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Charles Opiyo Ayieko, Musembi RJ, Alex Awuor Ogacho, Benard Odhiambo Aduda, Boniface Mutua Muthoka, Jain PK. "Controlled Texturing of Aluminum Sheet for Solar Energy Applications." Advances in Materials Physics and Chemistry. 2015;5:458. Abstract
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AA S, D V, E M. "A Controller for a Wind Driven Micro-Power Electric Generator.". In: Proceedings of the First International Conference on Advances in Engineering and Technology. Entebbe, Uganda; 2006.
Shah P, Ayiemba E. "Convention on biological diversity and rural-urban connections with reference to Kenya." International Journal of Research in Environmental Studies. 2019;6:14-26.
Munguti J, Awori K, Odula P, Ogeng’o J. "Conventional and variant termination of the porta vein in a black Kenyan population." Folia Morphol.. 2013;72(1):57-52.
Ombuna AK, Maina SW, Alasow KB, Kisumbi BK, Gathece L. "Convergence angles of tooth preparations assessed on dies for full crowns and bridge retainers." East African Medical Journal. 2017;94:405-412. Abstract
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Ambuko J, Karithi E, Hutchinson M, Owino W, Wasilwa L, Hansen B, others. "The CoolbotTM: a low-cost cold storage alternative for smallholders in developing countries.". In: The 1st All Africa Post Harvest Congress & Exhibition, Reducing food losses and waste: sustainable solutions for Africa, 28th-31st March 2017, Nairobi, Kenya. Conference Proceedings. University of Nairobi; 2017:. Abstract
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A. HASHIM. "Coping with Conflicts: Colonial Policy towards Muslim Personal Law in Kenya and Post-independent Court Practice.". In: Muslim Family Law in Colonial and Postcolonial Sub-Saharan Africa. Amsterdam: University of Amsterdam Publishers; 2009.coping_with_conflicts.pdf
Liu Y, Edmond KV, Curran A, Bryant C, Peng B, Aarts DGAL, Sacanna S, Dullens RPA. "Core–shell particles for simultaneous 3D imaging and optical tweezing in dense colloidal materials." Advanced Materials. 2016;28:8001-8006. Abstract
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Ogunleye OO, Godman B, Fadare JO, Mudenda S, Adeoti AO, Yinka-Ogunleye AF, Ogundele SO. "Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) Pandemic across Africa: Current Status of Vaccinations and Implications for the Future." Vaccines. 2022;10(9):1553.ogunlaye_et_al-vaccines-10-01553-1.pdf
Alukwe GH, Ngugi PK, Ogollah K, Orwa G. "Corporate Governance Challenge to Regulation Compliance by Deposit Taking Savings and Credit Co- Operative Societies in Kenya." Corporate Governance Challenge to Regulation Compliance by Deposit Taking Savings and Credit Co- Operative Societies in Kenya. 2015;5(3).alukhwe_ngugi_ogollah_orwa_corporate_governance_publication_2015.pdf
ADUDA JO. "Corporate Governance Practices, and the Relationship between Corporate Governance and Financial Performance among Broadcasting Stations in Kenya.". In: African Journal of Business and Management. Nairobi: AJBUMA publishing; 2012.
Fraley DS, Adler S. "Correction of hyperkalemia by bicarbonate despite constant blood {pH}." Kidney International. 1977;12:354-360. Abstract

Patients having hyperkalemia often are given bicarbonate to raise blood pH and shift extracellular potassium into cells. Blood pH in many hyperkalemic patients, however, is compensated. To determine whether bicarbonate, independent of its pH action, affects plasma potassium, 14 hyperkalemic patients were treated with bicarbonate in 5% dextrose. In five patients (changed pH group), blood pH rose at least 0.08, while in nine (constant pH group), it changed less than 0.04. In the first group, pH rose 0.12, bicarbonate rose 5.9 mEq/liter, and plasma potassium fell 1.6 mEq/liter, and plasma potassium fell 1.4 mEq/liter. The correlation between changes in plasma potassium and bicarbonate was identical in the two groups and independent of urinary potassium excretion. Four additional patients, who were treated with 5% dextrose alone, did not significantly lower their plasma potassium, although subsequent treatment with bicarbonate in 5% dextrose lowered their plasma potassium. Thus, bicarbonate lowers plasma potassium, independent of its effect on blood pH, and despite a risk of volume overload, should be used to treat hyperkalemia in compensated acid-base disorders, even in the presence of renal failure, provided the plasma bicarbonate concentration is decreased.

Mundo L, Porro LD, Granai M, Siciliano MC, Mancini V, Santi R, Marcar L, Vrzalikova K, Vergoni F, Stefano GD, Schivoni G, Segreto G, Noel Onyango, Nyagol JA, Amato T, Bellan C, Anagnostopoulos I, Falini B, Leoncini L, Lazzi S. "Correction: Frequent traces of EBV infection in Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphomas classified as EBV-negative by routine methods: expanding the landscape of EBV-related lymphomas." Modern Pathology. 2020:10.1038/s41379-020-0608-y.
Macharia R, Mireji P, Murungi E, Murilla G, Christoffels A, Aksoy S, Masiga D. "Correction: Genome-Wide Comparative Analysis of Chemosensory Gene Families in Five Tsetse Fly Species." PLoS Negl Trop Dis. 2016;10(12):e0005199. Abstract

[This corrects the article DOI: 10.1371/journal.pntd.0004421.].

M G, L M, AU A, MC S, H R, V M, N O, J N, OA A, I M, S M, W W, M B, PP P, L Q-M, F F, S L, Leoncini L, T M. "Correction: Immune landscape in Burkitt lymphoma reveals M2-macrophage polarization and correlation between PD-L1 expression and non-canonical EBV latency program. ." Infect Agent & Cancer . 2020;15(39):doi:10.1186/s13027-020-00304-9.
Slyker JA, Patterson J, Ambler G, Richardson BA, Maleche-Obimbo E, Bosire R, Mbori-Ngacha D, Farquhar C, John-Stewart G. "Correlates and outcomes of preterm birth, low birth weight, and small for gestational age in HIV-exposed uninfected infants." BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2014;14:7. Abstract

Preterm birth (PTB), low birth weight (LBW) and small for gestational age (SGA) contribute to neonatal mortality. Maternal HIV-1 infection has been associated with an increased risk of PTB, but mechanisms underlying this association are undefined. We describe correlates and outcomes of PTB, LBW, and SGA in HIV-exposed uninfected infants.

Kodhiambo MO, Amugune BK. "Correlates of Paediatric Malaria Prevention and Health Seeking Behaviour in Households within Homa Bay County, Kenya ." Pharmaceutical Journal of Kenya /2018 vol. 23, No 3 100-106. 2018;23(3):100-106.
Arimura H. "Correlation between molecular size and interferon- inducing activity of poly I:C." Acta Virol.. 1975;19(6):457-66. Abstract

Electron microscopy showed that commerical poly I: C consisted of molecules varying in length from less than 0.05 nm to more than 5 nm and also in morphology . To clarify the relationship between its molecular size and interferon-inducing activity, poly I: C was sonicated or fractionated by sucrose density gradient centrifugation, and the molecular length distribution and interferon-inducing activity of each preparation was determined in vivo and in vitro. The results showed that (1) poly I : C molecules 0.1-0.3 nm long were the most effective for interferon induction; (2) sonication of poly I : C reduced its molecular length and also the interferon-inducing activity, the degree of reduction varying in different fractions; and (3) the interferon-inducing activity of poly I: C of 0.1-0.3 nm obtained by sucrose density gradient centrifugation was higher than that poly I: C of corresponding length prepared by sonication.

A M, J N, Rogena E, W O, Kimani M, N O, L P, R S, Leoncini L, W M. "Correlation of EGFR, pEGFR and p16INK4 expressions and high-risk HPV infection in HIV/AIDS-related squamous cell carcinoma of conjunctiva." Infect Agent Cancer. . 2014;9(1):7.
AJ W, SO ML. "Cost consideration in renal replacement therapy in Kenya." East Afr Med J. 1995;72(1):69-71. Abstract

End stage renal disease requiring renal replacement therapy is a common complication of several renal diseases that are seen in the tropics. World over, the costs of the various modalities of therapy that constitute renal replacement therapy, including hemodialysis, continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis and renal transplantation, is prohibitive. All the above modes of therapy are provided in Kenya, unlike most countries with similar level of socioeconomic development. This article analyses the factors behind the limited success that renal replacement therapy enjoys in Kenya, which is faced with more pressing basic problems of malnutrition and infection.

A MRMAKACHIAPETER. "A Cost Modeling Design Strategy For Dweller-Initiated Transformation In Urban Housing.". In: 3rd International Conference On Construction Industry Development Post-Graduate Conference (CIDB) 2005. Lund Centre for Habitat Studies. Lund University; 2005. Abstract
Heavily glazed office buildings in the Kenyan Capital City Nairobi, common in recent times does not augur well for a micro and macro architectural environment. This has a consequent negative impact on energy use in office spaces. By use of computer simulations, traditional tools and literature review glazing use in office fenestration is analysed and its implications for architectural design investigated. The results indicate a direct relationship between the variable parameters of glazing type and size, glazed opening orientation, shading devices and control of energy loads within the office spaces and the objective of human comfort in the office spaces. In conclusion it is recommended that optimum levels of glazing size and type as well as suitable glazing orientations for architectural use in office buildings in Nairobi.
Kioko UM, Menon V, Ally M, Forsythe S. "Costs and Impacts of Scaling Up Male Circumcision in Tanzania.". In: Washington, DC: Futures Group, USAID | Health Policy Initiative, Costing Task Order.; 2012.
Okuda Y, Adrogue HJ, Field JB, Nohara H, Yamashita K. "Counterproductive effects of sodium bicarbonate in diabetic ketoacidosis." The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. 1996;81:314-320. Abstract

Although a growing body of evidence supports that alkali therapy in diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) might be counterproductive, our knowledge about the consequences of this treatment on ketone metabolism is limited. Consequently, we performed clinical and animal studies to further examine this topic. The clinical studies assessed seven patients with DKA treated with continuous insulin infusion at a low dosage. Three of them also received sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3), whereas the remaining four acted as controls. The group receiving NaHCO3 showed a 6-h delay in the improvement of ketosis as compared with controls. In addition, there was an increase in acetoacetate (AcAc) levels during alkali administration, followed by an increase in 3-hydroxybutyrate (3-OHB) level after its completion. Significant differences were not found between groups in the response of plasma glucose to the overall therapy. The animal study examined the effects of a NaHCO3-rich perfusate on the hepatic production of ketones with the in situ rat-liver preparation. Alkali loading resulted in an immediate increase in the AcAc level followed by increases in both the 3-OHB level and the 3-OHB/AcAc ratio after its completion. Hepatic ketogenesis increased even further, to about twice the basal level, after termination of the NaHCO3 loading. This investigation confirms that alkali administration augments ketone production and unravels an effect of bicarbonate infusion that promotes a selective build up of AcAc in body fluids. The data support that alkali therapy in DKA has nonsaltuary effects in the metabolism and plasma levels of ketones.

Hope R, Olago D, Opondo M, Mumma A, Ouma G, Dulo S, A Trevett, Harvey P, Stallone A, Koehler J, Katuva J, James R, Washington R, Bradley D, Cheeseman N, Borgomeo E, Charles K, Thomson P. Country Diagnostic Report, Kenya.; 2015. Abstractcountry_diagnostic_report_kenya.pdfOxford University Research Archive

Kenya is one of Africa’s most dynamic and entrepreneurial economies, but one with increasing water security risks. These risks are of growing concern to the poor; where it is clear current poverty metrics do not capture the impact and implications of water shocks or long-term human exposure to water risks. This report highlights 4 significant but uncertain developments that will interact to determine Kenya’s progress in its quest to reach middle-income status by 2030 and improve water security for over 17 million poor people: the impacts of decentralisation resilience to climate shocks reducing inequality harnessing mobile ecosystems. The report presents potential locations to establish Water Security Observatories that address these key issues and developments. Through a risk-based approach and science-practitioner partnerships, the observatories are proposed to examine ‘small towns in fragile lands’ and ‘build water secure institutions’ with the goal of reducing water security risks for the poor. This paper is an output from the REACH Improving Water Security for the Poor programme

Hope R, Olago D, Opondo M, Mumma A, Ouma G, Dulo S, A Trevett. "Country diagnostic report, Kenya." Oxford University Research Archive. 2015. Abstractora.ox.ac.uk

Kenya is one of Africa’s most dynamic and entrepreneurial economies, but one with increasing water security risks. These risks are of growing concern to the poor; where it is clear current poverty metrics do not capture the impact and implications of water shocks or long-term human exposure to water risks. This report highlights 4 significant but uncertain developments that will interact to determine Kenya’s progress in its quest to reach middle-income status by 2030 and improve water security for over 17 million poor people: the impacts of decentralisation resilience to climate shocks reducing inequality harnessing mobile ecosystems. The report presents potential locations to establish Water Security Observatories that address these key issues and developments. Through a risk-based approach and science-practitioner partnerships, the observatories are proposed to examine ‘small towns in fragile lands’ and ‘build water secure institutions’ with the goal of reducing water security risks for the poor. This paper is an output from the REACH Improving Water Security for the Poor programme

A K, Folayan MO, Sabbah W, El Tantawi M, Ramos-Gomez F. "Country Profile of the Epidemiology and Clinical Management of Early Childhood Caries.". In: Country Profile of the Epidemiology and Clinical Management of Early Childhood Caries. Lausanne: Frontiers Media SA.; 2020.
BROWN GINA, WARREN MARY, Williams JE, Adam EJ, Coles JA. "Cranial computed tomography of elderly patients: an evaluation of its use in acute neurological presentations." Age and ageing. 1993;22:240-243. AbstractWebsite
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A O, EC R, chindia ML, FG M, M N, Fred W. "Craniofacial anomalies amongst births at two hospitals in Nairobi, Kenya.". 2012;41:596-603. Abstractcraniofacial_anomalies_amongst_births_at_two_hospitals_in_nairobi_kenya.pdf

The pattern of congenital oral and craniofacial anomalies (CFAs) in the Kenyan population remains unknown. The objective of this study was to describe the pattern of occurrence of CFAs at two hospitals in Nairobi. A descriptive cross-sectional study at the Kenyatta National Hospital and Pumwani Maternity Hospital was carried out from November 2006 to March 2007. Mothers who delivered at the hospitals consented to an interview and physical examination of their babies within 48 h of delivery. The anomalies were classified for type and magnitude. Data were analysed to determine the association of these anomalies with ages of the mothers, gender, weight, birth order, mode of delivery and birth status of the babies. During the study period, 7989 babies were born. The CFAs manifested in 1.8% of the total births and were more common in female (1.4%) than in male (1.0%) live births. 12.8% of stillbirths had CFAs, with lesions manifesting more in males (16.7%) than in females (6.9%). The commonest CFA was preauricular sinus (4.3/1000) followed by hydrocephalus (1.9/1000) then preauricular tags and cleft lip and palate (1.5/1000 and 1.3/1000 total births, respectively).

Kamali A, Price MA, Lakhi S, Karita E, Inambao M, Sanders EJ, Anzala O, Latka MH, Bekker L-G, Kaleebu P, Asiki G, Ssetaala A, Ruzagira E, Allen S, Farmer P, Hunter E, Mutua G, Makkan H, Tichacek A, Brill IK, Fast P, Stevens G, Chetty P, Amornkul PN, Gilmour J. "Creating an African HIV clinical research and prevention trials network: HIV prevalence, incidence and transmission." PLoS ONE. 2015;10(1):e0116100. Abstract

HIV epidemiology informs prevention trial design and program planning. Nine clinical research centers (CRC) in sub-Saharan Africa conducted HIV observational epidemiology studies in populations at risk for HIV infection as part of an HIV prevention and vaccine trial network. Annual HIV incidence ranged from below 2% to above 10% and varied by CRC and risk group, with rates above 5% observed in Zambian men in an HIV-discordant relationship, Ugandan men from Lake Victoria fishing communities, men who have sex with men, and several cohorts of women. HIV incidence tended to fall after the first three months in the study and over calendar time. Among suspected transmission pairs, 28% of HIV infections were not from the reported partner. Volunteers with high incidence were successfully identified and enrolled into large scale cohort studies. Over a quarter of new cases in couples acquired infection from persons other than the suspected transmitting partner.

Ayah R, Gitau S, Rogge M, Mugasia D, Hoyle W, Ogot M. "Creating High Value, High Impact Products from Recycled Plastic: Case Study, Building Digital Microscopes for Malaria Diagnosis. .". In: 1st Annual Architecture & Engineering Conference. Nairobi, Kenya; 2018.
Gitao CG, Akundabweni LSM. "Creation of research linkages in Africa by regional bodies.". In: Third Ruforum Biennial Meeting. Kampala, Uganda; 2012.creation_of_networks.docx
Amolo EJA, Rambo CM, Wafula CM. "Credit Enhancement and Performance of Hydroelectric Energy Projects in Kenya." Journal of Finance & Banking Studies. 2020;9(4):47-57.
Kihara J, Mukalama J, Ayuke FO, Njoroge S, Waswa B, Okeyo J, Koala S, Bationo A. "Crop and Soil response to tillage and crop residue application in a tropical Ferralsol in Sub-humid Western Kenya.". In: In: Bationo, A., Waswa, B., Kihara, J., Adolwa, I., Vanlauwe, B., Saidou, K. (Eds), Lessons learned from long-term soil fertility management experiments in Africa, 3:41-57. Springer; 2012. Abstract

Conservation agriculture (CA) offers an opportunity to reverse prevailing land degradation and consequent loss of productivity often occasioned by intensive soil tillage in cropping systems in most parts of sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). A long term experiment was established in Nyabeda Western Kenya in 2003 to evaluate the effect of tillage and crop residue application on maize and soybean yields, and on soil properties. The experiment was set up as a split-split-split plot design with four replicates and involved a factorial combination of tillage system (reduced and conventional tillage), cropping system (continuous cereal, soybean-maize rotation and intercropping), crop residue – maize stover – management (plus and minus crop residue) and nitrogen (N) application. Results showed that tillage infl uenced performance
of maize although signifi cant tillage effects were observed in only 5 out of the 15 seasons analyzed. Overall average maize grain yields were 2.9 ton ha −1 in reduced tillage and 3.6 ton ha −1 in conventional tillage systems. Application of crop residue increased seasonal maize grain yield in reduced tillage (340 kg ha −1 ) and in conventional tillage (240 kg ha −1 ), but the only signifi cant crop residue (CR) effect was observed in season 10. Differences in maize yields between the two systems were attributed to phosphorus availability as it was demonstrated that application of crop residue in the reduced tillage resulted in better availability of P than without crop residue application. Under the rotation system, signifi cant tillage effects were observed in 6 of the 15 seasons with greater maize yield in conventional than in reduced tillage system. Soybean yields under reduced tillage were comparable to those from conventional tillage with the good performance of soybean in reduced tillage being related to the effect of its canopy on soil evaporation, and or to changes in microbial diversity and soil structure. For both the conventional and reduced tillage systems, legume
benefi ts on succeeding maize were observed with similar maize yields being observed between maize monocropping and maize rotated with soybean. Reduced tillage improved soil aggregation with greater aggregate mean weight diameters being observed in this system than in conventional tillage. Tests for biological activity showed that the application of crop residue increased termite abundance in both
reduced and conventional tillage systems. The results from this study indicate the importance of long term trials in better understanding the benefi cial effects of conservation agriculture on soil productivity.

Keywords Reduced tillage • Rotation • Soybean • Soil aggregation • Soil organisms

Matthew 3H, Rubene D, Mweresa CK, Ajamma YUO, Owino EA, Matthew L. "Crop damage by granivorous birds despite protection efforts by human bird scarers in a sorghum field in western Kenya." Ostrich; Journal of African Ornithology . 2014;85(2):153-159.
Waema TM, Camara SB, Abdelnour, Nocera J. Cross-Cultural Participatory Design in the Developing World..; 2008.
A. HASHIM. Crown and Crescent: Competing Policies on the Administration of Islamic Law in the East African Coast. University of Johannesburg, South Africa: Research Centre for Islamic History, Art and Culture (IRCICA) Istanbul; 2009.crown_and_cresecent.pdf
Mandala N, Wanga C, Aduda J. "A Cryptography-Based System for Offline Collection and Verification of Tax Revenue by County Governments of Kenya." European Scientific Journal. 2017;13(34):414-433.
A. PROFWAMOLAISAAC. "Cunnington AJ, Kendrick SF, Wamola B, Lowe B, Newton CR.Carboxyhemoglobin levels in Kenyan children with Plasmodium falciparum malaria.Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2004 Jul;71(1):43-7.". In: Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2004 Jul;71(1):43-7. IBIMA Publishing; 2004. Abstract
Heme oxygenase (HO) is thought to be induced in severe malaria, but the pathophysiologic consequences have not been examined. It is induced by hemolysis, oxidative stress, and inflammation. It degrades heme, producing carbon monoxide (CO), which causes elevated levels of carboxyhemoglobin (COHb). In a prospective study of 1,520 children admitted to a Kenyan district hospital, COHb levels were no higher in children with malaria than with other infections. The COHb levels in children with severe malarial anemia were higher than in other children with malaria, but significantly lower than in children with other causes of severe anemia such as sickle cell disease. Levels of COHb were not significantly higher in children with cerebral malaria or in those dying of malaria. These results do not support a systemic increase in HO activity in malaria compared with other infectious diseases, but the roles of HO and CO in malaria require further study.
Ombui JN, McDermott JJ, Arimi SM, Mbugua SK, Kakuko S, Kilungo K. "Current and potential roles of dairy co-operative societies in Kiambu District, Kenya." East African Agricultural and Forestry Journal. 1995;61(2):129-140.
Nderitu J;, Waturu C;, Olubayo F;, Aura J;, Kasina J. "Current French bean pests and disease management at Mwea Tebere, Central Kenya."; 2001.
Nderitu J;, Waturu C;, Olubayo F;, Aura J;, Kasina J. "Current French bean pests and disease management at Mwea Tebere, Central Kenya."; 2001.
Akama MK. Current pattern of road traffic accidents, maxillofacial and associated injuries in Nairobi.; Submitted. Abstract

Objective: To describe the characteristics and pattern of maxillofacial and concomitant injuries sustained in Road Traffic Accidents (RTAs).
Study Area: Kenyatta National Hospital (KNH).
Study Design: A descriptive cross sectional study including all patients involved in RTAs
brought to casualty and dental departments of KNH as well as accident victims admitted to the
KNH mortuary over a four- month period from September 2004 to December 2004.
Results: A total of 482 people involved in RTAs were included in the study. Four hundred and
thirteen (85.7%) had non-fatal injuries whereas 69 (14.3%) had sustained fatal injuries.
Nonfatal injuries. The 21-30-year-old age group was the most affected. The male to female ratio
was 4:1. Day time injuries were recorded among 60.3% of the participants. The incidence of
RTAs was highest on Fridays. There were 245 (59.5%) pedestrians and 139 (33.7%) passengers
involved. Most accidents were caused by passenger service vehicles (matatu) which were
responsible for 256 (62%) casualties whereas private saloon cars were involved in 150 (36.3%)
cases. Non- use of safety belts was reported in 90 (56.6%) cases whereas over-speeding was
reported by 120 (29.1 %) casualties. Alcohol use by drivers was reported in 26 (6.3%) cases
whereas vehicle defects accounted for 62 (15%) cases.Three hundred and seventy (89.6%)
casualties had soft tissue injuries (STls) involving the craniofacial region with facial cuts being the
majority (69.2%). Two hundred and seventy three (66.1 %) incidents of other STls than those of
the head region were noted, the lower limbs accounting for 45.4% of these. Only 5.1% of the
casualties had fractures involving the maxillofacial skeleton. Skeletal injuries other than those
involving the maxillofacial region were found in 142 (34.1%) incidents. The lower limbs were
more affected with 61 (43%) incidents followed by the upper limbs (24.6%). Pedestrians were
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most involved in sustaining skeletal injuries than other categories of road users.
Fatal RTAs: Sixty nine (14.3%) of the 482 participants were fatally injured. The 21-30- year-old
age group was the most affected (20%). The male to female ratio was 3.3:1. Matatus and minibuses
were the leading cause of fatal accidents together having been responsible for 28 (40.6%) of
the accidents. Pedestrians (71.4%) were by far more involved than other categories of road users.
Most participants had multiple injuries with chest injuries having been the most common (50
cases). Fourty six (66.7%) victims had injuries to the head region with subdural haemorrhage
having been the commonest injury found at autopsy (47.8%). Injuries to the chest were found in
fifty (72.2%) victims whereas abdominal and limb injuries were recorded in 42 (60.9%) and 34
(49.3%) victims respectively. Head injury alone was the leading cause of death (37.7%) followed
by head and chest injuries combined (13.0%)
Conclusion: The majority of people involved in RTAs were in their third decade of life with
males having been the predominant group affected. Pedestrians were the leading casualties
amongst road users. Most of the accidents were caused by passenger service vehicles. The lower
limbs sustained most soft tissue and skeletal injuries compared to other anatomic sites other than
the craniofacial area. The leading cause of death was head injury.

Nguta JM, Appiah-Opong, Nyarko AK, Yeboah-Manu, D., Addo GA. "Current perspectives in drug discovery against tuberculosis from natural products." International Journal of Mycobacteriology. 2015;4:165-183.
Obiero LM, Abong' GO, W OM, OMAYIO DUKEG, G OE, Villacampa M. "Current practices concerning the environmental management systems among horticultural processing MSMES in Kenya." East African Journal of Science, Technology and Innovation,. 2021;2(special Issue):1-16.current_practices_of_msmes.pdf
OMAYIO DUKEG, Abong GO, Okoth MW, GACHUIRI CHARLESK, Mwang’ombe AW. "Current Status of Guava (Psidium Guajava L) Production, Utilization, Processing and Preservation in Kenya: A Review." Current Agriculture Research Journal. 2019;7(3):318.
OMAYIO DUKEG, Abong’ GO, Okoth MW, GACHUIRI CHARLESK, Mwang’ombe AW. "Current Status of Guava (Psidium Guajava L.) Production, Utilization, Processing and Preservation in Kenya." Current Agriculture Research Journal. 2019;Vol. 7,( No.(3) 2019, ):pg. 318-331.current_status_of_guava_psidium_guajava_l._production_utilization_processing_and_preservation_in_kenya.pdf
Anyango B;, Keya SO;, Widdowson D;, Wangaruro S;, Mugane C;, Karani FN. "Current Status of Legume Inoculant Production in Kenya.".; 1985.
Abong’ GO, Kabira JN. The current status of potato value chain in Kenya. Hotel intercontinental, Nairobi: TUD press; 2013.potato_value_chain_abstract_for_staple_food_conf_april_2013.docx
Abong' GO, Kabira JN. "The current status of the potato value chain in Kenya.". In: Trends and opportunities in the production, processing and consumption of staple foods crops in Kenya. Dresden: TUD Press; 2013.
A. MRJALEHAALEXC. "Currently developing a manual for distance learning undergraduate students, " Principles of Management.". In: Department of Clinical Studies University of Nairobi 2008. Departmental seminar; 1993. Abstract
Description: This book describes four types of indigenous water retention structures used in East Africa. These structures are the Berkad tank, the Charco dam, sand wiers and hillside water retention ditches.
A. PROFKARANIFLORIDA. ""Curriculum Issues - Bachelor of Pharmacy Syllabus Review &. Development.".". In: Workshop on Bachelor of Pharmacy Syllabus Review and Development; at Machakos Garden Hotel on llth April 1997. Kenya. Journal of BiochemiPhysics; 1997. Abstract
   
A. PROFKARANIFLORIDA. ""Curriculum Issues - Bachelor of Pharmacy Syllabus Review &. Development.".". In: Workshop on Bachelor of Pharmacy Syllabus Review and Development; at Machakos Garden Hotel on llth April 1997. Kenya. Journal of BiochemiPhysics; 1997. Abstract

 

 

Gacheru PK, ABONG' GO, Okoth MW, Lamuka PO, Shibairo SA, Katama CM. "Cyanogenic Content, Aflatoxin Level and Quality of Dried Cassava Chips and Flour Sold in Nairobi and Coastal Regions of Kenya." Current Research in Nutrition and Food Science. 2015;3(3):197-206.gacheru_2015_cyanogenic_content_cassava_chips__flour.pdf
Amayo AA, Wambua JV ODAO. "Cyclosporin monitoring in Kenya: External Quality Assurance Performance." Proc XVI ICC. 1996:506.
Acevedo JL, Shah RK, Neville HL, Poole MD. "Cystic hygroma." Medscape Reference [actualizado 22 Jul 2011]. Disponível em: http://emedicine. medscape. com/article/994055-overview. 2009. Abstract
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Githigia S, A W, Maingi N. "Cysticercosis in Kenya." The Association of Institutions for Tropical Veterinary Medicine. 2001;(10):92-93. Abstract

There has been a decrease in the prevalence of cysticercosis (T. saginata and T solium) in Kenya since independence in the early 1960s. this has been due to improvement of hygiene, strict meat inspection procedures, public educational nd a ban on free range pig keeping.

The prevalence of C. bovis decreased from 25% in the 1960s to 8.8% in the 1970s and to 1.1% in the early 1990s. the decline has been attributed in addition to the above to the take over of control of meat inspection in the country by the department of veterinary services from the ministry of health in 19;74. The training of meat inspectors was also centralized. Among the provinces , the prevalence has been highest in the Rift Valley which is a net exporter of animals to other provinces and this is where the pastoral communities are found. The infection seems to spread from this province.

Outbreaks of porcine cysticercosis (T.solium) were recorded in the early 1960s mainly among the free range pig farmers in the north western Rift Valley (Tranzoia) Kakamega and Busia. A government ban on free range pig raising in the country after independence and proper hygience led to a sharp devreas in cases of T> Solium.

Waruk JLM, Machuki Z, Mesa C, Juno JA, Anzala O, Sharma M, Ball BT, Julius Oyugi, Kiazyk S. "Cytokine and chemokine expression profiles in response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis stimulation are altered in HIV-infected compared to HIV-uninfected subjects with active tuberculosis." Tuberculosis (Edinb). 2015;95(5):555-61. Abstract

Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infects nearly 2 million people annually and is the most common cause of death in HIV-infected individuals. Tuberculosis (TB) diagnostics cater to HIV-uninfected individuals in non-endemic countries, are expensive, slow, and lack sensitivity for those most affected. Patterns of soluble immune markers from Mtb-stimulated immune cells are not well defined in HIV co-infection. We assessed immune differences between HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected individuals with active TB utilizing IFNγ-based QuantiFERON®-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT) testing in Nairobi, Kenya. Excess QFT supernatants were used to measure cytokine and chemokine responses by a 17-plex bead array. Mtb/HIV co-infected participants were significantly less likely to be QFT+ (47.2% versus 84.2% in the HIV-uninfected group), and demonstrated lower expression of all cytokines except for IFNα2. Receiver operator characteristic analyses identified IL-1α as a potential marker of co-infection. Among HIV-infected individuals, CD4+ T cell count correlated weakly with the expression of several analytes. Co-expression analysis highlighted differences in immune profiles between the groups. These data suggest that there is a unique and detectable Mtb-specific immune response in co-infection. A better understanding of Mtb immunology can translate into much needed immunodiagnostics with enhanced sensitivity in HIV-infected individuals, facilitating their opportunity to obtain live-saving treatment.

Adem FA, Kuete V, Mbaveng AT, Heydenreich M, Ndakala A, Irungu B, Efferth T, Yenesew A. "Cytotoxic benzylbenzofuran derivatives from Dorstenia kameruniana." Fitoterapia. 2018;128:26-30. Abstract

Chromatographic separation of the extract of the roots of Dorstenia kameruniana (family Moraceae) led to the isolation of three new benzylbenzofuran derivatives, 2-(p-hydroxybenzyl)benzofuran-6-ol (1), 2-(p-hydroxybenzyl)-7-methoxybenzofuran-6-ol (2) and 2-(p-hydroxy)-3-(3-methylbut-2-en-1-yl)benzyl)benzofuran-6-ol(3) (named dorsmerunin A, B and C, respectively), along with the known furanocoumarin, bergapten (4). The twigs of Dorstenia kameruniana also produced compounds 1–4 as well as the known chalcone licoagrochalcone A (5). The structures were elucidated by NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The isolated compounds displayed cytotoxicity against the sensitive CCRF-CEM and multidrug-resistant CEM/ADR5000 leukemia cells, where compounds 4 and 5 had the highest activities (IC50 values of 7.17 μM and 5.16 μM, respectively) against CCRF-CEM leukemia cells. Compound 5

Adem FA, Kuete V, Mbaveng AT, Heydenreich M, Ndakala A, Irungu B, Efferth T, Yenesew A. "Cytotoxic benzylbenzofuran derivatives from Dorstenia kameruniana." Fitoterapia. 2018;128:26-30. AbstractFitoterapia

Description
Chromatographic separation of the extract of the roots of Dorstenia kameruniana (family Moraceae) led to the isolation of three new benzylbenzofuran derivatives, 2-(p-hydroxybenzyl)benzofuran-6-ol (1), 2-(p-hydroxybenzyl)-7-methoxybenzofuran-6-ol (2) and 2-(p-hydroxy)-3-(3-methylbut-2-en-1-yl)benzyl)benzofuran-6-ol(3) (named dorsmerunin A, B and C, respectively), along with the known furanocoumarin, bergapten (4). The twigs of Dorstenia kameruniana also produced compounds 1–4 as well as the known chalcone licoagrochalcone A (5). The structures were elucidated by NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The isolated compounds displayed cytotoxicity against the sensitive CCRF-CEM and multidrug-resistant CEM/ADR5000 leukemia cells, where compounds 4 and 5 had the highest activities (IC50 values of 7.17 μM and 5.16 μM, respectively) against CCRF-CEM leukemia cells. Compound 5 …

Fozia AA, Victor K, Armelle MT, Matthias H, Andreas K, Albert N, Beatrice I, Abiy Y, Thomas E. "Cytotoxic flavonoids from two Lonchocarpus species." Natural Product Research. 2019;33(18): 2609-2617 .
Adem FA, Kuete V, Mbaveng AT, Heydenreich M, Koch A, Ndakala A, Irungu B, Yenesew A, Efferth T. "Cytotoxic flavonoids from two Lonchocarpus species." Natural product research. 2019;33(18):2609-2617. AbstractNatural product research

Description
A new isoflavone, 4′-prenyloxyvigvexin A (1) and a new pterocarpan, (6aR,11aR)-3,8-dimethoxybitucarpin B (2) were isolated from the leaves of Lonchocarpus bussei and the stem bark of Lonchocarpus eriocalyx, respectively. The extract of L. bussei also gave four known isoflavones, maximaisoflavone H, 7,2′-dimethoxy-3′,4′-methylenedioxyisoflavone, 6,7,3′-trimethoxy-4′,5′-methylenedioxyisoflavone, durmillone; a chalcone, 4-hydroxylonchocarpin; a geranylated phenylpropanol, colenemol; and two known pterocarpans, (6aR,11aR)-maackiain and (6aR,11aR)-edunol. (6aR,11aR)-Edunol was also isolated from the stem bark of L. eriocalyx. The structures of the isolated compounds were elucidated by spectroscopy. The cytotoxicity of the compounds was tested by resazurin assay using drug-sensitive and multidrug-resistant cancer cell lines. Significant antiproliferative effects with IC50 values below 10 …

Yenesew A, Sunnerhagen, P., Erdelyi M, Abdissa N, Induli, M., Fitzpatrick P, Alao JP, Landberg G. "Cytotoxic Quinones from the Roots of Aloe dawei." Molecules. 2014;19,:3264-3273. Abstractpaper_69_abdissa_et_al_molecules_2014.pdf

Seven naphthoquinones and nine anthraquinones were isolated from the roots of Aloe dawei by chromatographic separation. The purified metabolites were identified by NMR and MS analyses. Out of the sixteen quinones, 6-hydroxy-3,5-dimethoxy-2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone is a new compound. Two of the isolates, 5,8-dihydroxy-3-methoxy-2-methylnaphthalene-1,4-dione and 1-hydroxy-8-methoxy-3-methylanthraquinone showed high cytotoxic activity (IC₅₀ 1.15 and 4.85 µM) on MCF-7 breast cancer cells, whereas the others showed moderate to low cytotoxic activity against MDA-MB-231 (ER Negative) and MCF-7 (ER Positive) cancer cells.

Adem FA, Mbaveng AT, Kuete V, Heydenreich M, Ndakala A, Irungu B, Yenesew A, Efferth T. "Cytotoxicity of isoflavones and biflavonoids from Ormocarpum kirkii towards multi-factorial drug resistant cancer." Phytomedicine. 2019;58:152-853. Abstract

While incidences of cancer are continuously increasing, drug resistance of malignant cells is observed towards almost all pharmaceuticals. Several isoflavonoids and flavonoids are known for their cytotoxicity towards various cancer cells.

Adem FA, Mbaveng AT, Kuete V, Heydenreich M, Ndakala A, Irungu B, Yenesew A, Efferth T. "Cytotoxicity of isoflavones and biflavonoids from Ormocarpum kirkii towards multi-factorial drug resistant cancer." Phytomedicine. 2019;58:152853. AbstractPhytomedicine

Description
Background
While incidences of cancer are continuously increasing, drug resistance of malignant cells is observed towards almost all pharmaceuticals. Several isoflavonoids and flavonoids are known for their cytotoxicity towards various cancer cells.
Purpose
The aim of this study was to determine the cytotoxicity of isoflavones: osajin (1), 5,7-dihydroxy-4ˈ-methoxy-6,8-diprenylisoflavone (2) and biflavonoids: chamaejasmin (3), 7,7″-di-O-methylchamaejasmin (4) and campylospermone A (5), a dimeric chromene [diphysin(6)] and an ester of ferullic acid with long alkyl chain [erythrinasinate (7)] isolated from the stem bark and roots of the Kenyan medicinal plant, Ormocarpum kirkii. The mode of action of compounds 2 and 4 was further investigated.
Methods
The cytotoxicity of compounds was determined based on the resazurin reduction assay. Caspases activation was evaluated using the caspase-Glo assay. Flow …

Victor, L.K O, V.R.S T, J.O M, A.T M, O K, H S, S S. "Cytotoxicity of Plumbagin, Rapanone and 12 other Naturally occurring Quinones towards Human Carcinoma Cells." BMC Pharmacology and Toxicology. 2016;17:60.kuete_and_omosa_et_al._2016.pdf
D
Amolo M. D ivination among the Luo community . Nairobi: University of Nairobi.; 1997.
A DRODHIAMBOWALTER. "D.E. Zavala, S. Bokongo, A.J Ime, I.M Senoga, R.E Mtonga, A.Z Mohammed, W.A. Odhiambo and P. Olupot Olupot; A Multinational Injury Surveillance System Pilot Project in Africa; 2007, 28: 4.431.". In: JPHP. Journal of Public Health Policy; 2007. Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To determine the pattern and characteristics of patients admitted with firearm injuries (FAIs) and establish the morbidity and mortality associated with these injuries. DESIGN: Retrospective cross-sectional study. SETTING: Kenyatta National Hospital (KNH), January 2004 to December 2005. SUBJECTS: All patients admitted with physically evident firearm injury. RESULTS: There were a total of 717 patients recorded with FAIs constituting 0.6% of the total number of patients seen in the casualty. Of these, 421 (58.7%) were admitted and treated as in- patients. A firearm was used in 6.7% of the 6300 assault cases recorded in 2004 and in 9.7% of the 3079 cases recorded in 2005. The increase from 6.7% in 2004 to 9.7% in 2005 was statistically significant (p < 0.05). There were 370 (87.9%) males and 49 (11.6%) females giving a male to female ratio of 7.5:1. The mean age was 29.7 +/- 10.9 years with a range of 3 to 66 years. At least 262 (62.2%) of the 421 admitted FAI casualties were treated under general anaesthesia (GA). The average duration of operation per patient was 2 +/- 1.5 hours. CONCLUSION: FAIs are on the increase and affect all age groups but is largely a disease of a young male adult in the 3rd and 4th decade of life. Mortality is higher with increasing age while female victims are fewer but on average six years younger than males. The lower extremities are the commonest target among the survivors. However, abdominal wounds tend to be the most lethal, accounting for greater mortality.
A DRODHIAMBOWALTER. "D.E. Zavala, S. Bokongo, A.J Ime, I.M Senoga, R.E Mtonga, A.Z Mohammed, W.A. Odhiambo and P. Olupot Olupot; A Multinational Injury Surveillance System Pilot Project in Africa; 2007, 28: 4.431.". In: JPHP. Journal of Public Health Policy; 2007. Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To determine the pattern and characteristics of patients admitted with firearm injuries (FAIs) and establish the morbidity and mortality associated with these injuries. DESIGN: Retrospective cross-sectional study. SETTING: Kenyatta National Hospital (KNH), January 2004 to December 2005. SUBJECTS: All patients admitted with physically evident firearm injury. RESULTS: There were a total of 717 patients recorded with FAIs constituting 0.6% of the total number of patients seen in the casualty. Of these, 421 (58.7%) were admitted and treated as in- patients. A firearm was used in 6.7% of the 6300 assault cases recorded in 2004 and in 9.7% of the 3079 cases recorded in 2005. The increase from 6.7% in 2004 to 9.7% in 2005 was statistically significant (p < 0.05). There were 370 (87.9%) males and 49 (11.6%) females giving a male to female ratio of 7.5:1. The mean age was 29.7 +/- 10.9 years with a range of 3 to 66 years. At least 262 (62.2%) of the 421 admitted FAI casualties were treated under general anaesthesia (GA). The average duration of operation per patient was 2 +/- 1.5 hours. CONCLUSION: FAIs are on the increase and affect all age groups but is largely a disease of a young male adult in the 3rd and 4th decade of life. Mortality is higher with increasing age while female victims are fewer but on average six years younger than males. The lower extremities are the commonest target among the survivors. However, abdominal wounds tend to be the most lethal, accounting for greater mortality.

Lingappa JR, Baeten JM, Wald A, Hughes JP, Thomas KK, Mujugira A, Mugo N, Bukusi EA, Cohen CR, Katabira E, Ronald A, Kiarie J, Farquhar C, Stewart GJ, Makhema J, Essex M, Were E, Fife KH, de Bruyn G, Gray GE, McIntyre JA, Manongi R, Kapiga S, Coetzee D, Allen S, Inambao M, Kayitenkore K, Karita E, Kanweka W, Delany S, Rees H, Vwalika B, Magaret AS, Wang RS, Kidoguchi L, Barnes L, Ridzon R, Corey L, Celum C. "Daily acyclovir for HIV-1 disease progression in people dually infected with HIV-1 and herpes simplex virus type 2: a randomised placebo-controlled trial." Lancet. 2010;375(9717):824-33. Abstract

Most people infected with HIV-1 are dually infected with herpes simplex virus type 2. Daily suppression of this herpes virus reduces plasma HIV-1 concentrations, but whether it delays HIV-1 disease progression is unknown. We investigated the effect of acyclovir on HIV-1 progression.

Mwaguni S, Ayiemba E, Onyari J. "DANCING TO THE TUNE OF OPPORTUNITIES –HUMAN SETTLEMENTS ALIGNED TO SHARE THE JACKPOT OF KENYA’S COASTAL TOURISM BENEFITS SPOIL THE BROTH.". 2017. AbstractFull text link

This paper highlights how human settlements aligned themselves to share the benefits to arise from coastal tourism development in
the Kenya coast, but have come to bedevil the industry through poor management of domestic waste. The study area comprised of
Nyali-Bamburi-Shanzu and Diani-Chale, which are two important tourist destinations in the country. It attempted to establish
population numbers in these habitations, the waste loads generated, and how it was managed. The study was accomplished through
field visits, library research and application of the World Health Organization (WHO 1989) rapid assessment methods for land, air
and water pollution. The relevant data for assessment was obtained from records of population census, bed nights, occupancy, and the
waste disposal methods in use. The study revealed that human settlements aligned themselves in clusters inland, reflecting the clusters
of the beach hotels dotting the shore line of the Indian Ocean. Large volumes of domestic waste were being generated in both the
human settlements and in the hotels. Management of the waste in the settlements was largely on-site and mixed, through the use of
both pit latrines and septic-tank/soakage pit systems in the human settlements, and only through septic-tank/soakage pits in the hotel
establishments. None of the settlements had wastewater treatment facilities. Only 5 beach hotels had wastewater treatment plants.
While the settlements positioned themselves to benefit from the tourism industry, tapping in business and employment opportunities,
the arrangement has seemed to spoil the broth as the settlements came to be the main source domestic waste affecting environmental
quality and undermining tourism growth and sustainability. Also, through the large number of visitors, during the peak tourist periods,
the beach hotels themselves have come contribute to large waste generation. On-site sanitation, it is concluded, is not appropriate for
managing domestic waste in coastal areas dependent on good quality environmental to flourish the tourism economic sector. Tourism
thrives in areas where the environment is aesthetically appealing; domestic waste undermine. Consequently, it is recommended that
innovative approaches are pursued for domestic waste management in order to flourish and sustain the industry.

Awange JL, Kyalo Kiema JB. "Data Models and Structure.". 2013. AbstractWebsite

By convention, data in the real world is deemed to exist in a continuous or analogue form usually in three dimensional space as discussed in Sect. 2.1. Such data needs to be digitized or made discrete before it can be input and processed by a digital computer. A GIS database can be viewed as an abstraction of reality. To convert object features observed or measured in the real world into the digital realm in a GIS database it is necessary to structure the data appropriately. Four (4) different generic types of primitive object features can be distinguished, namely: point features (0-D), line features (1-D), area features/polygons (2-D), and surface features (3-D). Incidentally, when surface features are captured in a discrete or non-continuous manner, this is then referred to as 2.5D. In general, an object feature is defined by three (3) properties in GIS, namely: position, attributes and relationship with other features referred to as topology.

Mwema FM, MBUYA TO, Akinlabi ET, Reed PAS, Obiko JO. "Data on the effect of high-pressure torsion processing on secondary cast Al–10%Si– Cu piston alloy: Methods, microstructure and mechanical characterizations." Data in Brief. 2019;25(August):104160. Abstracthttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.dib.2019.104160

The dataset presented here shows the microstructure and mechanical properties of secondary (recycled) cast aluminum-silicon (Al–Si) piston alloys processed through severe plastic deformation technique, known as high-pressure torsion (HPT). The HPT processing was undertaken for 1/4, 1/2, 1 and 10 turns of the lower anvil (rotating at constant speed of 1rpm) while the upper anvil maintained at a normal pressure of 3.0 GPa. The data on microstructural evolution obtained at the central region and edge of the circular (disk) HPT sample were obtained using optical and scanning electron microscopy and these data are presented here. The data on the analysis of the particle shape, sizes and distribution from the micrographs using ImageJ software are also presented. Data on mechanical properties characterized using Vickers microhardness measurement across the surface of HPT sample are also shown. Pictures depicting the microhardness measurement scheme, high-pressure torsion facility and sample nomenclature are presented.

Biermann O, Mwoka M, Ettman CK, Abdalla SM, Shawky S, Ambuko J, Pearson M, Zeinali Z, Galea S, Mberu B, others. "Data, Social Determinants, and Better Decision-making for Health: the 3-D Commission." Journal of Urban Health. 2021;98:4-14. Abstract
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Osano SN, Amolo KO, R.O.Ouko. "Data-Driven High Collision Location Identification and Corrective Countermeasures on Roads in Kenya." International Journal of Scientific and Research Publications,. 2020;Volume 10(Issue 10):37-41.
Hudson LN, Newbold T, Contu S, Hill SLL, Lysenko I, De Palma A, Phillips HRP, Alhusseini TI, Bedford FE, Bennett DJ, others. "The database of the Predicts (Projecting responses of ecological diversity in changing terrestrial systems) project." Ecology and Evolution. 2017;7:145-188. Abstract
n/a
Shagwira H, Mwema FM, MBUYA TO, Adediran A. "Dataset on impact strength, flammability test and water absorption test for innovative polymer-quarry dust composite." Data in Brief. 2020;29( April):105384. Abstracthttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.dib.2020.105384

In this article data on impact strength, flammability and water absorption tests for innovative plastic-quarry dust composite is presented. The composites were prepared through moulding with virgin HDPE and PP plastics and quarry dust. The quarry dust was used at 0%, 5%, 20%, 40%, 60% and 80% weight percentages. The prepared samples were characterised for strength, fire resistance and hydrophobic properties using Charpy impact, flammability and water absorption tests respectively. For impact strength test was conducted according to ISO 179–1:2010 (E). The flammability test was conducted according to ASTMD 2863 while the water absorption test was carried out in accordance to ASTM D 570–98. These data illustrate the potential of the plastic quarry dust composite application in construction industry and model for regeneration of waste plastics for green building technologies.

Ambrose SH, Kyule MD, Muia M, Deino A, Williams MAJ. "Dating the MSA/ LSA transition in Southwest Kenya." Society for American Anthropology. 2000:33.
A PROFOMWANDHOCHARLESO. "Daudi K Langat , Pedro J Morales , Charles O Omwandho , Asgerally T Fazleabas and Joan S Hunt, Polymorphisms in Paan-AG promoter influences NF-kB binding and transcription activity in HEK293 cells.". In: The Journal of Immunology 2007, 178: 42.12.; 2007. Abstract

HLA-G is a protein highly expressed at the human maternal-fetal interface during pregnancy. It is thought to be critical for the survival of the semi-allogenic fetus. The baboon (Papio anubis) expresses an HLA-G-like protein termed Paan-AG in the placenta, and may serve as a model for HLA-G studies. Paan-AG shares many characteristics with HLA-G, including alternative splicing of the mRNA and restricted tissue expression of the protein. Our hypothesis is that the two genes share similar regulatory mechanisms. The objective of the current study was to assess binding of the transcription factor NF- B to Paan-AG B elements and determine the effects of binding on Paan-AG promoter activity. We assessed two Paan-AG alleles each containing two B elements, B1 and B2. NF- B bound both B1 and B2 elements in the AG1 allele. In contrast, only B1 of the AG-2 allele bound to NF- B; B2 did not bind. Mutagenesis studies showed that the difference in binding was due to two nucleotide differences in the 3' end of B1. The functional activity of the two alleles also differed; AG2 consistently showed higher luciferase activity compared to AG1. Mutating the last two nucleotides in the 3' end of B1 resulted in an increase of luciferase activity to levels comparable to that of AG2. Overall, these results suggest that variations in the proximal promoter may influence transcription rates of Paan-AG as reported recently for HLA-G, and provide further evidence of the potential usefulness of the baboon as a model for in vivo HLA-G studies.

A PROFOMWANDHOCHARLESO. "Daudi K. Langat(1), Pedro J. Morales(1), Charles O. Omwandho(2), Asgerally T. Fazleabas(3), Joan S. Hunt(1). Polymorphisms in Paan-AG promoter influences NF-kB binding and transcription activity in HEK293 cells. In Proceedings of the 39th Meeting of the S.". In: Biology of Reproduction. Special Issue, July 2006, pp 73, Abstract No. 13.; 2006. Abstract

1. University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas, KS 2. University of Nairobi, Nairobi, Kenya 3. University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL The human leukocyte antigen-G(HLA-G), a protein highly expressed at the human maternal-fetal interface during pregnancy, is thought to be critical for the survival of the semi-allogenic fetus. Current evidence suggests that HLA-G programs immune cells at the maternal-fetal interface into immunosuppressive phenotypes, but definitive proof remains elusive since the vivo experiments in humans are not possible due to ethical concerns. In the search for an appropriate animal model, we have identified the olive baboon (Papio anubis) as a potential candidate. The primate expresses an HLA-G-like protein termed Paan-AG n the placenta. Preliminary data shows that Paan-AG gene shares many characteristics with HLA-G, including limited polymorphism, alternative splicing of the mRNA, and restricted tissue expression of the protein. Restricted tissue expression suggested that the two genes might share tissue-specific regulatory elements. We previously identified a number of two Paan-AG alleles, 5'UTAG-1(AG1) and 5'UTAG-2(AG2). The objective of the current study was to assess binding of the transcription factor NF-kB to Paan-AG promoter activity. Both alleles contained two kB elements, kB1 and kB2. Binding was assessed using electrophoretic mobility shift assays and functional activity using luciferase reporter assays. NF-kB bound both kB1 and kB2 elements in the AG1 allele. In contrast, only kB1 of the AG-2 allele bound to NF-kB; kB2 did not bind. The AG2 kB1. Mutagenesis studies showed that the difference in binding was due to two alleles also differed; AG2 consistently showed higher luciferase activity compared to AG1. Mutating the last two nucleotides in the 3' end of kB1 resulted in an increase of luciferase activity to levels comparable to that of AG2. Overall, these results suggests that variations in the proximal promoter may influence transcription rates of Paan-AG as reported recently for HLA-G, and provide further evidence of the potential usefulness of the baboon as a model for in vivo HLA-G studies. Supported by NIH grant HD39878 (JSH)

Waita SM, Aduda BO, Mwabora, J.M; Niklasson GA, Lindquist SE, Granqvist CG. DC sputter deposited TiO2 photoelectrodes: Effect of deposition angle on the efficiency of dye sensitized solar cell..; 2008.
Waita SM, Aduda BO, Mwabora JM, Niklasson GA, Lindquist SE, Granqvist CG. DC sputter deposited TiO2 photoelectrodes: Effect of deposition angle on the efficiency of dye sensitized solar cell..; 2008.
Loiselle S, zar A´s C´, Adgo E, Ballatore T, Chavula G, Descy JP, Harper DM, Kansiime F, Kimirei I, Langenberg V, Ma R, Sarmento12 H, Odada E. "Decadal Trends and Common Dynamics of the Bio- Optical and Thermal Characteristics of the African Great Lakes." PLOS ONE. 2014;9(4):1-6. Abstract

The Great Lakes of East Africa are among the world’s most important freshwater ecosystems. Despite their importance in providing vital resources and ecosystem services, the impact of regional and global environmental drivers on this lacustrine system remains only partially understood. We make a systematic comparison of the dynamics of the bio-optical and thermal properties of thirteen of the largest African lakes between 2002 and 2011. Lake surface temperatures had a positive trend in all Great Lakes outside the latitude of 0u to 8u south, while the dynamics of those lakes within this latitude range were highly sensitive to global inter-annual climate drivers (i.e. El Nin˜o Southern Oscillation). Lake surface temperature dynamics in nearly all lakes were found to be sensitive to the latitudinal position of the Inter Tropical Convergence Zone. Phytoplankton dynamics varied considerably between lakes, with increasing and decreasing trends. Intra-lake differences in both surface temperature and phytoplankton dynamics occurred for many of the larger lakes. This inter-comparison of bio-optical and thermal dynamics provides new insights into the response of these ecosystems to global and regional drivers.

KD O, H S, A S. "A decade of surgical volunteerism in Kenya: Impact and possibilities." Annals of African Surgery. 2013;10(1):55-60.
Howell KL, Hilário A, Allcock LA, et al. "A decade to study deep-sea life." Nature Ecology & Evolution . 2020;5:265-267.
AUGUSTINE PROFCHITEREPRESTON. "Decentralization for rural development. In: African Administrative Studies, No.32 (Chitere, P.O. and Monya, J.).". In: Proceedings of the Kenya National Academy of Sciences. Heinrich Boll Foundation.; 1989.
AKATCH PROFSAMUELO. "Decentralization of Development Planning in Kenya, published PhD thesis University of Dortmund, Germany (1992).". In: Federation Proceedings, 31 1470. Journal of Natural Products; 1992.
A. PROFESHIWANIARTHUR. "The Decentralization Process in Kenya: The Place of Local Authorities - The African Centre for Technology Studies, (ACTOS), Nairobi, Research Memorandum Series.". In: Journal of African Meteorological Society, vol.15, 2001. A Matimba, M Oluka, B Ebeshi, J Sayi, Bolaji, J Del Favero , C Van Broeckhoven, AN Guanta; 1994. Abstract
Oral infection with Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) is a frequent and well documented complication in immunosuppressed individuals including patients on immunosuppressive medication. We report the development of severe oral infection with HSV type 1 in a 34 year old woman with type 1 diabetes mellitus and end stage renal disease (ESRD) following cadaveric renal transplantation at the Western General Hospital, Edinburgh. The role of acyclovir in therapy and chemoprophylaxis is discussed.
Asfaw A;, Dauro D;, Kimani PM. "Decentralized participatory bean breeding in southern Ethiopia."; 2006. Abstract

In order to utilize farmers' knowledge on the crop and the environment, and to fit the crop to the specific needs and uses of farmers' communities, a four cycle decentralized participatory bean breeding was conducted in two locations in Sidama zone of the southern Nations, Nationalities and People Region. Forty four farmers selectors representing the community evaluated and then selected bean lines on-stations, the initial diverse germplasm pool of 147 lines at first selection cycle. In the following three cropping seasons, the farmers evaluated their selected lines on their farms and retained promising lines at the end of each selection cycle according to their own selection criteria. Their selections were evaluated by neighboring non-selector farmers (farmer-evaluators) using selection criteria set by farmer selectors. Group selection by selector farmers was attempted at cycle-4 on all individually selected lines grown on communal plots. The farmers effectively evaluated and selected bean lines that gave increased yield on their farm and met their specific preferences among large number of advanced lines. The farmers retained more large seeded beans as compared to small and medium seeded beans indicating that there is a shift in preference to large seeded beans in the region from their previously well-acquainted small red seed type. Bean lines selected by farmer following decentralized individual selection were farmer-specific except certain lines selected in common by some farmers. This lack of common selection to all farmers implies farmers' diverse preference for bean germplasm. In the selection process the farmers used growth habit, plant height, pod load, pod length, pod clearance from the base, early maturity, seed color, seed size and seed yield as selection criteria to retain or reject the bean lines. Seed color and seed yield were their decision making criteria whereas the rest were descriptor criteria to select good cultivars. The selection process indicated that farmers were capable of making significant contribution in identification of cultivars acceptable to them within a relatively short period. Moreover, the result suggests that conducting decentralized participatory individual selection and then participatory group selection with all farmer-selectors on all individually selection lines grown on communal plot and evaluating the final selection with evaluator farmers (non-selectors) against their communal plot and evaluating the final selection with evaluator farmers (non-selectors) against their selection criteria can improve variety development and increase the chance of adoption of new varieties by other farmers in a community.

A B, K KP, Nafula N, DK M. "The Decline in Primary School Enrolment in Kenya.". In: Economic reforms in developing countries.; 2008.
Yamoah CF;, Mulongoy K;, Agboola AA;, Ssali H;, Keya SO. "Decomposition and nitrogen contribution by prunings of selected legumes in alley cropping."; 1985.
Aly S, Ogot M, Pelz R, Siclari M. "A decoupled stochastic approach to the jig-shape aeroelastic wing design problem.". In: 36th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting and Exhibit.; 1998:. Abstract

A novel approach to the jig-shape aeroelastic wing design problem is presented
in this paper. Unlike previous design efforts were the aerodynamic analyses where coupled
to the structural analyses throughout the optimization process, this work presents a truly
decoupled approach. The developed twolevel methodology performs aerodynamic shape
optimization at Level I to determine an optimal configuration, followed by structural shape
optimization at Level n to find the corresponding jig-shape. During Level n optimization, no …

Aly S, Ogot M, Pelz R, Siclari M. "A decoupled stochastic approach to the jig-shape aeroelastic wing design problem.". In: 36th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting and Exhibit.; 1998:. Abstract

A novel approach to the jig-shape aeroelastic wing design problem is presented
in this paper. Unlike previous design efforts were the aerodynamic analyses where coupled
to the structural analyses throughout the optimization process, this work presents a truly
decoupled approach. The developed twolevel methodology performs aerodynamic shape
optimization at Level I to determine an optimal configuration, followed by structural shape
optimization at Level n to find the corresponding jig-shape. During Level n optimization, no …

Arunga S, Kintoki GM, Gichuhi S, Onyango J, Newton R, Leck A, Macleod D, Hu VH, Burton MJ. "Delay Along the Care Seeking Journey of Patients with Microbial Keratitis in Uganda." Ophthalmic Epidemiol. 2019:1-10. AbstractWebsite

PURPOSE:To describe the care seeking journey and causes of delay among patients with Microbial Keratitis in Uganda.
METHODS:A prospective cohort of patients presenting with microbial keratitis at the two main eye units in Southern Uganda (2016-2018). We collected information on demographics, home address, clinical history, and presentation pathway including, order of facilities where patients went to seek care, treatment advice, cost of care, and use of Traditional Eye Medicine. Presentation time was noted. We compared "direct" presenters versus "indirect" presenters and analysed predictors of delay.
RESULTS: About 313 patients were enrolled. All were self-referred. Only 19% of the patients presented directly to the eye hospital. Majority (52%) visited one facility before presenting, 19% visited two facilities, 9% visited three facilities, and 2% visited four facilities. The cost of care increased with increase in the number of facilities visited. People in a large household, further distance from the eye hospital and those who used Traditional Eye Medicine were less likely to come directly to the eye hospital. Visiting another facility prior to the eye hospital and use of Traditional Eye Medicine aOR 1.58 (95%CI 1.03-2.43), p = .038 were associated with delayed presentation to the eye hospital.
CONCLUSION: This study provided information on patient journeys to seek care. Delay was largely attributable to having visited another health facility: a referral mechanism for microbial keratitis was non-existent. There is need to explore how these health system gaps can be strengthened.

Aluvaala J, Okello D, Murithi G, Wafula L, Wanjala L, Isika N, Wasunna A, Were F, Nyamai R, English M. "Delivery outcomes and patterns of morbidity and mortality for neonatal admissions in five Kenyan hospitals." Journal of Tropical Pediatrics. 2015;(61):255-259. Abstractdelivery_outcomes_and_patterns_of_morbidity_and_mortality_for_neonatal_admissions_in_five_kenyan_hospitals.pdf

A cross-sectional survey was conducted in neonatal and maternity units of five Kenyan district public hospitals. Data for 1 year were obtained: 3999 maternal and 1836 neonatal records plus tallies of maternal deaths, deliveries and stillbirths. There were 40 maternal deaths [maternal mortality ratio: 276 per 100 000 live births, 95% confidence interval (CI): 197–376]. Fresh stillbirths ranged from 11 to 43 per 1000 births. A fifth (19%, 263 of 1384, 95% CI: 11–30%) of the admitted neonates died. Compared with normal birth weight, odds of death were significantly higher in all of the low birth weight (LBW, <2500 g) categories, with the highest odds for the extremely LBW (<1000 g) category (odds ratio: 59, 95% CI: 21–158, p<0.01). The observed maternal mortality, stillbirths and neonatal mortality call for implementation of the continuum of care approach to intervention delivery with particular emphasis on LBW babies.

Margaret Maimbolwa, Omoni G, Enid Mwebaza, Angela Chimwaza, Rose Laisser, Christina Mudokwenyu-Rawdon, Carol Bedwell, Rebecc. "A Delphi survey to determine midwifery research priorities among midwives in sub-Saharan Africa." African Journal of Midwifery and Women's Health. 2015;9(1):6-11. AbstractWebsite

Objective:

In sub-Saharan Africa, midwifery input into the generation of important research questions is limited. The authors aimed to address this issue by enabling midwives to set their own research priorities with the intention of developing a research strategy to conduct studies relevant to clinical practice.
Methods:

A survey was carried out in six countries (Kenya, Malawi, Uganda, Zambia, Zimbabwe and Tanzania). The Delphi method was used with six panels of midwives (n=118) to attain a convergence of opinion on midwifery research priorities. Consensus-building was achieved by using a series of questionnaires delivered using multiple iterations to collect data. Data were analysed using ranked means and proportions.
Findings:

Consensus was reached on 11 research questions which were considered regional priorities. These covered three key areas: midwifery training, clinical care and organisational issues. Conclusions: Midwives prioritised areas of research that had direct applicability to their own practice. All questions were at the applied end of the research spectrum. Priorities tended to cover broad areas within reproductive health, as opposed to being disease-focused. This is likely to reflect the desire to provide quality care that embraces the social aspects of health. Some of these research priorities are being taken forward by midwives in the group.
Keywords: Delphi method, Midwives, Research, sub-Sahara

Oketch H, Abaga A, Manda DK. "Demand and Supply of Micro and Small Enterprise Finance in Kenya.". In: K - REP working paper, K - REP. Nairobi, Kenya.; 1995.
Owiti E, Awiti M, Mwabu G. "The Demand for Healthcare by Orphans and Vulnerable Children: A Case of Migori District.". In: XV International AIDS Conference. Bangkok . Medimond, Italy; 2004.
Nzomo M, Adhiambo-Oduol J, Kabira WM. Democratic Change in Africa: Women's Perspective.; 1993.Website
Ayiemba EHO. "Demographic Characteristics .". 1986.Website
Opiyo C, Agwanda A. "The Demographic Dividend: A gift or a curse.". In: Youth Research Compendium . Nairobi: Institute Of Economic Affairs ; 2011.
Ayiemba EHO. "Demographic Patterns .". 1985.Website
Mengwa VK, Makau NW, Amolo GO, Lutta S, Okoth MDO, Musembi RJ, Maghanga CM, Mwabora JM. A Density Functional Theory Study of Electronic Structure of Rutile (110) Surfaces with Catechol Adsorbate. United Kenya Club, Nairobi, 28-29th November 2013; 2013. Abstract

Titanium dioxide (TiO2) is used as semiconductor in the dye sensitized solar cell (DSSC), amongst many other applications. Thus coupled with a suitable sensitizer such as catechol, the study of surface electronic structure of TiO2 will improve light harvesting and electron transfer processes in DSSC. The distribution of states in clean and catechol terminated four and five layer TiO2 (110) rutile surfaces were investigated. All calculations in this work were done by quantum espresso code which uses plane waves and pseudopotentials. The slabs were modelled by four and five layers with vacuum width of 20 Å. The results showed that the (110) stoichiometric TiO2 four layer surface had band gap of 2.1 eV, a value less than band gap value of 2.2 eV of similar catechol bound TiO2 surface. There was an increase in the band gap value of 0.32 eV for the catechol bound TiO2 (110) rutile five layer surface compared to that of clean stoichiometric TiO2 (110) surface. The HOMO in four and five layered TiO2 (110) surfaces was found to lie above the valence band edge. The LUMO in both surfaces was located in the conduction band, and hence the band gap of the molecule was in the range of 4.0 eV. These findings have showed that the energy level alignment of catechol coupled to TiO2 is a suitable model to study electron transfer processes that occur in dye sensitized solar cell.

Mengwa VK, N. W. Makau, Amolo GO, Lutta S, Okoth MDO, Mwabora JM, Musembi RJ, Maghanga CM, Gateru R. A Density Functional Theory Study of Electronic Structure of Rutile (110) Surfaces with Catechol Adsorbate. United Kenya Club, Nairobi, 28-29th November 2013; 2013. Abstract

Titanium dioxide (TiO2) is used as semiconductor in the dye sensitized solar cell (DSSC), amongst many other applications. Thus coupled with a suitable sensitizer such as catechol, the study of surface electronic structure of TiO2 will improve light harvesting and electron transfer processes in DSSC. The distribution of states in clean and catechol terminated four and five layer TiO2 (110) rutile surfaces were investigated. All calculations in this work were done by quantum espresso code which uses plane waves and pseudopotentials. The slabs were modelled by four and five layers with vacuum width of 20 Å. The results showed that the (110) stoichiometric TiO2 four layer surface had band gap of 2.1 eV, a value less than band gap value of 2.2 eV of similar catechol bound TiO2 surface. There was an increase in the band gap value of 0.32 eV for the catechol bound TiO2 (110) rutile five layer surface compared to that of clean stoichiometric TiO2 (110) surface. The HOMO in four and five layered TiO2 (110) surfaces was found to lie above the valence band edge. The LUMO in both surfaces was located in the conduction band, and hence the band gap of the molecule was in the range of 4.0 eV. These findings have showed that the energy level alignment of catechol coupled to TiO2 is a suitable model to study electron transfer processes that occur in dye sensitized solar cell.

Ober-Oluoch J, Abdulhalim H, Dimba EAO. "Dentinogenesis imperfecta–a case report.". 2010. Abstract
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Abdille AA, Kimani J, Wamunyokoli F, Bulimo W, Gavamukulya Y, Maina EN. "Dermaseptin B2’s Anti-Proliferative Activity and down Regulation of Anti-Proliferative, Angiogenic and Metastatic Genes in Rhabdomyosarcoma RD Cells in Vitro." Advances in Bioscience and Biotechnology. 2021;12:337-359. Abstract
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El-Banhawy EM, Abou-Awad BA. "Description of some Typhlodromus species from Tanzania (Mesostigmata: Phytoseiidae). Acarologia: 217.". In: Published by the Democratization and Research Centre, Rome, Vol. 27, No. 3, March. El-Banhawy, E. M.; 1991. Abstract

We surveyed the phytoseid mites in four different geographical zones of Kenya: Zone I, upper highland and tropical alpine (2400-4400m): Zone II, lower highland (1800-2400m); zone III, midland (800-1800m); Zone IV, tropical, hot and humid( 0-800m ). A total of 107 species was found. In the sub family, amblyseeinae there were 14 species in the genus Neoseilus , one in Aspereroseius Chant, one in Paraphytoseius Swirski &Schechter, five in typhlodromips De Leon, five in Transeius Chant & McMurty, one in Graminaseius Chant &McMurty, 11 in Amblyseius Berlese, one in Arrenoseius Wanstein, two in Typhlodromalus muma, seven in Ueckemannseius Chant &McMurty, one in Ambylodromalus Chant &Mcmurty,, 20 in Euseius Wanstein, one in Iphiseius Berlese, one in Phytoseilus Evans and one in Gynaseius Ehara & Imano. In the subfamily Phytoseiinae Berlese there were four species in the genus Phytoseiius Ribaga. In the subfamily Typhlodrominae Wanstein, there were four species in the genus Kuzinellus Wainstein and 27 in Typhlodromus Scheuten

ABDULHALIM DRHUSSEIN. "DESCRIPTIVE COMPARATIVE STUDY OF THE ORAL HEALTH STATUS OF CHILDREN WITH CLEFT LIP AND PALATE IN NAIROBI ( A MASTERS THESIS).". In: A MASTERS THESIS. The Indian Journal of Animal Sciences; Submitted. Abstract
No abstracts available
S Q, A L, J G, K K, W W, EA D. "Design and Implementation of the Retinoblastoma Collaborative Laboratory." Ocular Oncology and Pathology. 2017.
Gichaga FJ, Murunga PA, Atibu FS. "Design and Performance Of Flexible Pavements under Tropical Environment.". In: 9th Africa Regional Conference. Lagos, Nigeria.; 1987.
Nganga G, Alexander M, Beushanusen H, Mumenya SW. Design for strength and durability. Kisumu, Kenya; 2013.
Mariabeth Silkey, Tobias Homan, Nicolas Maire, Alexandra Hiscox, Mukabana R, Takken W, Smith TA. "Design of trials for interrupting the transmission of endemic pathogens." Trials. 2016;17(1):278.
Osanjo L, Amollo L. "Design Policy and Promotion Map." SEE Bulletin. 2010;3 (Issue 3 - May 2010):8.
Osanjo L, Ambole LA. "Design with Social Impact for Rural Communities in Africa.". In: Sustainable Energy for All by Design conference. Cape Town, South Africa; 2016.osanjo__ambole_2016.pdf
Abade OE, Kaji K, Kawaguchi N. "Design, Implementation and Evaluation of a Routing Engine for a multipoint communication protocol: XCAST6." International Journal of Computer Science and Network Security. 2011;11(5):200-209.
Fajardo I, Lidtke AA, Bendoukha SA, Gonzalez-Llorente J, Rodríguez R, Morales R, Faizullin D, Matsuoka M, Urakami N, Kawauchi R, Miyazaki M, Yamagata N, Hatanaka K, Abdullah F, Rojas JJ, Keshk ME, Cosmas K, Ulambayar T, Saganti P, Holland D, Dachev T, Tuttle S, Dudziak R, Okuyama K-ichi. "Design, Implementation, and Operation of a Small Satellite Mission to Explore the Space Weather Effects in LEO." Aerospace. 2019;6. AbstractWebsite

Ten-Koh is a 23.5 kg, low-cost satellite developed to conduct space environment effects research in low-Earth orbit (LEO). Ten-Koh was developed primarily by students of the Kyushu Institute of Technology (Kyutech) and launched on 29 October 2018 on-board HII-A rocket F40, as a piggyback payload of JAXA’s Greenhouse gas Observing Satellite (GOSAT-2). The satellite carries a double Langmuir probe, CMOS-based particle detectors and a Liulin spectrometer as main payloads. This paper reviews the design of the mission, specifies the exact hardware used, and outlines the implementation and operation phases of the project. This work is intended as a reference that other aspiring satellite developers may use to increase their chances of success. Such a reference is expected to be particularly useful to other university teams, which will likely face the same challenges as the Ten-Koh team at Kyutech. Various on-orbit failures of the satellite are also discussed here in order to help avoid them in future small spacecraft. Applicability of small satellites to conduct space-weather research is also illustrated on the Ten-Koh example, which carried out simultaneous measurements with JAXA’s ARASE satellite.

Amimo JO, Junga JO, W. O. Ogara, Vlasova AN, Njahira MN, Maina S, Okoth EA, Bishop RP, Saif LJ, Djikeng A. "Detection and genetic characterization of porcine group A rotaviruses in asymptomatic pigs in smallholder farms in East Africa: Predominance of P[8] genotype resembling human strains." Veterinary Microbiology. 2015;175(2-4):195-210.
Amimo JO, Saif LJ, Junga J, Vlasova AN, Okoth EA, Njahira MN, Ogara WO, Djikeng A. "Detection and molecular characterization of selected swine enteric viruses in smallholder farms in Kenya and Uganda.". In: 9th Biennial Conference and exhibition of the faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Nairobi. Upper Kabete Campus, Nairobi; 2014.detection_and_molecular_characterization_of_selected_swine_enteric_viruses_in_smallholder_farms_in_kenya_and_uganda__9thbiennial_jamimo-18-08-2014_final.pdf
Kenya EU, Okun DO, Gachuche DN, Abdulahi A, U. AL, Manohar R. "Detection and presumptive identification of Clostridium perfrigens in drinking water." Aquaculture. 2006;7(1): 27-36. Abstractabstract.pdfWebsite

Rural aquaculture in Lake Victoria basin is a fast increasing nontraditional farming activity which if not appropriately practised will lead to degradation of the wetlands. As part of a study to develop appropriate guidelines and model systems for wetlands-based rural aquaculture in the basin a survey was conducted to assess the status and the ecological and socioeconomic impact of rural aquaculture on wetlands and wetlands communities. Aquaculture practice was found to be common but not as a major activity. Aquaculture in the wetlands can be described as a low input-low output production activity and subsistence based on ponds under 400 m2 using free seed from public agencies with hardly any supplementary feeding. Men owned most of the ponds and women only contributed to the management of the fishponds by feeding the fish. Poorly constructed ponds and loss during harvesting have led to the escape of cultured species into the wild. Introduction of nonnative species in the basin has already led to wide ranging ecological, environmental and socioeconomic changes whose impact and usefulness are still very much contentious. Repeat of such scenarios can be avoided if appropriate and science-based models for rural aquaculture farming are developed, tested and disseminated to the communities

Autrup H, Wakhisi J, Vahakangas K, Wasunna A, Harris CC. "Detection of 8,9-dihydro-(7'-guanyl)-9-hydroxyaflatoxin B1 in human urine." Environ. Health Perspect.. 1985;62:105-8. Abstract

A possible role of aflatoxin B1 (AFB) in the etiology of human liver cancer has been suggested from several epidemiological studies. This has been based upon the association between consumption of AFB-contaminated food and the liver cancer incidence in different parts of the world. To further establish the role of AFB as a major factor, we initiated a pilot study in three different districts of Kenya to determine the number of individuals exposed to significant amounts of AFB as measured by the urinary excretion of 8,9-dihydro-8-(7-guanyl)-9-hydroxyaflatoxin B1 (AFB-Gua), an adduct formed between the ultimate carcinogenic form of AFB and nucleic acids. This product has previously been detected in urine from rats treated with AFB. Urine collected at the outpatient clinics at the district hospitals were concentrated on C18 Sep-Pak columns and analyzed by high-pressure liquid chromatography under two different chromatographic conditions. The chemical identity of the samples showing a positive response in both chromatographic systems was verified by synchronous scanning fluorescence spectrophotometry. The highest number of individuals with detectable urinary AFB-Gua lived in either Murang'a district or the neighboring Meru and Embu districts. In Murang'a district a rate of 12% was observed in the January-March period, while only 1 of 32 patients (3%) had a detectable exposure in July-August.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

Ofula VO, Franklin AB, Root JJ, Sullivan HJ, Gichuki P, Makio A, Bulimo W, Abong'o BO, Muchai M, Schnabel D. "Detection of Avian Influenza Viruses in Wild Waterbirds in the Rift Valley of Kenya Using Fecal Sampling." Vector borne and zoonotic diseases (Larchmont, N.Y.). 2013. Abstractofula_et_al._2103.pdf

Abstract Highly pathogenic avian influenza virus A/H5N1 has been reported in 11 African countries. Migratory waterbirds have the potential of introducing A/H5N1 into east Africa through the Rift Valley of Kenya. We present the results of a wild bird surveillance system for A/H5N1 and other avian influenza viruses based on avian fecal sampling in Kenya. We collected 2630 fecal samples in 2008. Viral RNA was extracted from pools of 3-5 fecal samples and analyzed for presence of avian influenza virus RNA by real-time RT-PCR. Twelve (2.3%) of the 516 sample pools were positive for avian influenza virus RNA, 2 of which were subtyped as H4N6 viruses. This is the first report of avian influenza virus in wild birds in Kenya. This study demonstrates the success of this approach in detecting avian influenza virus in wild birds and represents an efficient surveillance system for avian influenza virus in regions with limited resources.

Ofula VO, Franklin AB, Root JJ, Sullivan HJ, Gichuki P, Makio A, Bulimo W, Abong'o BO, Muchai M, Schnabel D. "Detection of avian influenza viruses in wild waterbirds in the Rift valley of Kenya using fecal sampling." Vector-Borne and Zoonotic Diseases. 2013;13:394-400. Abstract
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Kuballa T, Hausler T, Okaru AO, Neufeld M, Abuga KO, Kibwage IO, Rehm J, Luy B, Walch SG, Lachenmeier DW. "Detection of counterfeit brand spirits using 1H NMR fingerprints in comparison to sensory analysis." Food chemistry. 2018;245:112-118. Abstract
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Kuballa T, Hausler T, Okaru AO, Neufeld M, Abuga KO, Kibwage IO, Rehm J, Luy B, Walch SG, Lachenmeier DW. "Detection of counterfeit brand spirits using 1H NMR fingerprints in comparison to sensory analysis." Food Chem.. 2018;245:112-115. Abstract

Beverage fraud involving counterfeiting of brand spirits is an increasing problem not only due to deception of the consumer but also because it poses health risks e.g. from possible methanol admixture. Suspicious spirit samples from Russia and Kenya were analysed using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in comparison to authentic products. Using linear regression analysis of spectral integral values, 4 counterfeited samples from Russia and 2 from Kenya were easily identifiable with R2 < 0.7. Sensory analysis using triangle test methodology confirmed significant taste differences between counterfeited and authentic samples but the assessors were unable to correctly identify the counterfeited product in the majority of cases. An important conclusion is that consumers cannot assumed to be self-responsible when consuming counterfeit alcohol because there is no general ability to organoleptically detect counterfeit alcohol. Beverage fraud involving counterfeiting of brand spirits is an increasing problem not only due to deception of the consumer but also because it poses health risks e.g. from possible methanol admixture. Suspicious spirit samples from Russia and Kenya were analysed using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in comparison to authentic products. Using linear regression analysis of spectral integral values, 4 counterfeited samples from Russia and 2 from Kenya were easily identifiable with R2 < 0.7. Sensory analysis using triangle test methodology confirmed significant taste differences between counterfeited and authentic samples but the assessors were unable to correctly identify the counterfeited product in the majority of cases. An important conclusion is that consumers cannot assumed to be self-responsible when consuming counterfeit alcohol because there is no general ability to organoleptically detect counterfeit alcohol.

Mitei. K, Bulimo. W, Achilla. R, Majanja. J, Wadegu. M, Mukunzi. S, Mwangi. J, Wangui. J, Osuna. F, Opot. B, Ochola. S, Njiri. J, Wurapa. E. "Detection of Respiratory Viruses other than Influenza in Children in Kenya, 2007-2011.". In: XV International Symposium on Respiratory Viral Infections. Rotterdam, Netherlands: The Macrae Foundation, Rancho Santa Fe, CA 92067; 2013. Abstract
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Nyamwaya D, Wang'ondu V, Amimo J, Michuki G, Ogugo M, Ontiri E, Sang R, Lindahl J, Grace D, Bett B. "Detection of West Nile virus in wild birds in Tana River and Garissa Counties, Kenya." BMC Infectious Diseases. 2016;16:696.
Nyamwaya D, Wang’ondu V, Amimo J, Michuki G, Ogugo M, Ontiri E, Sang R, Johanna Lindahl, Grace D, Bett B. "Detection of West Nile virus in wild birds in Tana River and Garissa Counties, Kenya.". 2016.
Kiiru J, Mburu J, Asch F, Becker M. "Determinants and Consequences of Transactions Costs of Microfinance and their Impact on Rural poor Beneficiaries Incomes." International Research on Food Security, Natural Resource Management and Rural Development. 2006:402.
Boscow OO, Abala DO, Kiriti-Ng'ang'a T. "Determinants Kenya’s Exports to the European Union (EU) (1960– 2010)." Regional Development Studies. 2013;17. Abstract

This paper examines the determinants of Kenya’s exports to the EU since 1960 to 2010 . The study uses ordinary least squares and two stage least square regression using exports values as the dependent variable. The independent variables are foreign aid, real gross fixed capital formation, terms of trade and consumption which is used as an instrument for real gross domestic product in the two stage least square as well as a dummy variable capturing the effect of reciprocity as a proxy for assessing the effect of the trade relation. The results show that during periods when there was reciprocity, Kenyan export values were stagnant and low, unlike periods when ACP states were given preferential treatment i.e. when there was no reciprocity. It is therefore evident that the proposed EPAs may worsen the current situation for Kenya’s exports.
Key Words: Kenya, ACP-EU, Exports, determinants, EPAs

Katabalo DM, Nyamu DG, Amugune BK, Karimi PN, Okalebo FA, Bosire KO, Muriuki G. "Determinants of Adherence to Anticonvulsant Therapy among Outpatient Epileptic Children in a Kenyan Referral Hospital ." Afr. J. Pharmacol. Ther.. 2015;4(2):40-47.
Balew S, Agwata J, Anyango S. "Determinants of Adoption Choices of Climate Change Adaptation Strategies in Crop Production by Small Scale Farmers in Some Regions of Central Ethiopia." Journal of Natural Sciences Research. 2014;Vol.4, No.4. Abstract

In Sub-Saharan Africa, climate change is set to hit the agricultural sector the most and cause untold suffering
particularly for smallholder farmers. Adoption of climate change adaptation strategies aims to minimize adverse
effects of climate change on crop yields. However, the capacity of smallholder farmers to choose from
appropriate climate change adaptation strategies in SSA is limited. It is therefore imperative to identify and
analyze factors that determine the capacity of these farmers to choose appropriate climate change adaptation
strategies. Such effort will help policy makers and development practitioners design policies that would help to
tackle the problem of food insecurity and poverty afflicting majority of the local people in various regions in the
continent. In this study, household data on crop farming systems in central Ethiopia was used and binary and
multinomial logit models developed to analyze the data. The binary logit model was used to identify
determinants of farmers’ decision to adapt to climate change at all. The multinomial logit model was employed
to analyse factors that affect farmers’ adoption choices. Results indicate that farmers´ decisions to choose from
several climate change adaptation strategies are influenced by various factors such as access to information on
climate change, input and output market, credit facility, extension services and social capital. The implication is
that policy makers and development practitioners should focus on improving information flow, access to input
and output market, the education level of the household head, and informal social networks that can speed up the
adoption of adaptation strategies. The multinomial logit model also shows that farmers´ decision to choose
among climate change adaptation strategies is influenced by the type of risk factor they faced and the occurrence
of drought or flood. Accordingly, policy makers and development practitioners should play a significant role by
promoting adaptation methods appropriate for particular climate change risk factor such as drought or flood.

Mensah ER;, Karantininis K;, Adégbidi A;, Okello JJ. "Determinants of Commitment to Agricultural Cooperatives: Cashew Nuts Farmers in Benin."; 2012. Abstract

Forming and using cooperatives as marketing channel is usually advised to African smallholder farmers for overcoming the constraint of market access. However, limited evidence of cooperative behavior in marketing has been observed. In this paper, we estimate a two-stage model of commitment to cooperatives by cashew nut farmers in Benin, West Africa. In the first stage, we use data on 109 non-members and 168 members and estimate a binary Logit model of farmer’s discrete choice with respect to committing to membership. In the second stage, we use the members’ data to estimate a Tobit model of the proportion of produce delivered to the cooperative, after controlling for the endogeneity of the proportion of presales. Empirical results reveal that the commitment to membership depends on the assessment of prices offered by the marketing channels, the farmer’s preferences for the specific attributes of the channels, the total farm size, and some psycho-sociological factors; the commitment to business depends on prices and transaction costs in the channels. Our findings call cooperatives for improving commitment by considering the subjective and economic reasoning of the farmers, and setting formal contracts between members and their organization.

Ayisi RK, Thuita FM, NJERU E, Wakoli AB. "Determinants of exclusive breastfeeding for six months in a peri urban settlement of Kangemi. A qualitative approach." European International Journal of Science and tecnology. 2013;2(10):53-60.
Koh VT, Tham Y-C, Cheung CY, Wong W-L, Baskaran M, Saw S-M, Wong TY, Aung T. "Determinants of ganglion cell-inner plexiform layer thickness measured by high-definition optical coherence tomography." Investigative ophthalmology & visual science. 2012;53:5853-5859. Abstract

{PURPOSE: To determine the distribution, variation, and determinants of ganglion cell-inner plexiform layer (GC-IPL) thickness in nonglaucomatous eyes measured by high-definition optical coherence tomography (HD-OCT). METHODS: Six hundred twenty-three Chinese adults aged 40 to 80 years were consecutively recruited from a population-based study. All subjects underwent a standardized interview, ophthalmic examination, and automated perimetry. HD-OCT with macular cube protocol was used to measure the GC-IPL thickness. Univariate and multiple linear regression analyses were performed to examine the relationship between GC-IPL thickness with ocular and systemic factors. RESULTS: The mean (±SD) age of study subjects was 52.84 ± 6.14 years, 50.1% were male, and all subjects had normal visual fields with no signs of glaucoma or glaucoma suspect. The mean overall, minimum, superior, and inferior GC-IPL thicknesses were 82.78 ± 7.01 μm, 79.67 ± 9.17 μm, 83.30 ± 7.89 μm, and 80.16 ± 8.31 μm, respectively. In multiple linear regression analysis, GC-IPL thickness was significantly associated with age (β = -0.202, P {\textless} 0.001), female sex (β = -2.367, P {\textless} 0.001), axial length (β = -1.279

ALEXANDER PROFMWANTHIMUTUKU. "Determinants of Immunization Coverage in Butere-Mumiasi District. Omutanyi, M and Mwanthi, M.A.". In: East African Medical Journal, 82:(10). 501-505, 2005. Karimurio Jefitha; Rono Hillary; Richard Le Mesurier; Mutuku Mwanthi; Jill Keeffe; 2005. Abstract
OBJECTIVE: This study assessed the role of governmental and non-governmental organizations in mitigation of stigma and discrimination among people infected and affected by HIV/AIDS in informal settlements of Kibera. METHODS: This was a descriptive cross-sectional study and used a multi stage stratified sampling method. The study was conducted in Kibera, an informal settlement with a population of over one million people which makes it the largest slum not only in Kenya but in sub-Saharan Africa. The study targeted infected individuals, non-infected community members, managers of the organizations implementing HIV/AIDS programmes and service providers. In the process 1331 households were interviewed using qualitative and quantitative data collection instruments. Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) and Nudist 4 packages were used to analyze the quantitative and qualitative data respectively. RESULTS: More than 61% of the respondents had patients in their households. Fifty five percent (55%) of the households received assistance from governmental and non-governmental organizations in taking care of the sick. Services provided included awareness, outreach, counseling, testing, treatment, advocacy, home based care, assistance to the orphans and legal issues. About 90% of the respondents perceived health education, counseling services and formation of post counseling support groups to combat stigma and discrimination to be helpful. CONCLUSION: Stigma and discrimination affects the rights of People Living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHAs). Such stigmatization and discrimination goes beyond and affects those who care for the PLWHAs, and remains the biggest impediment in the fight against HIV/AIDS in Kibera. Governmental and non-governmental organizations continue to provide key services in the mitigation of stigma and discrimination in Kibera. However, personal testimonies by PLWHAs showed that HIV positive persons still suffer from stigma and discrimination. Approximately 43% of the study population experienced stigma and discrimination.
Abala DO. "Determinants of manufactured exports in Kenya:An application of control function approach." DBA Africa management review. 2013;Vol. 3 no.1(1):50-72. Abstract

This paper uses firm level survey panel data to estimate parameters of export propensity and intensity in Kenyan manufacturing. The effects of unobservable factors that would otherwise bias the estimated parameters are removed using a control function regression procedure. The key finding of the study is that export propensity and intensity are strongly responsive to total factor productivity. In particularly a 10% increase in total factor productivity increases export propensity by 54%, but export intensity rises less steeply by 18%. We also find that ownership structure of the firm and unobserved factors specific to firms strongly influence exports. Taken together, the estimation results provide insights into the policies
needed to promote entry and stay of firms in export markets. The findings suggest that policy measures to improve export performance of Kenyan firms should focus on improving total factor productivity, encouraging foreign direct investment and stimulating modernization of manufacturing capital.

Keywords: Exports, manufacturing firms, total factor productivity, control function approach, Kenya.

Adrogué HJ, Lederer ED, Suki WN, Eknoyan G. "Determinants of plasma potassium levels in diabetic ketoacidosis." Medicine. 1986;65:163-172. Abstract

The classic proposal of intracellular K+ for extracellular H+ exchange as responsible for the hyperkalemia of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) has been questioned because experimentally induced organic anion acidosis fails to produce hyperkalemia. It has been suggested, instead, that the elevated serum [K+] of DKA might be the result of the compromised renal function, secondary to volume depletion, that usually accompanies DKA. However, several metabolic derangements other than volume depletion and acidosis, which are known to alter potassium metabolism, also develop in DKA. This study of 142 admissions for DKA examines the possible role of alterations in plasma pH, bicarbonate, glucose (G), osmolality, blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and plasma anion gap (AG) on the levels of [K+]p on admission. Significant (p less than 0.01) correlations of [K+]p with each of these parameters were found that could individually account for 8 to 15 percent of the observed variance in the plasma potassium levels; however, the effects of some or all of these parameters on the [K+]p could be independent and therefore physiologically additive. Since the parameters under study are themselves interrelated, having statistically significant correlations with each other, their possible independent role on [K+]p was evaluated by multiple regression analysis. Only plasma pH, glucose and AG emerged as having a definite independent effect on [K+]p, with no independent role found for bicarbonate, BUN and osmolality. The equation that best describes [K+]p on admission for DKA was: [K+]p = 25.4 - 3.02 pH + 0.001 G + 0.028 AG, (r = 0.515). These results indicate that the endogenous ketoacidemia and hyperglycemia observed in DKA, which result primarily from insulin deficit, are the main determinants of increased [K+]p. Since exogenous ketoacidemia and hyperglycemia in the otherwise normal experimental animal do not increase [K+]p, it is postulated that insulin deficit itself may be the major initiating cause of the hyperkalemia that develops in DKA. Renal dysfunction by enhancing hyperglycemia and reducing potassium excretion also contributes to hyperkalemia.

ATIENO DRODINGOALICE. "Determinants of Poverty: Lessons from Kenya. Paper submitted for publication in GeoJournal.". In: Paper submitted for publication in GeoJournal. Departmental seminar; 2008. Abstract
Description: This book describes four types of indigenous water retention structures used in East Africa. These structures are the Berkad tank, the Charco dam, sand wiers and hillside water retention ditches.
Akaranga SI, Simiyu PC. "Determinants of Secondary school learners’ performance in Christian Religious Education in Lelan sub county, Kenya." Journal of Education and Practice. 2015;7(5):125-130.
Ogolla K, Awino ZB, Muchemi AW. "Determinants of Strategic Forces That Shape Competition in Handicraft Industry in Kenya." Prime Journal of Business Administration and Management (BAM). 2011;Volume 1(12):58-67.
Agwanda AO. "Determinants of transitions to first sex, marriage and pregnancy: Evidence from South Nyanza, Kenya.". In: Under review, International Family Planning Perspectives. E Afr Med J; 2004. Abstract

African Population Studies 19 (2): 42-62

Agwanda A. Determinants of Unmet Need for Contraception in Kenya. Dakar: Union of African Population Studies; 2000.
Ogara WO, Gitahi NJ, Andanje SA, Oguge N, Nduati DW, Mainga AO. "Determination of carnivores prey base by scat analysis in Samburu community group ranches in Kenya." African Journal of Environmental Science and Technology. 2010;4(8):540-546.determination_of_carnivore_prey_base_by_scat_analysis_in_samburu_community_group_ranches_in_kenya.pdf
H K, Njoroge K, Mugo S, Ariga ES, Kanampiu F, Nderitu JH. "Determination of levels of Striga germination stimulants for maize gene bank accessions and elite inbred lines." International Journal of Plant Production. 2012;6(2):209-224.
H K, Njoroge K, Mugo S, Ariga ES, Kanampiu F, Nderitu JH. "Determination of levels of Striga germination stimulants for maize gene bank accessions and elite inbred lines." . International Journal of Plant Production. 2012;6 (2):209-224.
Karaya H, Njoroge K, Mugo S, Ariga ES, Kanampiu F, Nderitu JH. "Determination of levels of Striga germination Stimulants for maize gene bank accessions and elite inbred lines." International Journal of Plant Production . 2012;6(2):209-223.abstract_levels_of_striga_germination_maize_gene_bank_karaya_ariga_et_al_2012.pdf
Muiruri J, Ambuko J, Nyankanga R, Owino WO, others. "Determination of maturity indices of three mango varieties produced in Embu County of Kenya.". In: The 1st All Africa Post Harvest Congress & Exhibition, Reducing food losses and waste: sustainable solutions for Africa, 28th-31st March 2017, Nairobi, Kenya. Conference Proceedings. University of Nairobi; 2017:. Abstract
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Midzi V, Ayele, A., ESARSWG. "Determination of velocity models for the East and Southern Africa Region." Africa Geoscience Review. 2010;Vol.17(1):21-34.
Andago A, Imungi J, Mwangi A, Lamuka P, Ruth Nduati. "Developemnt of a bovine blood enriched porridge flour for alleviation of anaemia among young children in Kenya." Food Science and Quality Management. 2015;39:73-83.
Shepherd M, Kasem S, Ablett G, Ochieng J, Crawford A. Developing a genetic classification for gene pool management of spotted gums.; 2013. Abstract

Spotted gums (Genus Corymbia Section Politaria) occur as a species replacement series along the eastern seaboard of Australia, their distributions marked by regions of disjunction and sympatry. Their taxonomy remains controversial, with species assignment often challenging and reliant upon knowledge of geographic origin as well as subtle morphological or leaf oil variation. In this paper we explore a classification for spotted gums without assuming predefined geographic or taxonomic groups, instead using genetic structure at microsatellite marker loci (n=9) and a Bayesian model-based clustering approach implemented in STRUCTURE software. The C. torelliana outgroup (n=21; Section Cadagaria) formed a well resolved cluster (min. pairwise Fst = 0.19). Four populations were evident within the spotted gums (n=93) but structure was weak (pairwise Fst range 0.13 -0.05). Geography, both distance and topography were major determinants of structure, with migration among populations approximating a linear stepping-stone model. Corymbia maculata was resolved as a taxon and had the greatest genetic distance to any other population (min pairwise Fst 0.08). Three clusters were evident within the northern taxa but alignment with taxonomic groupings was poor. Corymbia citriodora material from north of a major disjunction in Central Queensland formed a Northern population. Corymbia citriodora, C. variegata and C. henryi material from below this disjunction but north of the Border Ranges, formed a Central population, whereas a Southern population was comprised of C. variegata and C. henryi from predominately south of the Border Ranges. Fewer ambiguous assignments occurred using genetic rather than taxonomic groups for self classification of the spotted gum reference population.

Grace Irimu, R W Nduati, Wamae A, Wasunna A, Were F, Ntoburi S, Opiyo N, Ayieko P, Peshu N, English M. "Developing and Introducing Evidence Based Clinical Practice Guidelines for Serious Illness in Kenya.". 2009;10(93):799-804. Abstractdeveloping_and_introducing_evidence_based_clinical_practice_guidelines_for_serious_illness_in_kenya..pdf

The under-5 mortality rate in most developing countries remains high yet many deaths could be averted if available knowledge was put into practice. For seriously ill children in hospital investigations in low-income countries commonly demonstrate incorrect diagnosis and treatment and frequent prescribing errors. To help improve hospital management of the major causes of inpatient childhood mortality we developed simple clinical guidelines for use in Kenya, a low-income setting. The participatory process we used to adapt existing WHO materials and further develop and build support for such guidelines is discussed. To facilitate use of the guidelines we also developed job-aides and a 5.5 days training programme for their dissemination and implementation. We attempted to base our training on modern theories around adult learning and deliberately attempted to train a ‘critical mass’ of health workers within each institution at low cost. Our experience suggests that with sustained effort it is possible to develop locally owned, appropriate clinical practice guidelines for emergency and initial hospital care for seriously ill children with involvement of pertinent stake holders throughout. Early experience suggests that the training developed to support the guidelines, despite the fact that it challenges many established practices, is well received, appropriate to the needs of front line health workers in Kenya and feasible. To our knowledge the process described in Kenya is among a handful of attempts globally to implement inpatient or referral care components of WHO / UNICEF’s Integrated Management of Childhood Illness approach. However, whether guideline dissemination and implementation result in improved quality of care in our environment remains to be seen.

Grace Irimu, R W Nduati, Wamae A, Wasunna A, Were F, Ntoburi S, Opiyo N, Ayieko P, Peshu N, English M. "Developing and introducing evidence based clinical practice guidelines for serious illness in Kenya." Arch. Dis. Child.. 2008;93(9):799-804.
Ballesteros C, Mwasi A, Mungai E, Ibarahim A, Thuranina-McKeever C, Aboge GO, Onono JO, Alarcon P. "Developing and validating a rapid assessment tool for small ruminant reproduction and production in pastoralist flocks in Kajiado, Kenya." Veterinary and Animal Science. 2021;13.
Korir A, Mauti N, Moats P, Gurka MJ, Mutuma G, Metheny C, Mwamba PM, Oyiro PO, Fisher M, Ayers LW, Rochford R, Mwanda WO, Remick SC. "Developing clinical strength-of-evidence approach to define HIV-associated malignancies for cancer registration in Kenya." PLoS ONE. 2014;9(1):e85881. Abstract

Sub-Saharan Africa cancer registries are beset by an increasing cancer burden further exacerbated by the AIDS epidemic where there are limited capabilities for cancer-AIDS match co-registration. We undertook a pilot study based on a "strength-of-evidence" approach using clinical data that is abstracted at the time of cancer registration for purposes of linking cancer diagnosis to AIDS diagnosis.

Murage JK, Amugune BK, Njogu P, Ndwigah SN. "Development and application of a spectrophotometric method in quality evaluation of benzimidazole anthelminthics in Nairobi City County." Future Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences . 2020;6:74.
Murage JK, Amugune BK, Njogu PM, S.N.Ndwigah. "Development and application of aspectrophotometric method in qualityevaluation of benzimidazole anthelminthicsin Nairobi city county." Future Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences . 2020;6:74.
Kawakyu N, Nduati R, Obimbo E, Munguambe K, Coutinho J, Mburu N, DeCastro G, Inguane C, Zunt A, Abburi N, Sherr K, S. G. "Development and Implementation of a Mobile Phone-Based Prevention of Mother-To-Child Transmission of HIV Cascade Analysis Tool: Usability and Feasibility Testing in Kenya and Mozambique." JMIR Mhealth Uhealth. 2019;13;7(5):( doi: 10.2196/13963.):e13963.
Alexandra Hiscox, Bruno Otieno, Anthony Kibet, Collins K Mweresa, Philemon Omusula, Martin Geier, Andreas Rose, Wolfgang R Mukabana, undefined. "Development and optimization of the Suna trap as a tool for mosquito monitoring and control." Malaria journal. 2014;13(1):257.
A Kibet, Rose A, P Omusula, Takken W, M Geier, Mweresa CK, B Otieno, Mukabana WR. "Development and optimization of the Suna trap as a tool for mosquito monitoring and control.". 2014.
AKATCH PROFSAMUELO. ""Development and Promotion of Community Based Sericulture. Annex XL pp 96.". In: Federation Proceedings, 31 1470. Journal of Natural Products; 1996.

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