphamethoxazole/trimethoprim, and kanamycin (42.5-11.9%). Resistance to kanamycin, sulphamethoxazole/trimethoprim, and tetracycline was significantly lower in cattle (2.5-7.5%) than in the other species (12.0-40.0%) (p < 0.01). Resistance to streptomycin and ampicillin were significantly higher in cattle and pigs respectively (p < 0.01). Similar resistance rates were observed among the faecal (29.9%) and carcass swab (33.1%) isolates. Forty resistance patterns were recorded of which only 5 (12.5%) were common among the isolates studied. This study shows that multi-drug resistant E. coli isolates are prevalent in cattle, pigs and chickens in Kenya and that a considerable proportion of E. coli isolates from fresh cattle and pig carcasses is resistant to a variety of antimicrobial agents. Differences in the rates and patterns of resistance were noted, perhaps reflecting differences in antibiotic use regimens among these species. It is recommended that the use of antimicrobials in food animals should follow prudent use guidelines to minimize the selection of resistant bacteria and that slaughter hygiene should be improved to minimize the risk of transfer of antimicrobial resistant bacteria to humans.

Fehr J, Hatz C, Soka I, Kibatala P, Urassa H, Battegay M, Jeffrey Z, Smith T, Mshinda H, Frei R, others. "Antimicrobial prophylaxis to prevent surgical site infections in a rural sub-{Saharan} hospital." Clinical microbiology and infection. 2006;12:1224-1227. AbstractWebsite
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Gichangi PB, Ndinya-Achola JO, Ombete J, Nagelkerke NJ, Temmerman M. "Antimicrobial prophylaxis in pregnancy: a randomized, placebo-controlled trial with cefetamet-pivoxil in pregnant women with a poor obstetric history." Am. J. Obstet. Gynecol.. 1997;177(3):680-4. Abstract

This study was undertaken to measure the impact of a single oral dose of cefetamet-pivoxil on pregnancy outcome in a population with substantial rates of low birth weight and high prevalence rates of maternal infections.

Opanga S, Mwang’ombe NJ, Okalebo F, Kuria KKAM. "Antimicrobial Prophylaxis for Neurosurgical Patients in low income countries: a systematic review. .". In: Infectious Disease Symposium. Nairobi; 2015.
Maima AO, Ndwigah SN, Thoithi GN, Kamau FN, Kibwage IO. "Antimicrobial Properties of Some Medicinal Plants of the Luo Community of Kenya." Afr. J. Pharmacol. Ther. . 2014;3(4):112-115.
Waithaka PN, Mwaura FB, Wagacha JM, Gathuru EM, Githaiga BM. "Antimicrobial Properties of Actinomycetes Isolated from Menengai Crater in Kenya." CellBio. 2017;06(2):13.
SOLOMON DRDERESE. "Antimicrobial flavonoids from the stem bark of Erythrina burttii." Fitoterapia. 2005;76(5):469-72. AbstractWebsite

Antimicrobial flavonoids from the stem bark of Erythrina burttii.

Yenesew A, Derese S, Midiwo JO, Bii CC, Heydenreich M, Peter MG.

Abstract

The chloroform extract of the stem bark of Erythrina burttii showed antifungal and antibacterial activities using the disk diffusion method. Flavonoids were identified as the active principles. Activities were observed against fungi and Gram(+) bacteria, but the Gram(-) bacteria Escherichia coli was resistant.

Yenesew A. "Antimicrobial flavonoids from the stem bark of Erythrina burttii." Fitotherapia . 2005;76:469-472. Abstractpaper_38_yenesew_et_al_fito_2005_76_469.pdf

The chloroform extract of the stem bark of Erythrina burttii showed antifungal and antibacterial activities using the disk diffusion method. Flavonoids were identified as the active principles. Activities were observed against fungi and Gram(+) bacteria, but the Gram() bacteria Escherichia coli was resistant.

ABIY PROFYENESEW, O PROFMIDIWOJACOB. "Antimicrobial flavonoids from the stem bark of Erythrina burttii.". In: Fitotherapia, 469-472.; 2005. Abstract
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Omosa LK, Amugune BK, Ndunda B, Milugo TK, Heydenreich M, Yenesew A, Midiwo JO. "Antimicrobial flavonoids and diterpenoids from Dodonaea angustifolia." South African Journal of Botany 91 . 2014;91:58-62.
Omosa LK, Amugune B, Ndunda B, Milugo TK, Heydenreich M, Yenesew A, Midiwo JO. "Antimicrobial flavonoids and diterpenoids from Dodonaea angustifolia." South African Journal of Botany. 2014;91:58-62.omosa_eet_al._sajb.pdf
Yenesew A, L. K., Omosa, Beatrice, Amugune, Ndunda B, Milugo TKTK, Heydenreich M, Midiwo JO. "Antimicrobial flavonoids and diterpenoids from Dodonaea angustifolia." South African Journal of Botany. . 2014;91, :58-62. Abstractpaper_67_omosa_et_al_south_africa_jou..2014.pdf

The surface exudates of the leaves of Dodonaea angustifolia from Ngong forest population (6 km from Nairobi city center, Kenya) demonstrated antimicrobial activity against Gram-negative (Escherichia coli), Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus pumilus) bacteria and the fungus Sacchromyces cerevisiae. Chromatographic separation of the exudates yielded eight methylated flavonoids; 5-hydroxy-3, 4′,7-trimethoxyflavone (1), 3,5-dihydroxy-4′,7-dimethoxyflavone (2), santin (3), kumatakenin (4), rhamnocitrin (5), isokaempferide (6), 3,4′,5,7, tetrahydroxy-6-methoxyflavone (7), pinocembrin (8); two clerodanes, dodonic acid (9) and 2β-hydroxyhardwickiic acid (10) and one labdane; (ent-3β,8α)-15,16-epoxy-13(16),14-labdadiene-3,8-diol (11) diterpenoids. The flavonoid aglycones; 6, 7 and the clerodane diterpenoids; 9 and 10 and labdane diterpenoid, 11 were isolated for the first time from this plant species. The structures of the isolated compounds were identified using ultraviolet (UV), mass spectroscopy (MS), one dimension (1D) and two dimension (2D) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and by comparison of the spectral data with literature. The quercetin derivative, 3,4′,5-trihydroxy-3′,7-dimethoxyflavone (12) showed broad spectrum antibacterial activities against E. coli and B. pumilus with minimum inhibition concentration (MIC) values less than 31.25 μg/well and against S. aureus with MIC below 62.5 μg/well. This compound showed poor antifungal activity against S. cerevisiae (MIC < 500 μg/well). Good antifungal activities were observed for 5,4′-dihydroxy-7-methoxyflavanone (13) and hautriwaic acid lactone (14) against S. cerevisiae with MIC values less than 7.8 μg/well. The most active antifungal compound was 5,7-dihydro-3,4′,6-trimethoxyflavone (3, santin) with an MIC value less than 3.9 μg/well against S. cerevisiae. The rest of the compounds exhibited weak to moderate activities. For comprehensive structure activity relationship studies (SAR), hautriwaic acid lactone (14), hautriwaic acid (15), penduletin (16) isolated from the surface exudates of D. angustifolia from Voi (200 km from Mombasa city center, Kenya) and 12 and 13 from Senecio roseiflorus isolated earlier were included in the bioassays.

Omosa LK, Amugune B, Ndunda B, Milugo TK, Heydenreich M, Yenesew A, Midiwo JO. "Antimicrobial flavonoids and diterpenoids from Dodonaea angustifolia." South African Journal of Botany. 2014. Abstract

The surface exudates of the leaves of Dodonaea angustifolia from Ngong forest population (6 km from Nairobi city center, Kenya) demonstrated antimicrobial activity against Gram-negative (Escherichia coli), Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus pumilus) bacteria and the fungus Sacchromyces cerevisiae. Chromatographic separation of the exudates yielded eight methylated flavonoids; 5-hydroxy-3, 4′,7-trimethoxyflavone (1), 3,5-dihydroxy-4′,7-dimethoxyflavone (2), santin (3), kumatakenin (4), rhamnocitrin (5), isokaempferide (6), 3,4′,5,7, tetrahydroxy-6-methoxyflavone (7), pinocembrin (8); two clerodanes, dodonic acid (9) and 2β-hydroxyhardwickiic acid (10) and one labdane; (ent-3β,8α)-15,16-epoxy-13(16),14-labdadiene-3,8-diol (11) diterpenoids. The flavonoid aglycones; 6, 7 and the clerodane diterpenoids; 9 and 10 and labdane diterpenoid, 11 were isolated for the first time from this plant species. The structures of the isolated compounds were identified using ultraviolet (UV), mass spectroscopy (MS), one dimension (1D) and two dimension (2D) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and by comparison of the spectral data with literature. The quercetin derivative, 3,4′,5-trihydroxy-3′,7-dimethoxyflavone (12) showed broad spectrum antibacterial activities against E. coli and B. pumilus with minimum inhibition concentration (MIC) values less than 31.25 μg/well and against S. aureus with MIC below 62.5 μg/well. This compound showed poor antifungal activity against S. cerevisiae (MIC < 500 μg/well). Good antifungal activities were observed for 5,4′-dihydroxy-7-methoxyflavanone (13) and hautriwaic acid lactone (14) against S. cerevisiae with MIC values less than 7.8 μg/well. The most active antifungal compound was 5,7-dihydro-3,4′,6-trimethoxyflavone (3, santin) with an MIC value less than 3.9 μg/well against S. cerevisiae. The rest of the compounds exhibited weak to moderate activities. For comprehensive structure activity relationship studies (SAR), hautriwaic acid lactone (14), hautriwaic acid (15), penduletin (16) isolated from the surface exudates of D. angustifolia from Voi (200 km from Mombasa city center, Kenya) and 12 and 13 from Senecio roseiflorus isolated earlier were included in the bioassays.

Omosa LK, Amugune B, Ndunda B, Milugo TK, Heydenreich M, Yenesew A, Midiwo JO. "Antimicrobial flavonoids and diterpenoids from Dodonaea angustifolia." South African Journal of Botany. 2014. Abstract

The surface exudates of the leaves of Dodonaea angustifolia from Ngong forest population (6 km from Nairobi city center, Kenya) demonstrated antimicrobial activity against Gram-negative (Escherichia coli), Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus pumilus) bacteria and the fungus Sacchromyces cerevisiae. Chromatographic separation of the exudates yielded eight methylated flavonoids; 5-hydroxy-3, 4′,7-trimethoxyflavone (1), 3,5-dihydroxy-4′,7-dimethoxyflavone (2), santin (3), kumatakenin (4), rhamnocitrin (5), isokaempferide (6), 3,4′,5,7, tetrahydroxy-6-methoxyflavone (7), pinocembrin (8); two clerodanes, dodonic acid (9) and 2β-hydroxyhardwickiic acid (10) and one labdane; (ent-3β,8α)-15,16-epoxy-13(16),14-labdadiene-3,8-diol (11) diterpenoids. The flavonoid aglycones; 6, 7 and the clerodane diterpenoids; 9 and 10 and labdane diterpenoid, 11 were isolated for the first time from this plant species. The structures of the isolated compounds were identified using ultraviolet (UV), mass spectroscopy (MS), one dimension (1D) and two dimension (2D) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and by comparison of the spectral data with literature. The quercetin derivative, 3,4′,5-trihydroxy-3′,7-dimethoxyflavone (12) showed broad spectrum antibacterial activities against E. coli and B. pumilus with minimum inhibition concentration (MIC) values less than 31.25 μg/well and against S. aureus with MIC below 62.5 μg/well. This compound showed poor antifungal activity against S. cerevisiae (MIC < 500 μg/well). Good antifungal activities were observed for 5,4′-dihydroxy-7-methoxyflavanone (13) and hautriwaic acid lactone (14) against S. cerevisiae with MIC values less than 7.8 μg/well. The most active antifungal compound was 5,7-dihydro-3,4′,6-trimethoxyflavone (3, santin) with an MIC value less than 3.9 μg/well against S. cerevisiae. The rest of the compounds exhibited weak to moderate activities. For comprehensive structure activity relationship studies (SAR), hautriwaic acid lactone (14), hautriwaic acid (15), penduletin (16) isolated from the surface exudates of D. angustifolia from Voi (200 km from Mombasa city center, Kenya) and 12 and 13 from Senecio roseiflorus isolated earlier were included in the bioassays.

Maina SW, Dimba E OJOMJWKSTK. "Antimicrobial Efficacy ofAzadirachta indica (Neem)Twigs Aqueous and Ethanol Extracts on Tooth Root Canals Biofilms. ." Inter. J. Pharmco. Phytochem.. 2015;7(4):735-739.
Maina SW, Dimba E, Oyugi JO, Kabuitu STK. "Antimicrobial Efficacy ofAzadirachta indica (Neem) Twigs Aqueous and Ethanol Extracts on Tooth Root Canals Biofilms." Inter. J. Pharmco. Phytochem.. 2015;7. Abstract
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Maina SW, Dimba E, Oyugi JO, Mwangi JW. "Antimicrobial efficacy of Hibiscus Fuscus garcke aqueous and ethanol extracts on tooth root canal microorganisms." East African Medical Journal. 2021;98. Abstract
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Kiitonde C, Lukhoba CW, Dossaji SF. "Antimicrobial and Phytochemical Study of Vernonia glabra (Steetz) Oliv. & Hiern. in Kenya.". In: Botany 2011 . Healing the Planet Symposium in St. Louis, Missouri, USA.: C. Kiitonde, C.W. Lukhoba & S.F. Dossaji; 2011. Abstract

Infectious diseases are prevalent and life threatening. In Kenya, a majority of the sick are seeking herbal remedies in such for effective, safe, and affordable cure. This project aims to investigate the antimicrobial activity and phytochemical compounds present in different parts of Vernonia glabra, a plant used by herbalists in various regions of Kenya claimed to treat different microbial infections. The plant was collected in January, 2010 in Machakos, and the different plant parts ground into powder and extracted in Dichloromethane:Methanol (1:1) and water. These were tested against bacterial and fungal organisms using disc diffusion technique. It was observed that the organic crude extracts of the flower, leaf, stem, root and/or entire plant, showed activity against at least one of the four test micro-organisms and at concentrations lower than the water crude extracts. The organic crude extract of the leaf showed the highest activity against Staphylococcus aureus (Mean inhibition, 1.83) and Aspergillus niger (mean inhibition, 1.43), and also recorded higher activity those of the standard ds. Organic crude extract of flower showed significant activity against one only organism- Staphylococcus aureus. Thin Layer Chromatography-Bioautography Agar Overlay, showed that saponins were eliciting over 60% of all the antimicrobial activity. These results suggest that Vernonia glabra may contain phytochemicals of medicinal properties and also justifies the use of Vernonia glabra in herbal medicine for the treatment of microbial diseases. In particular, the V. glabra leaf may contain broad spectrum antibacterial and antifungal agents that could be useful in the development of competent antimicrobial drugs. Further investigation to isolate, determine the pure and safe antimicrobial compounds is recommended for scientific verification and validation of the drugs from Vernonia glabra.

Odhiambo MA. Antimicrobial and phytochemical properties of some medicinal plants used by the Luo community of Kenya.; Submitted. Abstract

The Luo community of Kenya have traditionally used plants for treatment of various disease conditions,
some of which we now know to be caused by microbial infections. Some of these plants, namely Lannea
stuhlmanii, Carissa edulis, Combretum fragrans, Conyza sumatrensis, Ormocarpum trichocarpum, Sida
cuneifolia, Plumbago zeylanica, and Rhoicissus revoilii, were studied. Their ethanol extracts were
screened for their antimicrobial activity against Candida albicans, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus
and Bacillus pumulus.
Ethanolic root extract of C sumatrensis had good antibacterial activity against E. coli, while extracts of
C fragrans root bark, C edulis root, S. cuneifolia whole plant, R. revoilii tubers and leaf extract of C
sumatrensis in the same solvent had good activity against it. Activity against B. pumulus was observed in
all extracts except those of L. stuhlmanii bark and R. revoilii tubers. Good activity against S. aureus was
observed for C fragrans, S. cuneifolia and L. stuhlmanii.
R. revoihi, L. stuhlmanii, C fragrans and C edulis exhibited good antifungal activity against Candida
albicans.
Combretum fragrans bark extract had the highest overall antimicrobial activity of all the different plant
extracts examined and was subsequently chosen for further studies. All its ethanol, methanol, ethyl
acetate and chloroform extracts were found to have significant antimicrobial activity.
Combretum fragrans bark powder was found to contain saponins, cardiac glycosides, free anthraquinones
(anthracene glycosides), tannins and flavonoids. However, it had no starch nor alkaloids.
The chloroform extract of C fragrans was subjected to column chromatographic separation and
sitosterol (with stigmasterol as a minor compound) was isolated and identified. Sitosterol was shown to
have antifungal activity against C albicans and antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli.
The results of this work would therefore appear to lend support to the traditional use of Lannea
stuhlmanii, Combretum fragrans, Conyza sumatrensis (tineasis), Plumbago zeylanica, and Rhoicissus
revoilii in disease conditions where microbial infections may be a factor. Use of growth enhancers like
Carissa edulis in combination therapy may be justified on the basis of their immune boosting activity.

Kemoli AM, van Amerongen WE, de JJ JJS. "Antimicrobial and buffer capacity of crude extracts of chewing sticks (mswaki) from Kenya." J Dent Child . 2001;68(1):183-188. Abstract

The use of Chewing sticks (Miswaki) in the third world for control of dental plaque is very popular. Some of the studies that have been conducted on this subject have reported marked decrease in the incidences of dental caries and periodontal diseases in the users of Miswaki, when compared to the users of the conventional toothbrush living under similar conditions. Various mechanisms by which the Miswaki contributes to this phenomenon have been suggested. The purpose of the present study was to investigate in vitro, the anti-microbial action, the potential acid buffer capacity and fluoride content of crude aqueous extracts of eight commonly used chewing sticks from three regions in Kenya. The results obtained in the study, showed that one of the Miswaki had remarkable antibiotic activity against three stains of oral bacteria. Three of the Miswaki had significant acid buffer capacity. None of the eight Miswaki showed any significant fluoride release.

SOLOMON DRDERESE. "Antimicrobial and antiparasitic abietane diterpenoids from the roots of Clerodendrum eriophyllum." Natural Products Communication. 2010;5(6):853-858. AbstractWebsite

Machumi F, Samoylenko V, Yenesew A, Derese S, Midiwo JO, Wiggers FT, Jacob MR, Tekwani BL, Khan SI, Walker LA, Muhammad I.; Nat Prod Commun. 2010 5(6), pp. 853-8.

Chromatographic separation of the roots of a Kenyan medicinal plant, Clerodendrum eriophyllum, led to the isolation of ten abietane diterpenoids (1-10), one of which (1) was isolated for the first time from a natural source. Using spectroscopic data, the structure of 1 was determined to be 12-hydroxy-8,12-abietadiene-3,11,14-trione. Circular dichroism (CD) spectra showed that the stereochemistry of compounds 1, 3, and 6-8 belongs to the normal series of abietane diterpenes, which confirmed the absolute stereochemistry of the isolated compounds. Compounds 1-10 were evaluated for their in vitro antiplasmodial, antileishmanial, antifungal and antibacterial activities. Compounds 3 and 7 exhibited potent antifungal activity (IC50/MIC 0.58/1.25 and 0.96/2.5 microg/mL, respectively) against C. neoformans, whereas 3, 6 and 7 showed strong antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus with IC50/MIC values between 1.33-1.75/2.5-5 and 0.96-1.56/2.5 microg/mL, respectively. In addition, compounds 3 and 9 exhibited potent antileishmanial activity (IC50 0.08 and 0.20 microg/mL, respectively) against L. donovani, while 3 and 7 displayed weak antimalarial activity against Plasmodium falciparum, but 9 was inactive.

Yenesew A., Machumi, F. SDMWJTKWVSJ. "Antimicrobial and Antiparasitic Abietane Diterpenoids from the roots of Clerodendrum eriophyllum." Natural Product Communications . 2010;5 :853-858. Abstractpaper_49_machumi_et_al-npc-2010.pdf

Chromatographic separation of the roots of a Kenyan medicinal plant, Clerodendrum eriophyllum, led to the isolation of ten abietane diterpenoids (1-10), one of which (1) was isolated for the first time from a natural source. Using spectroscopic data, the structure of 1 was determined to be 12-hydroxy-8,12-abietadiene-3,11,14-trione. Circular dichroism (CD) spectra showed that the stereochemistry of compounds 1, 3, and 6-8 belongs to the normal series of abietane diterpenes, which confirmed the absolute stereochemistry of the isolated compounds. Compounds 1-10 were evaluated for their in vitro antiplasmodial, antileishmanial, antifungal and antibacterial activities. Compounds 3 and 7 exhibited potent antifungal activity (IC50/MIC 0.58/1.25 and 0.96/2.5 microg/mL, respectively) against C. neoformans, whereas 3, 6 and 7 showed strong antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus with IC50/MIC values between 1.33-1.75/2.5-5 and 0.96-1.56/2.5 microg/mL, respectively. In addition, compounds 3 and 9 exhibited potent antileishmanial activity (IC50 0.08 and 0.20 microg/mL, respectively) against L. donovani, while 3 and 7 displayed weak antimalarial activity against Plasmodium falciparum, but 9 was inactive

Yenesew A. "Antimicrobial and Anticancer Carvotacetone Derivativesof Sphaeranthus." Natural Product Communications . 2012;7:1123-1126. Abstractpaper_58_machumi_npc_publication-sphaeranthus_bullatus-2012.pdf

The CH2Cl2-MeOH (1:1) extract of the aerial parts of Sphaeranthus bullatus, an annual herb native to tropical East Africa, showed activity against chloroquine sensitive D6 (IC50 9.7 μg/mL) and chloroquine resistant W2 (IC50 15.0 μg/mL) strains of Plasmodium falciparum. Seventeen secondary metabolites were isolated from the extract through conventional chromatographic techniques and identified using various spectroscopic methods. The compounds were evaluated for their in vitro antiplasmodial, antileishmanial and anticancer activities revealing activity of four carvotacetone derivatives, namely 3-acetoxy-7-hydroxy-5-tigloyloxycarvotacetone (1), 3,7-dihydroxy-5-tigloyloxycarvotacetone (2), 3-acetoxy-5,7-dihydroxycarvotacetone (3) and 3,5,7-trihydroxycarvotacetone
(4); with antiplasmodial IC50 values of 1.40, 0.79, 0.60 and 3.40 μg/mL, respectively, against chloroquine sensitive D6 strains of P. falciparum;
antiplasmodial activity of IC50 2.00, 0.90, 0.68 and 2.80 μg/mL, respectively, against chloroquine resistant W2 strains of P. falciparum; antileishmanial IC50
values of 0.70, 3.00, 0.70 and 17.00 μg/mL, respectively, against the parasite L. donovanii promastigotes, and anticancer activity against human SK-MEL, KB,
BT-549 and SK-OV-3 tumor cells, with IC50 values between <1.1 - 5.3 μg/mL for 1-3. In addition, cytotoxic effects of the active compounds were evaluated against monkey kidney fibroblasts (VERO) and pig kidney epithelial cells (LLC-PK11). The structures of carvotacetone derivatives were determined by 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy; the absolute stereochemical configuration of 3-acetoxy-7-hydroxy-5-tigloyloxycarvotacetone (1) was determined as 3R, 4R, 5S by circular dichroism, specific rotation, 1H NMR and 2D NMR ROESY and NOESY experiments.

Keywords: Sphaeranthus bullatus, Asteraceae, Antiplasmodial, Antileishmanial, Anticancer, Carvotacetones.

Aboge GO;, Kang’ethe EK;, Arimi SM;, Omore AO;, McDermott JJ;, Kanja LW;, Macharia JK;, Nduhiu JG;, Githua A. "Antimicrobial Agents Detected In Marketed Milk In Kenya."; 2000. Abstract

Drug residues in foods are a major public health concern in many countries, especially where most food sales bypass official quality assurance channels. In common with many tropical countries, sales of unpasteurized milk in Kenya account for over 85% of marketed milk. This milk is either sold directly from producers to consumers or via various cadres of informal market agents. Besides residues that may arise from lack of adherence to withdrawal times following cow therapy, there have been concerns that some antimicrobial agents may be added to informally marketed milk to extend its shelf life. As part of a large study to assess public health hazards associated with marketed milk, samples were collected seasonally between January 1999 and January 2000 from raw (unpasteurized) milk consuming households and informal market agents of various cadres. Pasteurised milk samples were also collected from retail points and tested for comparison. All samples were screened for antimicrobial residues using charm AIM-96 and Charm-ROSA (Charm Sciences Inc, USA) tests. The former detects a wide range of anti-microbials, and the latter detects β-lactams and tetracyclines specifically, at levels above maximum residue limits (MRLS) recommended by the European Union (EU). The Charm-AIM screening test showed that 9.4% and 5.7% of samples from consumer households and market agents had antimicrobial residues above EU MRLS, respectively. It was concluded that antimicrobial residues were more likely to have originated at farm-level than because of poor market handling practices.

Aboge GO;, Kang’ethe EK;, Arimi SM;, Omore AO;, McDermott JJ;, Kanja LW;, Macharia JK;, Nduhiu JG;, Githua A. "Antimicrobial Agents Detected In Marketed Milk In Kenya."; 2000. Abstract

Drug residues in foods are a major public health concern in many countries, especially where most food sales bypass official quality assurance channels. In common with many tropical countries, sales of unpasteurized milk in Kenya account for over 85% of marketed milk. This milk is either sold directly from producers to consumers or via various cadres of informal market agents. Besides residues that may arise from lack of adherence to withdrawal times following cow therapy, there have been concerns that some antimicrobial agents may be added to informally marketed milk to extend its shelf life. As part of a large study to assess public health hazards associated with marketed milk, samples were collected seasonally between January 1999 and January 2000 from raw (unpasteurized) milk consuming households and informal market agents of various cadres. Pasteurised milk samples were also collected from retail points and tested for comparison. All samples were screened for antimicrobial residues using charm AIM-96 and Charm-ROSA (Charm Sciences Inc, USA) tests. The former detects a wide range of anti-microbials, and the latter detects β-lactams and tetracyclines specifically, at levels above maximum residue limits (MRLS) recommended by the European Union (EU). The Charm-AIM screening test showed that 9.4% and 5.7% of samples from consumer households and market agents had antimicrobial residues above EU MRLS, respectively. It was concluded that antimicrobial residues were more likely to have originated at farm-level than because of poor market handling practices.

Aboge GO;, Kang’ethe EK;, Arimi SM;, Omore AO;, McDermott JJ;, Kanja LW;, Macharia JK;, Nduhiu JG;, Githua A. "Antimicrobial Agents Detected In Marketed Milk In Kenya."; 2000. Abstract

Drug residues in foods are a major public health concern in many countries, especially where most food sales bypass official quality assurance channels. In common with many tropical countries, sales of unpasteurized milk in Kenya account for over 85% of marketed milk. This milk is either sold directly from producers to consumers or via various cadres of informal market agents. Besides residues that may arise from lack of adherence to withdrawal times following cow therapy, there have been concerns that some antimicrobial agents may be added to informally marketed milk to extend its shelf life. As part of a large study to assess public health hazards associated with marketed milk, samples were collected seasonally between January 1999 and January 2000 from raw (unpasteurized) milk consuming households and informal market agents of various cadres. Pasteurised milk samples were also collected from retail points and tested for comparison. All samples were screened for antimicrobial residues using charm AIM-96 and Charm-ROSA (Charm Sciences Inc, USA) tests. The former detects a wide range of anti-microbials, and the latter detects β-lactams and tetracyclines specifically, at levels above maximum residue limits (MRLS) recommended by the European Union (EU). The Charm-AIM screening test showed that 9.4% and 5.7% of samples from consumer households and market agents had antimicrobial residues above EU MRLS, respectively. It was concluded that antimicrobial residues were more likely to have originated at farm-level than because of poor market handling practices.

Aboge GO;, Kang’ethe EK;, Arimi SM;, Omore AO;, McDermott JJ;, Kanja LW;, Macharia JK;, Nduhiu JG;, Githua A. "Antimicrobial Agents Detected In Marketed Milk In Kenya."; 2000. Abstract

Drug residues in foods are a major public health concern in many countries, especially where most food sales bypass official quality assurance channels. In common with many tropical countries, sales of unpasteurized milk in Kenya account for over 85% of marketed milk. This milk is either sold directly from producers to consumers or via various cadres of informal market agents. Besides residues that may arise from lack of adherence to withdrawal times following cow therapy, there have been concerns that some antimicrobial agents may be added to informally marketed milk to extend its shelf life. As part of a large study to assess public health hazards associated with marketed milk, samples were collected seasonally between January 1999 and January 2000 from raw (unpasteurized) milk consuming households and informal market agents of various cadres. Pasteurised milk samples were also collected from retail points and tested for comparison. All samples were screened for antimicrobial residues using charm AIM-96 and Charm-ROSA (Charm Sciences Inc, USA) tests. The former detects a wide range of anti-microbials, and the latter detects β-lactams and tetracyclines specifically, at levels above maximum residue limits (MRLS) recommended by the European Union (EU). The Charm-AIM screening test showed that 9.4% and 5.7% of samples from consumer households and market agents had antimicrobial residues above EU MRLS, respectively. It was concluded that antimicrobial residues were more likely to have originated at farm-level than because of poor market handling practices.

Chalo DM, Lukhoba CW, Dossaji, S. F. "Antimicrobial activity, toxicity and phytochemical screening of selected medicinal plants of Losho, Narok County, Kenya. ." Journal of Natural Product Biochemistry. 2017;Vol 15((1)):pp. 29-43.
Kaigongi MM, Dossaji SF, Nguta JM, Lukhoba CW, Musila FM. "Antimicrobial Activity, Toxicity and Phytochemical Screening of Four Medicinal Plants Traditionally Used in Msambweni District, Kenya." Journal of Biology, Agriculture and Healthcare. 2014;4(28):6-12. Abstractkagongi_et_al._2014.pdf

This study was designed to evaluate the antimicrobial activity, toxicity and phytochemical composition of
organic and aqueous crude extracts of Zanthoxylum chalybeum Engl. (Rutaceae), Adansonia digitata L.
(Bombacaceae), Launaea cornuta (Hocht. ex Oliv. & Hern) C.Jeffrey (Compositae) and Grewia trichocarpa
Hochst. ex A.Rich (Tiliaceae) traditionally used by local communities of Msambweni District in Kenya.
Aqueous and organic [Chloroform: Methanol (1: 1)] crude extracts were evaluated for their in vitro antimicrobial activity against Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Bacillus cereus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Candida albicans using broth dilution and disc diffusion methods. Toxicity was determined using Brine-shrimp larvae (Artemia salina L. nauplii) assay. The crude extracts were screened to determine the presence of flavonoids, alkaloids, saponins and sesquiterpene lactones using standard techniques. It was observed that the organic crude extracts from all the species tested except L. cornuta exhibited dose dependent activity against B. cereus, MRSA, P. aeruginosa and C. albicans. None of the crude extracts showed any inhibition against E. coli. Adansonia digitata and Grewia trichocarpa had LC50>1000 μg/ml and were shown to be non-toxic to Brine shrimp larvae unlike those of Z. chalybeum and L. cornuta which both had LC50<500 ug/ml and were considered to be toxic. Phytochemical screening of the crude extracts showed that alkaloids, flavonoids, sesquiterpene lactones and saponins were present in the four plants tested.The study has shown that A. digitata and Z. chalybeum possess promising antimicrobial activity against microbes of health importance and could lead to the isolation of new and potentially effective antimicrobial compounds.
Keywords: Medicinal plants; Antimicrobial activity; Brine shrimp lethality test; Phytochemical analysis;
Msambweni district; Kenya.

Kaigongi MM, Dossaji SF, Nguta JM, Lukhoba CW, Musila FM. "Antimicrobial activity, toxicity and phytochemical screening of four medicinal plants traditionally used in Msambweni district, Kenya." Journal of Biology Agriculture and Healthcare. 2014;4(28).
Kaigongi MM, Dossaji SF, Nguta JM, Lukhoba CW, Musila FM. "Antimicrobial Activity, Toxicity and Phytochemical Screening of Four Medicinal Plants Traditionally Used in Msambweni District, Kenya." Journal of Biology, Agriculture and Healthcare. 2014;4(28).
Abubakar LU, Mwangi CN, Uku J, Ndirangu S. "Antimicrobial activity of various extracts of the sea urchin Tripneustes gratilla (Echinoidea)." African Journal of Pharmacology and Therapeutics . 2012;1(1): 19-23. Abstractabstract-ajpt.pdfWebsite

Background:
Marine invertebrates rely solely on innate immune mechanisms, the cellular component of which is characterized by hemocytes that phagocytize microbes and secrete soluble antimicrobial and cytotoxic substances. In this regard, marine invertebrates are a potential source of promising antimicrobial compounds with novel mechanisms of action.
Objective:
The objective of this study was to evaluate extracts of the gut, gonad, spines and mouth parts of the sea urchin Tripneustes gratilla for antimicrobial and haemolytic activities in vitro.
Methods:
Potentially bioactive metabolites were extracted using methanol and chloroform and tested for activity against Salmonella typhi, Escherichia coli, Shigella sonnei, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Penicillium spp. using the agar disc diffusion method. Toxicity was determined by assaying for hemolysis against human red blood cells.
Results:
Bioactivity against the tested bacteria was observed mainly with the methanol and chloroform extracts of the gonads and gut. Higher antibacterial activity was present in the methanol extracts compared to chloroform extracts. Activity against the Penicillium spp was detected only in the methanol extracts, while the chloroform extracts showed no activity. The various extracts of the sea urchin lacked any detectable hemolytic activity against human erythrocytes.
Discussion:
These research findings suggest that marine echinoderms are a potential source of novel antimicrobial compounds.
Key words:
Tripneustes gratilla, antimicrobial activity, marine invertebrates

Amugune BK, Matu EN, Kirira PG, Kigondu EVM, Moindi E. "Antimicrobial activity of organic total extracts of three Kenyan Medicinal plants." Afr. J. Pharmacol. Ther.. 2012;1(1):14-18.
Mwangi JW, Mensah IA, G.Muriuki, R.Munavu, L.W L. Antimicrobial activity of lippie grandifolia and lippa javancia. Biology and chemistry of active natural substances. Bonn: Thieme George, Thieme Verlag Strutgart, New York ; 1990.
Mubiu JK, Ndwigah SN, Abuga KO, Ongarora DSB. "Antimicrobial activity of extracts and phytosterols from the root bark of Lonchocarpus eriocalyx." East Cent. Afr. J. Pharm. Sci. . 2017;20:13-16. Abstract

The root bark of Lonchocarpus eriocalyx was dried, powdered and extracted using chloroform, methanol and hot water. The extracts exhibited antibacterial activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus and antifungal activity against Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The decoction (100mg/ml) was more active than the chloroform and methanol extracts against the four microorganisms. Chromatographic fractionation of the chloroform extract using normal phase silica yielded the phytosterols lupeol and lupenone. At 100 mg/ml, the compounds were active against all the four microorganisms, with lupeol being more active than lupenone. This is the first report of the isolation of lupenone from Lonchocarpus eriocalyx.

Mubiu JK, Ndwigah SN, Abuga KO, Ongarora DSB. "Antimicrobial activity of extracts and phytosterols from the root bark of Lonchocarpus eriocalyx." East and Central African Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences. . 2017;20:13-16.
Mubiu JK, Ndwigah SN, Abuga KO, Ongarora DSB. "Antimicrobial Activity of Extracts and Phytosterols from Lonchocarpus eriocalyx." East and Central African Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences. 2017;20:13-16.
Matasyoh LG, Matasyoh JC, Wachira FN, Kinyua MG, Muigai Thairu AW, TK. M. "Antimicrobial activity of essential oils of Ocimum gratissimum L. from different populations of Kenya." Afr. J. Trad. CAM . 2008;5(2):187-193.
M. PROFMUNAVURAPHAEL. "Antimicrobial Activity of Essential Oil of Lippia species in Kenya", Discovery and Innovation, 6, 58-60.". In: East African Medical Journal. 68, 526-531. Journal of School of Continuous and Distance Education ; 1994. Abstract
Kamau RK, Osoti AO, Njuguna EM. Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, College of Health Sciences, University of Nairobi, P.O. Box 1%76-00202, Nairobi, Kenya. BACKGROUND: Cancer of the uterine cervix is the most common female cancer in Kenya. Despite being preventable, it is often diagnosed when it is already late. For this reason, only palliative therapy is provided. Hence, it is expected that their daily routines and that of their caregivers are severely disrupted. OBJECTIVES: To determine the extent to which diagnosis and treatment of inoperable cervical carcinoma affects quality of life (QOL). DESIGN: Cross-sectional descriptive study. Setting Radiotherapy Department at the Kenyatta National Hospital. SUBJECTS: Women undergoing radiotherapy for inoperable cervical cancer. RESULTS: There is high prevalence of profound disruptions in nearly all domains of QOL. In the social domain, between 33% and 44% had the perception that family members and friends had withdrawn social support. Reduction in various economic facets was reported by 47.4%-52.6%, with 44.7% reporting a fall in the overall living standards. There were significant changes in the sexual domain, as a result in which 28.3% reported marital discordance. In the personality domain, decreased self-esteem and self-projection in life occurred in 30.9% and 36.2% respectively. On functional outcomes (EORTC QLQ-C30), only 32%-41% reported not being affected in the various facets of emotional function. Physical functions were affected in 19%-79%, role functions in 69%-75%; symptoms in 49%-80%; cognitive functions in 46%-56%; social functions in 63%-71% and financial aspects by 63%. On global QOL, 53% and 47% respectively reported high level disruption in overall physical health and overall QOL. CONCLUSION: Severe deterioration of QOL occurs as a result of diagnosis of inoperable cervical cancer and subsequent therapies. For this reason there is need to establish severe disease and end-of-life research and management services that would ensure better coping with cancer for patients and for home-based caregivers. PMID: 17633581 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Rukenya Zachary Muthii, Mbaria James Mucunu, Mbaabu Mathiu Peter, Gitahi KS, Onzago OR. "Antimicrobial activity of aqueous and methanol extract of naturally growing and cultivated Aloe turkanensis. .". 2014;3(5):243-347.
S.K. M, J. N N. "The antimicrobial activity of activity of fermented Uji.". 1992. Abstract

Modern infant formulations based on milk have been shown to cause severe diarrhoea an malnutrition during weaning unlike the traditional weaning roods such ujl (cereal porridge). Such diseases can be attributed to the unhygienic conditions and dirty water used during preparation or infant roods. Results on microbial growth or death of Staphylococcus aureus . Salmonella tyhimurium enteropathogenic Escherichia Coli and Shigella dysenteriae during uji fermentation and storage or ready-to eat products are described. All the pathogens declined during uji fermentation and storage. with the declining rate being higher during storage. Invitro studies on antimicrobial activities on plates by uji culture against the pathogens suggest that the inhibition mechanism could he due to both acid production and antibiotic substances. KEY WORDS: Fermented uji. anti-bacterial activity. diarrhoea pathogens

Kitonde CK, F. DS, Lukhoba CW, Jumba MM. "ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY AND PHYTOCHEMICAL STUDY OF VERNONIA GLABRA (STEETZ) OLIV. & HIERN. IN KENYA." African Journal of Traditional, Complementary and Alternative medicines. 2013;10(1):149-157. Abstract

Infectious diseases are prevalent and life threatening in Kenya. Majority of the sick are seeking herbal remedies in search of effective, safe, and affordable cure. This project aims to investigate the antimicrobial activity and presence of active phytochemical compounds in different parts of Vernonia glabra ; a plant used by herbalists in various regions of Kenya, for the treatment of gastrointestinal problems. The plant sample was collected in January 2010 in Machakos, and different parts dried at room temperature under shade, ground into powder and extracted in Dichloromethane: Methanol in the ratio 1:1, and water. These crude extracts were tested against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Candida albicans, and Aspergillus niger for antimicrobial activity using disc diffusion technique. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) for active crude extracts were done using disc diffusion technique after the failure of agar and broth dilution methods. It was observed that the organic crude extracts of flower, leaf, stem, root, and/or entire plant, showed activity against one or four micro-organisms, and at concentrations lower than the aqueous crude extracts. Organic crude extract of the leaf showed the highest activity against Staphylococcus aureus (mean inhibition zone 1.85), recording higher activity than the commercially used standard antibiotic (Streptomycin mean inhibition zone of 1.30). The organic crude extract of flower showed significant activity only against S.aureus , with the lowest MIC of 1.5625mg/100μl, compared to streptomycin with M.I.C of 6.25mg/100μl. Thin Layer Chromatography-Bioautography Agar-Overlay showed that, flower alkaloids (50% active), root sapogenins (43.8% active), and root terpenoids (38.5% active) were identified as the potential antibacterial compounds against S.aureus. These results suggest that, V.glabra contains phytochemicals of medicinal properties and justify the use of V.glabra in traditional herbal medicine for the treatment of microbial based diseases. However, research on toxicity which is missing in this study is recommended for V. glabra in order to verify, validate and document the safety of this medicinal plant to the society.

Kitonde C, Dossaji SF, Lukhoba CW, Jumba M. "Antimicrobial Activity and Phytochemical study of Vernonia glabra (Steetz) Oliv. & Hiern in Kenya." Afr J Tradit Complement Altern Med. 2013;10(1):149-157. Abstractkitonde_et_al._2013.pdf

Infectious diseases are prevalent and life threatening in Kenya. Majority of the sick are seeking herbal remedies in search of effective, safe, and affordable cure. This project aims to investigate the antimicrobial activity and presence of active phytochemical compounds in different parts of Vernonia glabra; a plant used by herbalists in various regions of Kenya, for the treatment of gastrointestinal problems. The plant sample was collected in January 2010 in Machakos, and different parts dried at room temperature under shade, ground into powder and extracted in Dichloromethane: Methanol in
the ratio 1:1, and water. These crude extracts were tested against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Candida albicans, and Aspergillus niger for antimicrobial activity using disc diffusion technique. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) for active crude extracts were done using disc diffusion technique after the failure of agar and broth dilution methods. It was observed that the organic crude extracts of flower, leaf, stem, root, and/or entire plant, showed activity against at least one of
the four micro-organisms screened, and at concentrations lower than the aqueous crude extracts. Organic crude extract of the leaf showed the highest activity against Staphylococcus aureus (mean inhibition zone of 1.85), recording higher activity than the commercially used standard antibiotic (Streptomycin mean inhibition zone of 1.30). The organic crude extract of flower showed significant activity only against S. aureus, with the lowest MIC of 1.5625 mg/100μl, compared to streptomycin with
M.I.C of 6.25 mg/100μl. Thin Layer Chromatography-Bioautography Agar-Overlay showed that, flower alkaloids (50% active), root sapogenins (43.8% active), and root terpenoids (38.5% active) were identified as the potential antibacterial compounds against S. aureus. These results suggest that, V. glabra contains phytochemicals of medicinal properties and justify the use of V. glabra in traditional herbal medicine for the treatment of microbial based diseases. However, research on toxicity which is missing in this study is recommended for V. glabra in order to verify, validate and document the safety
of this medicinal plant to the society.

Keywords: Vernonia glabra, Antimicrobial activity, and Phytochemicals.

*Kitonde, C.K., Dossaji, S. F., Lukhoba, C.W., Jumba, M.M. "Antimicrobial Activity and Phytochemical Study of Vernonia glabra (Steetz) Oliv. & Hiern. in Kenya." African Journal of Traditional, Complementary and Alternative Medicines.. 2013;10(1):149-157.
Kitonde CK. Antimicrobial activity and phytochemical screening of three selected medicinal plants used to treat bacterial and fungal infections in Kenya. Nairobi: University of Nairobi; 2012. Abstract

Infectious diseases are prevalent and life threatening in Kenya. The majority of the sick are
seeking herbal remedies in search of effective, safe, and affordable treatments. This study
investigated the antimicrobial activity and presence of alkaloids, terpenoids, sapogenins,
flavonoids and quinones in different parts of Vernonia glabra, Senna didymobotrya, and
Kigelia africana. Traditionally, these medicinal plants are used to treat microbial infections in
Kenya. The plants were selected based on the available traditional medical knowledge and
literature and collected in January 2010 in Machakos and Kisumu Counties. Different parts
were dried at room temperature under shade, ground into powder and extracted in
dichloromethane: methanol (1:1) and water. The crude extracts were tested against
Staphylococcus aureus (gram positive), Escherichia coli (gram negative) bacteria, Candida
albicans (yeast fungus), and Aspergillus niger (filamentous fungus) for antimicrobial activity
and Minimum Inhibitory Concentrations (MICs) determined using disc diffusion technique
under sterile conditions. Discs impregnated with standard antibiotics (Streptomycin for
bacteria and Nystatin for fungi) were used as positive controls while the extraction solvents
were used as negative controls. Antimicrobial activity was determined by measuring the
diameter of the clear inhibition zones around the paper discs using a transparent ruler (cm)
after 24 to 48 hours for bacteria and yeast fungus, and up to 72 hours for filamentous fungus.
Thin Layer Chromatography (TLC) was used to determine the chemical compounds present
in selected active crude extracts. Results showed that, organic extracts of V. glabra leaf
(Mean inhibition zone of 1.85 cm) and flower (MIZ of 1.78 cm) recorded the highest activity
against S. aureus than the standard antibiotic (Streptomycin MIZ of 1.30 cm). Organic extract
of V. glabra flower showed significant activity only against S. aureus, with the lowest MIC
of 1.5625 mg/100 mL compared to streptomycin at high MIC of 6.25 mg/100 mL. Qualitative
spray reagents on TLC plates, showed the V. glabra and S. didymobotrya flavonoids highly
present; terpenoids, sapogenins and quinones sufficiently present and V. glabra flower
alkaloids greatly present. The results of this study suggest that the three plants have
significant antimicrobial properties and justify their use in traditional herbal medicine for the
management of microbial based diseases. The presence of chemical compounds in most
extracts of V. glabra indicates its potential to produce novel compounds. Bioassay-guided
fractionations are recommended to identify the compounds responsible for antimicrobial
activity. Cytotoxicity assays are highly recommended for V. glabra in order to verify,
validate and document its safety in medicine.
Key words: Microbial infections, Vernonia glabra, Senna didymobotrya, Kigelia africa

Kitonde* CK, Fidahusein DS, Lukhoba CW, Jumba MM. "Antimicrobial Activity and Phytochemical Screening of Senna didymobotrya used to treat bacterial and fungal infections in Kenya." International Journal of Education and Research. 2014;2(1):1-12.
Kitonde CK, Dossaji SF, Lukhoba CW, Jumba MM. "Antimicrobial activity and phytochemical screening of Senna didymobotry used to treat bacterial and fungal infections in Kenya." International Journal of Education and Research. 2014;2(No. 1):1-12. Abstractsenna_didymobotrya.pdf

Infectious diseases are prevalent and life threatening in Kenya. The majority of the sick are seeking
herbal remedies in search of effective, safe, and affordable treatments. This study aimed to
investigate the antimicrobial activity and presence of chemical compounds in different parts of
Senna didymobotrya. Results showed that, organic extracts of root with Mean inhibition zone (MIZ)
of 1.58 cm, recorded the highest activity against S. aureus than the standard antibiotic
(Streptomycin MIZ of 1.30 cm. Flavonoids were the chemical compoundshighly present. The
results of this study suggest that S. didymobotrya has significant antimicrobial properties and justify
its use in traditional herbal medicine for the management of microbial based diseases. Cytotoxicity
assays are highly recommended for S. didymobotrya in order to verify, validate and document its
safety in medicine.
Key words: Prevalent, Effective, Herbal, Senna didymobotrya.

Kitonde CK, Fidahusein DS, Lukhoba CW, Jumba MM. "Antimicrobial activity and phytochemical screening of Senna didymobotry used to treat bacterial and fungal infections in Kenya." International Journal of Education and Research. 2014;1(2):1-12.
Kitonde CK, Fidahusein D, Lukhoba CW, Jumba MM. "Antimicrobial activity and phytochemical screening of Senna didymobotry used to treat bacterial and fungal infections in Kenya." International Journal of Education and Research. 2014;2(1):1-12.
Malele RM, Mutayabarwa CK, J.W. M, et al. "Antimicrobial activity and composition of Hyptis suaveolens (L.) Poit. essential oil from Tanzania,." J. Essential Oil Research . 2003;15:438-440.
Amugune BK, Thoithi GN, Mwangi JW, L.K.Omosa, Kibwage IO. "Antimicrobial Activity and Bioactive Constituents of Alectras sessiliflora (Vahl) Kuntze Methanol Extract." East and Central African Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences . 2013;16 :61-68.amugune_et_al.pdf
Amugune BK, Thoiti GN, Mwangi JW, Omosa LK, Kibwage IO. "Antimicrobial Activity and Bioactive Constituents of Alectra sessiliflora (Vahl) Kuntze Methanol Extract." 3. 2013;16(1026-552X):61-68.alectra_sessiliflora.pdf
Yenesew A. "Antimicrobial activities of a new schizozygane indoline alkaloid from Schizozygia coffaeoides and the revised structure of isoschizogaline." Journal of Natural Products. 2002;65:566-569. Abstractpaper_28_kariba_et_al_j.nat_._prod._2002.pdf

Extracts from Schizozygia coffaeoides showed antimicrobial activity against fungal and bacterial species. Alkaloids isolated using bioassay-guided fractionation were isoschizogaline, schizogynine, and a new indoline alkaloid, 7,8-dehydro-19beta-hydroxyschizozygine, shown to be the most active antifungal compound. The structure of isoschizagaline, the only active antibacterial, is revised on the basis of NMR analysis.

Nguta JM, Mbaria JM, Gakuya DW, Gathumbi PK, Kiama SG. "Antimalarial Remedies of Musambweni, Kenya." Journal of Ethnopharmacology. 2010;128 :424-432.
Kawaljit S, Okombo J, Brunschwig C, Ndubi F, Barnard L, Wilkson C, Njogu PM, Njoroge M, et al. "Antimalarial pyrido[1,2-a]benzimidazoles: Lead optimization, parasite life cycle stage profile, mechanistic evaluation, killing kinetics and in vivo oral efficacy in a mouse model." J. Med. Chem. 2017;60(4):1432-1448.
Ndakala AJ, Gessner RK, Gitari PW, October N, White KL, Hudson A, Fakorede F, Shackleford DM, Kaiser M, Yeates C, Charman SA, Chibale K. "Antimalarial Pyrido[1,2-a]benzimidazoles." Journal of Medicinal Chemistry. 2011;54:4581-4589.Website
WANJIRU. DRGITARIPATRICIA. "Antimalarial Pyrido[1,2-a]benzimidazoles.". In: 5th African Crop Science Society International Conference in Lagos Nigeria October 21-26 2001. American Chemical Society; 2011. Abstract
Presented here is a 16-year-old girl who was referred on 30th January 1996 with diagnosis of cord compression with spastic paraplegia with sensory level at T7/T8. CT scan myelogam confirmed soft tissue density mass displacing cord to the left with no dye being seen beyond T3. Thoracic spine decompressive laminectomy was performed on 1st January 1996 at Nairobi West Hospital extending from T3 to T6 level, which revealed a fibrous haemorrhagic tumour. Histology showed meningioma (mixed fibrous type and meningoepitheliomatous type) with many psammoma bodies. She had a stormy post-operative period, with infection and wound dehiscence. This was treated with appropriate antibiotics and wound care. She was eventually rehabilitated and was able to walk with the aid of a walking frame because of persistent spasticity of right leg. She was seen once as an outpatient by author on 6th July 1996, she was able to use the walking frame, but the right leg was still held in flexion deformity at the knee. She was thus referred to an orthopaedic surgeon for possible tenotomy. She was able to resume her studies at the University ambulating using a wheel chair and walking frame. She presented with worsening of symptoms in 2001 (five years after her first surgery). MRI scan thoracic spine revealed a left anterolateral intradural lesion extending from T3 to T5 vertebral body level compressing and displacing the spinal cord. She had a repeat surgery on 6th March 2001 at Kenyatta National Hospital; spastic paraparesis and urinary incontinenece persisted. She also developed bed sores and recurrent urinary tract infections. She was followed up by the author and other medical personnel in Mwea Mission Hospital where she eventually succumbed in 2005, nine years after her first surgery. This case is presented as a case of incompletely excised spinal meningioma to highlight some of the problems of managing spinal meningiomas when operating microscope and embolisation of tumours are not readily available. Also the family experienced financial constraint in bringing the patient for regular follow-up, and getting access to appropriate antibiotics, catheters and urine bags.
Wanjiru Patricia G. Antimalarial Pyrido[1,2-a]benzimidazoles.; 2011.
Nguta JM, Mbaria JM, Gakuya DW, Gathumbi PK, Kiama SG. "Antimalarial herbal remedies of Msambweni, Kenya.". 2010. Abstract

Malaria is a serious cause of mortality globally. The disease is of regional concern in Africa and of national interest in Kenya due to its high morbidity and mortality as a result of development of resistant strains of Plasmodium falciparum to many existing drugs such as chloroquine. Alternative medicine using herbal remedies are commonly used to treat malaria in Kenya. However, plants used in some rural areas in Kenya are not documented. Many antimalarial drugs have been derived from plants. This study was conducted to document medicinal plants that are traditionally used by the Msambweni community of Kenyan South Coast to treat malaria, where the disease is endemic. Herbalists were interviewed by administration of semistructured questionnaires in order to obtain information on medicinal plants traditionally used for the
treatment of malaria. Focused group discussions held with the herbalists supplemented the interview and questionnaire survey. Twenty-seven species of plants in 24 genera distributed in 20 families were reported to be used in this region for the treatment of malaria. Labiatae, Rutaceae and Liliaceae families had each eleven percent of the plant species reported and represented the species that are most commonly used. Thirteen plant species, namely; Aloe deserti Berger (Liliaceae), Launea cornuta (Oliv and Hiern) C. Jeffrey (Compositae), Ocimum bacilicum L. (Labiatae), Teclea simplicifolia (Eng) Verdoon (Rutaceae), Gerranthus lobatus (Cogn.) Jeffrey (Cucurbitaceae), Grewia hexaminta Burret. (Tiliaceae), Canthium glaucum Hiern. (Rubiaceae), Amaranthus hybridus L. (Amaranthaceae), Combretum padoides Engl and Diels (Combretaceae), Senecio syringitolius O. Hoffman. (Compositae), Ocimum suave Willd (Labiatae), Aloe macrosiphon Bak. (Liliaceae) and Laudolphia buchananii (Hall.f) Stapf. (Apocynaceae) are documented from this region for the first time for the treatment of malaria. These results become a basis for selection of plants for further pharmacological, toxicological and phytochemical studies in developing new plant based antimalarial drugs.

Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
PMID: 20096761
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

NGUTA DRJOSEPHMWANZIA. "Antimalarial herbal remedies of Msambweni, Kenya J.M. Nguta, J.M. Mbaria, D.W. Gakuya, P.K. Gathumbi, S.G. Kiama." Journal of Ethnopharmacology 128 (2010) 424. 2010;128:424-432.Website
J.M. Nguta, J.M. Mbaria, D.W. Gakuya, P. K. Gathumbi, S.G.Kiama. "Antimalarial herbal remedies of Msabweni,Kenya." Journal of Ethnopharmacology. 2010;128(2):424-432.2010.antimalarial_herbal_remedies_of_msabweni_kenya_1_1.pdf
Ongarora DSB, Strydom N, Wicht K, Njoroge M, Wiesner L, Egan TJ, Wittlin S, Jurva U, Masimirembwa CM, Chibale K. "Antimalarial benzoheterocyclic 4-aminoquinolines: Structure-activity relationship, in vivo evaluation, mechanistic and bioactivation studies." Bioorg. Med. Chem.. 2015;23(17):5419-32. Abstract

A novel class of benzoheterocyclic analogues of amodiaquine designed to avoid toxic reactive metabolite formation was synthesized and evaluated for antiplasmodial activity against K1 (multidrug resistant) and NF54 (sensitive) strains of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Structure-activity relationship studies led to the identification of highly promising analogues, the most potent of which had IC50s in the nanomolar range against both strains. The compounds further demonstrated good in vitro microsomal metabolic stability while those subjected to in vivo pharmacokinetic studies had desirable pharmacokinetic profiles. In vivo antimalarial efficacy in Plasmodium berghei infected mice was evaluated for four compounds, all of which showed good activity following oral administration. In particular, compound 19 completely cured treated mice at a low multiple dose of 4×10mg/kg. Mechanistic and bioactivation studies suggest hemozoin formation inhibition and a low likelihood of forming quinone-imine reactive metabolites, respectively.

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