Publications

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Book
Mulwa AS. Social Studies: Teaching Techniques and Map Reading. Nairobi, Kenya: Kingtech Pubishers; 2007.
HAMU PROFHABWEJOHN. Sofia Mzimuni. Longhorn Publishers; 2007.
Mito CO. SPH 405: Electrodynamics II. Nairobi: University of Nairobi press; 2007.
Inyega J. Teaching online courses: Lessons learned. College Reading Association Yearbook; 2007.
Wamitila KW. Uncle's Joke: A Play.; 2007.Website
MBATIAH PMWENDA. Vipanya vya Maabara. NAIROBI: Jomo Kenyatta Foundation (winner of the Wahome Mutahi Prize); 2007.
Cerda C;, Diafas J;, Barkmann J;, Mburu J;, Marggraf R. WTP or WTA, or Both? Experiences from Two Choice Experiments for Early Planning Stages. In: Meyerhoff J., N. Lienhoop and P. Elsasser, eds. State Preference Methods for Environmental Valuation: Applications from Germany and Austria.; 2007. AbstractWebsite

The optimised design of project alternatives is a main challenge for the early stage of any real-world planning process. For participatory conservation planning procedures as required, e.g., by the CBD (Convention on Biological Diversity) Ecosystem Approach, it is essential to involve concerned stakeholders – and their values – as early as possible. We argue that the utilisation of choice experiments offers an attractive solution to the problem of an optimised design of project alternatives. In particular, we report experiences from two case studies employing choice experiments to generate policy advice. In both case studies, the necessity of dealing with the ambiguities of participatory planning processes led to the adoption of a payment vehicle format that includes WTP and WTA attribute levels. Like several other studies, we found evidence of WTP/WTA disparities that argue for reporting both values to stakeholders and administrators.

Gardner DG, Shoback DM. Greenspan's basic & clinical endocrinology. McGraw-Hill Medical New York:; 2007. Abstract
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Riechi A, Otieno M. The impact of HIV and AIDS on teachers in Kenya: A pilot study in Nairobi, Machakos and Siaya districts. Nairobi: Institute of Policy Analysis and Research; 2007. Abstract
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Ndetei DM, Othieno CJ, Kilonzo G, Mburu J, Tarek O. The African Textbook of Clinical Psychiatry and Mental Health. Nairobi: African Medical and Research Foundation (AMREF); 2006.the_african_textbook_of_clinical_psychiatry_and_mental_health_2.pdfWebsite
J.S. S, S.M. M. Agricultural Investment in Eastern Kenya. Nairobi: Interregional Economic Network; 2006.
Wamitila KW. Chura na ndovu.; 2006.Website
Kameri-Mbote P. Conflict and Cooperation: Making the Case for Environmental Pathways to Peacebuilding in the Great Lakes Region.; 2006. AbstractWebsite

Authoritarian regimes, genocides, and civil wars have plagued countries in the Great Lakes Region in recent years. The region’s nations rely heavily on natural resources—water, minerals, land—for their economic development, as well as for the livelihoods of their people, and many of the region’s conflicts are connected to these resources or other environmental factors. Opportunities for environmental peacemaking in the Great Lakes Region have not yet been isolated, even though there are many examples of cooperation at the national, regional, sub-regional, and local levels. This brief examines the possibility of using environmental management as a pathway to peace in the region.With its prevalence of conflict and transboundary ecosystems, the Great Lakes Region could be a potential model for a future worldwide initiative in environmental peacemaking

Owuor SO, Foeken D. The crops.; 2006.Website
Hamu PJH, Matei A. Darubini ya Kiswahili. Phoenix Publishers; 2006.
Mulwa MR. Economic and Environmental Performance of Sugarcane Production in Kenya: Non-Parametric Frontier Approaches. Farming and Rural System Economics, Volume 84, Magraf-Verlag Publishers, Weikersheim, Germany: ; 2006.
KYALO DN, OBANDO A. Fasihi Simulizi for Secondary schools. . Nairobi,: Napunyi publishers,; 2006.
Mugambi JNK, Kebreab G. Fresh Water to Eradicate Poverty. Oslo: Norwegian Church Aid; 2006.
Wamukowa N. A general survey of map projections, . Nairobi: Basic Books (K) LTD; 2006.
Mwaniki JM. Heterocyclic Chemistry Volume 1. 2006: University of Nairobi; 2006.
Mwaniki DJM. Heterocyclic Chemistry Volume 2. Nairobi: University of Nairobi; 2006.
Kimani M, Kiragu K, Mannathoko C. HIV/AIDS and Teachers in Kenya. Nairobi: UNICEF; 2006.
Mbwesa J. Introduction to Management Research, A student’s handbook. NAIROBI: Jomo Kenyatta Foundation; 2006.
KYALO DN, OBANDO A. IsimuJamii for secondary schools. Nairobi: Napunyi Publishers; 2006.
Wamitila KW. Jumba la huzuni.; 2006.Website
Wamitila KW. Kamusi ya ushairi.; 2006.Website
Wamitila KW. Kesi ya kuchekesha.; 2006.Website
Wamitila KW. Kuku na mwewe.; 2006.Website
Musyoka W. Law of Succession.. Nairobi: LawAfrica Publishing (K) Limited.; 2006.
Musyoka W. Law of Succession.. Nairobi: LawAfrica Publishing (K) Limited.; 2006.
Amiri S. M wongozo wa Kif o Kisimani. Nairobi: Longhorn Publishers; 2006.
8. KYALO DN, OBANDO A(. Maswali na Majibu (sample papers) for form four KCSE revision. Nairobi,: Jomo Kenyatta Publishers; 2006.
Oriare P. The Media ahd the Public Good at Strathmore University Annual Conference. Nairobi: Strathmore University; 2006.
MBATIAH PMWENDA. Migogoro . NAIROBI: Jomo Kenyatta Foundation; 2006.
KYALO DN, OBANDO A. Miongozo ya vitabu vya fasihi (kanda za kusikizia na vitabu). Nairobi: Napunyi Publishers; 2006.
Wamitila KW. Mwanakijiji na miwani.; 2006.Website
Non communicable Diseases in Adults. Nairobi: University of Nairobi; 2006.
Oral Cancer In Kenya. In Solid Tissue Tumours Handbook.. Nairobi: University of Nairobi; 2006.
Wasamba P, Indangasi H. Our Narratives our Landscapes: Relationship between Creativity and Environmental Conservation. Nairobi: Kenya Oral Literature Association; 2006.
Kamenju J, Mwathi L. Primary Teacher Education Physical Education.; 2006.
S MRWANYAMAJOSEPH. SEIZING THE NIGHT. Nairobi: Blue Hills; 2006.Website
N.M.Monyonko. STATISTICAL PHYSICS. NAIROBI: UNIVERSITY OF NAIROBI ; 2006.
Wamitila KW. Sumu ya bafe.; 2006.Website
Owuor SO;, Foeken D, King’ori PW. The support.; 2006.Website
Nyarwath O, Omosa M, Njeru G, Ontita E. Theory and Practice of Governance in Kenya. Nairobi: University of Nairobi Press; 2006.
Nyarwath O, Omosa M, Njeru GR, Ontita E. Theory and Practice of Governance in Kenya: Towards Civic Engagement. Nairobi: University of Nairobi Press; 2006.
Ontita E, Njeru GR, Omosa M, Nyarwath O. Theory and practice of governance in Kenya: towards civic engagement.; 2006.Website
Wamitila KW. Yatima.; 2006.Website
Guyton A, Hall J. Guyton {Textbook} {Of} {Medical} {Physiology} 11th {Edition}. 11th ed. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: Elsevier Inc.; 2006. AbstractWebsite

guyton

Riechi ARO, Mbiti DM, Kisilu B. Policy gaps and suggested strategies of enhancing access to early childhood development and education in Kenya. Institute of Policy Analysis and Research; 2006. Abstract
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Riechi ARO. Towards improving Kenya's primary education: suggested policy interventions. Institute of Policy Analysis and Research; 2006. Abstract
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Nganga W. Word Sense Disambiguation of Swahili: Extending Swahili Language Technology with Machine Learning. Helsinki University Press; 2005. Abstract

This thesis addresses the problem of word sense disambiguation within the context of Swahili-English machine translation. In this setup, the goal of disambiguation is to choose the correct translation of an ambiguous Swahili noun in context. A corpus based approach to disambiguation is taken, where machine learning techniques are applied to a corpus of Swahili, to acquire disambiguation information automatically. In particular, the Self-Organizing Map algorithm is used to obtain a semantic categorization of Swahili nouns from data. The resulting classes form the basis of a class-based solution, where disambiguation is recast as a classification problem. The thesis exploits these semantic classes to automatically obtain annotated training data, addressing a key problem facing supervised word sense disambiguation. The semantic and linguistic characteristics of these classes are modelled as Bayesian belief networks, using the Bayesian Modelling Toolbox. Disambiguation is achieved via probabilistic inferencing.The thesisdevelops a disambiguation solution which does not make extensive resource requirements, but rather capitalizes on freely-available lexical and computational resources for English as a source of additional disambiguation information. A semantic tagger for Swahili is created by altering the configuration of the Bayesian classifiers. The disambiguation solution is tested on a subset of unambiguous nouns and a manually created gold standard of sixteen ambiguous nouns, using standard performance evaluation metrics.

(Editor) FM,(Editor) HN. 3. Africa Imperatives in the World Trade Order: Case Studies on Kenya. , 2005.. Nairobi: AERC.-KIPPRA; 2005.
Oyugi, Lutiali, Saka, Musumba. Au Sommet 3: Une approche Intégrée et communicative . Nairobi: Kenya Literature Bureau; 2005.
Crossland JIM, Morcom N. The catchment to coast continuum.; 2005.Website
C.O.N K, Anne N. Chosing a Spouse. In Kassim A (2005) True Love Waits(Eds). Nairobi: BARA manual ; 2005.
Shrestha KB;, Jha PK;, Suman S. Commercial distribution of tree seed in small bags - results from a pilot and action research project in Nepal.; 2005. AbstractWebsite

Access to quality tree seed implies specific problems for tree planting farmers in developing countries. Since most of them are smallholders, they need only few seed. Distribution networks usually do not exist for such small quantities. In 2001 it was decided to test a new approach to distribution of tree seed on a pilot basis in Nepal: Commercial distribution of tree seed in small bags through commercial enterprises dealing with horticultural and agricultural seed. In Nepal, such enterprises are known as agro-vets. The development objectives were (a) to increase access to high quality tree seed for farmers, FUG and other small-scale tree-planters, and (b) to support the operations of two tree seed co-operatives, NAFSCOL-Kaski and NAFSCOL-Kabhre by contributing to their increased turnover. The research objectives were to assess the financial, viability and social biodiversity impact of the approach cf. the project description in annex 1. The pilot project ran from 2003-2004 and had two phases. During phase 1, the pilot project was prepared and implemented. Small bags were designed, produced and packed with tree seed from five different fodder species. Agro-vet dealers located in all the different regions of Nepal sold the bags. During phase 2, lessons learned from the pilot project were collected and analysed. Distribution channel: the pilot project confirms that agro-vets can work as channels for reaching small-scale tree planters. There is scope for developing the market further through advertisement and by targeting FUG more directly. Species: the project included five fodder tree species. The choice of these species was appropriate in the sense that the species sold well. Dealers and customers suggested more species to be included. Size of bags: two sizes of bags were produced and distributed with a view to testing which of them would be the most suitable. The smallest bags contained seed for 50 seedlings, the larger bags for 500. The smallest size appeared to be the most suitable, especially for private nurseries, farmers and other small-scale tree planters. The larger size was useful but not required for targeting large-scale tree planters. Design: dealers and customers appreciated the aluminium material and the colourful and attractive design of the bags. The design and the dealers helped convincing the customers to buy the seed. Information on the bags: the respondents found that the information printed on the bags was useful, but requested additional information on sowing season. Some dealers had ordered a second lot of small bags. These bags were not packed properly, which may have implied loss of credibility. Guidelines on germination: guidelines on how to make the seed germinate were elaborated as part of the project. Brochures containing the guidelines were added to the bags and distributed to dealers and other interested persons. Only few of the interviewed customers consulted the guidelines.

Makau BF. Comparative analysis of veterinary drugs delivery mechanisms in the arid lands of Kenya.; 2005. AbstractWebsite

As in other remote, inaccessible pastoral areas of the world, access to quality drugs in a timely and affordable manner remains a major problem in the ASAL areas of Kenya. Several drug delivery mechanisms have been tried by different organisations, but it appears none of them has proved to be satisfactory. This study was therefore launched to carry out a comparative analysis of the different models of running the drug stores, their strengths and limitations, compare their effectiveness and sustainability and provide guidelines for subsequent implementation, monitoring and evaluation of the different delivery systems to ensure effectiveness and value to the pastoral communities. The findings and conclusions in this report are based on observations and interviews with stakeholders and key informants in Nairobi as well as in all the 11 arid districts and one semi- arid district (West Pokot)

Wasamba P, Mutea Z. Curriculum for Trainers on Gender Equality and Women’s Participation in Local Governance. Nairobi: Kenya Oral Literature Association; 2005.
Wanjala C. Drums of Death. Nairobi: Africawide Network; 2005.
Ininda JM. DYNAMIC METREOROLOGY II (SMR 401). Nairobi: University Of Nairobi; 2005. AbstractUniversity of Nairobi

This course is a continuation of Dynamic Meteorology I (SMR401). If you studied SMR301 a long while ago, it
may be advisable to review it once more before you embark on this course. As you worked through SMR301, you may have been introduced to several equations and may be wondering why this course appear to be mathematical. Well, as you may have already found out, there are many processes that take place in the atmosphere, dynamic meteorology will seek not only to explain how this comes about, but also to express the relationship between the forces involved in a mathematical form.

Musingi JK. Explore Geography Learners Form 3.. Longman Kenya; 2005. AbstractWebsite

The  study found out that Masinga Dam has adversely affected the public health in the communities around the dam. malaria was the most prevalent ailment followed by typhoid fever. Bilharzia has also increased since the dam was constructed.

Kristensen K;, Larsen B;J, Madsen P. Forest rehabilitation in Denmark using nature-based forestry .; 2005.Website
Subbo W, et al. Gender Training Manual. Nairobi: Catholic Secretariat; 2005.training_manual.pdf
Boniface; Makau, F; Wellington, N; Ekaya J;, Gathuma M. Guidelines For Emergency Livestock Off -take Handbook.; 2005. AbstractWebsite

Kenya’s agricultural sector accounts for 20–30% of the gross domestic product (GDP). Of this, the livestock sector alone makes a contribution of about 50%. Thus, livestock contributes heavily to the GDP and food security of its population. It also provides the necessary thrust for other forms of development in the country. Recent statistics indicate that currently over 50% of the country’s livestock population is based in the arid and semi-arid lands (ASALs), which form about 80% of the country’s land area. However, comparative international statistics show that livestock contributes 88% of the total agricultural output in Botswana even though the country has half Kenya’s livestock population and is of less agricultural potential. Thus, there is a huge potential contribution that livestock can make to the Kenyan national economy. Unfortunately, this sector receives only 10% of the government’s agricultural expenditure and less than one per cent of total spending, yet it is estimated that Kenya’s potential to export livestock products if adequately exploited would earn more than the earnings from tea and coffee combined. This then calls for new thinking about livestock development strategies to harness the arid landsThe livestock sector accounts for 90% of employment and more than 95% of household incomes in the ASALs. Most of the livestock slaughtered in major urban centres originates in these areas, with an annual slaughter of about 1.6 million Tropical Livestock Units. Kenya’s livestock from the ASALs is worth Kshs 60 billion (US$800 million). The internal livestock trade in trade in thepastoral areas alone nets in about 6 billion shillings (US$80 million )a yearIn the arid areas of the ASALs, arable crop production is not possible without some form of irrigation; while in semi-arid areas rainfall may be sufficient for certain types of crops, requiring special management techniques. Therefore, except for the areaunder cropping, the rest of the arid areas is used for livestock.......

Wellington, N; Ekaya, Joseph; Gathuma M, Boniface; Makau F;, Dickson, M; Nyariki. Guidelines For Emergency Livestock Off -take Handbook.; 2005. AbstractWebsite

Kenya’s agricultural sector accounts for 20–30% of the gross domestic product (GDP). Of this, the livestock sector alone makes a contribution of about 50%. Thus, livestock contributes heavily to the GDP and food security of its population. It also provides the necessary thrust for other forms of development in the country. Recent statistics indicate that currently over 50% of the country’s livestock population is based in the arid and semi-arid lands (ASALs), which form about 80% of the country’s land area. However, comparative international statistics show that livestock contributes 88% of the total agricultural output in Botswana even though the country has half Kenya’s livestock population and is of less agricultural potential. Thus, there is a huge potential contribution that livestock can make to the Kenyan national economy. Unfortunately, this sector receives only 10% of the government’s agricultural expenditure and less than one per cent of total spending, yet it is estimated that Kenya’s potential to export livestock products if adequately exploited would earn more than the earnings from tea and coffee combined. This then calls for new thinking about livestock development strategies to harness the arid landsThe livestock sector accounts for 90% of employment and more than 95% of household incomes in the ASALs. Most of the livestock slaughtered in major urban centres originates in these areas, with an annual slaughter of about 1.6 million Tropical Livestock Units. Kenya’s livestock from the ASALs is worth Kshs 60 billion (US$800 million). The internal livestock trade in trade in thepastoral areas alone nets in about 6 billion shillings (US$80 million )a yearIn the arid areas of the ASALs, arable crop production is not possible without some form of irrigation; while in semi-arid areas rainfall may be sufficient for certain types of crops, requiring special management techniques. Therefore, except for the areaunder cropping, the rest of the arid areas is used for livestock......

Joseph; Gathuma M, Dickson, M; Nyariki, Wellington, N; Ekaya, Boniface; Makau F;. Guidelines For Emergency Livestock Off -take Handbook.; 2005. AbstractWebsite

Kenya’s agricultural sector accounts for 20–30% of the gross domestic product (GDP). Of this, the livestock sector alone makes a contribution of about 50%. Thus, livestock contributes heavily to the GDP and food security of its population. It also provides the necessary thrust for other forms of development in the country. Recent statistics indicate that currently over 50% of the country’s livestock population is based in the arid and semi-arid lands (ASALs), which form about 80% of the country’s land area. However, comparative international statistics show that livestock contributes 88% of the total agricultural output in Botswana even though the country has half Kenya’s livestock population and is of less agricultural potential. Thus, there is a huge potential contribution that livestock can make to the Kenyan national economy. Unfortunately, this sector receives only 10% of the government’s agricultural expenditure and less than one per cent of total spending, yet it is estimated that Kenya’s potential to export livestock products if adequately exploited would earn more than the earnings from tea and coffee combined. This then calls for new thinking about livestock development strategies to harness the arid landsThe livestock sector accounts for 90% of employment and more than 95% of household incomes in the ASALs. Most of the livestock slaughtered in major urban centres originates in these areas, with an annual slaughter of about 1.6 million Tropical Livestock Units. Kenya’s livestock from the ASALs is worth Kshs 60 billion (US$800 million). The internal livestock trade in trade in thepastoral areas alone nets in about 6 billion shillings (US$80 million )a yearIn the arid areas of the ASALs, arable crop production is not possible without some form of irrigation; while in semi-arid areas rainfall may be sufficient for certain types of crops, requiring special management techniques. Therefore, except for the areaunder cropping, the rest of the arid areas is used for livestock.......

Kameri-Mbote P, Ikdahl I, Hellum A, Kaarhhus R, Benjaminsen TA. Human Rights, Formalisation And Women's Land Rights In Southern And Eastern Africa.; 2005.Website
Ikiara GK, Mbataru P, Kariuki J, Tallio V. Kenyan studies.; 2005.Website
Kithung'a P. Nzuki Marketing Communications, An E. Nairobi: University of Nairobi; 2005. AbstractWebsite
We are interested in pricing rainfall options written on precipitation at specific locations. We assume the existence of a tradeable financial instrument in the market whose price process is affected by the quantity of rainfall. We then construct a suitable
Wamitila KW. Matatu.; 2005.Website
T.K. M. Medicinal Plants of Kenya. IDRC-KARI-ISBN 9966-879-68-4; 2005.
and van Oucho, P. Kok GOZDJOJ. Migration in South and Southern Africa. Pretoria: HSRC Press; 2005.
MUMMA_MARTINON CA. nflict And Litigation Between Oil Companies And Village Communities.. Rutgers University: Transaction Publishers; 2005.book_review.pdf
Wasamba P. Notes on Marjorie Oludhe Macgoye’s Coming to Birth. Nairobi: Marimba ; 2005.
HAMU PROFHABWEJOHN. Paradiso. Nairobi: Jomo Kenyatta Foundation; 2005.
Olubayo FM, Nyeko P;. PARTICIPATORY ASSESSMENT OF FARMERS’ EXPERIENCES OF TERMITE PROBLEMS INAGROFORESTRY IN TORORO DISTRICT, UGANDA.; 2005. AbstractWebsite

As agroforestry technologies are developed and promoted, there is a need to integrate indigenous knowledge about pest identification and management techniques into the scaling-up process in order to improve farmers’ pest management practices. This paper documents farmers’ knowledge, perceptions and management practices against termites in agroforestry in Tororo District, Uganda. The applicability and implications of such information in the development and promotion of sustainable termite management in agroforestry are discussed.

Odada PEO, Olago PDO, Ochola W, Ntiba M, Wandiga S, Gichuki N, Oyieke H. PROCEEDINGS OF THE 11 TH WORLD LAKES CONFERENCE, NAIROBI, KENYA, 31 OCTOBER TO 4TH NOVEMBER 2005 . Nairobi: PASS Publication; 2005. AbstractWebsite

Abstract
Winam Gulf is a large (surface area ~ 1400 km2) and shallow (<20 m) bay of northeastern Lake Victoria with only one connection to the open lake through Rusinga Channel. To understand the exchange dynamics between Winam Gulf and the offshore waters of Lake Victoria and the hydrodynamics of the region, field studies were carried out from Apr. 22-May 4 and Aug. 5-16 of 2005. A meteorological station (shortwave, total radiation, air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and direction), thermistor chain (0.75 m vertical resolution) and ADCP (40cm vertical resolution) were deployed in Rusinga Channel in a depth of 20 m. Similarly, at an offshore station in northeastern Lake Victoria another thermistor chain was deployed in a water depth of 40 m along with wind speed and direction sensors.

Over both field campaigns the exchange dynamics through Rusinga Channel behaved similar to a tidally- driven system with surface level fluctuations of between 5-15 cm at the ADCP location, and much larger excursions at the eastern end of Winam Gulf. In general, these surface level movements led to barotropically driven flows into the Gulf during rising surface levels and currents towards the open lake during falling lake level. The frequency of these currents was found to vary between 6 and 12 hours and current speeds ranged from 10-50 cm s-1. Field data and ELCOM simulations indicate that despite the high current velocities in the channel the net exchange is low due to the oscillatory nature of the forcing. This implies that the Gulf is relatively decoupled from the main lake.

Key words: Lake Victoria, Exchange flow, Flushing times

OTIENO PROFMWANDAWALTER. Psychological aspects of the paediatric cancer patients. MBA; 2005. AbstractWebsite

D. M. Ndetei, D. M. Kathuku, O. W. Mwanda. Research proposal: Psychological aspects of the paediatric cancer patients in Kenyatta National Hospital . 2005

Ndugire N;, K’omudho B;, Kuhumba F;, Onyango JC;, Okoth MW;, Magambo J;, Ikiara M;, Mutunga C. Selection, design and implementation of economic instruments in the solid waste management sector in Kenya: The case of plastic bags.; 2005. AbstractWebsite

The generation of solid waste has become an increasing environmental and public health problem everywhere in the world, but particularly in developing countries. The fast expansion of urban, agricultural and industrial activities spurred by rapid population growth has produced vast amounts of solid and liquid wastes that pollute the environment and destroy resources.

Njeri KM, Meleckidzedeck K. Social Capital, Micro and Small Enterprises and Poverty Alleviation.. Addis Ababa: OSSREA; 2005.
Wamitila KW. Tamthilia ya maisha.; 2005.Website
McCluskey WJ, K'akumu A, Olima WHA. Theoretical Basis of Land Value Taxation.; 2005.Website
MBATIAH PMWENDA. Upotevu. NAIROBI: Phoenix Publishers; 2005.
Oluoch-Kosura, W; Karugia JT, W; Karugia JT. Why the early promise for rapid increases in maize productivity in Kenya was not sustained: lessons for sustainable investment in agriculture.; 2005. AbstractWebsite

The influence of climatic, policy and institutional-related (infrastructure, technology, institutional support) factors on the decline in maize output and yields and the subsequent deepening and broadening of food poverty in Kenya is discussed. This chapter provides lessons to enable a re-focusing of attention on ways to achieve sustainable investment in agriculture in order to improve the livelihoods of the majority of households in Kenya.

Oluoch-Kosura W;, Karugia JT. Why the early promise for rapid increases in maize productivity in Kenya was not sustained: lessons for sustainable investment in agriculture.; 2005. AbstractWebsite

The influence of climatic, policy and institutional-related (infrastructure, technology, institutional support) factors on the decline in maize output and yields and the subsequent deepening and broadening of food poverty in Kenya is discussed. This chapter provides lessons to enable a re-focusing of attention on ways to achieve sustainable investment in agriculture in order to improve the livelihoods of the majority of households in Kenya.

Mescher A. Junqueira's {Basic} {Histology}: {Text} . 12th ed. McGraw-Hill Education; 2005. AbstractWebsite
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Clark OH, Duh Q-Y, Kebebew E. Textbook of endocrine surgery. WB Saunders Company; 2005. Abstract
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Mbithi PMF;, Mwangi JAN. Principles of Veterinary Surgery  .; 2004.Website
editor Jesse N.K. Mugambi, editor Frank Kürschner Pelkmann. 7 2004 Church-State Relations: A Challenge for African Christianity, Nairobi: Acton (with Frank Kürschner-Pelkmann).. Nairobi: Acton; 2004.
Nyandemo S, Singh. Aspects of project planning, monitoring, evaluation and implementation. Bishen Sighn Publishers; 2004.
Rose D. CHARACTERISTICS OF DROPOUTS AMONG UPPER PRIMARY PUPILS - TEACHERS' PERCEPTIONS. Germany: VDM Verlag Dr. Muller GmbH & Co. KG; 2004.
Mwai OA;, Rosati A;, Tewolde A;, Mosconi C. Development of livestock production systems in Africa..; 2004.Website
Mwai OA, Mitaru B;, Rosati A;, Tewolde A;, Mosconi C. Development of livestock production systems in Africa..; 2004.Website
Bahemuka J,(Eds) JB. East Africa in Transition: Images, Institutions and Identities. Nairobi: University of Nairobi Press; 2004.
F.G M, Anne N. Educational Policy and Planning. NAIROBI: KTTC-VVOB; 2004.
Gatumu HN. EGC 500: Research Methods in Counselling. Nairobi: Kenyatta University; 2004.
Gatumu HN. EGC 501: Research Statistics and Data Processing. Nairobi: Kenyatta University press; 2004.
Gatumu HN. EGC 501: Research Statistics and Data Processing. Nairobi: Kenyatta University press; 2004.
N.M.Monyonko. ELECTRICITY AND MAGNETISM TW0. NAIROBI: UNIVERSITY OF NAIROBI; 2004.
Gatumu HN. EPS 402: Educational Statistics and Evaluation. Nairobi: Kenyatta University press; 2004.
Gatumu HN. EPS 402: Educational Statistics and Evaluation. Nairobi: Kenyatta University press; 2004.
Githiori J;, Mbaabu M;, poke L;, Miaron. J;, Omari P. Ethnoveterinary Practices in Eastern Africa.; 2004.Website
Miaron. J;, Omari P, poke L;, Mbaria. JM;, Mbaabu M;, Githiori J;. Ethnoveterinary Practices in Eastern Africa.; 2004.Website
and D.N. Kariuki PMCAMN. Explore Chemistry, Form 3.; 2004.
Kioko UM, Guthrie T, Lara G, Sumbana H, Phororo H, Kerapeletswe C, Fairstein C, Valdes A, Sotomayor J, Darce D. Funding the fight: Budgeting for HIV/AIDS in Developing Countries. ISBN 1-919798-71-4, . Idasa, Cape Town; 2004.
K DRKARIUKIDAVID. General and Inorganic Chemistry Book for First Year Distance Learners. Vaccine 26:2788- 2795; 2004. AbstractWebsite

OBJECTIVE: To determine the bacteriology and antibiotic sensitivity of the bacterial isolates in chronic maxillary sinusitis patients seen at the Kenyatta National Hospital. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING: Kenyatta National Hospital, ENT department. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Seventy-three patients had bilateral sntral washout done and the lavage submitted for culture and anti-microbial sensitivity between January and June 1996. RESULTS: Antral lavage yielded secretions in 63% of patients but bacteria were cultured in only 28.8% of the specimens. The isolates included Streptococcus pneumonia (22.2%), Staphylocococus albus (18.5%), Staphylocococus aureus (11.1%) and Enterobactericiae (11.1%). Anaerobic bacteria were cultured in 22.2% of the specimens. Of the commonly used antibiotics, there was high sensitivity to erythromycin, cefadroxyl, chloramphenicol and amoxicillin and poor sensitivity to ampicillin, cotrimoxazole and perfloxacin. CONCLUSION: The bacteriology of chronic maxillary sinusitis at Kenyatta National Hospital is generally similar to that found elsewhere. The bacteria are susceptible to relatively affordable antibiotics like amoxicillin, erythromycin and cefadroxyl.

Mulei CM;, Nguhiu-Mwangi, Mbithi PMF;. Handbook of the Principles of General Veterinary Surgery.; 2004.Website
Nguhiu-Mwangi, Mbithi PMF;, Mulei CM;. Handbook of the Principles of General Veterinary Surgery.; 2004.Website
Michael A, Walker C, Machera M, Paul Kamau, Kanyinga K, Omondi C. The Impact of HIV/AIDS on Land Rights: Case Studies from Kenya. Cape Town: Human Science Research Council Publishers; 2004.
Odipo G, Bowa O. Industrial Geography. . Nairobi: College of Education and External Studies Press, University of Nairobi; 2004.
Kithung'a P. Nzuki Consumer Behaviour,. Nairobi: University of Nairobi; 2004. AbstractWebsite
We are interested in pricing rainfall options written on precipitation at specific locations. We assume the existence of a tradeable financial instrument in the market whose price process is affected by the quantity of rainfall. We then construct a suitable
Hamu PJH, Karanja P. Misingi ya Sarufi ya Kiswahili. Phoenix Publishers; 2004.
Wamitila KW. Musaleo!.; 2004.Website
Machera M, ed) SA(. Opening a Can of Worms: A Debate on Female Sexuality in the Lecture Theatre. Uppsala: Nordic Africa Institute; 2004.
Yusuf A. Organic Chemistry 2 (SCH 202). Nairobi: University of Nairobi Press; 2004.scan0023.pdf
Kamenju J, Mwathi L, Kiganjo G. Physical Education Form Three Teacher's Guide.; 2004.
editor Jesse N.K. Mugambi, editor Mary N. Getui. Religions in Eastern Africa Under Globalization . Nairobi: Acton; 2004.
Otieno SP. Ripples of Guilt. Trafford: Trafford; 2004.
Gatumu HN. STC/GCD 517: Psychological Assessment. Nairobi: Kenyatta University press; 2004.
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