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Iraki XN. Economic Models in Africa: Poverty vs. Cohesion. Juja, Kenya: Jomo Kenyatta University of Science and Technology; 2015.
Book
D.N. Kariuki PMC. Explore Chemistry, Form 4.; Submitted.
Magutu PO, Inyega JO, Nyaanga RO. Evidence-based training assessment approaches and methodologies in procurement planning and supply chain managemen. Knowledge Empowerment Foundation. ISBN: 978-81-942015-4-0; 2020.
Otieno DJ, Akinyi B, Rege JEO. Empowering Early Career Professionals for Effective Leadership of Agricultural Institutions: Experiences from a Leadership Mentoring Project in Eastern and Southern Africa. Nairobi: Institute for People, Innovations and Change in Organizations – Eastern Africa (PICO-EA); 2018.
W.A. ODHIAMBO, S.W. G. Essentials of Oral and Maxillofacial Trauma. A Manual for Undergraduate students. Nairobi: Jap Lambert Academic Publishers; 2018.
Wamitila KW. An Eye for Poetry: A Guide to the Study of Poetry. Nairobi: Vide~Muwa Publishers Ltd.; 2018.
Syomiti M, Kuria J, Wahome R. Effective Microorganisms as an Additive for Improving Feed Value of Maize stovers. LAMBERT academic Publishers, Germany; 2017.
Gitao G, Maina S, Gathumbi P. Experimental infection of Peste des petits ruminants disease in Kenya. Lap Lambert Academic Publishing; 2016.978-3-659-97197-6-1.pdf
Moronge J. Economic Liberalisation and Industrial Restructuring in Kenya. Saarbrucken: LAP Lambert Academic Publishing; 2015.
Awange JL, Kyalo Kiema JB. Environmental Geoinformatics : Monitoring and Management.; 2013. AbstractWebsite

There is no doubt that today, perhaps more than ever before, humanity faces a myriad of complex and demanding challenges. These include natural resource depletion and environmental degradation, food and water insecurity, energy shortages, diminishing biodiversity, increasing losses from natural disasters, and climate change with its associated potentially devastating consequences, such as rising sea levels. These human-induced and natural impacts on the environment need to be well understood in order to develop informed policies, decisions, and remedial measures to mitigate current and future negative impacts. To achieve this, continuous monitoring and management of the environment to acquire data that can be soundly and rigorously analyzed to provide information about its current state and changing patterns, and thereby allow predictions of possible future impacts, are essential. Developing pragmatic and sustainable solutions to address these and many other similar challenges requires the use of geodata and the application of geoinformatics. This book presents the concepts and applications of geoinformatics, a multidisciplinary field that has at its core different technologies that support the acquisition, analysis and visualization of geodata for environmental monitoring and management. We depart from the 4D to the 5D data paradigm, which defines geodata accurately, consistently, rapidly and completely, in order to be useful without any restrictions in space, time or scale to represent a truly global dimension of the digital Earth. The book also features the state-of-the-art discussion of Web-GIS. The concepts and applications of geoinformatics presented in this book will be of benefit to decision-makers across a wide range of fields, including those at environmental agencies, in the emergency services, public health and epidemiology, crime mapping, environmental management agencies, tourist industry, market analysis and e-commerce, or mineral exploration, among many others. The title and subtitle of this textbook convey a distinct message. Monitoring -the passive part in the subtitle - refers to observation and data acquisition, whereas management - the active component - stands for operation and performance. The topic is our environment, which is intimately related to geoinformatics. The overall message is: all the mentioned elements do interact and must not be separated. Hans-Peter B ahr, Prof. Dr.-Ing. Dr.h.c., Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Germany.

Kinyua AM, Maina DM, MANGALA MJ, GATARI MJ. Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) in non-destructive testing of oil samples. erepository.uonbi.ac.ke; 2013. AbstractWebsite

A rapid non-destructive, multi-elemental and ultra-sensitive analytical technique of engine oil analysis is described. Using" an x-ray excitation source and Si (Li) detector for the1 measurements, the deterioration of an internal combustion engine) is evaluated from results …

Shah P, mwaura F, Moronge J. Environmental Audits and Education Institutions. Saarbrucken: LAP Lambert Academic Publishing; 2012.
Parita S, Francis M, James M. Environmental Audits and Educational Institutions. Lamberts Publishing; 2012.
Wasamba P, Muchiri J, kiiru DH. Essay as a Handshake. Nairobi: CHSS; 2012.
Wasamba P, Muchiri J, DH Muchugu Kiiru(eds.). The Essay as a Handshake: Impressions on the Kenyan-Korean Interface. Nairobi: Bridging the Divide: Networking African and Korean Researchers’ Project; 2012.
Mwimali BJ, et al. The East Africa Court of Justice Law Digest: 2005 -2011. East African Law Society; 2011.
Odada EO, Olago DO, Ochola WO. Environment for Development: An Ecosystems Assessment of Lake Victoria Basin Environmental and Socio-economic Status, Trends and Human Vulnerabilities. Nairobi: United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) and PASS; 2010. AbstractUNEP/PASS

Discussions on social and policy dimensions of the Lake Victoria Basin (LVB) centre on the inhabitants of the basin and their livelihood strategies which are defined by environmental stewardship and natural resource utilization. This paper presents a contextual narrative of the people of the LVB and their livelihood. It sets the stage for an ecosystem assessment of the basin’s social and economic implication of natural resource state, trends and vulnerabilities. The demographic characteristics and selected social indicators for the basin are presented with a focus on implications to sustainable resource management. A description of fishing together with other main occupational activities of the basin’s inhabitants is presented with emphasis on strategies, impacts, challenges and vulnerabilities that the current resources extraction activities impose on the people and environment. Owing to the transboundary nature of the basin, it is recognised that the people and institutional framework of the basin including the East African Community (EAC) together with subsidiary arrangements such as the Lake Victoria Development Programme (LVDP) hold the key to a joint and sustainable management of the basin. The policy areas singled out as important include: ecosystems, natural resources and environment; production and income generation; living conditions and quality of life; population and demography; and governance and institutional order.

Keywords: Socio-economics, policy framework, Lake Victoria basin, livelihoods, sustainable development

WAFULA DRCHARLES. Environmental Issues in Project Planning and Management. University of Nairobi; 2010.
Schwartz A, Pertsemlidis D, Inabnet III WB, Gagner M. Endocrine surgery. Taylor & Francis US; 2010. Abstract
n/a
Gunga S. EDU 1103: Philosophy of Education. African Virtual University; 2009.
Essential Oil Bearing Plants from Kenya: Chemistry, Biological Activity and Applications. The American Chemical Society; 2009. Abstract

Essential oils are aromatic volatiles that are recovered from different plant tissues using a variety of distillation and extraction technologies. Kenya, being a country with diverse
plant genetic resources, is endowed with plant species containing essential oils, many of which have not been studied. A review of research on the chemical constituents and biological activities of Kenyan essential oil bearing plants is presented and shows that the use of these indigenous natural
resources are under-recognized and underutilized. Potential applications in cosmetic, food, agricultural and pharmaceuticalindustry, among others, are discussed.

Nzuma MJ. An Economic Evaluation of the Impacts of Trade Liberalization on Kenya’s Maize Secto. Düsseldorf, Germany: VDM Verlag Publishers; 2008.
J.H. Nderitu &, Nyamasyo GHN, Kasina JM. Eds. Agricultural Entomology (Practical Aspects of Agric. Entomology), First Edition (ISBN 9966-05-121-X). Nairobi, Kenya.: Equatops Trading; 2008.
Mbithi ML. Erosion Under NAMA WTO Negotiations: The Case for Kenya. Nairobi: Institute of Economic Affairs-Kenya. IEA ; 2008.
Ebrahim YH. Essays in environmental design (1 - 5): Short papers. Nairobi, Kenya: Ebenergy Enterprises; 2008.
Ebrahim YH. Elementary acoustics design and noise control: Noise control. Nairobi, Kenya: Ebenergy Enterprises; 2007.
Ebrahim YH. Elementary acoustics design and noise control: Room acoustics. Nairobi, Kenya: Ebenergy Enterprises; 2007.
Ebrahim YH. Elementary lighting design: Artificial lighting design . Nairobi, Kenya: Ebenergy Enterprises; 2007.
Ebrahim YH. Elementary lighting design: Natural lighting design . Nairobi, Kenya: Ebenergy Enterprises; 2007.
Mulwa MR. Economic and Environmental Performance of Sugarcane Production in Kenya: Non-Parametric Frontier Approaches. Farming and Rural System Economics, Volume 84, Magraf-Verlag Publishers, Weikersheim, Germany: ; 2006.
Abinya ONA, Abwao HO, Bird P, Baraza R, BYAKIKA B, Kodwavwalla Y. Experience with breast cancer in a single oncology clinic in Nairobi.. Nairobi: University of Nairobi Press; 2006.
HM M. EXPRESSION OF ESTROGEN RECEPTORS ALPHA. Giessen: VVB LAUFERSWEILER VERLAG; 2006.
Musingi JK. Explore Geography Learners Form 3.. Longman Kenya; 2005. AbstractWebsite

The  study found out that Masinga Dam has adversely affected the public health in the communities around the dam. malaria was the most prevalent ailment followed by typhoid fever. Bilharzia has also increased since the dam was constructed.

Bahemuka J,(Eds) JB. East Africa in Transition: Images, Institutions and Identities. Nairobi: University of Nairobi Press; 2004.University of Nairobi Press
F.G M, Anne N. Educational Policy and Planning. NAIROBI: KTTC-VVOB; 2004.
Gatumu HN. EGC 500: Research Methods in Counselling. Nairobi: Kenyatta University; 2004.
Gatumu HN. EGC 501: Research Statistics and Data Processing. Nairobi: Kenyatta University press; 2004.
Gatumu HN. EGC 501: Research Statistics and Data Processing. Nairobi: Kenyatta University press; 2004.
N.M.Monyonko. ELECTRICITY AND MAGNETISM TW0. NAIROBI: UNIVERSITY OF NAIROBI; 2004.
Ogot M, Kremer G. Engineering design: a practical guide. Trafford Publishing; 2004. Abstract

Successful engineering design requires a strong understanding of fundamentalconcepts in
the basic sciences and engineering combined with mathematics. This text provides an
introduction to the design tools used in engineeringdesign. It focuses on the first two steps of
the design process: determination of need/problem clarification and conceptualization. In
addition, an overview of materials and manufacturing methods ispresented. The use of Excel
has been incorporated throughout the text forperforming routine calculations, leaving more …

Gatumu HN. EPS 402: Educational Statistics and Evaluation. Nairobi: Kenyatta University press; 2004.
Gatumu HN. EPS 402: Educational Statistics and Evaluation. Nairobi: Kenyatta University press; 2004.
Githiori J;, Mbaabu M;, poke L;, Miaron. J;, Omari P. Ethnoveterinary Practices in Eastern Africa.; 2004.Website
Miaron. J;, Omari P, poke L;, Mbaria. JM;, Mbaabu M;, Githiori J;. Ethnoveterinary Practices in Eastern Africa.; 2004.Website
and D.N. Kariuki PMCAMN. Explore Chemistry, Form 3.; 2004.
Mulwa JK. Earth Processes Lecture series for Bachelor of Science (Geology) and Bachelor of Science (ODL). Nairobi: Nairobi University Press; 2003. Abstract

The Earth Processes course unit is one of the three core courses in Geology. The other two core courses are SGL 101 – Materials of the Earth and SGL 103 - Introduction to Paleontology. Geology is a science of the study of the earth with reference to its evolution, composition and processes that have prevailed from the time of its evolution to the present time.

The earth is a dynamic body that has undergone various changes. These changes are both of internal and external origin. The internal processes are referred to as diastrophism and they tend to elevate the earth’s surface. They are counterbalanced by the external processes that wear down the land surface. The constant interaction between these two processes determines the configuration of the earth’s surface. The external processes are as a result of solar energy and gravitational forces whereas the internal processes are as a result of the earth’s internal heat.

Weather pattern, for example, is to a large extent due to the solar energy on the one hand. Along the equator there is a substantial amount of heating because the sun is always overhead and therefore this results in the rising up of hot air. The rising hot air is replaced by cold air from the colder regions. This cyclic process is closely related to ocean waves and currents generated by solar heating. Waves are effective forces for determining the shape of the landscape along shorelines of oceans and seas.

The force of gravity on the other hand is due to mutual attraction between bodies. The greater the attracting bodies the greater the gravitational force. Because the mass of the earth is greater than any other body on its surface, materials are attracted towards the earth’s center. Rain and snow precipitate due to gravitational attraction of the earth. Water moves towards the oceans because of gravitational force. Glaciers on higher mountains are normally pulled down by the force of gravity.

Internal earth processes are due to heat energy which keeps rocks in the mantle below the earth’s crust in a molten state. This break forth as a volcanic flow during volcanic eruptions. Heat energy is also responsible for large-scale processes such as earthquakes and mountain building, and small scale processes such as geysers, hot springs, steaming ground and hydrothermal processes.

We can therefore conclude that all earth processes are manifestations of energy and these processes are responsible for sculpturing the land surface.

The Earth Processes course unit begins with an overview of the types of energy which contribute to earth processes. These are discussed in Lecture 1. The unit is thereafter subdivided into two parts. Lectures in Part I of the course unit discusses the External Earth processes where else lectures in Part II of the unit discusses the Internal Earth Processes.

The general objective of the Earth processes course unit is to introduce you to the basic concepts of geosciences. More specifically, at the end of this course unit you should be able to:

 describe the internal and external processes which shape the earth;
 explain the present configuration of the earth and attempt to reconstruct its original form;
 explain the natural processes of the earth;
 categorize hazardous and non-hazardous processes of the earth;
 outline the contribution of the earths natural fields in exploration of natural resources;
• propose measures of minimizing hazards due to earth processes.

You are required to have writing materials e.g. books or foolscaps, pens, lead pencils, coloured pencils or crayons, a scientific calculator, a ruler and a mathematical set. Although every effort has been made to provide you with an up-to-date lecture notes, you are expected to do further reading for a better understanding of Geology, Geological concepts and Processes.

Practicals are compulsory in this course unit and a separate practical manual will be availed to you.

and D.N. Kariuki PMCAMN. Explore Chemistry, Form 2.; 2003.
eds EOO, eds DOO. THE EAST AFICAN GREAT LAKES: LIMNOLOGY, PALAEOLIMNOLOGY AND BIODIVERSITY. Moscow: KLUWER ACADEMIC PUBLISHERS; 2002. Abstractspringer

The Second International Symposium on the East African Lakes was held from 10-15 January 2000 at Club Makokola on the southern shore of Lake Malawi. The symposium was organized by the International Decade for the East African Lakes (IDEAL), a research consortium of African, European and North American scientists interested in promoting the investigations of African Great Lakes as archives of environmental and climatic dynamics. Over one hundred African, European and North American scientists with special expertise in the tropical lakes participated in the symposium which featured compelling presentations on the limnology, climatology, palaeoclimatology and biodiversity of the East African Lakes. It is their papers that comprise this book.

The large lakes of East Africa are important natural resources that are heavily utilized by their bordering countries for transportation, water supply, fisheries, waste disposal, recreation and tourism. The lakes are unique in many ways: they are sensitive to climatic change and their circulation dynamics, water-column chemistry and biological complexity differ significantly from large lakes at higher latitudes; they have long, continuous, high resolution records of past climatic change; and they have rich and diverse populations of endemic organisms. These unique properties and the significance of the palaeolimnological records demand and attract research interest from around the world. IDEAL research is contributing to our understanding of basic limnological processes in the African Great Lakes and how physical dynamics drive their biogeochemistry and thus rendering them sensitive, compared to temperate great lakes, to climatic and anthropogenic change. Recent studies indicate that Lake Victoria has undergone dramatic shifts in the lake ecosystem caused by the introduction of the Nile Perch in 1950s and of the water hyacinth during the past five years.

The lake also dried up completely prior to 12,400 years BP. Thus, the hundreds of species of fish in modern Lake Victoria may have evolved within the last 12,400 years; this is the fastest rate of vertebrate species evolution ever recorded. Elsewhere in East Africa, high resolution studies of past climate change in Lake Naivasha, Kenya and in Lake Malawi have shown a distinct Little Ice Age in tropical Africa. Evidence for the Younger Dryas even in tropical Africa has also been documented in the sediment record of Lake Albert. More recent studies havedemonstrated that Lake Malawi was at a low stand during the LGM like all the African lakes in the Northern Hemisphere. This lake was previously known to havex been low in the early Holocene and around 35ka but was believed to have been at a high stand during the LGM. Lake Malawi and Lake Tanganyika are aquatic island systems of elevated endemic biodiversity providing extraordinary conditions to study evolutionary biology. In these lakes we have the unique opportunity to investigate the dynamics of evolutionary and ecological change.

Patterns of speciation, the origin of major morphological evolution, and the origin of major reorganizations in community structures can all be investigated in a comparative setting in these two lakes. The sedimentary record of these lakes offers us an opportunity to resolve both evolutionary and ecological changes in their biota at time scales of decades, centuries, millennia, to millions of years. Despite their long histories and geological similarities, the patterns of diversity and genetic differentiation of the biota differ dramatically between Lakes Malawi and Tanganyika. Both lakes were colonized by cichlid fishes, thiarid gastropods and ostracode crustaceans, but these exemplar taxal currently have contrasting aspects in the two lakes. Approximately 1000 fish species are estimated to have evolved within the cradle of Lake Malawi, which is approximately 10 per cent of all freshwater fish species in the world. Despite their astonishing multitude, these species encompass a rather modest degree of molecular genetic and morphological change. The fishes in Lake Tanganyika are genetically and morphologically much more diverse than those in Lake Malawi, yet total only 300 species. In Lake Tanganyika about 240 out of 250 species of prosobranch gastropods and ostracode crustaceans are unique to that lake, and like the cichlid fish, form numerous distinct, divergent lineages. The living prosobranch gastropod fauna of Lake Malawi has undergone only limited differentiation and few if any endemic ostracodes are reported from this lake.

The papers presented in this book provide a comprehensive coverage of the large lakes of East African Rift Valley, touching on climate, limnology, palaeoclimatology, sedimentation processes, biodiversity and management issues of these lakes. The papers show that high quality, globally relevant research can be, and is being done in Africa. The call from African researchers is for their international colleagues and the science funding agencies to move from a position where they see their interactions in Africa essentially as “capacity building” to one of partnership and “capacity recognition” with capacitating where necessary and effective. African and developed world science administrators must work together to sustain the scientific capacity which has been built in Africa, instead of tacitly allowing it to migrate to Europe and North America. The world needs it to stay home.

Wanjala G. Educational Planning : Lecture Series. Nairobi: University of Nairobi Press-CEES; 2002. Abstract

The module as a whole is designed to provide both the student and the lecturer/professor with a descriptive account of the content of planning and its application to education and national development. it is divided into four sections. Section One comprises of the first six lectures of the unit and is intended to introduce the learner to the study of educational planning. Lecture 1 deals with the general concept of planning ; its characteristics and scope. The concept of planning as applied to education is described in Lecture 2 and Lecture 3 deals with the concept of modelling in educational planning. Lecture 4 discusses the historical background and rationale for educational planning while the social and psychological factors affecting educational planning are dealt with in Lecture 5 and the final lecture in this section discusses the process of educational planning.
Section Two covers three lectures which , taken together intend to introduce the learner to methodologies of educational planning with particular reference to developing countries , that is the Social Demand Approach covered in in Lecture 7 ; the Labour Requirements Approach covered in Lecture 8 and the Cost/benefit Analysis Approach covered in Lecture 9.
Section Three has three broad lectures , which give some highlights on the need to plan for changes in the educational system. They focus on the issues of efficiency and equity as a measure of the success of an educational system.
Section Four has three lectures dealing with population , education and national development. Apart from considering demographic factors and how they affect educational planning , we also examine matters dealing with the location of schools.

Bahemuka J,(Eds) JB. East Africa in Transition: Communities, Cultures and Change. Nairobi: Acton Publishers; 2001.
Gichuki FN;, Mungai DN;. Effect of micro-catchment size on survival and growth of two semiarid tree species..; 2000. AbstractWebsite

The effects of three different micro-catchment sizes on survival and growth of plant species was assessed and success in establishment and growth of Croton megalocarpus and Cassia spectabilis was compared in a semi-arid region of Kitui District, Kenya. Both species were planted in 25 x 25 cm, 45 x 45 cm, and 65 x 65 cm spherical micro-catchments. Height and diameter were measured and a survival count was taken. Results show that then micro-catchment size influenced (P>0.05) lateral growth of both species. Lateral growth of C. spectabilis in the smaller two micro-catchments (3.66 and 4.60 cm, resp.) was not significantly different (P>0.05), but was less than in the largest micro-catchment(5,31 cm). These results indicate that the two species are suitable for afforestation in these areas and that their survival is not limited by provision of a catchment in the area.

Mungai DN;, Gichuki FN;, Gachene CKK. Effect of micro-catchment size on survival and growth of two semiarid tree species..; 2000. AbstractWebsite

The effects of three different micro-catchment sizes on survival and growth of plant species was assessed and success in establishment and growth of Croton megalocarpus and Cassia spectabilis was compared in a semi-arid region of Kitui District, Kenya. Both species were planted in 25 x 25 cm, 45 x 45 cm, and 65 x 65 cm spherical micro-catchments. Height and diameter were measured and a survival count was taken. Results show that then micro-catchment size influenced (P>0.05) lateral growth of both species. Lateral growth of C. spectabilis in the smaller two micro-catchments (3.66 and 4.60 cm, resp.) was not significantly different (P>0.05), but was less than in the largest micro-catchment(5,31 cm). These results indicate that the two species are suitable for afforestation in these areas and that their survival is not limited by provision of a catchment in the area.

Gichuki FN;, Mungai DN;. The effect of variations in maize stover placement on maize growth and nitrogen uptake in continuous maize cropping systems in two regions of Kenya..; 2000. AbstractWebsite

Stover placement (surface mulch, incorporated or a mixture of mulch and incorporation) was compared with stover removal in the presence and absence of 50kg N fertilizer/ha in trials over two successive seasons in continuous maize cropping systems in two regions in Kenya. Stover applied at 4 tonnes DM/ha was found to have highly variable effects on maize growth and yield according to site., method of stover placement, N application and season. Relative to controls without stover, stover incorporation reduced yield by 39% in the first season, followed by yield increases of 15% in the second season. In the first season there was little or no response to N in the presence of stover. Low N uptake and N use efficiency suggested N immobilization in the incorporation treatment. Yield responses and large N uptake in the following season suggested mineralization of N immobilized in the previous season. Surface mulching at the Kabete site increased grain yields in the first season by 39% and 6% compared to stover removal without and with fertilizer, resp. In the second season, surface mulching markedly reduced yields possibly due to a combination of reduced phytotoxicity and N immobilization. At the Katumani site, stover amendments increased yields compared to removal in both seasons with incorporation results being superior to surface mulch. At this site, in both seasons, application of N reduced the effect of stover mulching and incorporation. You must log in to CAB Direct in order to view search results. If you have forgotten your log

Mungai DN;, Gichuki FN;, Gachene CKK. The effect of variations in maize stover placement on maize growth and nitrogen uptake in continuous maize cropping systems in two regions of Kenya..; 2000. AbstractWebsite

Stover placement (surface mulch, incorporated or a mixture of mulch and incorporation) was compared with stover removal in the presence and absence of 50kg N fertilizer/ha in trials over two successive seasons in continuous maize cropping systems in two regions in Kenya. Stover applied at 4 tonnes DM/ha was found to have highly variable effects on maize growth and yield according to site., method of stover placement, N application and season. Relative to controls without stover, stover incorporation reduced yield by 39% in the first season, followed by yield increases of 15% in the second season. In the first season there was little or no response to N in the presence of stover. Low N uptake and N use efficiency suggested N immobilization in the incorporation treatment. Yield responses and large N uptake in the following season suggested mineralization of N immobilized in the previous season. Surface mulching at the Kabete site increased grain yields in the first season by 39% and 6% compared to stover removal without and with fertilizer, resp. In the second season, surface mulching markedly reduced yields possibly due to a combination of reduced phytotoxicity and N immobilization. At the Katumani site, stover amendments increased yields compared to removal in both seasons with incorporation results being superior to surface mulch. At this site, in both seasons, application of N reduced the effect of stover mulching and incorporation. You must log in to CAB Direct in order to view search results. If you have forgotten your log

Gichuki FN;, Mungai DN;. The effect of varying rates of compost and diammonium phosphate on soil physical properties and crop performance..; 2000. AbstractWebsite

Long-term use of compost (4, 8, 12 or 125 kg/ha for maize and 10, 20, 30 or 200 kg/ha for beans) on improving crop yields and soil physical characteristics was studied at the steep-land research site, Kabete campus, Kenya. Preliminary results showed that maize yields under compost were lower than under diammonium phosphate (DAP). Compost increased the maize yield by 15% compared to an increase of 50% caused by DAP. Bean yield did not show any response to any rates of compost or DAP. The use of compost improved soil physical conditions, mainly bulk density and infiltration rates.

Mungai DN;, Gichuki FN;, Gachene CKK. The effect of varying rates of compost and diammonium phosphate on soil physical properties and crop performance..; 2000. AbstractWebsite

Long-term use of compost (4, 8, 12 or 125 kg/ha for maize and 10, 20, 30 or 200 kg/ha for beans) on improving crop yields and soil physical characteristics was studied at the steep-land research site, Kabete campus, Kenya. Preliminary results showed that maize yields under compost were lower than under diammonium phosphate (DAP). Compost increased the maize yield by 15% compared to an increase of 50% caused by DAP. Bean yield did not show any response to any rates of compost or DAP. The use of compost improved soil physical conditions, mainly bulk density and infiltration rates

Gichuki FN;, Mungai DN;. Effectiveness of three grass species as filter strips for soil conservation on cropland..; 2000. AbstractWebsite

The effectiveness of different grass spp. in reducing runoff and soil loss was studied at Kabete campus, University of Nairobi, Kenya. Half metre wide strips of Napier grass (Pennisetum purpureum), Nandi setaria (Setaria anceps) and tall Signal grass (Brachiaria ruziziensis) were established on 11m x 2m runoff plots, and runoff and soil loss were monitored for each rainfall event during the long and short rains of 1990. In terms of runoff control, there was no significant difference between treatments during early establishment; however, runoff form plot with filter strips was always lower than controls. B. ruziziensis was most effective at runoff and soil loss reduction and this was attributed to growth habit and slow rate of establishment. The capability of the strips to impede runoff improved with time.

Mungai DN;, Gichuki FN;, Gachene CKK. Effectiveness of three grass species as filter strips for soil conservation on cropland..; 2000. AbstractWebsite

The effectiveness of different grass spp. in reducing runoff and soil loss was studied at Kabete campus, University of Nairobi, Kenya. Half metre wide strips of Napier grass (Pennisetum purpureum), Nandi setaria (Setaria anceps) and tall Signal grass (Brachiaria ruziziensis) were established on 11m x 2m runoff plots, and runoff and soil loss were monitored for each rainfall event during the long and short rains of 1990. In terms of runoff control, there was no significant difference between treatments during early establishment; however, runoff form plot with filter strips was always lower than controls. B. ruziziensis was most effective at runoff and soil loss reduction and this was attributed to growth habit and slow rate of establishment. The capability of the strips to impede runoff improved with time.

Gichuki FN;, Mungai DN;. Effects of phosphorus supply on the growth and nodulation of cowpeas..; 2000. AbstractWebsite

The effects of P supply (0, 20, 40, 80, 160 and 320 kg/ha) on growth and nodulation of cowpeas (Vigna unguiculata) cv. Vita 4 and Ife Brown grown in a podzolic soil (Haplustult) was studied in a greenhouse trial. The seeds were inoculated with Bradyrhyzobium CB 756. Plants were harvested at the beginning of flowering. The number of trifoliate leaves and DM yield in both cv. increased with increasing P application. The yield of the tops of Vita 4 was maximum at 160 kg P/ha and that of Ife Brown at 320 kg P/Ha. Extractable P related linearly to the rate of applied P, and DM yield increased with increase in extractable P. Plants grown without P had fewer and smaller nodules. An increase in P from 1 to 160 kg/ha increased the number of nodules/plant from 16 to 113 in Vita 4 and from 14 to 70 in Ife Brown. Similarly, increasing P increased nodule dry weight. The P conc. of the youngest fully expanded leaf (YFEL) and in the whole plant top increased with increasing P supply in both cv. and was generally higher in the YFEL than in the whole top. A critical P conc. of 0.3 and 0.25% was found in the YFEL and the whole top, resp., for cv. Vita 4.

Mungai DN;, Gichuki FN;, Gachene CKK. Effects of phosphorus supply on the growth and nodulation of cowpeas..; 2000. AbstractWebsite

The effects of P supply (0, 20, 40, 80, 160 and 320 kg/ha) on growth and nodulation of cowpeas (Vigna unguiculata) cv. Vita 4 and Ife Brown grown in a podzolic soil (Haplustult) was studied in a greenhouse trial. The seeds were inoculated with Bradyrhyzobium CB 756. Plants were harvested at the beginning of flowering. The number of trifoliate leaves and DM yield in both cv. increased with increasing P application. The yield of the tops of Vita 4 was maximum at 160 kg P/ha and that of Ife Brown at 320 kg P/Ha. Extractable P related linearly to the rate of applied P, and DM yield increased with increase in extractable P. Plants grown without P had fewer and smaller nodules. An increase in P from 1 to 160 kg/ha increased the number of nodules/plant from 16 to 113 in Vita 4 and from 14 to 70 in Ife Brown. Similarly, increasing P increased nodule dry weight. The P conc. of the youngest fully expanded leaf (YFEL) and in the whole plant top increased with increasing P supply in both cv. and was generally higher in the YFEL than in the whole top. A critical P conc. of 0.3 and 0.25% was found in the YFEL and the whole top, resp., for cv. Vita 4.

Gichuki FN;, Mungai DN;, Thomas DB. Environmental and land-use consequences of sand harvesting in Masinga division..; 2000. AbstractWebsite

This paper examines the impact of sand harvesting from rivers on the environment, land use and social life in the Masinga Division, Machakos District, Kenya. Sand acts as a safe aquifer for water flowing below and through it. Removal of sand results in destruction of underground aquifers and loss of safe water. sand scooping adversely affects surface water quality and quantity and damages the aquatic ecosystem. Haulage of sand by heavy trucks causes environmental degradation by accelerating soil erosion and affecting soil stability. Storage of sand causes destruction of surface areas through clearing of vegetation and uses land that could be used for agriculture. Related social and health problems include prostitution and high school drop-out rate leading to serious social and health problems. The beneficial effects of sand harvesting include local employment; however, the share of monetary benefits to locals is minimal. The results show that the local community gains the least from sand harvesting, but stands to suffer the most if the degradation of the river system continues. Suggestions are made for safe and sustainable methods of managing sand harvesting, in which greater local involvement and stricter enforcement of regulations to protect the environment are vital.

Mungai, DN; Thomas DB, Gichuki FN;, Gachene CKK;, Gachene CKK;. Environmental and land-use consequences of sand harvesting in Masinga division..; 2000. AbstractWebsite

This paper examines the impact of sand harvesting from rivers on the environment, land use and social life in the Masinga Division, Machakos District, Kenya. Sand acts as a safe aquifer for water flowing below and through it. Removal of sand results in destruction of underground aquifers and loss of safe water. sand scooping adversely affects surface water quality and quantity and damages the aquatic ecosystem. Haulage of sand by heavy trucks causes environmental degradation by accelerating soil erosion and affecting soil stability. Storage of sand causes destruction of surface areas through clearing of vegetation and uses land that could be used for agriculture. Related social and health problems include prostitution and high school drop-out rate leading to serious social and health problems. The beneficial effects of sand harvesting include local employment; however, the share of monetary benefits to locals is minimal. The results show that the local community gains the least from sand harvesting, but stands to suffer the most if the degradation of the river system continues. Suggestions are made for safe and sustainable methods of managing sand harvesting, in which greater local involvement and stricter enforcement of regulations to protect the environment are vital.

Gichuki FN;, Mungai DN;. Environmental impact assessment for water development and conservation..; 2000. AbstractWebsite

The possible environmental impacts of water development projects and land use practices such as deforestation and over grazing on water supply in Kenya are reviewed. Measures that can be taken in conjunction with properly conducted environmental impact assessments to mitigate adverse impacts are suggested

Mungai, DN; Gachene CKK, Gichuki FN;, Gichuki FN;. Environmental impact assessment for water development and conservation..; 2000. AbstractWebsite

The possible environmental impacts of water development projects and land use practices such as deforestation and over grazing on water supply in Kenya are reviewed. Measures that can be taken in conjunction with properly conducted environmental impact assessments to mitigate adverse impacts are suggested

Gichuki FN;, Mungai DN;. Erosion scars caused by earthflows: a case study of Ol Joro Orok division, Nyandarua district.; 2000. AbstractWebsite

This paper describes earthflow features in Nyairoko sub-location of Ol Joro Orok Division, Kenya. In 1989 more than 900 earthflows were counted in Nyandarua District, most of them in Ol Joro Orok and Ol Kalou Divisions. Individual flows affected areas between a few square metres and two hectares. More than 50% of the farms in the area were affected by earthflows. Such earthflows occurred only on grazing land and on convex slopes and were usually the result of extremely slow processes. Soils in the area are mainly moderately well drained, dark reddish brown Luvisols and well-drained, red to reddish-brown Nitisols. The first visible signs were usually shallow scars along the contour, breaking up the grass vegetation. Subsequent soil movement was very gradual. According to old residents of the area some of the earthflow features had been observed as long as 60 years ago and could not be attributed to land use change. One earthflow studied in detail revealed that soil stratification impeded drainage, leading to oversaturation of the topsoil layers and that seasonal subsurface flow generally seemed to be responsible for the soil movement. No obvious triggering could be identified.

Mungai DN;, Gichuki FN;, Gachene CKK. Erosion scars caused by earthflows: a case study of Ol Joro Orok division, Nyandarua district.; 2000. AbstractWebsite

This paper describes earthflow features in Nyairoko sub-location of Ol Joro Orok Division, Kenya. In 1989 more than 900 earthflows were counted in Nyandarua District, most of them in Ol Joro Orok and Ol Kalou Divisions. Individual flows affected areas between a few square metres and two hectares. More than 50% of the farms in the area were affected by earthflows. Such earthflows occurred only on grazing land and on convex slopes and were usually the result of extremely slow processes. Soils in the area are mainly moderately well drained, dark reddish brown Luvisols and well-drained, red to reddish-brown Nitisols. The first visible signs were usually shallow scars along the contour, breaking up the grass vegetation. Subsequent soil movement was very gradual. According to old residents of the area some of the earthflow features had been observed as long as 60 years ago and could not be attributed to land use change. One earthflow studied in detail revealed that soil stratification impeded drainage, leading to oversaturation of the topsoil layers and that seasonal subsurface flow generally seemed to be responsible for the soil movement. No obvious triggering could be identified.

G.N. OPINYA, Guthua SW. Essentials of Pediatric Orthodontics and Introduction to Orthognathic Surgery in Developing Countries. Nairobi: University of Nairobi Press; 2000.
Gichuki FN;, Mungai DN;. An evaluation of gully control measures in Central Province, Kenya..; 2000. AbstractWebsite

Forty controlled gullies distributed in Kiambu, Murang'a and Nyeri Districts of Central Province, Kenya, were randomly selected to evaluate their control measures. A recording schedule was developed to assist in collecting pertinent information. Results indicate that the failure of gully control in Central Province can be attributed to lack of technically skilled personnel and poor maintenance of gully control structures. It is concluded that there is a great need to impart technical knowledge to technical staff, and that it is essential to intensify research on gully control techniques and that there is regular and proper maintenance of all gully control structures after rainstorms.

Mungai DN;, Gachene CKK, Gichuki FN;. An evaluation of gully control measures in Central Province, Kenya..; 2000. AbstractWebsite

Forty controlled gullies distributed in Kiambu, Murang'a and Nyeri Districts of Central Province, Kenya, were randomly selected to evaluate their control measures. A recording schedule was developed to assist in collecting pertinent information. Results indicate that the failure of gully control in Central Province can be attributed to lack of technically skilled personnel and poor maintenance of gully control structures. It is concluded that there is a great need to impart technical knowledge to technical staff, and that it is essential to intensify research on gully control techniques and that there is regular and proper maintenance of all gully control structures after rainstorms.

Kinyua AM, GATEBE CK, MANGALA MJ. Environmental and industrial applications of XRF and related techniques at the Institute of Nuclear Science, University of Nairobi, Kenya. osti.gov; 1999. AbstractWebsite

ENVIRONMENTAL AND INDUSTRIAL APPLICATIONS OF XRF AND RELATED TECHNIQUES AT THE INSTITUTE OF NUCLEAR SCIENCE, UNIVERSITY OF NAIROBI, KENYA AM KJNYUA1, CK GATEBE1, MJ MANGALA1, XA9953279" DM MAINA1, AK KORIR1, K …

J.A O. Educational Management: Theory and Practice. Nairobi: Nairobi University Press; 1998.University of Nairobi Press
Hashim NO, Kinyua AM, MANGALA MJ, Rathore IV. EDXRF analysis of lead and other toxic trace elements in soil samples along two major highways of Kenya. erepository.uonbi.ac.ke; 1998. AbstractWebsite

Adjacent lands along most major highways of Kenya are left as open spaces, or used for small scale farming and grazing of cattle and livestock. Some grass and plants are expected to have high levels of lead and other toxic metals. So far, no study has been carried out to …

D.N.B. NGASSAPA, Hassanali J., P. AMWAYI, Guthua SW. Essentials of Orofacial Anatomy. Dar-es-Salaam: Dar-es-Salaam University Press; 1997.
Gatumu HN. Essentials of Educational Statistics. Nairobi: East African Education Publishers Ltd; 1996.
Denga FO;, Ongwenyi GS;, Kitheka JU;, Gichuki FN;, Mungai DN;, Thomas DB. Erosion and sedimentation problems in the arid and semi-arid lands of Kenya..; 1993. AbstractWebsite

This paper examine past and present trends in the development of Kenyan water resources, and the status of Kenya's arid and semi-arid lands. It considers the parameters linked with soil erosion and sedimentation processes and suggests means of combating the problem.

Mungai DN;, Denga, F. O; Ongwenyi GS;, Gichuki FN;, Kitheka JU;, Kitheka JU;, Gachene CKK;, Thomas DB. Erosion and sedimentation problems in the arid and semi-arid lands of Kenya..; 1993. AbstractWebsite

This paper examine past and present trends in the development of Kenyan water resources, and the status of Kenya's arid and semi-arid lands. It considers the parameters linked with soil erosion and sedimentation processes and suggests means of combating the problem.

Kaur, SS & Nyamongo IK. Ecology, Growth and Nutritional Status . New Delhi: Ashish Publishing House; 1990.
Gichaga FJ, Parker NA. Essentials of Highway Engineering.. MacMillan Publishers.; 1988.
Book Chapter
Onjala J. "Economic Performance across Monetary Unions in Africa.". In: Aloysius Amin (ed) Monetary and Financial Institutions, Integration and Economic Performance in Africa. Palgrave Macmillan; In Press.
Maweu JM. "Equality, Difference and the Complementarity of African and Western Philosophy.". In: Thinking Polyloguous: Considerations Concerning An Intercultural-Philosophical Minimal Rule. Vienna: Polylog; 2018.
Asingo PO. "Ethnicity and Political Inclusivity in Kenya: Retrospective Analysis and Prospective Solutions.". In: Ethnicity and Politicization in Kenya: The National Study. Nairobi: Kenya Human Rights Commission; 2018.Ethnicity and Politicization in Kenya
Ogot M, Okudan Gül E. "Educating for Complex Problem Solving Using Theory of Inventive Problem Solving (TRIZ).". In: Learning to Solve Complex Scientific Problems. Routledge; 2017:. Abstract

This chapter focuses on a potential remedy for the situation: adoption of the Theory of Inventive Problem Solving (TRIZ), a systematic problem-solving methodology that provides a structured process during the initial stages of design and supports the problem-solving process by providing design information that novice designers may not possess. It provides steps that allow design teams to explore nontraditional solutions and not restrict themselves to common, comfortable ones. The latter problem can be addressed by introducing a small subset of the TRIZ toolset as part of existing design courses. The case study presents a brief summary of results from a formal ideation assessment of two cohorts of first-year students in the same introductory engineering design course. Although it provides a vast and powerful set of tools, this chapter has presented a reduced toolset that is easy to learn and can be incorporated into …

"Either Patronage or Partnership: John Gatu’s Proposal for Moratorium.". In: Dictionary of African Christian Biography.; 2017.
Kibugi R. "Evaluating the Role of Private Land Tenure Rights in Sustainable Land Management for Agriculture in Kenya.". In: International Yearbook of Soil Law and Policy 2016. Springer, Cham; 2017:. Abstract
n/a
Mugambi JNK. "Ecumenism in African Christianity.". In: Routledge Companion to Christianity in Africa. London: Routledge; 2016.
Mwirigi M, Nkando I, Olum M, Attah-Poku S, Ochanda H, Berberov E, Gerdts V, Perez-Casal J, Wesonga H, Soi R, Naessens J. "Efficacy of a capsular polysaccharide conjugated vaccine against Contagious Bovine Pleuropneumonia.". In: Veterinary Immunology and Immunopathology.; 2016.
Wambua RN, Oboko R. "ELearning for Persons with Visual Disabilities: Case of Low Vision.". In: Handbook of Research on Educational Technology Integration and Active Learning. United States of America (USA): IGI Global; 2015.
Maina ME, Wagacha PW, Oboko R. "Enhancing active learning pedagogy through online collaborative learning.". In: Handbook of Research on Active Learning and the Flipped Classroom Model in the Digital Age. IGI Global: Handb. Res. Act. Learn. Flip. Classr. Model Digit. Age; 2015. Abstract

Learner-centered learning theories such as active learning and collaborative
learning are highly supported by Web 2.0 technologies and they are augmenting traditional
teacher-centered approaches. New teaching pedagogies such as flipped classroom have
also embraced the use of collaborative learning where students engage in group-based
activities during class time and they embark on asynchronous video lectures after the
classroom. However, there is little research on how flipped classrooms can support online

Upadhyaya R, Johnson S. "Evolution of Kenya's Banking Sector 2000-2012. In A Heyer & M. King (Eds.).". In: The Kenyan Financial Transformation. Nairobi: FSD Nairobi; 2015.
Mwirigi M, Nkando I, Aye R, Soi R, Ochanda H, Berberov E, Potter A, Gerdts V, Perez-Casal J, Naessens J, Wesonga H. "Experimental evaluation of inactivated and live attenuated vaccines against Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides.". In: Veterinary Immunology and Immunopathology.; 2015.
Mwangi JT. "Educational Goals, Aims and Objectives in Relation to Children’s Learning in the book.". In: Teaching Children: A Handbook for Preschool Teachers. Nairobi: Vidic Investments Limited; 2014.
Kagira JM, Kanyari PN, Githigia SM, Maingi N, Chege N. "Efficacy of Neem and Pawpaw Products against Oesophagostomum Spp Infection in Pigs.". In: Anthelmintics: Clinical Pharmacology, Uses in Veterinary Medicine and Efficacy. New York: Nova Science Publishers; 2014.
Clet Wandui Masiga, Abdalla Mohamed, Sarah Osama, Abigail Ngugi, Dan Kiambi, Santie de Villiers, Ngugi K, Mugoya C, Rasha Ali. "Enhanced Utilization of Biotechnology Research and Development Innovations in Eastern and Central Africa for Agro-ecological Intensification.". In: Enhanced Utilization of BiotechnologyResearch and Development Innovationsin Eastern and Central Africafor Agro-ecological Intensification. Entebe: Association for Strengthening Agricultural Research in Eastern and Central Africa (ASARECA); 2014.masiga_et_al_2014_enhanced_use_of_biotechnology_in_eca.pdf
Kuria MW. "Ethics in Psychiatry Chapter 19.". In: Aid to Undergraduate Psychiatry. Nairobi: Kenyatta University Press; 2014.
Gatumu JC. "Evaluating preschool children’s performance. In: Teaching children: a handbook for preschool teachers.". In: ISBN 978-9966-1797-0-8. Vol. ISBN 978-9966-1797-0-8.; 2014:. Abstract

What entails the training of young children making them ready for primary school and in essence for the future? Are there specific items, procedures, factors, etc. that need to be considered for the successful achievements of this goal? Can anybody who loves children undertake teaching preschoolers? These are some of the question that Teaching children seeks to address. This book navigates the waters of preschool teaching – the process of learning, teaching methods, motivation, differences in children all thorough to evaluation as preschool children lay blocks for their future. The journey along this road of preschool education and training begins here.

Muasya, Juliet N. "An Exploratory Study of Students' Perceptions of Heterosexual Culture in the University of Nairobi, Kenya.". In: USHEPIA Crossing Boundaries, Knowledges from the Continent. Cape Town, South Africa: Siber Ink ; 2014.
Grainger A, Wong G, KABUBO-MARIARA J, Mbuvi D, Low PK, Low PS. "Economic and Social Impacts Assessment of DLDD. Chapter 2 .". In: Economic and social impacts of desertification, land degradation and drought. White Paper I. UNCCD 2nd Scientific Conference, prepared with the contributions of an international group of scientists; 2013.unccd_white_paper_1.pdfunccd_key_findings_policy_implications_and_recommendations_of_wp_i.pdf
Iraki XN. "The Economic Implications of Peaceful and Fair General Elections in Kenya.". In: Youth and Peaceful Elections in Kenya, ISBN :978-9966-028-37-2. Nairobi: Twaweza communications; 2013.
Marani M. "Emergency Situations and Humanitarian Response.". In: Kenya Population Situation Analysis. Nairobi: Government of Kenya; 2013.
Abong' GO, Kabira JN, Okoth MW. "Enhancing b-carotene, ascorbic acid and sensory properties of potato crisps using carrot powder as a flavoring agent .". In: Trends and opportunities in the production, processing and consumption of staple foods crops in Kenya. Dresden: TUD Press; 2013.
Khasakhala" "AA, Kloos" "H. "Ethical Issues in HIV biomedical Research in Sub-Sahara Africa.". In: Vulnerabilities, Impacts, and Responses to HIV/AIDS in Sub-Saharan Africa . London: Palgrave Macmillan; 2013.
Ogonda GO. "Environmental Psychology." Nairobi: University of Nairobi; 2012.
Nyamongo GB. "Effects of Gender-Based |Violence: A Situation Analysis of the 2007 Post Election Ethnic Violence in Kenya .". In: Gender Violence: Mechanisms, Anti-Mechanisms, Interventions, and Evaluations. Linkoping: Linkoping University, Sweden, Swedish Research Council; 2011.
Kibugi R. "Enhanced Access to Environmental Justice in Kenya: Assessing the Role of Judicial Institutions.". In: Environmental Law and Sustainability After Rio. Cheltenham: Edward Elgar; 2011.
Masinde M, Nyikal Z, Bagula N. "Extending the Power of Mobile Phone Using Service Oriented Computing.". In: 4th International ICST Conference on MOBILe Wireless MiddleWARE, Operating Systems, and Application MOBILWARE 2011. Social Informatics and Telecommunications Engineering; 2011.
Kiriti-Nganga TW. "Economic Development and Food Security in Kenya: T he Shamba System.". In: Globalisation and Development: Coun t ry Experi ences , Edited by Kartik Roy and Anita Medhekar,. ova Science Publishers, New York: USA , pp, 147 - 160 .; 2010.
ethe NN ’, Omosa M, Nyangena W. "Economic Processes and Poverty in Kenya.". In: Drivers and Maintainers of Pove rty in Kenya - A Research Agenda.; 2010.
Mwabu G, Adam C, Collier P, Ndung’u N. "Education for Prosperity: Improving Access and Quality.". In: Kenya: Policies for Prosperity. Oxford: Oxford University Press; 2010.
Mbatia PN, Bikuri K, Ndiritu P, and Njogu, Kimani; Ngeta KWM(eds). "Ethnicity and Multiparty Politics in a Multi - Ethnic State: The Case of Kenya.". In: Ethnic diversity in Eastern Africa: Opportunities a nd challenges. Nairobi: Twaweza Communications; 2010.
Nyariki, D.M. WVO, Mworia JK. "Ecological, socio-economic and livelihood differentiation of Kenya.". In: Trends and Scope of Human Ecology. Vol. 5. Kamla-RaJ Enterprises, India; 2010:. Abstract
n/a
Ruto S, Kameri-Mbote P, Muteshi J. "Engendering Environmental Management for Sustainable Livelihoods.". In: The Promises and Realities: Taking Stock of the 3rd International Women’s Conference. NAIROBI: African Women & Child Feature Service & Ford Foundation; 2009.
Wasamba P. "An Ethno-linguistic Analysis of Chronic Poverty in Kenya: A Background Paper”.". In: Chronic Poverty in Kenya. Nairobi: Institute for Development Studies; 2009.
Nilsson D, Nyanchaga EN. "East African Water Regimes: The Case of Kenya.". In: The Evolution of the Law and Politics of Water. Vol. ISBN: 978-1-4020-9866-6. Springer.; 2008.
Kiriti-Nganga TW. "Economic Growth in Kenya: How does Gender Inequality Matter?". In: Gender Inequality in Developing Countries / edited by Siddhartha Sarkar and Tabitha Kiriti - Nganga. New Delhi: Arise Publications and Distributors; 2008.
Okidi CO, Mbote P, Akech M, Nyangena W. "Economic Issues for Environmental and Resource Management in Kenya.". In: Environmental Governance in Kenya: Implementing the Framework Law.; 2008.
Otsuka K, Place F, Holden ST, Nyangena W. "Efficiency and Equity Impacts of Land Markets in Kenya.". In: The Emergence of Land Markets in Africa.; 2008.
sponsored by UNICEF(DHE). "Essential drugs and rational use of antibiotics AND Childhood Asthma : Primary health Care manual .". In: Essential drugs and rational use of antibiotics AND Childhood Asthma . unicef; 2008.
Mwega F. "Explaining Africa's Economic Growth Performance: the Case of Kenya.". In: The Political Economy of Economic Growth in Africa, 1960–2000: Volume 2, Country Case Studies. Cambridge University Press; 2008.
ADAMS DOLOO. "East Africa: One Identity or Multiple Identities?". In: East African Scenarios Project Research Compendium. NAIROBI: Society for International Development; 2007.
Mulwa, M R, Nuppenau E-A. "Economic Efficiency of Sugarcane Production in Kenya: A DEA Meta-frontier Approach.". In: In (Bauer, S. and L. Karki Eds.), Issues and Challenges in Rural Development: A Compendium of Approaches for Socio-Economic and Ecological Development in Developing Countries, Vol. 1. Margraf Publishers, ISBN 978-3-8236-1502-6: Pp. 195-208; 2007.
Kiriti-Nganga TW. "Economic Growth and Poverty in Kenya: Will the Poverty Reduction Stra tegy Paper Help?". In: Poverty Alleviation and Social Disadvantage: Analysis, Case Studies and Policies , Edited by Clem Tisdell Ph.D , Vol. III.VII, . Serials Publications, New Delhi: India; 2007.
Akinyeye R, Michira I, Botha S, Baker P, Iwuoha E. "Electrocatalytic Sensor Applications of Nanostructured Polypyrolles and Polythiophenes.". In: Recent advances in Electroanalytical chemistry. Vol. T.C. 37/661(2), Fort P.O., Trivandrum-695 023, kerala, India. Keralala, India: Transworld Network; 2007:.
Ayuke FO, Karanja NK, Bunyasi SW. "Evaluating effect of mixtures of organic resources on nutrient release patterns and uptake by maize.". In: In: Bationo, A., Waswa B., Kihara, J., Kimetu, J. (Eds). Advances in Integrated Soil Fertility Research in sub-Saharan Africa: Challenges and Opportunities, 79: 833-844 . Springer Publishers; 2007. Abstract

To supplement high costs of inorganic fertilizers, smallholder farmers in the tropics are likely to increase the use of appropriate plant residues as an alternative source of plant nutrients especially nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P). To maximize benefit accrued from these materials, synchronizing nutrient release patterns of the materials with crop’s nutrient requirements need to be understood. Consequently, this study was undertaken to: (1) evaluate the effect of plant residues on mineralization and N-release patterns, (2) evaluate the N release patterns of mixtures of low and high quality organic materials and synchrony with maize uptake. Incubation studies were established for 12 weeks using six selected plant residues: which included Leucaena leucocephala, Croton macrostachyus, Calliandra calothyrsus, Tithonia diversifolia, Sorghum bicolor and rice (Oryza sativa) husks. Soil samples were taken at 2 weeks interval for ammonium nitrogen (NH+4 -N) and nitrate nitrogen (NO−3 -N) determination. The organic residues differed in their chemical composition and this was found to influence mineralization rates and nitrogen release patterns. Two distinctive NO−3 -N + NH+4 N release patterns were observed over the incubation period. L. leucocephala, C. macrostachyus, C. calothyrsus, T. diversifolia had a net N release throughout while S. bicolor and rice husks (O. sativa) had a significant N immobilization. Nitrogen-release was best correlated with C:N ratio (r2= –0.84 to –0.90) for most of the sampling periods. Polyphenol:N ratio also had a significantly high
correlation with cumulative N mineralized (r2 = –0.65 to –0.95). Two organic resource with contrasting C:N and PP:N ratios i.e. C. macrostachyus and O. sativa were selected for use and in depth effect of mixing high quality C. macrostachyus (Cm) and low quality O. sativa (Os) at different ratios on mineralization N release patterns. Agronomic effectiveness of the best mixture, which was based on N release, was measured using maize as the test crop in a glasshouse experiment. The dynamics of N-mineralization of the various mixture of C. macrostachyus (Cm) and O. sativa (Os) were in general not significantly different from those predicted from the O. sativa and C. macrostachyus treatments alone with the exception of the ¾ Cm + ¼ Os which gave significant N immobilization at 6–8 weeks and the ¼ Cm+¾Os which enhanced N mineralization at 2
and 12 weeks respectively. Addition of plant residues significantly increased maize biomass in the glasshouse with potted mixtures of plant residues giving the highest maize dry matter yield and N uptake.

Key words: Agronomic effectiveness, chemical composition, mineralization, nutrient release, nutrient uptake,
organic resources

Gakinya B, Mburu J, Maru H, editor Ndetei, D.M. "Electro-Convulsive Therapy (ECT)."; 2006.
editor Ndetei, D.M., Othieno C, Kilonzo G, Mburu J. "Epilepsy."; 2006.
Hogan NM, Kilonzo G, editor Ndetei, D.M., Sebit MB, Ongecha-Owuor F. "Ethics in Psychiatric Research."; 2006.
Hogan NM, editor Ndetei, D.M., Kilonzo G, Sebit MB, Gakinya B. "Ethics in the Practice of Psychiatry and Mental Health."; 2006.
Kanyinga K. "'Ethnic inequalities and governance of the public sector in Kenya.". In: Ethnicity, Inequalities and Public Sector. London: Pelgrave Macmillan; 2006.
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Dr. OLOO ADAMS in Rok Ajulu(ed.). "The East African Legislative Assembly and the National Assemblies of Partner States: Conflict or Harmony.". In: The Making of a Region: The Revival of the East African Community. SOUTH AFRICA: Institute for Global Dialogue; 2005.
"Education and the Development of Nationhood in Kenya.". In: Re-invigorating the University Mandate in a Globalising Environment: Challenges, Obstacles and Way Forward . Nairobi: DAAD; 2005.education_and_the_development_of_nationhood_in_kenya.pdf
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Ayiemba EHO, J.O. Oucho. E, et al. "Effective Family Planning Programmes for Africa: Lessons from Kenya’s Experience.". In: Population and Development in Kenya. Nairobi: School of Journalism Press, University of Nairobi; 2000.
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Kokwaro JO. "Ethnobotany in Africa .". In: Ethnobotany by R.E. Schultes & S. Von Reis, . Portland, Oregon: Dioscorides Press; 1995.
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Oucho JO. "The Effect of Culture and Religion on Family Formation.". In: Family and Population.; 1984.
Broadcast
Mueni J. Ep 07 Custody. Medeva; 2010. Abstract

MEDEVA TV
Be the Judge
Be the Judge is a groundbreaking TV legal drama series (with a citizens’ jury) educating the people on due process of law and how to understand the way the courts work in Kenya. The programme, which airs on KTN, underlines the fact that access to justice and legal awareness are key components in a democracy. By understanding the law and its workings, Kenyans will be better placed to enjoy their fundamental human rights

By Joy Mueni (Lecturer, SOJMC) - Actor-Judge

Mueni J. Ep 12. Medeva; 2010. Abstractbe_the_judge.docx

Be the Judge is a groundbreaking TV legal drama series (with a citizens' jury) educating the people on due process of law and how to understand the way the courts work in Kenya. The programme, which airs on KTN, underlines the fact that access to justice and legal awareness are key components in a democracy. By understanding the law and its workings, Kenyans will be better placed to enjoy their fundamental human rights.

By Joy Mueni (Lecturer, SOJMC) - Actor-Judge

Mueni J. Ep 13 Negligence. Medeva; 2010. Abstract

Be the Judge is a groundbreaking TV legal drama series (with a citizens' jury) educating the people on due process of law and how to understand the way the courts work in Kenya. The programme, which airs on KTN, underlines the fact that access to justice and legal awareness are key components in a democracy. By understanding the law and its workings, Kenyans will be better placed to enjoy their fundamental human rights.

By Joy Mueni (Lecturer, SOJMC) - Actor-Judge

Classical
Conference Paper
ODERA PROFALILAPATRICK. "Editor, Local Social Development Systems in Africa: Ethiopia, Kenya and Zimbabwe (forthcoming 2006) - Chapter on Kenya.". In: Acta Crystallographica C. International Union of Crystallography; Forthcoming. Abstract
Presented here is a 16-year-old girl who was referred on 30th January 1996 with diagnosis of cord compression with spastic paraplegia with sensory level at T7/T8. CT scan myelogam confirmed soft tissue density mass displacing cord to the left with no dye being seen beyond T3. Thoracic spine decompressive laminectomy was performed on 1st January 1996 at Nairobi West Hospital extending from T3 to T6 level, which revealed a fibrous haemorrhagic tumour. Histology showed meningioma (mixed fibrous type and meningoepitheliomatous type) with many psammoma bodies. She had a stormy post-operative period, with infection and wound dehiscence. This was treated with appropriate antibiotics and wound care. She was eventually rehabilitated and was able to walk with the aid of a walking frame because of persistent spasticity of right leg. She was seen once as an outpatient by author on 6th July 1996, she was able to use the walking frame, but the right leg was still held in flexion deformity at the knee. She was thus referred to an orthopaedic surgeon for possible tenotomy. She was able to resume her studies at the University ambulating using a wheel chair and walking frame. She presented with worsening of symptoms in 2001 (five years after her first surgery). MRI scan thoracic spine revealed a left anterolateral intradural lesion extending from T3 to T5 vertebral body level compressing and displacing the spinal cord. She had a repeat surgery on 6th March 2001 at Kenyatta National Hospital; spastic paraparesis and urinary incontinenece persisted. She also developed bed sores and recurrent urinary tract infections. She was followed up by the author and other medical personnel in Mwea Mission Hospital where she eventually succumbed in 2005, nine years after her first surgery. This case is presented as a case of incompletely excised spinal meningioma to highlight some of the problems of managing spinal meningiomas when operating microscope and embolisation of tumours are not readily available. Also the family experienced financial constraint in bringing the patient for regular follow-up, and getting access to appropriate antibiotics, catheters and urine bags.
ODERA PROFALILAPATRICK. "Editor, Local Social Development Systems in Africa: Ethiopia, Kenya and Zimbabwe (forthcoming) - Chapter on Kenya.". In: Acta Crystallographica C. International Union of Crystallography; Forthcoming. Abstract
Presented here is a 16-year-old girl who was referred on 30th January 1996 with diagnosis of cord compression with spastic paraplegia with sensory level at T7/T8. CT scan myelogam confirmed soft tissue density mass displacing cord to the left with no dye being seen beyond T3. Thoracic spine decompressive laminectomy was performed on 1st January 1996 at Nairobi West Hospital extending from T3 to T6 level, which revealed a fibrous haemorrhagic tumour. Histology showed meningioma (mixed fibrous type and meningoepitheliomatous type) with many psammoma bodies. She had a stormy post-operative period, with infection and wound dehiscence. This was treated with appropriate antibiotics and wound care. She was eventually rehabilitated and was able to walk with the aid of a walking frame because of persistent spasticity of right leg. She was seen once as an outpatient by author on 6th July 1996, she was able to use the walking frame, but the right leg was still held in flexion deformity at the knee. She was thus referred to an orthopaedic surgeon for possible tenotomy. She was able to resume her studies at the University ambulating using a wheel chair and walking frame. She presented with worsening of symptoms in 2001 (five years after her first surgery). MRI scan thoracic spine revealed a left anterolateral intradural lesion extending from T3 to T5 vertebral body level compressing and displacing the spinal cord. She had a repeat surgery on 6th March 2001 at Kenyatta National Hospital; spastic paraparesis and urinary incontinenece persisted. She also developed bed sores and recurrent urinary tract infections. She was followed up by the author and other medical personnel in Mwea Mission Hospital where she eventually succumbed in 2005, nine years after her first surgery. This case is presented as a case of incompletely excised spinal meningioma to highlight some of the problems of managing spinal meningiomas when operating microscope and embolisation of tumours are not readily available. Also the family experienced financial constraint in bringing the patient for regular follow-up, and getting access to appropriate antibiotics, catheters and urine bags.
P.OCHILO. "The Electronic Media and Advocacy for Health.". In: The International Planned Parenthood Federation Seminar,for IPPF affiliate Personnel from four of IPPF’s six Worldwide Regions - Africa Arab World, Western Hemisphere, East and South Asia and Oceanic. ; Submitted.
Atoh FO. "Exploring the New Ohangla Music in the Context of Urbanization: The Search for Relevance for Sustainability. .". In: International Conference on Refocusing Music and Performing Arts for Sustainable Development . Kabarak University ; Submitted.
W PROFNJENGALYDIAH. "e-learning module II contents for 'Coordination Chemistry'.". In: A 3rd year BED Science course material. UoN; Submitted. Abstract
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OYOO PROFWANDIGASHEM. "Effects of Chemical Events on Environment in Africa.". In: Pontifical Academy of Science's Study Week on "Chemical Events in the Atmosphere and Their Impact", November 1983, P.649-673. Academic Press Elsevier. Int.; Submitted. Abstract
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OYOO PROFWANDIGASHEM, OYOO PROFWANDIGASHEM. "The Electric Dipole Moments of Monohalogen Derivatives of German.". In: Letters. 7, 71 (1971). Academic Press Elsevier. Int.; Submitted. Abstract
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N PROFKAMAUGEOFREY. "Electrocatalytic decomposition of organohalides in microemulsion,".". In: Submitted to Journal of Electrochimica Acta. Survey Review; Submitted. Abstract
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DR. ANYANGO BEATRICE. "Enviromental Risk Assesment of Genetically Modified Organisms.Vol. 2. Methodologies for Assesing Bt.Cotton in Brazil .. CAB International, Wallingford , UK .". In: Royal Botanic Gardens , Kew , England. El-Banhawy, E. M.; Submitted. Abstract
We surveyed the phytoseid mites in four different geographical zones of Kenya: Zone I, upper highland and tropical alpine (2400-4400m): Zone II, lower highland (1800-2400m); zone III, midland (800-1800m); Zone IV, tropical, hot and humid( 0-800m ). A total of 107 species was found. In the sub family, amblyseeinae there were 14 species in the genus Neoseilus , one in Aspereroseius Chant, one in Paraphytoseius Swirski &Schechter, five in typhlodromips De Leon, five in Transeius Chant & McMurty, one in Graminaseius Chant &McMurty, 11 in Amblyseius Berlese, one in Arrenoseius Wanstein, two in Typhlodromalus muma, seven in Ueckemannseius Chant &McMurty, one in Ambylodromalus Chant &Mcmurty,, 20 in Euseius Wanstein, one in Iphiseius Berlese, one in Phytoseilus Evans and one in Gynaseius Ehara & Imano. In the subfamily Phytoseiinae Berlese there were four species in the genus Phytoseiius Ribaga. In the subfamily Typhlodrominae Wanstein, there were four species in the genus Kuzinellus Wainstein and 27 in Typhlodromus Scheuten
JAMES DRMWAURA. "Experiences, Knowledge and Perceptions of Women on Gender Based Violence; A case study of Komu Sub-location, Thika Municipality, Kenya.". In: Kenya Nursing Journal volume 37. National Nurses Association of Kenya; Submitted.
NJOGU DRMBUGUAMARTIN. "Extraction of vernonia oil from Vernonia galamensis seeds and it.". In: Journal of Kenya Chemical Society. University of Nairobi.; Submitted.

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