Publications

Found 44192 results

Sort by: Author Title [ Type  (Asc)] Year
Book
N.O. O. Theory and Practice of Mixed Modeling. Saarbrucken: VDM-Verlag Dr.Mueller; 2010.
K'Odhiambo AK. TIME AS A METAPHYSICAL DETERMINANT OF PEDAGOGY. Germany: VDM of Germany (2010); 2010.
Nyarwath O. Traditional Logic: An Introduction, 2nd edition. Nairobi: Consolata Institute of Philosophy; 2010.
Mweri JG. UTANGULIZI WA ISIMU. Nairobi: Kenya literature Bureau; 2010.
Muchiri J. Women’s Autobiography: Voices from Independent Kenya. Saarbrucken: VDM Verlag; 2010.
Mutuku A, Murungaru K, Magadi M.  Fertility in Kenya: Analysis of Birth intervals in Kenya. . Mauritius: VDM Publishing House LTD; 2010.
Schwartz A, Pertsemlidis D, Inabnet III WB, Gagner M. Endocrine surgery. Taylor & Francis US; 2010. Abstract
n/a
Mbogo T, Omwenga E, Waiganjo P. A Framework for Distributed Learning Objects Repository. LAP Lambert Academic Publishing; 2010. AbstractWebsite
n/a
Germain F, Pérez-Rico C, Vicente J, de la Villa P. Functional histology of the retina. Formatex; 2010. AbstractWebsite
n/a
Germain F, Pérez-Rico C, Vicente J, de la Villa P. Functional histology of the retina. Formatex; 2010. AbstractWebsite
n/a
Parangi S, Phitayakorn R. Thyroid {Disease}. ABC-CLIO; 2010. AbstractWebsite
n/a
Musonye MM. A close Shave (New Progressive English 7J) . Nairobi: 0xford University Press; 2009.
Branthomme A, Bunning C, Kamerlaczyk S, Rodas R., Anyango SO, Situma C. Integrated Natural Resources Assessment Kenya: field manual . Rome: FAO; 2009.
co-author Jesse N.K. Mugambi, co-author Michael R. Guy. 2009 Jesse N.K. Mugambi and Michael R. Guy, Conxtextual Theology Across Cultures, Nairobi: Acton.. Nairobi: Acton; 2009.
P M F M, Nguhiu J, CM M. Basic Principles of Veterinary Surgery. Nairobi, Kenya: University of Nairobi Press; 2009.
Kiai Wambui, Kiiru Samuel MNUW. The Challenges of Media Training and Practice in East Africa.. Nairobi: University of Nairobi & Ford Foundation; 2009.
Sihanya B. Combating Counterfeit Trade in Kenya.; 2009. AbstractWebsite

Product counterfeiting and trade in counterfeit products, labels and packaging involve imitation of genuine products that are marketed under brand names.3 Counterfeit products are becoming a major problem to consumers, innovators and traders in Kenya and globally. Such imitations are usually clones or falsified products, labels and packaging designed to look like those of genuine products. The aim is to confuse or deceive consumers as to their quality, source, origin or legitimacy. Counterfeits are manufactured, processed or supplied by unscrupulous traders who infringe and unlawfully apply other corporations’ or individuals’ innovations and intellectual property (IP).4 The basic thesis in this Chapter is that although there are short-term gains to consumers and the Kenyan economy from counterfeiting, the medium and long-term losses are massive. This Chapter adopts a three-pronged strategy on combating counterfeiting in Kenya. First, I evaluate the nature and extent of counterfeit trade in Kenya in the context of trade liberalization and the development of an information society. I also assess the effects of counterfeit trade on the various economic players including consumers, innovators, traders, investors, and the Kenyan Government. Second, I evaluate the intellectual property regime in Kenya and how IP can combat counterfeiting. I then carefully examine the anti-counterfeiting law and enforcement mechanisms in Kenya, including their effectiveness in addressing the problem. Third, I explore how that law can be reformed to ensure sustainable development by protecting innovators, consumers and other stakeholders.

Sihanya B. Copyright in E-Commerce and Music Industry in Kenya.; 2009. AbstractWebsite

This chapter analyses copyright in the context of e-commerce in Kenya. It explores whether the music industry in Kenya is sufficiently protected in the digital era by focusing on five interrelated themes. Part One explores the interrelationship between e-commerce and intellectual property in Kenya. It discusses e-commerce in the context of patent, trade mark, trade secret and domain names. Part Two, Copyright law in e-commerce. It introduces copyright law; copyright in musical works; music in the Internet; the music industry in Kenya; legal dimensions of online music; and the challenges facing the music industry in Kenya.. Part Three explores copyright enforcement in Kenya with respect to civil and criminal remedies for copyright infringement as well copyright management organizations. We conclude Part Four critically

Okebe M.A", Wanyande" P. Discourses on civil society in Kenya. Nairobi: ARRF; 2009.
Gunga S. EDU 1103: Philosophy of Education. African Virtual University; 2009.
Essential Oil Bearing Plants from Kenya: Chemistry, Biological Activity and Applications. The American Chemical Society; 2009. Abstract

Essential oils are aromatic volatiles that are recovered from different plant tissues using a variety of distillation and extraction technologies. Kenya, being a country with diverse
plant genetic resources, is endowed with plant species containing essential oils, many of which have not been studied. A review of research on the chemical constituents and biological activities of Kenyan essential oil bearing plants is presented and shows that the use of these indigenous natural
resources are under-recognized and underutilized. Potential applications in cosmetic, food, agricultural and pharmaceuticalindustry, among others, are discussed.

HAMU PROFHABWEJOHN. Fumbo La Maisha . Nairobi: Jomo Kenyatta Foundation; 2009.
SHEIKH ABDULATIFAHMED. Fundamentals of Arabic Grammar.; 2009.
GATHAARA NV;, NGUGI JN. Gender, soil and water conservation in Machakos district, Kenya.; 2009. AbstractWebsite

Gender mainstreaming is crucial in soil and water conservation initiatives. The existing technologies though, as designed, are expected to be gender neutral, lead to gender differences at the adoption stage. This was confirmed during a study conducte d in Kathekakai settlement scheme, Machakos district where despite both men and women participating in soil and water conservation initiatives, women’s efforts to adopt the recommended technologies were hampered by their limited access to authoritative infor ma- tion and lack of control over land. Women though playing major roles as farmers (64.6%), could not make key decisions on land u se. Previous reports indicate that the women in Machakos district contributed significantly to soil and water conservation efforts in the mid 1980’s leading to terracing of over 70% of the district. Gender mainstreaming efforts need to be enhanced for achievement o f sustainable and effective soil and water conservation for improved agricultural production and livelihoods

Kopf A, Patel NB. Guide it Pain Management in Low Resource Settings. International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP); 2009.
Oketch Oboth JWB. Health Psychology . Nairobi: Centre for Open and Distant Learning, University of Nairobi; 2009.
Muleka J. Images of Women in African Oral Literature. Saarbrucken: VDM Verlag; 2009.
Siundu G. Imagining Home and Community in East African Asian Writings. Saarbrucken: VDM Verlag Dr. Muller; 2009.
Njenga HN, W. W. Industrial Chemistry. Nairobi: African Virtual University; 2009.industrial_chemistry.pdf
NZUVE SNM. Industrial Relations Management. Nairobi: University of Nairobi press; 2009.
Introduction to Ethics. Nairobi: Sophia Publications Ltd.; 2009.ethics_back_cover.pdf
of Kenya NC. MANUAL OF CLINICAL PROCEDURES. Nairobi: Nursing Council of Kenya; 2009.manual_of_clinical_procedures.pdf
Kokwaro JO. Medicinal Plants of East Africa . Nairobi: University of Nairobi Press; 2009.
Jussi I, -Mwangi MM, Paul Kamau, Kamau A, Njoka JM. Merry Go Round: A Study of Informal Self-Help Groups in Kenya. Nairobi: Nokia Research Africa; 2009.
Jussi I, Mwangi MM, Kamau P, Kamau A, Njoka J. Merry Go Round: A study of Informal Self-Help Groups in Kenya. Nairobi: Nokia Research Centre - Africa; 2009.
Mboroki DG. Methods of Instruction. Kenya: Gugno Books; 2009.
Muleka J. Naomi and the Canibals. Nairobi: Kenya Literature Bureau; 2009.
Muleka J. Naomi in her New School. Nairobi: Kenya Literature Bureau; 2009.
Wahome RG;, Choge S;, Wamwere N;, Mnene J;, Wang'ombe; Matere J, Matere J. Nutritional evaluation of the suitability of prosopis pods for livestock feed.; 2009. AbstractWebsite

To study the suitability of prosopis pods flour as a feed ingredient in manufacture of animal feeds, prosopis pods were collected from four districts heavily affected by the invasive species. Pods were collected from trees at three levels; green but mature pods still attached to the twigs, yellow (dry) pods still attached to the tree and yellow (dry) pods that had dropped onto the ground from the tree. Pods picked from the ground were inspected against decay or insect damage. These samples were analyzed at the department of animal production laboratory University of Nairobi for proximate chemical composition, fibre composition, and calcium and phosphorus profiles. In addition cost comparisons between prosopis pod flour and animal feedstuffs with approximate chemical composition were done. Pods collected in Tana River and Garissa Districts were drier than those collected in Baringo indicating potentially better keeping quality. The pods protein content averaged 11.7% but the fibre content was on the higher side at 29.8%. The calcium and phosphorus level, at 0.3% and 0.36% respectively, were considerably higher than those found in cereals although its availability on digestion was likely to be affected by the high fibre level. Pending studies on digestibility, degradability and metabolizable energy and performance evaluation will inform appropriate level of use in animal diets. However, the researchers, from the preliminary analysis, concluded that the flour will form a valuable addition to the feed ingredient base in Kenya.

Manyora H. Optimal English . Hillman Publishers; 2009.
Khamis SA, Bertoncini E, Gromov M, Wamitila KW. Outline of Swahili Literature: Prose Fiction and Drama. 2nd Edition. Extensively Revised and Enlarged. Leiden: E.J. Brill; 2009.
J.N. M. The Politics of School Texts. The Struggle for the Literary Canon in Kenya. Saarbrucken, Germany: Verlag Dr. Muller; 2009.
Njeri KM. Polytechnic Graduates : what next?. Lambert; 2009.
Martin M;, Gichohi M, Karugia JT;. Poverty, Growth, and Institutions: Seminar report.; 2009.Website
and Kambo I KKNST. Procedure manual for Nurses and Midwives. Nairobi: African Medical and Research Foundation (AMREF); 2009.
and Kambo I KKNST. Procedure manual for Nurses and Midwives. Nairobi: African Medical and Research Foundation (AMREF); 2009.
SIFUNJO DRKISAKAERASTUS. Public Finance, Open and Distance Learning Module,. University of Nairobi Press; 2009. AbstractWebsite

This study examined the RWH using the run tests, Ljung-Box statistics, and the unit root tests. The data covered the period starting January 1994 to June 2007 for the daily closing prices of the Ksh/UD dollar spot rate. The main finding of this study is that the RWH is strongly rejected at the 5% significance level. The results indicate that the rejections are due to autocorrelation in currency returns. The exchange rate tends to appreciate most of the time over the sample period. Therefore failure of the EMH could be due to exchange rate undershooting and overshooting phenomena. The unit root tests showed that the exchange rate data is non-stationary while returns are stationary. Therefore the evidence strongly suggested that the foreign exchange market is not efficient.

of Kenya NC. RN-BScN UPGRADING CURRICULUM. Nairobi: Nursing Council of Kenya; 2009.rn-bscn_upgrading_curriculum_2009.doc
Kim S, Williams R, Cinque L, Shiundu PM. Size Determination of Nanoparticles Used in Coatings.; 2009. AbstractSize Determination of Nanoparticles Used in Coatings

This chapter begins with a description of some commonly used particle sizing techniques, their applicability to nanoparticles, and their advantages and disadvantages. A special emphasis is given to fractionation techniques and their ability to simultaneously characterize nanoparticles and isolate monodispersed fractions from polydispersed samples. The latter part of this chapter provides an in-depth discussion of sedimentation field-flow fractionation (SdFFF) size analysis of nanoparticles used in coatings

E. DROWAKAHFRANCIS. Social Philosophy. Nairobi: The Centre for Open and Distance Learning, University of Nairobi; 2009. AbstractWebsite

An instruction manual for teaching Social philosophy to third year students in the department of philosophy.

Agwanda" "A, Bocquier' "P, Khasakhala" "A, Owuor" "S. A Socio-Demographic Survey of Nairobi. Dakar, Senegal: CODESSRIA; 2009.
Ngesu L. Sociology of Education. Nairobi: University of Nairobi Press; 2009.
Gichuru EK;, Combes MC;, Mutitu EW;, Ngugi ECK;, Omondi CO;, Bertrand B;, Lashermes P. Towards the development of sequence based markers for resistance to coffee berry disease (Colletotrichum kahawae).; 2009. AbstractWebsite

Coffee Berry Disease which affects green Arabica coffee (Coffea arabica) berries is caused by the fungus Colletotrichum kahawae and is a major problem in Arabica coffee production in African countries. Breeding for resistance to this disease is therefore to a major priority in these countries avoid intensive chemical usage for its control. Recently, microsatellite and Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphisms (AFLP) markers for a gene conferring resistance to the disease were identified and mapped onto the chromosomal region carrying the gene. To improve the repeatability of the AFLP markers, four of the marker bands were selected for cloning and sequencing to facilitate specific primers to be designed. Three of the resultant primers did not amplify products that exhibited polymorphism characteristic of the parent AFLP bands; but one primer pair amplified a product that dominantly identified the presence of the parent AFLP marker at an optimum temperature of 62°C followed by electrophoresis in agarose. The reliability of the designed primers was confirmed by analysis in 95 plants from a F2 population previously used to map the chromosomal fragment carrying the resistance. The importance of the results in enhancing the utility of the parent AFLP marker in relation to analytical costs and position on the chromosomal fragment is discussed.

Bocquier P, Otieno AAT, Khasakhala A, Owuor S. Urban integration in Africa: A socio demographic survey of Nairobi. . Dakar: Council for the Development of Social Science Research in Africa (CODESRIA; 2009.
Bocquier P, Otieno AAT, Khasakhala A, Owuor S. Urban integration in Africa: A socio demographic survey of Nairobi. . Dakar: Council for the Development of Social Science Research in Africa (CODESRIA; 2009.
Ndiba PK, Axe L, Jahan K, Ramanujachary V. XRF measurement of heavy metals in highway marking beads..; 2009.Website
E. DROWAKAHFRANCIS. African Philosophy. The Centre for Open and Distance Learning, University of Nairobi; 2008. AbstractWebsite

An Instructional Manual for teaching African Philosophy to second year students in the department of philosophy, University of Nairobi

SHEIKH ABDULATIFAHMED. Al-Bustan.; 2008.
Boon TRE;, Lund DH;, Buttoud G;, Kouplevatskaya I. Analysis along procedural elements.; 2008.Website
B.N N. Aspects African History Nairobi. Nairobi: Catholic University Press ; 2008.
Oketch Oboth JWB. Biopsychology. Nairobi: Centre for Open and Distant Learning, University of Nairobi; 2008.
HAMU PROFHABWEJOHN. Cheche za Moto . Nairobi: Jomo Kenyatta Foundation; 2008.
Collaborative Filtering: A Comparison of Graph-based Semisupervised Learning Methods and Memory-based Methods.; 2008. AbstractWebsite

Collaborative filtering is a method of making predictions about the interests of a user based on interest similarity to other users and consequently recommending the predicted items. There is a widespread use of collaborative filtering systems in commercial websites, such as Amazon.com, which has popularized item-based methods. There are also many music and video sites such as iLike and Everyone’s a Critic (EaC) that implement collaborative filtering systems. This trend is growing in product-based sites. This paper discusses the implementation of graph-based semisupervised learning methods and memory-based methods to the collaborative filtering scenario and compares these methods to baseline methods such as techniques based on weighted average. This work compares the predictive accuracy of these methods on the MovieLens data set. The metrics used for evaluation measure the accuracy of generated predictions based on already known, held-out ratings that constitute the test set. Preliminary results indicate that graph-based semi-supervised learning methods perform better than baseline methods. However, some of the memory-based methods outperform the graph-based semi-supervised learning methods as well as the baseline methods.

Gakunga DK. Comparative Education : East African Perspective. Nairobi: RiverBrooks; 2008.
Hamu PJH, Nyonje J. Darubini ya Utunzi. Phoenix Publishers; 2008.
J.H. Nderitu &, Nyamasyo GHN, Kasina JM. Eds. Agricultural Entomology (Practical Aspects of Agric. Entomology), First Edition (ISBN 9966-05-121-X). Nairobi, Kenya.: Equatops Trading; 2008.
Mbithi ML. Erosion Under NAMA WTO Negotiations: The Case for Kenya. Nairobi: Institute of Economic Affairs-Kenya. IEA ; 2008.
Sarkar S, Kiriti-Nganga TW. Gender Inequality in Developing Countries. New Delhi: Arise Publications and Distributors .; 2008.
Atoh F, L. K. Introduction to Morphology. Nairobi: University of Nairobi; 2008.
Wamitila KW. Kanzi ya Fasihi: Misingi ya Uchanganuzi wa Fasihi. . Nairobi: Vide-Muwa Publishers Ltd.; 2008.
IRIBEMWANGI PI. Mwongozo wa Utengano. Nairobi: ISBN 978-9966-25-533-8; EAEP; 2008. Abstractmwongozo_wa_utengano.pdfWebsite

n/a

co-editor Jesse N.K. Mugambi, co-editor Christoph Stückelberger. Responsible Leadership: Global and Contextual Ethical Perspctives. Geneva/Nairobi: Globethics.net/Acton; 2008.
NZUVE SNM. Reviewed Organization Theory, Study manual for Bachelor of Commerce distance learning. Nairobi: University of Nairobi press; 2008.
MUNYAO DRNYAMAICHRISTOPHER. SGL 308: Introduction to Geological Mapping, Lecture series. Nairobi: Nairobi University Press.; 2008. Abstract

One of the critical issues for Community Development, Civil Society action and Governance anywhere and specifically in Africa is to create leaders at the fastest possible rate, at all levels of the society/ community. Such levels of leadership revolve round - skilled, ethical, effective and unifying leadership. Young people are most eager to play a leadership role in these efforts. The values/ benefits of the African young people involvement in Civil Society in the African states will bring energy, catalyze other group members to rethink their priorities, commitment and remove invisible barriers that have kept them from moving forward. Typically and traditionally in many cultures, young people have been excluded from efforts to rebuild their communities. This marginalization of our youth not only harms them and endangers our future, but it also cheats the world of a valuable resource. If we are to function effectively as local and even global communities then we must incorporate all significant voices. This paper argues that an enduring and positive community renewal is possible only if all members are involved and feel a sense of ownership. On the other hand, the spirit of volunteerism by young people helps to create a stable and cohesive society and as a result add value to the services that governments provide. Voluntary action creates bonds of trust and encourages cooperation; in other words it creates social capital. Volunteerism draws people of different ethnic origins, religion and economic status. This compositional aspect enhances social harmony. Voluntary participation in public affairs can also help to create a politically literate public, which is important for the preservation of democratic principles. Volunteer effort is essential to Civil Society action as a way that would enhance community policing and conflict resolution. Service For Peace (SFP) Kenya Chapter as an organization, through its young people empowerment program has the aim to integrate service learning and volunteerism in the processes of capacity development/ building, creating appropriate awareness, dissemination and networking of the youth in the sub-regional and region areas. The Kenyan Chapter serves as a knowledge resource base for periodic value-based training programs on volunteerism.

Manyora H. A Simplified Grammar of English. Hillman Publishers; 2008.
Hamu HJ. Sofia mzimuni.; 2008.Website
Michira JN, Matolo M. A Study Guide to The River Between . Nairobi: Vide-Muwa Publishers; 2008.
Munavu RM, Ogutu DM, Wasanga PM. Sustainable articulation pathways and linkages between upper secondary and higher education in Africa.; 2008. AbstractWebsite

Abstract: The recent and rising increase in enrollment at th e primary school level since the
introduction of th e FPE in 2003 has led to a corresponding and signif icant rise in enrollment
rates at the secondary school level. This has translated into an increased demand for higher
education in the country. The demand for higher education is driven by the realiz ation that
this level of education forms the princi pal pillar of development. The current development
agen da in Kenya is inspired by the realization that there are many available options and …

Oboko RO, Wagacha PW, Masinde EM, Omwenga E, Libotton A. Value Difference Metric for Student Knowledge Level initialization in a Learner Model-based Adaptive e-Learning System.; 2008. AbstractValue Difference Metric for Student Knowledge Level initialization in a Learner Model-based Adaptive e-Learning System

Web-based learning systems give students the freedom to determine what to study based on each individual learner’s learning goals. These systems support learners in constructing their own knowledge for solving problems at hand. However, in the absence of instructors, learners often need to be supported as they learn in ways that are tailored to suit a specific learner. Adaptive web-based learning systems fit in such situations. In order for an adaptive learning system to be able to provide learning support, it needs to build a model of each individual learner and then to use the attribute values for each learner as stored in the model to determining the kind of learning support that is suitable for each learner. Examples of such attributes are learner knowledge level, learning styles and learner errors committed by learners during learning. There are two important issues about the use of learner models. Firstly, how to initialize the attributes in the learner models and secondly, how to update the attribute values of the learner model as learners interact with the learning system. With regard to initialization of learner models, one of the approaches used is to input into a machine learning algorithm attribute values of learners who are already using the system and who are similar (hence called neighbors) to the learner whose model is being initialized. The algorithm will use these values to predict initial values for the attributes of a new learner. Similarity among learners is often expressed as the distance from one learner to another. This distance is often determined using a heterogeneous function of Euclidean and Overlap measures (HOEM). This paper reports the results of an investigation on how HOEM compares to two different variations of Value Difference Metric (VDM) combined with the Euclidean measure (HVDM) using different numbers of neighbors. An adaptive web-based learning system teaching object oriented programming was used. HOEM was found to be more accurate than the two variations of HVDM

Schröder H. Word Order in Toposa: An Aspect of Multiple Feature-Checking. Arlington, US : SIL International and the University of Texas at Arlington Publications in Linguistics 142; 2008.
Gakunga DK. Comparative Education : East African Perspective. Nairobi: RiverBrooks; 2008. Abstract
n/a
Standring S. Gray's anatomy: the anatomical basis of clinical practice. 40th edition. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone Elsevier; 2008. Abstract
n/a
Oyugi CCA. Bereavement Counseling for children . Nairobi: Uzima Press; 2007.
NZUVE SNM. Elements of Organizational Behaviour; Revised edition. Nairobi: University of Nairobi press; 2007.
Thairu PK. The African and The AIDS Holocaust. Nairobi: Phoenix Publishers ; 2007.
John HPH. Ayubu Mashakani. Longhorn Publishers; 2007.
Ogana W. Campus Days (Novel). Nairobi: Jomo Kenyatta Foundation; 2007.
WAMBUGU LYDIAH, WANJIRU ANN. Chemistry Practical Book. Nairobi: Pavement Publishers; 2007.
Chaga H. CLS 101 Module: Introduction to Swahili Language Skills . Nairobi: University of Nairobi Press; 2007.
Treue T;. Community-based natural resource management.; 2007. AbstractWebsite

This technical note gives a brief introduction to community-based natural resource management (CBNRM) and how this concept may be used as a development strategy. CBNRM has the triple objective of poverty reduction, natural resource conservation and good governance. The opportunity and challenge is to pursue these objectives simultaneously, as they are not, by default, mutually supportive. Lessons learnt from CBNRM will be useful when designing community-based climate adaptation strategies. Thus, this note is a contribution to an ongoing debate as well as a product of the long-standing experiences of Danida’s environmental portfolio. The note has been produced in cooperation with the Department for Forest, Landscape and Planning, Faculty of Life Sciences at the University of Copenhagen. Many practitioners have contributed through a fruitful peer review process. Dr. Thorsten Treue together with Iben Nathan have been the main contributors to the final note. Involving local communities and securing the rights of poor and marginalised groups in sustainable management of natural resources is a central theme in international development assistance. The poverty-governance-environment link has been further highlighted in recent years through interventions aimed at building capacity for resilience (disaster preparedness) as well as adapting to climate change. A successful implementation of CBNRM often requires changes at three different levels of society: 1) the national level, 2) the local level and the link between these, and 3) the intermediate level. At the national level, policies and the legislative framework normally needs adjustment and revision to establish an enabling environment that makes CBNRM attractive to local communities. At the intermediate level, it is important to promote the model of decentralised natural resource management that is most likely to work under the given political circumstances. In particular, this involves a choice between: (i) devolution of natural resource management authority to elected local governments, and (ii) deconcentration of line agencies, authorising district-level officers to delegate management authority to local communities. At the local level, it is crucial that CBNRM establishes significant economic incentives for managing and conserving the resource, which is closely related to clearly defined and officially supported tenure systems, as well as to revenue-sharing mechanisms. Furthermore, CBNRM should result in a coordination of resource use by numerous individuals, thus establishing an ‘optimal’ rate of production and consumption at the local level as well as for society at large. In practical terms, it is the elaboration, implementation and experience-based revision of resource management plans at local levels that determine the actual performance of CBNRM on the ground. The poverty reduction rationale of CBNRM, as an alternative to open access resource use, is that the total resource value can be maintained or enhanced, and that the costs and benefits of management can be distributed equitably, so that all community members, within a reasonable time horizon, experience a net gain, or at least a zero loss. Resource conservation requires harvest not to exceed increment over the long term. This calls for reasonably accurate knowledge about the extent and growth of the resource, as well as reliable recording of harvest volumes. Even so, CBNRM could still fail at the local level if inefficient rule enforcement allows free-riders to over-harvest the resource, and/or if inequitable distribution of costs and benefits leads to a breakdown of management rules and subsequent over-harvesting or permanent marginalisation of certain groups. Therefore, the establishment and maintenance of good governance or “appropriate decision-making iii arrangements” is the only feasible way to prevent the failure (or ensure the success) of CBNRM. Decision-making arrangements specify who decides what in relation to whom. Good governance at local level can be promoted through CBNRM legislation that establishes democratic conditions of collective choice, so that all members of a community (including women and other potentially vulnerable groups) get the opportunity to participate in defining: (i) the purpose of resource management, and (ii) the resulting management plan, including how it is enforced, and how products and benefits from the common resource are distributed. Furthermore, communities must hold authority to control free-riding by punishing defaulters, and community leaders must be downwards accountable to the people they represent. It would be naïve to assume that, once initiated, CBNRM is a guaranteed self-sustaining success, which needs no monitoring or adjustment. Regular monitoring of CBNRM processes should be conducted to adjust associated policies, legislative framework and implementation strategies, so that failures may be corrected and positive effects enhanced. Monitoring the progress of planned CBNRM activities should be simple and embedded within existing official monitoring systems to ensure sustainability. However, assessment of the degree to which CBNRM is achieving its triple objective should probably be carried out by independent research centres, NGOs and university departments that are not directly engaged in the implementation as such. CBNRM is not a stand-alone solution to poverty, resource degradation and bad governance. Rather it is a development process and constant power struggle. Thus, even after years of implementation, donors are still likely to have a mission in promoting CBNRM. Lessons learnt will feed into the new agenda of community-based adaptation to climate change. Donor support may be channelled as programme-based or as earmarked support for monitoring and research that deliver credible and easily accessible information. Checks and balances can be supported through civil society as well as the media. An informed public debate based on the results of sound monitoring is, in all likelihood, the key to the long-term success of CBNRM.

Rading GO. Concise Notes on Materials Science and Engineering. Victoria BC: Trafford Publishing; 2007.
Wanjiku J;, Manyengo JU;, Oluoch-Kosura W;. Gender differentiation in the analysis of alternative farm mechanization choices on small farms in Kenya.; 2007. AbstractWebsite

Using multinomial logit we analyze factors that influence the choice of mechanization technologies in Nyanza Province. The results show that farmers are aware of the attributes of the mechanization technologies, and that animal traction is the most commonly used. Gender, formal and informal training of the household head, and technology attributes influence the choice of mechanization technology. This study recommends increased formal and informal training, extension, credit, and tractor hire services to facilitate knowledge transfer, credit, and tractor availability. The study also recommends enactment of laws that increase women's access and control of productive resources.

Oluoch-Kosura W;, Manyengo JU;, Wanjiku J;, Karugia JT. Gender differentiation in the analysis of alternative farm mechanization choices on small farms in Kenya.; 2007. AbstractWebsite

Using multinomial logit we analyze factors that influence the choice of mechanization technologies in Nyanza Province. The results show that farmers are aware of the attributes of the mechanization technologies, and that animal traction is the most commonly used. Gender, formal and informal training of the household head, and technology attributes influence the choice of mechanization technology. This study recommends increased formal and informal training, extension, credit, and tractor hire services to facilitate knowledge transfer, credit, and tractor availability. The study also recommends enactment of laws that increase women's access and control of productive resources.

Wanyande P, Omosa M, Ludeki C. Governance Issues in Kenya: An Overview.; 2007.Website
Ludeki C, Wanyande P, Omosa M. Governance Issues in Kenya: An Overview.; 2007.Website
Søren M, Lars S;. Guidelines for distribution of tree seed in small bags: small quantities and high quality.; 2007. AbstractWebsite

It has been assessed that the majority of trees planted in developing countries are planted by farmers. On-farm tree planting is likely to gain importance in the future as access to natural forests and trees is getting more and more difficult. On-farm tree planting, however, often suffers from lack of access to a diversity of high quality tree planting material. Quality tree seed are normally sold from major seed producers (national tree seed organisations) in a centralised manner, with only 1-3 outlets within the country, and often only in large quantities. Small holders cannot afford to travel long distances and need only small amounts of seed. Therefore the seed will have to be brought to the farmer

Søren M;, Lars S;. Guidelines for distribution of tree seed in small bags: small quantities and high quality.; 2007. AbstractWebsite

It has been assessed that the majority of trees planted in developing countries are planted by farmers. On-farm tree planting is likely to gain importance in the future as access to natural forests and trees is getting more and more difficult. On-farm tree planting, however, often suffers from lack of access to a diversity of high quality tree planting material. Quality tree seed are normally sold from major seed producers (national tree seed organisations) in a centralised manner, with only 1-3 outlets within the country, and often only in large quantities. Small holders cannot afford to travel long distances and need only small amounts of seed. Therefore the seed will have to be brought to the farmers

Ombongi ENK&, Petri S. Juuti, Katko TS, Vuorinen HS, eds. History of water supply and sanitation in Kenya, 1895 – 2002(Environmental history of water). London: IWA; 2007.
samuel m. Maina. introduction to ergonomics, fitting tools, man and work. Nairobi: Frajopa Printers Mall; 2007.
Wasamba P. Introduction to Oral Literature: Lecture Series. Nairobi: Nairobi University Press; 2007.
Oketch Oboth JWB. Introduction to Psychology . Nairobi: Centre for Open and Distant Learning, University of Nairobi; 2007.
& NGHN, Nderitu J.H. Invertebrate Zoology for Beginners.(ISBN. 9966-05-131-7) . Nairobi, Kenya.: Equatops Trading; 2007.
Mbatiah AM. Kiswahili Timilifu-Kidato cha Kwanza. Nairobi: University of Nairobi Press; 2007.
MBATIAH PMWENDA. Kurudi Nyumbani na Hadithi Nyingine (editor and main contributor) . NAIROBI: Focus Books; 2007.
Mwabu G, Fosu A. Malaria and Poverty in Africa.; 2007.Website
Ngugi CM. Mau Mau.; 2007.Website
Rummel-Bulska I. The negotiating process leading to the Convention on Biological Diversity. Finland: International Environmental Law-making and Diplomacy Review, Joensuu; 2007.
Kremmer E, Krämer PM, Weber CM, Räuber C, Martens D, Forster S, Stanker LH, Rauch P, Shiundu PM, Mulaa FJ. Optical Immunosensor and ELISA for the Analysis of Pyrethroids and DDT in Environmental Samples.; 2007. AbstractOptical Immunosensor and ELISA for the Analysis of Pyrethroids and DDT in Environmental Samples

An optical immunosensor (AQUA-OPTOSENSOR) and ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) for the analysis of pyrethroids and DDT in river water and/or sediment, are described. The optical immunosensor consists of a bench-top optical read-out-device and disposable single-use sensor chips. ELISA was carried out in the coating antigen format. As examples, phenothrin (pyrethroid) and p,p'-DDT were chosen. Herein we describe the overall strategy, the set-up and principle of the immunosensor platform, and show representative results for immunosensor and ELISA analysis. The immunosensor employs fluorophore (Oyster®-645)-labeled monoclonal antibodies (mouse mAb Py-1 and rat mAb DDT 7C12), and makes use of the evanescent field, thus operating without washing steps. ELISA in the coating antigen format uses a second antibody labeled with peroxidase. Both, phenothrin and p,p'-DDT can be analyzed with these immunochemical techniques in the low ppb levels. Advantages and drawbacks of both immunochemical platforms are discussed.

Krämer PM, Weber CM, Kremmer E, Räuber C, Martens D, Forster S, Stanker LH, Rauch P, Shiundu PM, Mulaa FJ. Optical Immunosensor and ELISA for the Analysis of Pyrethroids and DDT in Environmental Samples.; 2007. AbstractOptical Immunosensor and ELISA for the Analysis of Pyrethroids and DDT in Environmental Samples

An optical immunosensor (AQUA-OPTOSENSOR) and ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) for the analysis of pyrethroids and DDT in river water and/or sediment, are described. The optical immunosensor consists of a bench-top optical read-out-device and disposable single-use sensor chips. ELISA was carried out in the coating antigen format. As examples, phenothrin (pyrethroid) and p,p'-DDT were chosen. Herein we describe the overall strategy, the set-up and principle of the immunosensor platform, and show representative results for immunosensor and ELISA analysis. The immunosensor employs fluorophore (Oyster®-645)-labeled monoclonal antibodies (mouse mAb Py-1 and rat mAb DDT 7C12), and makes use of the evanescent field, thus operating without washing steps. ELISA in the coating antigen format uses a second antibody labeled with peroxidase. Both, phenothrin and p,p'-DDT can be analyzed with these immunochemical techniques in the low ppb levels. Advantages and drawbacks of both immunochemical platforms are discussed.

Chaga H. Peremende’ in Kurudi Nyumbani na Hadithi Nyingine . Nairobi: Focus Publishers ; 2007.
Njeru GR, Njoka JM. Political Ideology in Kenya.; 2007.Website
Njoka JM, Njeru GR. Political Ideology in Kenya.; 2007.Website
Oketch E, Francheschi L, Mimbi P. Politics and the Common Good. Nairobi: Strathmore University Press; 2007.
. AAA, Ayot.M.R. Principles of Teaching and Communication. Nairobi: Jomo Kenyatta Foundation, Nairobi ; 2007.
HAMU PROFHABWEJOHN. Safina na Kima wa Ajabu. Longhorn Publishers; 2007.
Manyora H. Shingo La Mbunge Na Hadithi Nyingine. Vide~Muwa Publishers; 2007.
Manyora HB. Short Stories.; 2007.Website

UoN Websites Search