Publications

Found 114 results

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Submitted
Wolfgang Richard Mukabana, Janet Achieng Onyango CKM. "Artisanal fishing supports breeding of malaria mosquitoes in Western Kenya.". Submitted.
2018
Quinlan MM, Birungi J, Coulibaly MB, Diabaté A, Facchinelli L, Wolfgang Richard Mukabana, M J. "Containment studies of transgenic mosquitoes in disease endemic countries: The broad concept of facilities readiness." Vector-Borne and Zoonotic Diseases. 2018;18(1):14-20.
Robinson A, Busula AO, Voets MA, Beshir KB, Caulfield JC, Powers SJ, Niels O Verhulst, Winskill P, Muwanguzi J, Birkett MA, Renate C Smallegange, Masiga DK, Mukabana RW, Sauerwe RW. "Plasmodium-associated changes in human odor attract mosquitoes." Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. 2018;115(18):E4209-E4218.
Kiuru CW, Oyieke FA, Wolfgang Richard Mukabana, Mwangangi J, Kamau L, Muhia-Matoke D. "Status of insecticide resistance in malaria vectors in Kwale County, Coastal Kenya." Malaria journal. 2018;17(1):3.
2017
Mburu MM, Collins K Mweresa, Philemon Omusula, Alexandra Hiscox, Takken W, Wolfgang R Mukabana. "2-Butanone as a carbon dioxide mimic in attractant blends for the Afrotropical malaria mosquitoes Anopheles gambiae and Anopheles funestus." Malaria journal. 2017;16(1):351.
Makworo NK, Ochieng VO, Ogoyi DO, Mukabana RW. "Knock down efficacy of commercially available insecticides against Anopheles gambiae." Journal of Applied Biology & Biotechnology Vol. 2017;5(2):077-084.
Hisco A, Tobias Homan, Smith TA, Masiga D, Wolfgang R Mukabana, Silky M, Collins K Mweresa, Prisca Oria, Jane Alaii, Cees Leeuwis, Teun Bousema, Nicolas Maire, DePasquale A. "ODOR-BAITED TRAPS AS A NOVEL TOOL FOR MALARIA CONTROL-THE SOLARMAL TRIAL." AMERICAN JOURNAL OF TROPICAL MEDICINE AND HYGIENE. 2017;95(5):26.
Omondi S, Wolfgang Richard Mukabana, Ochomo E, Muchoki M, KEMEI BRIGID, Mbogo C, Bayoh N. "Quantifying the intensity of permethrin insecticide resistance in Anopheles mosquitoes in western Kenya." Parasites & vectors. 2017;10(1):548.
Busula AO, Takken W, de Boer JG, Wolfgang R Mukabana, Niels O Verhulst. "Variation in host preferences of malaria mosquitoes is mediated by skin bacterial volatiles." Medical and veterinary entomology. 2017;31(3):320-326.
2016
Mariabeth Silkey, Tobias Homan, Nicolas Maire, Alexandra Hiscox, Mukabana R, Takken W, Smith TA. "Design of trials for interrupting the transmission of endemic pathogens." Trials. 2016;17(1):278.
Menger DJ, Philemon Omusula, Wouters K, Oketch C, Carreira AS, Durka M, Derycke J-L, Loy DE, Hahn BH, Wolfgang R Mukabana, Collins K Mweresa, Joop JA van Loon, Takken W, Alexandra Hiscox. "Eave screening and push-pull tactics to reduce house entry by vectors of malaria." The American journal of tropical medicine and hygiene. 2016;94(4):868-878.
Tobias Homan, Alexandra Hiscox, Collins K Mweresa, Masiga D, Wolfgang R Mukabana, Prisca Oria, Nicolas Maire, Pasquale AD, Mariabeth Silkey, Jane Alaii, Teun Bousema, Cees Leeuwis, Smith TA, Takken W. "The effect of mass mosquito trapping on malaria transmission and disease burden (SolarMal): a stepped-wedge cluster-randomised trial." The Lancet. 2016;388(10050):1193-1201.
Collins K Mweresa BOJJAVLWT, Wolfgang R Mukabana, Philemon Omusula. "Enhancing attraction of African malaria vectors to a synthetic odor blend." Journal of chemical ecology. 2016;42(6):508-516.
Takken W, Loon JJAV, Zwiebel LJ, Pask GM, Wolfgang Richard Mukabana. "Insect repellent compositions and methods of use.". 2016.
Alexandra Hiscox, Tobias Homan, Collins K Mweresa, Nicolas Maire, Pasquale AD, Masiga D, Oria PA, Jane Alaii. "Mass mosquito trapping for malaria control in western Kenya: study protocol for a stepped wedge cluster-randomised trial." Trials. 2016;17(1):356.
Tobias Homan, Pasquale AD, Onoka K, Ibrahim Kiche, Alexandra Hiscox, Collins Mweresa, Wolfgang R Mukabana, Masiga D, Takken W, Nicolas Maire. "Profile: the Rusinga health and demographic surveillance system, western Kenya." International journal of epidemiology. 2016;43(5):718-727.
Tobias Homan, Nicolas Maire, Alexandra Hiscox, Pasquale A, Ibrahim Kiche, Onoka K, Collins Mweresa, Wolfgang R Mukabana, Ross A, Smith TA, Takken W. "Spatially variable risk factors for malaria in a geographically heterogeneous landscape, western Kenya: an explorative study." Malaria journal. 2016;15(1):1.
Tobias Homan, Alexandra Hiscox, Collins K Mweresa, Masiga D, Wolfgang R Mukabana, Prisca Oria, Nicolas Maire, Pasquale AD, Jane Alaii, Cees Leeuwis, Smith TA, Takken W. "Stepped wedge cluster-randomised trial of the impact of mass mosquito trapping on malaria (SolarMal)." Impact of odour-baited mosquito traps for malaria control. 2016:125.
Jeroen Spitzen, Koelewijn T, Mukabana RW, Takken W. "Visualization of house-entry behaviour of malaria mosquitoes." Malaria journal. 2016;15(1):233.
2015
Mutero CM, Mbogo C, Mwangangi J, Imbahale S, Kibe L, Orindi B, Girma M, Njui A, Lwande W, Affognon H, Gichuki C, Wolfgang Richard Mukabana. "An assessment of participatory integrated vector management for malaria control in Kenya." Environmental health perspectives. 2015;123(11):1145.
Ondiaka SN, Masinde EW, Koenraadt CJM, Takken W, Wolfgang R Mukabana. "Effects of fungal infection on feeding and survival of Anopheles gambiae (Diptera: Culicidae) on plant sugars." Parasites & vectors. 2015;8(1):35.
Susan S Imbahale, Wolfgang R Mukabana. "Efficacy of neem chippings for mosquito larval control under field conditions." BMC ecology. 2015;15(1):8.
Menger DJ, Philemon Omusula, Maarten Holdinga, Tobias Homan, Carreira AS, Patrice Vandendaele, Derycke J-L, Collins K Mweresa, Wolfgang Richard Mukabana, Joop JA van Loon, Takken W. "Field evaluation of a push-pull system to reduce malaria transmission." PLoS One. 2015;10(4):e0123415.
Tobias Homan, Pasquale A, Ibrahim Kiche, Onoka K, Alexandra Hiscox, Collins Mweresa, Wolfgang R Mukabana, Takken W, Nicolas Maire. "Innovative tools and OpenHDS for health and demographic surveillance on Rusinga Island, Kenya." BMC research notes. 2015;8(1):397.
Joop JA van Loon, Renate C Smallegange, Gabriella Bukovinszkiné-Kiss, Frans Jacobs, Marjolein De Rijk, Wolfgang R Mukabana, Niels O Verhulst, Menger DJ, Takken W. "Mosquito attraction: crucial role of carbon dioxide in formulation of a five-component blend of human-derived volatiles." Journal of chemical ecology. 2015;41(6):567-573.
Busula AO, Takken W, Loy DE, Hahn BH, Wolfgang R Mukabana, Niels O Verhulst. "Mosquito host preferences affect their response to synthetic and natural odour blends." Malaria journal. 2015;14(1):133.
Olanga EA, Okombo L, IRUNGU LUCYW, Wolfgang R Mukabana. "Parasites and vectors of malaria on Rusinga Island, Western Kenya." Parasites & vectors. 2015;8(1):250.
Collins K Mweresa, Bruno Otieno, Philemon Omusula, Berhane T Weldegergis, Niels O Verhulst, Marcel Dicke, Joop JA van Loon, Takken W, Wolfgang R Mukabana. "Understanding the long-lasting attraction of malaria mosquitoes to odor baits." PloS one. 2015;10(3):e0121533.
Jared Owiti Yugi, Ochanda H, Wolfgang Richard Mukabana. "Zea mays pollen for the optimization of colony rearing of Anopheles arabiensis Patton (Diptera: Culicidae) mosquitoes under laboratory conditions." Journal of Mosquito Research. 2015;5.
2014
Alexandra Hiscox, Bruno Otieno, Anthony Kibet, Collins K Mweresa, Philemon Omusula, Martin Geier, Andreas Rose, Wolfgang R Mukabana, undefined. "Development and optimization of the Suna trap as a tool for mosquito monitoring and control." Malaria journal. 2014;13(1):257.
A Kibet, Rose A, P Omusula, Takken W, M Geier, Mweresa CK, B Otieno, Mukabana WR. "Development and optimization of the Suna trap as a tool for mosquito monitoring and control.". 2014.
Collins K Mweresa, Wolfgang R Mukabana, Philemon Omusula, Bruno Otieno, Tom Gheysens, Takken W, Joop JA van Loon. "Evaluation of textile substrates for dispensing synthetic attractants for malaria mosquitoes." Parasites and vectors. 2014;7(1):376.
Collins K Mweresa, Wolfgang R Mukabana, Philemon Omusula, Bruno Otieno, Tom Gheysens, Takken W, Joop JA van Loon. "Evaluation of textile substrates for dispensing synthetic attractants for malaria mosquitoes." Parasites and vectors. 2014;7(1):376.
Tobias Homan, Alexandra Hiscox, Pasquale AD, Ibrahim Kiche, Collins Mweresa, Wolfgang Mukabana, Thomas Smith, Takken W, Nicolas Maire. "Measuring outcomes of the first trial of odour-baited mosquito traps for malaria control using a state of the art health and demographic surveillance system." Malaria journa. 2014;13(1):P97.
Collins K Mweresa, Philemon Omusula, Bruno Otieno, Joop JA van Loon, Takken W, Wolfgang R Mukabana. "Molasses as a source of carbon dioxide for attracting the malaria mosquitoes Anopheles gambiae and Anopheles funestus." Malaria journal. 2014;13(1):160.
Menger DJ, Bruno Otieno, Marjolein De Rijk, W Richard Mukabana, Joop JA van Loon, Takken W. "A push-pull system to reduce house entry of malaria mosquitoes." Malaria journal. 2014;13(1):119.
Wanzala W, Hassanali A, Wolfgang Richard Mukabana, Takken W. "Repellent activities of essential oils of some plants used traditionally to control the brown ear tick, Rhipicephalus appendiculatus." Journal of parasitology research. 2014;2014.
Jared Owiti Yugi, Otieno-Ayayo ZN, Ochanda H, Mukabana WR. "The silver cyprinid Rastrineobola argentea as the main diet source for rearing Anopheles arabiensis mosquitoes." Journal of Mosquito Research. 2014;4(1).
Alexandra Hiscox, Tobias Homan, Corné Vreugdenhil, Bruno Otieno, Anthony Kibet, Collins K Mweresa, Ron van Lammeren, Wolfgang R Mukabana, Takken W. "Spatial heterogeneity of malaria vectors and malaria transmission risk estimated using odour-baited mosquito traps." Malaria journal. 2014;13(S1):P41.
Takken W, AF Hiscox, R Smallegange, Mukabana WR, Collins Mweresa. "Synthetic odour blends for sampling of malaria mosquitoes." Antenna: Bulletin of the Royal Entomological Society. 2014;(Special Edition 2014):92-93.
Oria PA, Alexandra Hiscox, Jane Alaii, Margaret Ayugi, Wolfgang Richard Mukabana, Takken W, Cees Leeuwis. "Tracking the mutual shaping of the technical and social dimensions of solar-powered mosquito trapping systems (SMoTS) for malaria control on Rusinga Island, western Kenya." Parasites & vectors. 2014;7(1):523.
F Okumu, L Biswaro, E Mbeleyela, Killeen GF, R Mukabana, Moore SJ. "Using Nylon Strips to Dispense Mosquito Attractants for Sampling the Malaria Vector Anopheles gambiae s.s." Journal of medical entomology. 2014;47(2):274-282.
2013
Imbahale SS, OK Abonyo, OP Aduogo, Githure JI, Mukabana WR. "Conflict between the need for income and the necessity of controlling endemic malaria." J Ecosystem Ecography. 2013;3:129.
Dugassa S, Lindh JM, Oyieke F, Mukabana WR, Lindsay SW, Fillinger U. "Development of a Gravid Trap for Collecting Live Malaria Vectors Anopheles gambiae s.l.". 2013.Website
Ephantus J Muturi, Mwangangi JM, John C Beier, Millon Blackshear, James Wauna, Sang R, Wolfgang R Mukabana. "Ecology and behavior of Anopheles arabiensis in relation to agricultural practices in central Kenya." Journal of the American Mosquito Control Association. 2013;29(3):222-230.
Lorenz LM, Keane A, Moore JD, Munk CJ, Seeholzer L, Mseka A, Simfukwe E, Ligamba J, Turner EL, Biswaro LR, Okumu FO, GF K, WR M, SJ. M. "Taxis assays measure directional movement of mosquitoes to olfactory cues. Parasites & Vectors." Parasites & Vectors. 2013;3(6):131.
2012
Nyasembe VO, Teal PEA MWRTJHTB. "Behavioural response of the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae to host plant volatiles and synthetic blends." Parasites & Vectors. 2012;5(234):doi:10.1186/1756-3305-234.
Nyasembe VO, Teal PEA, WR M, Tumlinson JH, Torto B. "Behavioural response of the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae to host plant volatiles and synthetic blends." Parasites & Vectors. 2012;5:234.
Wanzala W, Takken W, WR M, Pala AO, Hassanali A. "Ethnoknowledge of Bukusu community on livestock tick prevention and control in Bungoma district, western Kenya." Journal of Ethnopharmacoly. 2012;140(2):298-324.
WR M, Collins K. Mweresa, Philemon Omusula, Benedict O. Orindi, Renate C. Smallegange, Joop JA van Loon, Takken W. "Evaluation of low density polyethylene and nylon for delivery of synthetic mosquito attractants." Parasites & Vectors. 2012;5:202.
Smallegange RC, GK Bukovinszkin´e, B Otieno, PA Mbadi, Takken W, Mukabana WR, vanLoon JA. "Identification of candidate volatiles that affect the behavioural response of the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto to an active kairomone blend: laboratory and semi-field assays." Physiological Entomology. 2012;37:60-71.
Imbahale SS, Githeko A, WR M, Takken W. "Integrated mosquito larval source management reduces larval numbers in two highland villages in western Kenya." BMC Public Health. 2012;2:362.
Wolfgang R. Mukabana, Collins K. Mweresa, Bruno Otieno, Philemon Omusula, Renate C. Smallegange, Joop JA van Loon, Takken W. "A novel synthetic odorant blend for trapping of malaria and other african mosquito species." Journal of Chemical Ecology. 2012;38:235-244.
Alexandra Hiscox, Nicolas Maire IKMSTHPOCMBOM. "The SolarMal Project: innovative mosquito trapping technology for malaria control." Malaria Journal 2012. 2012;11(1):O45 doi:10.1186/1475-2875-11-S1-O45.
Alexandra Hiscox, Nicolas Maire, Ibrahim Kiche, Mariabeth Silkey, Tobias Homan, Prisca Oria, Collins Mweresa, Bruno Otieno, Margaret Ayugi, Teun Bousema, Patrick Sawa, Jane Alaii, Thomas Smith, Cees Leeuwis, Wolfgang R Mukabana, Takken W. "The SolarMal Project: innovative mosquito trapping technology for malaria control." Malaria Journal. 2012;11(1):O45 doi:10.1186/1475-2875-11-S1-O45.
Imbahale SS, WR M, Orindi B, Githeko AK, Takken W. "Variation in malaria transmission dynamics in three different sites in Western kenya." Journal of Tropical Medicine. 2012;912408.
2011
Susan S Imbahale, Collins K Mweresa, Takken W, Wolfgang R Mukabana. "Development of environmental tools for Anopheline larval control." Parasites & Vectors. 2011;4:130.
Niels O Verhulst, Phoebe A Mbadi, Gabriella Bukovinszkine Kiss, Wolfgang R Mukabana, Joop JA van Loon, Takken W, Renate C Smallegange. "Improvement of a synthetic lure for Anopheles gambiae using compounds produced by human skin microbiota." Malaria Journal. 2011;10:28.
Susan S Imbahale, Krijn P Paaijmans, Wolfgang R Mukabana, Ron van Lammeren, Githeko AK, Takken W. "A longitudinal study on Anopheles mosquito larval abundance in distinct geographical and environmental settings in western Kenya. ." Malaria Journal. 2011;10:81.
Albert O. Mala, Lucy W. Irungu, Josephat I.Shililu, Ephantus J. Muturi, Charles C. Mbogo, Joseph K. Njagi, Wolfgang R Mukabana, Githure JI. "Plasmodium falciparum transmission and aridity: a Kenyan experience from the dry lands of Baringo and its implications for Anopheles arabiensis control." Malaria Journal. 2011;10:121.
Verhulst N., Mukabana W.R., Takken W, R.mallegange. "Skin microbiota volatiles as odour baits for the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae." Entomologia Experimentalis et applicata. 2011;139:170-179.
2010
Olanga, EA., Okal, M., Mbadi, PA., Kokwaro, ED, Mukabana WR. "Attraction of Anopheles gambiae to odour baits augmented with heat and moisture." Malaria Journal. 2010;9:6.
Okumu F.O., Killeen G.F., Ogoma.S, Biswaro L., Smallegange R.C., Mbeyela E., Titus E., Munk C., Ngonyani H., Takken W., Mshinda H., Mukabana W.R., Moore S.J. "Development and field evaluation of a synthetic mosquito lure that is more attractive than humans. ." PLoS One. 2010;5(1):e8951.
Ogoma SB, Lweitoijera DW, Ngonyani H, Furer B, Russell TL, WR M, GF K, SJ. M. "Screening mosquito house entry points as a potential method for integrated control of endophagic filariasis, arbovirus and malaria vectors." PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases. 2010;4(8):e773.
Renate C Smallegange, Wolfgang H Schmied, Karel J van Roey, Niels O Verhulst, Jeroen Spitzen, Wolfgang R Mukabana, Takken W. "Sugar-fermenting yeast as an organic source of carbon dioxide to attract the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae. ." Malaria Journal. 2010;9:292.
Okumu, F., Biswaro, L., Mbeleyela, E, Killeen, G.F., Mukabana, W.R., Moore SJ. "Using Nylon Strips to Dispense Mosquito Attractants for Sampling the Malaria Vector Anopheles gambiae s.s." Journal of Medical Entomology . 2010;47(2):274-282.
2009
Ogoma SB, Kannady K, Sikulu M, Chaki PP, Govella NJ, Mukabana W.R., GF K. "Window screening, ceilings and closed eaves as sustainable ways to control malaria in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania." Malaria Journal. 2009;8:221.
2008
Muriu, S.M, Muturi, E.J., Shililu, J.I., Mbogo, C.M., Mwangangi, J.M., Jacob, B.G., Irungu, L.W., Mukabana, W.R., Githure J, R.J. N. "Host choice and multiple blood feeding behaviour of malaria vectors and other anophelines in Mwea rice scheme, Kenya." Malaria Journal. 2008;7:43.
PROF. IRUNGU LUCYW, DR. MUKABANA WOLFANGRICHARD. "Muriu S.M., Shilulu J.I., Muturi E.J., Irungu l.W., Mwangangi J.M., Mukabana R.W., Jacob B.G., Githure J.I., and Novak R.J., (2008). Host choice and multiple blood feeding behaviour of malaria vectors and other anophelines in Mwea rice irrigation scheme, .". In: Malaria Journal 7:43. Journal of School of Continuous and Distance Education ; 2008. Abstract
Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 st1:*{behavior:url(#ieooui) } /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;} Studies were conducted between April 2004 and February 2006 to determine the blood-feeding pattern of anopheles mosquitoes in Mwea Kenya. Samples were collected indoors by pyrethrum spay catch and outdoors by Centers for Disease Control light traps and processed for blood meal analysis by an Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay. A total of 3.333 blood-fed Anopheles mosquitoes representing four Anopheles species were collected and 2.796 of the samples were assayed, with Anopheles arabiensis comprising 76.2% (n=2.542) followed in decreasing order by Anopheles coustani 8.9% (n=297), Anopheles pharoensis 8.2 % (n=272) and anopheles funestus 6.7% (n=222).  All mosquito species had a high preference for bovine (range 56.3-71.4%) over human (range 1.1-23.9%) or goat (0.1-2.2%) blood meals.  Some individuals from all the four species were found to contain mixed blood meals.  The bovine blood index (BBI) for An. arabiensis was significantly higher for populations collected indoors (71.8%), than populations collected outdoors (41.3%), but the human blood index (HBI) did not differ significantly between the two populations.  In contrast, BBI for indoor collected An. funestus (51.4%) was significantly lower than for outdoor collected populations (78.8%) and the HBI was significantly higher indoors (28.7%) than outdoors (2.4%).  Anthropophily of An. funestus was lowest within the rice scheme, moderate in unplanned rice agro-ecosystem, and highest within the non-irrigated agro-ecosystem.  Anthropophily of An. Arabiensis was significantly higher in the non-irrigated agro-ecosystem than in the other agro-ecosystems. These findings suggest that rice cultivation has an effect on host choice by Anopheles mosquitoes.  The study further indicate that zooprophylaxis may be a potential strategy for malaria control, but there is need to assess how domestic animals may influence arboviruses epidemiology before adapting the strategy.
2007
Mukabana, W.R., Takken, W., Killeen GF, Knols, B.G.J. "Clinical malaria reduces human attractiveness to mosquitoes." Proceedings of the Netherlands Entomological Society. 2007;18:125-129.
Opiyo, P., Mukabana, W.R., Kiche, I.O., Mathenge, E.M., Killeen, G.F., Fillinger, U. "An exploratory study of community factors relevant for participatory malaria control on Rusinga Island, western Kenya. ." Malaria Journal. 2007;6:48.
Knols, B.G.J., Bossin, H.C., Mukabana, W.R., Robinson AS. "Transgenic mosquitoes and the fight against malaria: managing technology push in a turbulent GMO world." American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. 2007;77(6):232-242.
DR. MUKABANA WOLFANGRICHARD. "Knols, B.G.J., Bossin, H.C., Mukabana, W.R., A.S. Robinson, 2007, Transgenic mosquitoes and the fight against malaria: managing technology push in a turbulent GMO world. American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 77 (Supplement 6), 232-242.". In: American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 77 (Supplement 6), 232-242. Journal of School of Continuous and Distance Education ; 2007. Abstract
Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;}   Genetic modification (GM) of mosquitoes (which renders them genetically modified organisms, GMOs) offers opportunities for controlling malaria. Transgenic strains of mosquitoes have been developed and evaluation of these to 1) replace or suppress wild vector populations and 2) reduce transmission and deliver public health gains are an imminent prospect. The transition of this approach from confined laboratory settings to open field trials in diseaseendemic countries (DECs) is a staged process that aims to maximize the likelihood of epidemiologic benefits while minimizing potential pitfalls during implementation. Unlike conventional approaches to vector control, application of GM mosquitoes will face contrasting expectations of multiple stakeholders, the management of which will prove critical to safeguard support and avoid antagonism, so that potential public health benefits can be fully evaluated. Inclusion of key stakeholders in decision-making processes, transfer of problem-ownership to DECs, and increased support from the wider malaria research community are important prerequisites for this. It is argued that the many developments in this field require coordination by an international entity to serve as a guiding coalition to stimulate collaborative research and facilitate stakeholder involvement. Contemporary developments in the field of modern biotechnology, and in particular GM, requires competencies beyond the field of biology, and the future of transgenic mosquitoes will hinge on the ability to govern the process of their introduction in societies in which perceived risks may outweigh rational and responsible involvement.
DR. MUKABANA WOLFANGRICHARD. "Opiyo, P., Mukabana, W.R., Kiche, I.O., Mathenge, E.M., Killeen, G.F., Fillinger, U., 2007, An exploratory study of community factors relevant for participatory malaria control on Rusinga Island, western Kenya. Malaria Journal, 6: 48.". In: Malaria Journal, 6: 48. Journal of School of Continuous and Distance Education ; 2007. Abstract
Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 st1:*{behavior:url(#ieooui) } /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;} Capacity strengthening of rural communities, and the various actors that support them, is needed to enable them to lead their own malaria control programmes. Here the existing capacity of a rural community in western Kenya was evaluated in preparation for a larger intervention. Focus group discussions and semi-structured individual interviews were carried out in 1,451 households to determine (1) demographics of respondent and household; (2) socio-economic status of the household; (3) knowledge and beliefs about malaria (symptoms, prevention methods, mosquito life cycle); (4) typical practices used for malaria prevention; (5) the treatment-seeking behaviour and household expenditure for malaria treatment; and (6) the willingness to prepare and implement community-based vector control. Malaria was considered a major threat to life but relevant knowledge was a chimera of scientific knowledge and traditional beliefs, which combined with socio-economic circumstances, leads to ineffective malaria prevention. The actual malaria prevention behaviour practiced by community members differed significantly from methods known to the respondents. Beside bednet use, the major interventions implemented were bush clearing and various hygienic measures, even though these are ineffective for malaria prevention. Encouragingly, most respondents believed malaria could be controlled and were willing to contribute to a community-based malaria control program but felt they needed outside assistance. Culturally sensitive but evidence-based education interventions, utilizing participatory tools, are urgently required which consider traditional beliefs and enable understanding of causal connections between mosquito ecology, parasite transmission and the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of disease. Community-based organizations and schools need to be equipped with knowledge through partnerships with national and international research and tertiary education institutions so that evidence-based research can be applied at the grassroots level.
2006
Mukabana RW, Kannady K, Kiama MG, Ijumba JN, Mathenge EM, Ibrahim Kiche, Nkwengulila G, Mboera L, Mtasiwa D, Yamagata Y, Schayk IV, Knols BGJ, Lindsay SW, de Castro MC, de Castro MC, Tanner M, Fillinger U, Killeen GF. "Ecologists can enable communities to implement malaria vector control in Africa.". In: Malaria Journal, 5 (1): 9. Journal of School of Continuous and Distance Education ; 2006. Abstract

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Integrated vector management (IVM) for malaria control requires ecological skills that are very scarce and rarely applied in Africa today. Partnerships between communities and academic ecologists can address this capacity deficit, modernize the evidence base for such approaches and enable future scale up. Community-based IVM programmes were initiated in two contrasting settings. On Rusinga Island, Western Kenya, community outreach to a marginalized rural community was achieved by University of Nairobi through a community-based organization. In Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, Ilala Municipality established an IVM programme at grassroots level, which was subsequently upgraded and expanded into a pilot scale Urban Malaria Control Programme with support from national academic institutes. Both programmes now access relevant expertise, funding and policy makers while the academic partners benefit from direct experience of community-based implementation and operational research opportunities. The communities now access up-to-date malaria-related knowledge and skills for translation into local action. Similarly, the academic partners have acquired better understanding of community needs and how to address them. Until sufficient evidence is provided, community-based IVM remains an operational research activity. Researchers can never directly support every community in Africa so community based IVM strategies and tactics will need to be incorporated into undergraduate teaching programmes to generate sufficient numbers of practitioners for national scale programmes. Academic ecologists at African institutions are uniquely positioned to enable the application of
practical environmental and entomological skills for malaria control by communities at grassroots
level and should be supported to fulfil this neglected role.

Mukabana, W.R., K. Kannady, G.M. Kiama, J. Ijumba, E.M. Mathenge, I. Kiche, G. Nkwengulila, L.E.G. Mboera, D. Mtasiwa, Y. Yamagata, I. van Schayk, B.G.J. Knols, S.W. Lindsay, M. Caldas de Castro, H. Mshinda, M. Tanner, U. Fillinger, Killeen GF. "Ecologists can enable communities to implement malaria vector control in Africa." Malaria Journal. 2006;5(1):9.
Knols, B.G.J., Hood-Nowotny, R.C., Bossin, H. FG, Robinson, A., Mukabana, W.R., Kemboi, D.C. "GM sterile mosquitoes: a cautionary note." Nature Biotechnology. 2006;24(9):1067-1068.
Killeen, G.F., Mukabana, W.R., Kalongolela, M.S., Kannady, K., Lindsay, S.W., Tanner, M., Castro, M.C., Fillinger U. "Habitat targeting for controlling aquatic stages of malaria vectors in Africa." American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. 2006;74(4):517-518.
Knols BGJ, Hood-Nowotny RC, Bossin H, Franz G, Robinson A, Wolfgang R Mukabana, Kemboi SK. "Knols, B.G.J., Hood-Nowotny, R.C., Bossin, H., Franz, G., Robinson, A., Mukabana, W.R., & Kemboi, S.K. GM sterile mosquitoes: a cautionary note. Nature Biotechnology, 24(9): 1067-1068." Nature Biotechnology, 24(9): 1067-1068.. 2006. AbstractWebsite

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Integrated vector management (IVM) for malaria control requires ecological skills that are very scarce and rarely applied in Africa today. Partnerships between communities and academic ecologists can address this capacity deficit, modernize the evidence base for such approaches and enable future scale up. Community-based IVM programmes were initiated in two contrasting settings. On Rusinga Island, Western Kenya, community outreach to a marginalized rural community was achieved by University of Nairobi through a community-based organization. In Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, Ilala Municipality established an IVM programme at grassroots level, which was subsequently upgraded and expanded into a pilot scale Urban Malaria Control Programme with support from national academic institutes. Both programmes now access relevant expertise, funding and policy makers while the academic partners benefit from direct experience of community-based implementation and operational research opportunities. The communities now access up-to-date malaria-related knowledge and skills for translation into local action. Similarly, the academic partners have acquired better understanding of community needs and how to address them. Until sufficient evidence is provided, community-based IVM remains an operational research activity. Researchers can never directly support every community in Africa so community based IVM strategies and tactics will need to be incorporated into undergraduate teaching programmes to generate sufficient numbers of practitioners for national scale programmes. Academic ecologists at African institutions are uniquely positioned to enable the application of
practical environmental and entomological skills for malaria control by communities at grassroots
level and should be supported to fulfil this neglected role.

Lacroix R, Wolfgang R Mukabana, Gouagna LC, Koella JC. "Malaria Infection Increases Attractiveness of Humans to Mosquitoes." PlosBiology, 3 (9), (e298).. 2006. AbstractWebsite

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Integrated vector management (IVM) for malaria control requires ecological skills that are very scarce and rarely applied in Africa today. Partnerships between communities and academic ecologists can address this capacity deficit, modernize the evidence base for such approaches and enable future scale up. Community-based IVM programmes were initiated in two contrasting settings. On Rusinga Island, Western Kenya, community outreach to a marginalized rural community was achieved by University of Nairobi through a community-based organization. In Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, Ilala Municipality established an IVM programme at grassroots level, which was subsequently upgraded and expanded into a pilot scale Urban Malaria Control Programme with support from national academic institutes. Both programmes now access relevant expertise, funding and policy makers while the academic partners benefit from direct experience of community-based implementation and operational research opportunities. The communities now access up-to-date malaria-related knowledge and skills for translation into local action. Similarly, the academic partners have acquired better understanding of community needs and how to address them. Until sufficient evidence is provided, community-based IVM remains an operational research activity. Researchers can never directly support every community in Africa so community based IVM strategies and tactics will need to be incorporated into undergraduate teaching programmes to generate sufficient numbers of practitioners for national scale programmes. Academic ecologists at African institutions are uniquely positioned to enable the application of
practical environmental and entomological skills for malaria control by communities at grassroots
level and should be supported to fulfil this neglected role.

Harbison, J.E., Mathenge, E.M., Misiani, G.O, Mukabana, W.R., Day JF. "A simple method for sampling indoor-resting malaria mosquitoes, Anopheles gambiae and Anopheles funestus (Diptera: Culicidae) in Africa." Journal of Medical Entomology. 2006;43(3):473-479.
Njiru, B.N., Mukabana, W.R., Takken, W., Knols, B.G.J. "Trapping of the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae with odour-baited MM-X traps in semi-field conditions in western Kenya." Malaria Journal. 2006;5(1):39.
DR. MUKABANA WOLFANGRICHARD. "Harbison, J.E., Mathenge, E.M., Misiani, G.O, Mukabana, W.R., & Day, J.F. 2006, A simple method for sampling indoor-resting malaria mosquitoes, Anopheles gambiae and Anopheles funestus (Diptera: Culicidae) in Africa. Journal of Medical Entomology, 43(3): .". In: Journal of Medical Entomology, 43(3): 473- 479. Journal of School of Continuous and Distance Education ; 2006. Abstract
Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 st1:*{behavior:url(#ieooui) } /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;} Capacity strengthening of rural communities, and the various actors that support them, is needed to enable them to lead their own malaria control programmes. Here the existing capacity of a rural community in western Kenya was evaluated in preparation for a larger intervention. Focus group discussions and semi-structured individual interviews were carried out in 1,451 households to determine (1) demographics of respondent and household; (2) socio-economic status of the household; (3) knowledge and beliefs about malaria (symptoms, prevention methods, mosquito life cycle); (4) typical practices used for malaria prevention; (5) the treatment-seeking behaviour and household expenditure for malaria treatment; and (6) the willingness to prepare and implement community-based vector control. Malaria was considered a major threat to life but relevant knowledge was a chimera of scientific knowledge and traditional beliefs, which combined with socio-economic circumstances, leads to ineffective malaria prevention. The actual malaria prevention behaviour practiced by community members differed significantly from methods known to the respondents. Beside bednet use, the major interventions implemented were bush clearing and various hygienic measures, even though these are ineffective for malaria prevention. Encouragingly, most respondents believed malaria could be controlled and were willing to contribute to a community-based malaria control program but felt they needed outside assistance. Culturally sensitive but evidence-based education interventions, utilizing participatory tools, are urgently required which consider traditional beliefs and enable understanding of causal connections between mosquito ecology, parasite transmission and the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of disease. Community-based organizations and schools need to be equipped with knowledge through partnerships with national and international research and tertiary education institutions so that evidence-based research can be applied at the grassroots level.
DR. MUKABANA WOLFANGRICHARD. "Killeen, G.F., Mukabana, W.R., Kalongolela, M.S., Kannady, K., Lindsay, S.W., Tanner, M., Castro, M.C., Fillinger, U., 2006, Habitat targeting for controlling aquatic stages of malaria vectors in Africa. American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, .". In: American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 74(4): 517 . Journal of School of Continuous and Distance Education ; 2006. Abstract
Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 st1:*{behavior:url(#ieooui) } /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;} Capacity strengthening of rural communities, and the various actors that support them, is needed to enable them to lead their own malaria control programmes. Here the existing capacity of a rural community in western Kenya was evaluated in preparation for a larger intervention. Focus group discussions and semi-structured individual interviews were carried out in 1,451 households to determine (1) demographics of respondent and household; (2) socio-economic status of the household; (3) knowledge and beliefs about malaria (symptoms, prevention methods, mosquito life cycle); (4) typical practices used for malaria prevention; (5) the treatment-seeking behaviour and household expenditure for malaria treatment; and (6) the willingness to prepare and implement community-based vector control. Malaria was considered a major threat to life but relevant knowledge was a chimera of scientific knowledge and traditional beliefs, which combined with socio-economic circumstances, leads to ineffective malaria prevention. The actual malaria prevention behaviour practiced by community members differed significantly from methods known to the respondents. Beside bednet use, the major interventions implemented were bush clearing and various hygienic measures, even though these are ineffective for malaria prevention. Encouragingly, most respondents believed malaria could be controlled and were willing to contribute to a community-based malaria control program but felt they needed outside assistance. Culturally sensitive but evidence-based education interventions, utilizing participatory tools, are urgently required which consider traditional beliefs and enable understanding of causal connections between mosquito ecology, parasite transmission and the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of disease. Community-based organizations and schools need to be equipped with knowledge through partnerships with national and international research and tertiary education institutions so that evidence-based research can be applied at the grassroots level.
DR. MUKABANA WOLFANGRICHARD. "Knols, B.G.J., Hood-Nowotny, R.C., Bossin, H., Franz, G., Robinson, A., Mukabana, W.R., & Kemboi, S.K., 2006, GM sterile mosquitoes: a cautionary note. Nature Biotechnology, 24(9): 1067-1068.". In: Nature Biotechnology, 24(9): 1067-1068. Journal of School of Continuous and Distance Education ; 2006. Abstract
Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 st1:*{behavior:url(#ieooui) } /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;} Capacity strengthening of rural communities, and the various actors that support them, is needed to enable them to lead their own malaria control programmes. Here the existing capacity of a rural community in western Kenya was evaluated in preparation for a larger intervention. Focus group discussions and semi-structured individual interviews were carried out in 1,451 households to determine (1) demographics of respondent and household; (2) socio-economic status of the household; (3) knowledge and beliefs about malaria (symptoms, prevention methods, mosquito life cycle); (4) typical practices used for malaria prevention; (5) the treatment-seeking behaviour and household expenditure for malaria treatment; and (6) the willingness to prepare and implement community-based vector control. Malaria was considered a major threat to life but relevant knowledge was a chimera of scientific knowledge and traditional beliefs, which combined with socio-economic circumstances, leads to ineffective malaria prevention. The actual malaria prevention behaviour practiced by community members differed significantly from methods known to the respondents. Beside bednet use, the major interventions implemented were bush clearing and various hygienic measures, even though these are ineffective for malaria prevention. Encouragingly, most respondents believed malaria could be controlled and were willing to contribute to a community-based malaria control program but felt they needed outside assistance. Culturally sensitive but evidence-based education interventions, utilizing participatory tools, are urgently required which consider traditional beliefs and enable understanding of causal connections between mosquito ecology, parasite transmission and the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of disease. Community-based organizations and schools need to be equipped with knowledge through partnerships with national and international research and tertiary education institutions so that evidence-based research can be applied at the grassroots level.
DR. MUKABANA WOLFANGRICHARD. "Mukabana, W.R., K. Kannady, G.M. Kiama, J. Ijumba, E.M. Mathenge, I. Kiche, G. Nkwengulila, L.E.G. Mboera, D. Mtasiwa, Y. Yamagata, I. van Schayk, B.G.J. Knols, S.W. Lindsay, M. Caldas de Castro, H. Mshinda, M. Tanner, U. Fillinger, & G.F. Killeen. 2006, .". In: Malaria Journal, 5 (1): 9. Journal of School of Continuous and Distance Education ; 2006. Abstract
Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 st1:*{behavior:url(#ieooui) } /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;} Integrated vector management (IVM) for malaria control requires ecological skills that are very scarce and rarely applied in Africa today. Partnerships between communities and academic ecologists can address this capacity deficit, modernize the evidence base for such approaches and enable future scale up. Community-based IVM programmes were initiated in two contrasting settings. On Rusinga Island, Western Kenya, community outreach to a marginalized rural community was achieved by University of Nairobi through a community-based organization. In Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, Ilala Municipality established an IVM programme at grassroots level, which was subsequently upgraded and expanded into a pilot scale Urban Malaria Control Programme with support from national academic institutes. Both programmes now access relevant expertise, funding and policy makers while the academic partners benefit from direct experience of community-based implementation and operational research opportunities. The communities now access up-to-date malaria-related knowledge and skills for translation into local action. Similarly, the academic partners have acquired better understanding of community needs and how to address them. Until sufficient evidence is provided, community-based IVM remains an operational research activity. Researchers can never directly support every community in Africa so community based IVM strategies and tactics will need to be incorporated into undergraduate teaching programmes to generate sufficient numbers of practitioners for national scale programmes. Academic ecologists at African institutions are uniquely positioned to enable the application of practical environmental and entomological skills for malaria control by communities at grassroots level and should be supported to fulfil this neglected role.
DR. MUKABANA WOLFANGRICHARD. "Njiru, B.N., Mukabana, W.R., Takken, W., Knols, B.G.J., 2006, Trapping of the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae with odour-baited MM-X traps in semi-field conditions in western Kenya. Malaria Journal, 5 (1): 39. http://www.malariajournal.com/content/pdf/14.". In: Malaria Journal, 5 (1): 39. http://www.malariajournal.com/content/pdf/1475-2875-5-39.pdf. Journal of School of Continuous and Distance Education ; 2006. Abstract
Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 st1:*{behavior:url(#ieooui) } /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;} Capacity strengthening of rural communities, and the various actors that support them, is needed to enable them to lead their own malaria control programmes. Here the existing capacity of a rural community in western Kenya was evaluated in preparation for a larger intervention. Focus group discussions and semi-structured individual interviews were carried out in 1,451 households to determine (1) demographics of respondent and household; (2) socio-economic status of the household; (3) knowledge and beliefs about malaria (symptoms, prevention methods, mosquito life cycle); (4) typical practices used for malaria prevention; (5) the treatment-seeking behaviour and household expenditure for malaria treatment; and (6) the willingness to prepare and implement community-based vector control. Malaria was considered a major threat to life but relevant knowledge was a chimera of scientific knowledge and traditional beliefs, which combined with socio-economic circumstances, leads to ineffective malaria prevention. The actual malaria prevention behaviour practiced by community members differed significantly from methods known to the respondents. Beside bednet use, the major interventions implemented were bush clearing and various hygienic measures, even though these are ineffective for malaria prevention. Encouragingly, most respondents believed malaria could be controlled and were willing to contribute to a community-based malaria control program but felt they needed outside assistance. Culturally sensitive but evidence-based education interventions, utilizing participatory tools, are urgently required which consider traditional beliefs and enable understanding of causal connections between mosquito ecology, parasite transmission and the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of disease. Community-based organizations and schools need to be equipped with knowledge through partnerships with national and international research and tertiary education institutions so that evidence-based research can be applied at the grassroots level.
2005
Lacroix, R., Mukabana, W.R., Gouagna LC, Koella JC. "Malaria Infection Increases Attractiveness of Humans to Mosquitoes." PlosBiology, . 2005;3(9):1590-1593 (e298).
2004
Mukabana, W.R., Takken, W., Killeen GF, Knols, B.G.J. "Allomonal effect of breath contributes to differential attractiveness of humans to the African malaria vector Anopheles gambiae." Malaria Journal. 2004;3:1.
Mshinda, H., Killeen, G.F., Mukabana, W.R., Mathenge, E.M., Mboera, L.E.G., Knols BGJ. "Development of genetically modified mosquitoes in Africa." Lancet Infectious Diseases. 2004;4(5):264-265.
DR. MUKABANA WOLFANGRICHARD. "African institutions to take the lead in development of GM mosquito.". In: Lancet Infectious Diseases, 4 (5), 264 -265. Journal of School of Continuous and Distance Education ; 2004. Abstract
Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 st1:*{behavior:url(#ieooui) } /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;} Integrated vector management (IVM) for malaria control requires ecological skills that are very scarce and rarely applied in Africa today. Partnerships between communities and academic ecologists can address this capacity deficit, modernize the evidence base for such approaches and enable future scale up. Community-based IVM programmes were initiated in two contrasting settings. On Rusinga Island, Western Kenya, community outreach to a marginalized rural community was achieved by University of Nairobi through a community-based organization. In Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, Ilala Municipality established an IVM programme at grassroots level, which was subsequently upgraded and expanded into a pilot scale Urban Malaria Control Programme with support from national academic institutes. Both programmes now access relevant expertise, funding and policy makers while the academic partners benefit from direct experience of community-based implementation and operational research opportunities. The communities now access up-to-date malaria-related knowledge and skills for translation into local action. Similarly, the academic partners have acquired better understanding of community needs and how to address them. Until sufficient evidence is provided, community-based IVM remains an operational research activity. Researchers can never directly support every community in Africa so community based IVM strategies and tactics will need to be incorporated into undergraduate teaching programmes to generate sufficient numbers of practitioners for national scale programmes. Academic ecologists at African institutions are uniquely positioned to enable the application of practical environmental and entomological skills for malaria control by communities at grassroots level and should be supported to fulfil this neglected role.
DR. MUKABANA WOLFANGRICHARD, DR. MUKABANA WOLFANGRICHARD. "Allomonal effect of breath contributes to differential attractiveness of humans to the African malaria vector Anopheles gambiae.". In: Malaria Journal, 3, 1. Journal of School of Continuous and Distance Education ; 2004. Abstract
Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 st1:*{behavior:url(#ieooui) } /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;} Integrated vector management (IVM) for malaria control requires ecological skills that are very scarce and rarely applied in Africa today. Partnerships between communities and academic ecologists can address this capacity deficit, modernize the evidence base for such approaches and enable future scale up. Community-based IVM programmes were initiated in two contrasting settings. On Rusinga Island, Western Kenya, community outreach to a marginalized rural community was achieved by University of Nairobi through a community-based organization. In Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, Ilala Municipality established an IVM programme at grassroots level, which was subsequently upgraded and expanded into a pilot scale Urban Malaria Control Programme with support from national academic institutes. Both programmes now access relevant expertise, funding and policy makers while the academic partners benefit from direct experience of community-based implementation and operational research opportunities. The communities now access up-to-date malaria-related knowledge and skills for translation into local action. Similarly, the academic partners have acquired better understanding of community needs and how to address them. Until sufficient evidence is provided, community-based IVM remains an operational research activity. Researchers can never directly support every community in Africa so community based IVM strategies and tactics will need to be incorporated into undergraduate teaching programmes to generate sufficient numbers of practitioners for national scale programmes. Academic ecologists at African institutions are uniquely positioned to enable the application of practical environmental and entomological skills for malaria control by communities at grassroots level and should be supported to fulfil this neglected role.
DR. MUKABANA WOLFANGRICHARD. "Mshinda, H., Killeen, G.F., Mukabana, W.R., Mathenge, E.M, Mboera, L.E.G., Knols, B.G.J., 2004, Development of genetically modified mosquitoes in Africa. Lancet Infectious Diseases, 4 (5), 264 -265.". In: Lancet Infectious Diseases, 4 (5), 264 -265. Journal of School of Continuous and Distance Education ; 2004. Abstract
Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 st1:*{behavior:url(#ieooui) } /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;} Integrated vector management (IVM) for malaria control requires ecological skills that are very scarce and rarely applied in Africa today. Partnerships between communities and academic ecologists can address this capacity deficit, modernize the evidence base for such approaches and enable future scale up. Community-based IVM programmes were initiated in two contrasting settings. On Rusinga Island, Western Kenya, community outreach to a marginalized rural community was achieved by University of Nairobi through a community-based organization. In Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, Ilala Municipality established an IVM programme at grassroots level, which was subsequently upgraded and expanded into a pilot scale Urban Malaria Control Programme with support from national academic institutes. Both programmes now access relevant expertise, funding and policy makers while the academic partners benefit from direct experience of community-based implementation and operational research opportunities. The communities now access up-to-date malaria-related knowledge and skills for translation into local action. Similarly, the academic partners have acquired better understanding of community needs and how to address them. Until sufficient evidence is provided, community-based IVM remains an operational research activity. Researchers can never directly support every community in Africa so community based IVM strategies and tactics will need to be incorporated into undergraduate teaching programmes to generate sufficient numbers of practitioners for national scale programmes. Academic ecologists at African institutions are uniquely positioned to enable the application of practical environmental and entomological skills for malaria control by communities at grassroots level and should be supported to fulfil this neglected role.
2003
DR. MUKABANA WOLFANGRICHARD, DR. MUKABANA WOLFANGRICHARD. "Contained semi-field environments for ecological studies on transgenic African malaria vectors: Benefits and constraints. In: Ecological aspects for application of genetically modified mosquitoes (W. Takken & T.W. Scott, eds.).". In: Chapter 8, pp 91 - 106. Kluwer Academic Publishers. Frontis series no. 2. Journal of School of Continuous and Distance Education ; 2003. Abstract
Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 st1:*{behavior:url(#ieooui) } /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;} Integrated vector management (IVM) for malaria control requires ecological skills that are very scarce and rarely applied in Africa today. Partnerships between communities and academic ecologists can address this capacity deficit, modernize the evidence base for such approaches and enable future scale up. Community-based IVM programmes were initiated in two contrasting settings. On Rusinga Island, Western Kenya, community outreach to a marginalized rural community was achieved by University of Nairobi through a community-based organization. In Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, Ilala Municipality established an IVM programme at grassroots level, which was subsequently upgraded and expanded into a pilot scale Urban Malaria Control Programme with support from national academic institutes. Both programmes now access relevant expertise, funding and policy makers while the academic partners benefit from direct experience of community-based implementation and operational research opportunities. The communities now access up-to-date malaria-related knowledge and skills for translation into local action. Similarly, the academic partners have acquired better understanding of community needs and how to address them. Until sufficient evidence is provided, community-based IVM remains an operational research activity. Researchers can never directly support every community in Africa so community based IVM strategies and tactics will need to be incorporated into undergraduate teaching programmes to generate sufficient numbers of practitioners for national scale programmes. Academic ecologists at African institutions are uniquely positioned to enable the application of practical environmental and entomological skills for malaria control by communities at grassroots level and should be supported to fulfil this neglected role.
2002
Mukabana, W.R., Takken W, Knols, B.G.J. "Analysis of arthropod blood meals using molecular genetic markers." Trends in Parasitology. 2002;18:505-509.
Mukabana, W.R., Takken, W., Seda, P., Killeen, G.F., Hawley WA, Knols, B.G.J. "Extent of digestion affects the success of amplifying human DNA from blood meals of Anopheles gambiae (Diptera: Culicidae). ." Bulletin of Entomological Research. 2002;92:233-239.
Mukabana, W.R. CR, Takken, W., Knols BGJ. "Host-specific cues cause differential attractiveness of Kenyan men to the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae." Malaria Journal. 2002;1:17.
Knols, B.G.J., Njiru, B.N., Mathenge, E.M., Mukabana, W.R., Beier JC, Killeen, G.F. "Malariasphere: A greenhouse-enclosed simulation of a natural Anopheles gambiae (Diptera: Culicidae) ecosystem in Western Kenya." Malaria Journal. 2002;1:19.
DR. MUKABANA WOLFANGRICHARD, DR. MUKABANA WOLFANGRICHARD, DR. MUKABANA WOLFANGRICHARD. "Analysis of arthropod blood meals using molecular genetic markers.". In: Trends in Parasitology. 18, 505-509. Journal of School of Continuous and Distance Education ; 2002. Abstract
Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 st1:*{behavior:url(#ieooui) } /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;} Integrated vector management (IVM) for malaria control requires ecological skills that are very scarce and rarely applied in Africa today. Partnerships between communities and academic ecologists can address this capacity deficit, modernize the evidence base for such approaches and enable future scale up. Community-based IVM programmes were initiated in two contrasting settings. On Rusinga Island, Western Kenya, community outreach to a marginalized rural community was achieved by University of Nairobi through a community-based organization. In Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, Ilala Municipality established an IVM programme at grassroots level, which was subsequently upgraded and expanded into a pilot scale Urban Malaria Control Programme with support from national academic institutes. Both programmes now access relevant expertise, funding and policy makers while the academic partners benefit from direct experience of community-based implementation and operational research opportunities. The communities now access up-to-date malaria-related knowledge and skills for translation into local action. Similarly, the academic partners have acquired better understanding of community needs and how to address them. Until sufficient evidence is provided, community-based IVM remains an operational research activity. Researchers can never directly support every community in Africa so community based IVM strategies and tactics will need to be incorporated into undergraduate teaching programmes to generate sufficient numbers of practitioners for national scale programmes. Academic ecologists at African institutions are uniquely positioned to enable the application of practical environmental and entomological skills for malaria control by communities at grassroots level and should be supported to fulfil this neglected role.
DR. MUKABANA WOLFANGRICHARD, DR. MUKABANA WOLFANGRICHARD. "Extent of digestion affects the success of amplifying human DNA from blood meals of Anopheles gambiae (Diptera: Culicidae). Bulletin of Entomological Research, 92, 233-239.". In: Bulletin of Entomological Research, 92, 233-239. Journal of School of Continuous and Distance Education ; 2002. Abstract
Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 st1:*{behavior:url(#ieooui) } /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;} Integrated vector management (IVM) for malaria control requires ecological skills that are very scarce and rarely applied in Africa today. Partnerships between communities and academic ecologists can address this capacity deficit, modernize the evidence base for such approaches and enable future scale up. Community-based IVM programmes were initiated in two contrasting settings. On Rusinga Island, Western Kenya, community outreach to a marginalized rural community was achieved by University of Nairobi through a community-based organization. In Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, Ilala Municipality established an IVM programme at grassroots level, which was subsequently upgraded and expanded into a pilot scale Urban Malaria Control Programme with support from national academic institutes. Both programmes now access relevant expertise, funding and policy makers while the academic partners benefit from direct experience of community-based implementation and operational research opportunities. The communities now access up-to-date malaria-related knowledge and skills for translation into local action. Similarly, the academic partners have acquired better understanding of community needs and how to address them. Until sufficient evidence is provided, community-based IVM remains an operational research activity. Researchers can never directly support every community in Africa so community based IVM strategies and tactics will need to be incorporated into undergraduate teaching programmes to generate sufficient numbers of practitioners for national scale programmes. Academic ecologists at African institutions are uniquely positioned to enable the application of practical environmental and entomological skills for malaria control by communities at grassroots level and should be supported to fulfil this neglected role.
DR. MUKABANA WOLFANGRICHARD. "A greenhouse-based simulation of a natural Anopheles gambiae (Diptera: Culicidae) ecosystem in Western Kenya.". In: Malaria Journal, 1, 19. Journal of School of Continuous and Distance Education ; 2002. Abstract
Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 st1:*{behavior:url(#ieooui) } /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;} Integrated vector management (IVM) for malaria control requires ecological skills that are very scarce and rarely applied in Africa today. Partnerships between communities and academic ecologists can address this capacity deficit, modernize the evidence base for such approaches and enable future scale up. Community-based IVM programmes were initiated in two contrasting settings. On Rusinga Island, Western Kenya, community outreach to a marginalized rural community was achieved by University of Nairobi through a community-based organization. In Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, Ilala Municipality established an IVM programme at grassroots level, which was subsequently upgraded and expanded into a pilot scale Urban Malaria Control Programme with support from national academic institutes. Both programmes now access relevant expertise, funding and policy makers while the academic partners benefit from direct experience of community-based implementation and operational research opportunities. The communities now access up-to-date malaria-related knowledge and skills for translation into local action. Similarly, the academic partners have acquired better understanding of community needs and how to address them. Until sufficient evidence is provided, community-based IVM remains an operational research activity. Researchers can never directly support every community in Africa so community based IVM strategies and tactics will need to be incorporated into undergraduate teaching programmes to generate sufficient numbers of practitioners for national scale programmes. Academic ecologists at African institutions are uniquely positioned to enable the application of practical environmental and entomological skills for malaria control by communities at grassroots level and should be supported to fulfil this neglected role.
DR. MUKABANA WOLFANGRICHARD, DR. MUKABANA WOLFANGRICHARD. "Host-specific cues cause differential attractiveness of Kenyan men to the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae.". In: Malaria Journal, 1, 17. Journal of School of Continuous and Distance Education ; 2002. Abstract
Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 st1:*{behavior:url(#ieooui) } /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;} Integrated vector management (IVM) for malaria control requires ecological skills that are very scarce and rarely applied in Africa today. Partnerships between communities and academic ecologists can address this capacity deficit, modernize the evidence base for such approaches and enable future scale up. Community-based IVM programmes were initiated in two contrasting settings. On Rusinga Island, Western Kenya, community outreach to a marginalized rural community was achieved by University of Nairobi through a community-based organization. In Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, Ilala Municipality established an IVM programme at grassroots level, which was subsequently upgraded and expanded into a pilot scale Urban Malaria Control Programme with support from national academic institutes. Both programmes now access relevant expertise, funding and policy makers while the academic partners benefit from direct experience of community-based implementation and operational research opportunities. The communities now access up-to-date malaria-related knowledge and skills for translation into local action. Similarly, the academic partners have acquired better understanding of community needs and how to address them. Until sufficient evidence is provided, community-based IVM remains an operational research activity. Researchers can never directly support every community in Africa so community based IVM strategies and tactics will need to be incorporated into undergraduate teaching programmes to generate sufficient numbers of practitioners for national scale programmes. Academic ecologists at African institutions are uniquely positioned to enable the application of practical environmental and entomological skills for malaria control by communities at grassroots level and should be supported to fulfil this neglected role.
DR. MUKABANA WOLFANGRICHARD. "Knols, B.G.J., Njiru, B.N., Mathenge, E.M., Mukabana, W.R., Beier, J.C. & Killeen, G.F., 2002, Malariasphere: A greenhouse-enclosed simulation of a natural Anopheles gambiae (Diptera: Culicidae) ecosystem in Western Kenya. Malaria Journal, 1, 19. http://w.". In: Malaria Journal, 1, 19. Journal of School of Continuous and Distance Education ; 2002. Abstract
Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 st1:*{behavior:url(#ieooui) } /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;} Integrated vector management (IVM) for malaria control requires ecological skills that are very scarce and rarely applied in Africa today. Partnerships between communities and academic ecologists can address this capacity deficit, modernize the evidence base for such approaches and enable future scale up. Community-based IVM programmes were initiated in two contrasting settings. On Rusinga Island, Western Kenya, community outreach to a marginalized rural community was achieved by University of Nairobi through a community-based organization. In Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, Ilala Municipality established an IVM programme at grassroots level, which was subsequently upgraded and expanded into a pilot scale Urban Malaria Control Programme with support from national academic institutes. Both programmes now access relevant expertise, funding and policy makers while the academic partners benefit from direct experience of community-based implementation and operational research opportunities. The communities now access up-to-date malaria-related knowledge and skills for translation into local action. Similarly, the academic partners have acquired better understanding of community needs and how to address them. Until sufficient evidence is provided, community-based IVM remains an operational research activity. Researchers can never directly support every community in Africa so community based IVM strategies and tactics will need to be incorporated into undergraduate teaching programmes to generate sufficient numbers of practitioners for national scale programmes. Academic ecologists at African institutions are uniquely positioned to enable the application of practical environmental and entomological skills for malaria control by communities at grassroots level and should be supported to fulfil this neglected role.
1999
Kamau, L., Mukabana, W.R., Hawley, W.A., Lehmann, T., Irungu, L.W., Orago AA, Collins, F.H. "Analysis of genetic variability in Anopheles arabiensis and Anopheles gambiae using microsatelite loci. ." Insect Molecular Biology. 1999;8:287-297.
DR. MUKABANA WOLFANGRICHARD, DR. MUKABANA WOLFANGRICHARD. "Analysis of genetic variability in Anopheles arabiensis and Anopheles gambiae using microsatelite loci.". In: Insect Molecular Biology, 8, 287-297. Journal of School of Continuous and Distance Education ; 1999. Abstract
Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 st1:*{behavior:url(#ieooui) } /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;} Integrated vector management (IVM) for malaria control requires ecological skills that are very scarce and rarely applied in Africa today. Partnerships between communities and academic ecologists can address this capacity deficit, modernize the evidence base for such approaches and enable future scale up. Community-based IVM programmes were initiated in two contrasting settings. On Rusinga Island, Western Kenya, community outreach to a marginalized rural community was achieved by University of Nairobi through a community-based organization. In Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, Ilala Municipality established an IVM programme at grassroots level, which was subsequently upgraded and expanded into a pilot scale Urban Malaria Control Programme with support from national academic institutes. Both programmes now access relevant expertise, funding and policy makers while the academic partners benefit from direct experience of community-based implementation and operational research opportunities. The communities now access up-to-date malaria-related knowledge and skills for translation into local action. Similarly, the academic partners have acquired better understanding of community needs and how to address them. Until sufficient evidence is provided, community-based IVM remains an operational research activity. Researchers can never directly support every community in Africa so community based IVM strategies and tactics will need to be incorporated into undergraduate teaching programmes to generate sufficient numbers of practitioners for national scale programmes. Academic ecologists at African institutions are uniquely positioned to enable the application of practical environmental and entomological skills for malaria control by communities at grassroots level and should be supported to fulfil this neglected role.

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