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ASWANI PROFMWANZIHELLENORONGA. "Widowing and Remarriage. East Africa in Transition. Nairobi.". In: University of Nairobi Press. Elsevier; 2004.
Feyssa DH, Njoka JT, Asfaw Z, Nyangito MM. "Wild Edible Fruits of Importance for Human Nutrition in Semiarid Parts of East Shewa Zone, Ethiopia: Associated Indigenous Knowledge and Implications to Food Security." Pakistan journal of Nutrition. 2011;10(1):40-50. Abstract

Nutrient value assessments and ethnobotanical studies of three wild edible fruit species [Ziziphus spina-christi (L.) Desf., Balanites aegyptiaca (L.) Del., Grewia flavescens A. Juss.], were carried out from October 2009 through June 2010 in east Shewa Zone, Ethiopia. Field data collection was combined with laboratory food content analyses with the aim of identifying promising wild edible fruit plants. Also, optimal use of preferred wild edibles particularly in addressing future food security issues of rural people in the drylands was assessed. Composite fruit samples randomly collected in six sites of Fantalle and Boosast districts were subjected to standard laboratory chemical analyses. Values for total carbohydrates, crude protein, crude lipid, moisture and total ash contents of the fruit pulps ranged from 76.67-86.12%, 1.45-4.20%, 3.58-4.02%, 35.18-57.41%, 8.11-16.40% for Z. spina-christi, 85.55-89.61%, 0.001-003, 49.03-68.26%, 10.18-12.88% for B. aegyptiaca; 83.74-93.68%, 0.64-3.14%, 18.90-61.35%, 3.16-7.25% for G. flavescens, respectively. The calculated energy (based on total carbohydrates) was highest for G. flavescens (373.6 Kcal/100 g), followed by B. aegyptiaca (354.24) and Z. spina-christi (344.48 Kcal/100 g). The results indicated that these fruit species, which are popularly used by the local communities, contain appreciable amounts of nutrients and energy and thus are useful food supplements. These species should be integrated into dryland agroforestry systems for sustainable use and conservation, as well as, preservation of the associated knowledge through the positive practice of the indigenous bio-cultural knowledge. In this case, lessons can be drawn from some farmers of Boosat District, who are currently using two of the species in traditional agroforestry practices.

Wambua L, Peninah Nduku Wambua, Allan Maurice Ramogo, Domnic Mijele, Moses Yongo Otiende. "Wildebeest-associated malignant catarrhal fever: perspectives for integrated control of a lymphoproliferative disease of cattle in sub-Saharan Africa." Archives of virology. 2016;161(1):1-10.
Githanga J, Axt J, Abdallah F, Axt M, Hansen E, et al. "Wilms Tumor Survival in Kenya." National institute of health. 2013;48(6)(2013 June ):1254-1262.wilms_paper_githanga__abdalla.pdf
Abdallah F, Axt J, Axt M, Githanga J, Hansen E, Lessan J, Li M, et al. "Wilms Tumor Survival in Kenya." National Institute of Health. 2013;48(6)(june 2013):1254-1262.
Axt J, Abdallah F AGHLLMMNMJEJ, Ndung'u J, Njuguna F NOPTUWO'NJAJLHN 3rd.AOKR. "Wilms tumor survival in Kenya." J Pediatr Surg.. 2013;48(6):1254-1262.
A. PROFODHIAMBOPETER. "Witchcraft Psychiatry?". In: East Africa Journal. Heinrich Boll Foundation.; 1996. Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To determine the bacteriology and antibiotic sensitivity of the bacterial isolates in chronic maxillary sinusitis patients seen at the Kenyatta National Hospital. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING: Kenyatta National Hospital, ENT department. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Seventy-three patients had bilateral sntral washout done and the lavage submitted for culture and anti-microbial sensitivity between January and June 1996. RESULTS: Antral lavage yielded secretions in 63% of patients but bacteria were cultured in only 28.8% of the specimens. The isolates included Streptococcus pneumonia (22.2%), Staphylocococus albus (18.5%), Staphylocococus aureus (11.1%) and Enterobactericiae (11.1%). Anaerobic bacteria were cultured in 22.2% of the specimens. Of the commonly used antibiotics, there was high sensitivity to erythromycin, cefadroxyl, chloramphenicol and amoxicillin and poor sensitivity to ampicillin, cotrimoxazole and perfloxacin. CONCLUSION: The bacteriology of chronic maxillary sinusitis at Kenyatta National Hospital is generally similar to that found elsewhere. The bacteria are susceptible to relatively affordable antibiotics like amoxicillin, erythromycin and cefadroxyl.
AMOLO PROFACHOLAMILCAH. "With N. Senkomago: Themes in East African History.". In: University of Nairobi Press.; 1991. Abstract

Colonial policy makers argued that they were  bringing civilization and better standards of living to Africans.  One perceived problem they had to contend with  was the “ignorance” of their subject peoples.  In health delivery, in particular, colonial administrators believed that ignorance accounted for the poor levels of health among Africans, and that knowledge and that knowledge and other preventive measures would greatly enhance standards of living, for instance, among urban Africans. In this paper we test this philosophy against colonial urban health policy’s and show that racism in the delivery of services  greatly undermined African and Asian health in order to afford  high quality services for Europeans in Nairobi.

ABDALLAH DRAL-ASARAYMAMIBRAHIM. ""Wole Soyinka Nigerian Nobel Prize Winner", African perspective, third volume, Tenth Issue, summer 2002, state information service.". In: IEE Journal in Engineering, Science and Education, Vol. & (NO) vol. 7, no. 2, pp. pp. 81-87. Academic Journals; 2002. Abstract
21) S. Derese, A. Yenesew, J.O. Midiwo, Heydenreich and M.G. Peter. (). ..
AUGUSTINE PROFCHITEREPRESTON. "The women.". In: Proceedings of the Kenya National Academy of Sciences. Heinrich Boll Foundation.; 1988.
AMOLO PROFACHOLAMILCAH. "Women in Economic Activities - Laikipia District in Women and Development in Kenya - Laikipia District by G. Were, C. Suda and J. Olenja eds. Institute of African Studies, University of Nairobi.". In: Journal Vol.4 No.2, 1990.; 1990. Abstract

Colonial policy makers argued that they were  bringing civilization and better standards of living to Africans.  One perceived problem they had to contend with  was the “ignorance” of their subject peoples.  In health delivery, in particular, colonial administrators believed that ignorance accounted for the poor levels of health among Africans, and that knowledge and that knowledge and other preventive measures would greatly enhance standards of living, for instance, among urban Africans. In this paper we test this philosophy against colonial urban health policy’s and show that racism in the delivery of services  greatly undermined African and Asian health in order to afford  high quality services for Europeans in Nairobi.

AMOLO PROFACHOLAMILCAH. "Women in Economic Activities - Siaya District in Women and Development in Kenya - Siaya District, by G. Were, C. Suda and J. Olenja, eds. Institute of African Studies, University of Nairobi.". In: In Nairobi 1928-62 in African Urban Quaterly.; 1991. Abstract

Colonial policy makers argued that they were  bringing civilization and better standards of living to Africans.  One perceived problem they had to contend with  was the “ignorance” of their subject peoples.  In health delivery, in particular, colonial administrators believed that ignorance accounted for the poor levels of health among Africans, and that knowledge and that knowledge and other preventive measures would greatly enhance standards of living, for instance, among urban Africans. In this paper we test this philosophy against colonial urban health policy’s and show that racism in the delivery of services  greatly undermined African and Asian health in order to afford  high quality services for Europeans in Nairobi.

A. PROFKARANIFLORIDA. ""Women in Management".". In: The Phase III of the Ford Foundation Management Development Seminar for Women Managers in the Public Sector. Nairobi Province. 2 nd April 2001. Journal of BiochemiPhysics; 2001. Abstract
   
A. PROFKARANIFLORIDA. ""Women in Management".". In: The Phase III of the Ford Foundation Management Development Seminar for Women Managers in the Public Sector. Nairobi Province. 2 nd April 2001. Journal of BiochemiPhysics; 2001. Abstract

 

 

A. PROFKARANIFLORIDA. ""Women Scholars' role in perpetrating change : How the participation of Women in the Education Sector can encourage positive Development in Kenya".". In: The International Womens' Day Seminar on Woman, Her Diversity at the United States International University Africa (USIU-A) Nairobi. Kenya. 5 th March 2003. Journal of BiochemiPhysics; 2003.
A. PROFKARANIFLORIDA. ""Women Scholars' role in perpetrating change : How the participation of Women in the Education Sector can encourage positive Development in Kenya".". In: The International Womens' Day Seminar on Woman, Her Diversity at the United States International University Africa (USIU-A) Nairobi. Kenya. 5 th March 2003. Journal of BiochemiPhysics; 2003. Abstract

Tetralones were converted to tetralinylamines via Leuckart reaction.These were then used to protect carboxamide side-chains of glutamine and asparagine. Clevage studies using trifluoroacetic acid and boron tristrifluoroacetate were then done on these derivatives. The groups 1-tetralinyl, 5,7-dimethyl-1-tetralinyl and 7-methoxy-1-tetralinyl were found to be good carboxamide protecting groups in asparagine.

A. PM. "Women Should Focus on Whole Judiciary." Nairobi Star, July 18, 2022.
Alila PO, Mitullah WV, Kamau AW. Women street vendors.; 2002.Website
Mitullah WV, Alila PO, Kamau AW. Women street vendors.; 2002.Website
Alila PO, Mitullah WV, Kamau AW. Women street vendors. Nairobi: University of Nairobi; 2002.
AKATCH PROFSAMUELO. ""Women's Alliance for the Restoration of Lake Victoria", in Dying Lake Victoria (1996). Annex XI pp 85.". In: Federation Proceedings, 31 1470. Journal of Natural Products; 1996.
Ongong’a JJ, Akaranga SI. "Work ethics for lecturers: An example of Nairobi and Kenyatta Universities." International Journal of Arts and COmmerce. 2013;Vol.21 No.8(8):8-22.work_ethics_for_lecturersan_example_of_nairobi_and_kenyatta_universities.pdf
Odada E, Zalasiewicz J, Waters CN, Summerhayes CP, Wolfe AP, et al. "The Working Group on the Anthropocene: Summary of evidence and interim recommendations." Anthropocene. 2017;19:55-60. AbstractFull Text

Since 2009, the Working Group on the ‘Anthropocene’ (or, commonly, AWG for Anthropocene Working Group), has been critically analysing the case for formalization of this proposed but still informal geological time unit. The study to date has mainly involved establishing the overall nature of the Anthropocene as a potential chronostratigraphic/geochronologic unit, and exploring the stratigraphic proxies, including several that are novel in geology, that might be applied to its characterization and definition. A preliminary summary of evidence and interim recommendations was presented by the Working Group at the 35th International Geological Congress in Cape Town, South Africa, in August 2016, together with results of voting by members of the AWG indicating the current balance of opinion on major questions surrounding the Anthropocene. The majority opinion within the AWG holds the Anthropocene to be stratigraphically real, and recommends formalization at epoch/series rank based on a mid-20th century boundary. Work is proceeding towards a formal proposal based upon selection of an appropriate Global boundary Stratotype Section and Point (GSSP), as well as auxiliary stratotypes. Among the array of proxies that might be used as a primary marker, anthropogenic radionuclides associated with nuclear arms testing are the most promising; potential secondary markers include plastic, carbon isotope patterns and industrial fly ash. All these proxies have excellent global or near-global correlation potential in a wide variety of sedimentary bodies, both marine and non-marine.

AUGUSTINE PROFCHITEREPRESTON. "Working with Rural Communities, University of Nairobi Press (Chitere, P.O. and Mutiso, R. eds.).". In: Proceedings of the Kenya National Academy of Sciences. Heinrich Boll Foundation.; 1991.
J.P. S, A.M. G, G. C, P. L, Z. Q. "The World Health Organization multicountry survey on maternal and newborn health: study protocol." BMC Health Serv Res. 2011;11:286-303. Abstract

Background: Effective interventions to reduce mortality and morbidity in maternal and newborn health already exist. Information about quality and performance of care and the use of critical interventions are useful for shaping improvements in health care and strengthening the contribution of health systems towards the Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5. The near-miss concept and the criterion-based clinical audit are proposed as useful approaches for obtaining such information in maternal and newborn health care. This paper presents the methods of the World Health Organization Multicountry Study in Maternal and Newborn Health. The main objectives of this study are to determine the prevalence of maternal near-miss cases in a
worldwide network of health facilities, evaluate the quality of care using the maternal near-miss concept and the criterion-based clinical audit, and develop the near-miss concept in neonatal health.

Methods/Design: This is a large cross-sectional study being implemented in a worldwide network of health facilities. A total of 370 health facilities from 29 countries will take part in this study and produce nearly 275,000 observations. All women giving birth, all maternal near-miss cases regardless of the gestational age and delivery status and all maternal deaths during the study period comprise the study population. In each health facility, medical records of all eligible women will be reviewed during a data collection period that
ranges from two to three months according to the annual number of deliveries.

Discussion: Implementing the systematic identification of near-miss cases, mapping the use of critical evidence-based interventions and analysing the corresponding indicators are just the initial steps for using the maternal nearmiss concept as a tool to improve maternal and newborn health. The findings of projects using approaches similar to those described in this manuscript will be a good starter for a more comprehensive dialogue with governments, professionals and civil societies, health systems or facilities for promoting best practices, improving quality of care and achieving better health for mothers and children.

Maj M, Janssen R, Satz P, Zaudig M, Starace F, Boor D, Sughondhabirom B, Bing EB, Luabeya MK, Ndetei MD, et al. "The World Health Organization's cross-cultural study on neuropsychiatric aspects of infection with the human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1).". 1991.
A. PROFKARANIFLORIDA. ""Writing a Project Proposal".". In: Pan- African Institute, Project Management Workshop, Kabwe, Zambia. 1984 and 1985. Journal of BiochemiPhysics; 1985. Abstract
   
A. PROFKARANIFLORIDA. ""Writing a Project Proposal".". In: Pan- African Institute, Project Management Workshop, Kabwe, Zambia. 1984 and 1985. Journal of BiochemiPhysics; 1985. Abstract

 

 

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Varma V, Abbott K, Gramlich T, Hunter S. "Y chromosome loss in esophageal carcinoma: An in situ hybridization study.". 1993.
Varma V, Abbott K, Gramlich T, Hunter S. "Y chromosome loss in esophageal carcinoma: An in situ hybridization study.". 1993. Abstract
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Absaloms HO. The Yagi-Uda Array. Nairobi, Kenya: University of Nairobi; 1988.
Cris Theron, Khajamohiddin Syed, Andreas Shiningavamwe, Evodia Setati, Obiero G, Newlande van Rooyen, Limpho Ramarobi, Simbarashe Mabwe, Jacobus Albetyn, Jean-Marc Nicaud,. MS. Yarrowia Lipolytica as a host for heterologous expression of cytochrome P450 monoxygenase. Grahamstown, South Africa; 2008.
Cris Theron, Khajamohiddin Syed, Andreas Shiningavamwe, Evodia Setati, Obiero G, Newlande van Rooyen, Limpho Ramarobi, Simbarashe Mabwe, Jacobus Albetyn,. J-M. Yarrowia Lipolytica as a host for heterologous expression of cytochrome P450 monoxygenase. Oviedo, Spain; 2008.
Bitange NM, Chemining’wa GN, Ambuko J, Owino WO. "Yield and tissue calcium concentration of mango (Mangifera indica L.) fruit as influenced by calcium source and time of application." International Journal of Plant & Soil Science. 2019:1-12. Abstract
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ADHIAMBO MRSOSANJOL. "You, Yourself and Your Portfolio.". In: Faculty of ADD, University of Nairobi. ISCTRC; 2005. Abstract

Designers, architects and artists have invariably relied on their portfolios to record their work and to exhibit their capabilities. Unfortunately there is very little reference from which to draw tips on how to effectively utilize a portfolio. Sometimes the attention given to the production of the work is not complemented with strong oral and visual, presentations. The continued failure to pay due attention to portfolio has led to loss of job opportunities. The portfolio can open doors and close them with equal speed. To people shopping for jobs, it's a calling card, the advance guard, the marketing tool, often the only opportunity to make an impression. Many companies do not hire people but rather hire portfolios. When a prospective employer requests for a portfolio it is because they are seeking certain attributes or traits that may be of service to them. Typically, the employer will say they are looking for somebody "creative". How does your portfolio show that you are creative? Is it in the way it is organized? The work you have put in it? Or is it the bag/booklet? The answer to this is "all of the above". It does not do good work justice if it's put together in a tattered envelope. Neither can a very expensive bag/booklet camouflage bad work. There must be a sense of your presence in the work you do, the way you do it, the way you present it and what you want to do with it. And, not to forget, what you want the work to do for you.

Agwanda A. Youth Dialogue Tool submitted to Ministry of Youth Affairs . Kenya Country Office: UNFPA ; 2011.
Achola MA. "Youth, Poverty and Destitution in Nairobi: 1945-60.". In: Past and Past Perspective. IFRA and British Institute in Eastern Africa in Nyeri; 2006.
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A. PROFWAMOLAISAAC. "Zimmerman, R R and WAMOLA I.A. A case of Acinetobacterial menegitis. EAMJ Vol. 54 No. 3 (March 1977 pp. 152).". In: EAMJ Vol. 54 No. 3 (March 1977 pp. 152). IBIMA Publishing; 1977. Abstract
A study that devised a modified method of reporting antibiotic sensitivity results was undertaken. Enterobacteriaceae and Gram positive cocci were tested for drug sensitivity by a disc diffusion method. Zones of bacterial growth inhibition were measured, dividing the isolates into four groups: the highly sensitive, the moderately sensitive, the slightly sensitive and the resistant ones. The slightly sensitive isolates were taken as indicators of antibiotic resistance acquisition. By that system, when more than 50% of the isolates fell into the slightly and resistant groups, that meant that the antibiotic concerned would be discontinued for some time until the bacteria reverted to being moderately sensitive. The study also provided a method of making antibiotic discs from local blotting papers, and a sample of a form on which antibiotic sensitivity results could be recorded was presented. The method is considered to be easy and very appropriate for developing countries in detecting gradual and abrupt acquisition of antibiotic resistance by bacteria.
Nthiwa D, Alonso S, Odongo D, Kenya E, Bett B. "Zoonotic Pathogen Seroprevalence in Cattle in a Wildlife-Livestock Interface, Kenya." Ecohealth. 2019;16(4):712-725. Abstract

A cross-sectional study was conducted to determine the seroprevalence of Brucella spp. and Leptospira spp. and risk factors of exposure in cattle in three zones with varying land use types and wildlife-livestock interactions. Five villages were selected purposively; two in areas with intensive livestock-wildlife interactions (zone 1), another two in areas with moderate livestock-wildlife interactions (zone 2) and one in areas where wildlife-livestock interactions are rarer (zone 3). Sera samples were collected from 1170 cattle belonging to 390 herds in all the zones and tested for antibodies against Brucella abortus and Leptospira interrogans serovar hardjo using ELISA kits. Data on putative risk factors for seropositivity of these pathogens in cattle were collected using a questionnaire. The overall apparent animal-level seroprevalence of brucellosis and leptospirosis was, respectively, 36.9% (95% CI 34.1-39.8) and 23.5% (95% CI 21.1-26.0). Brucella spp. seroprevalence was higher in zone 1 than in zones 2 and 3 (χ = 25.1, df = 2, P < 0.001). Zones 1 and 2 had significantly higher Leptospira spp. seroprevalence than zone 3 (χ = 7.0, df = 2, P = 0.029). Results of multivariable analyses identified animal sex (female) and zones (high interface area) as significant predictors (P < 0.05) of animal-level seropositivity of Brucella spp. For Leptospira spp., important predictors of animal-level seropositivity were animal sex (female), zones (moderate interface area) and herds utilizing a communal grazing reserve. The seroprevalences of Brucella spp. and Leptospira spp. in cattle were higher in areas with moderate to high wildlife-livestock interactions than those with rare interactions.

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Alekseeva IG, Lapina GP, Tulovskaia ZD, Izmaĭlova VN. "[Structure formation in interphase adsorption layers of lysozyme at liquid boundaries]." Biofizika. 1975;20(4):566-9. Abstract

In connection with the modelling of biomembranes regularities of the formation and development of interphase adsorption layers of lysozyme at liquid borders under different conditions and depending on the nature of carbohydrate phase were investigated by the determination of mechanical characteristics of such layers. The investigations carried out showed that the most solid layers appeared under the conditions which assured the formation of the maximum number of intermolecular bonds (which in a common case is performed with maximum disorderlinesss of the macromolecules which get at the interphase).

Alekseeva IG, Lapina GP, Tulovskaia ZD, Izmaĭlova VN. "[Structure formation in interphase adsorption layers of lysozyme at liquid boundaries]." Biofizika. 1975;20(4):566-9. Abstract

In connection with the modelling of biomembranes regularities of the formation and development of interphase adsorption layers of lysozyme at liquid borders under different conditions and depending on the nature of carbohydrate phase were investigated by the determination of mechanical characteristics of such layers. The investigations carried out showed that the most solid layers appeared under the conditions which assured the formation of the maximum number of intermolecular bonds (which in a common case is performed with maximum disorderlinesss of the macromolecules which get at the interphase).

J D, A S, E I. "[{Variations} in the position and point of origin of the vermiform appendix]." Medicinski arhiv. 2001;56:5-8. AbstractWebsite

Author: Delić J, Journal: Medicinski arhiv[2001/12], Abstract: There were investigated variations of appendix vermiformis in the place of origin and position. The investigations were carried out on 50 human preparations of adults of both sexes, unintentional...

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Tofighi H, Taghadosi-nejad F, Abbaspour A, Behnoush B, Salimi A, Dabiran S, Ghorbani A, Okazi A. "The {Anatomical} {Position} of {Appendix} in {Iranian} {Cadavers}." International Journal of Medical Toxicology and Forensic Medicine. 2013;3:126-130. AbstractWebsite

Background : Vermiform appendix is different in terms of anatomical position, length and mesoappendix.  Knowing the anatomical position of vermiform appendix is important for the surgeons in terms of diagnosis and management. The aim of this study is analysis of length, anatomical position and mesoappendix of vermiform appendix. Methods: This is a cross-sectional study on the 400 randomly selected cadavers (306 male and 94 female) who have been referred to the autopsy hall of legal medicine organization of Tehran province to be autopsied between March 21, 2010 and March, 2011. The cause of death was very heterogeneous among autopsied cadavers. Results: According to our results the anatomical positions were pelvic, subcecal, retroileal, retrocaecal, ectopic and preileal in 55.8%, 19%, 12.5%, 7%, 4.2% and 1.5% respectively. The mean length of vermiform appendix was 91.2 mm and 80.3 mm in men and women, respectively. Mesoappendix was complete in 79.5% and incomplete in 20.5%. No association was seen between sex and anatomical position of vermiform appendix. Conclusion: Anterior anatomical position was the most frequent vermiform appendix position in our population which is in discrepancy with most of the reports from western countries. It might be possible that factors such as race, geographical regions and nutritional regiment play roles in determining the position of vermiform appendix.

Seki M, Nawa H, Fukuchi T, Abe H, Takei N. "{BDNF} is upregulated by postnatal development and visual experience: quantitative and immunohistochemical analyses of {BDNF} in the rat retina." Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2003:3211-3218. Abstract

PURPOSE. This study sought to elucidate changes in the levels and distribution of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the retina throughout aging and depending on visual experience. METHODS. Protein and mRNA levels of BDNF were quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and semiquantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), respectively. Levels were assayed in the retinas of rats on postnatal day (P)2, P7, and P14 (approximate time of eye opening) and at 1 month (M), 3M, 8M, and 18M of age. Changes in BDNF expression and localization in the retina were assessed by immunohistochemistry. The effect of monocular deprivation during infancy on retinal BDNF expression was also examined, by ELISA and immunohistochemistry. RESULTS. Both protein and mRNA levels of BDNF in the rat retina increased after P14. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed

Seki M, Nawa H, Fukuchi T, Abe H, Takei N. "{BDNF} is upregulated by postnatal development and visual experience: quantitative and immunohistochemical analyses of {BDNF} in the rat retina." Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2003:3211-3218. Abstract

PURPOSE. This study sought to elucidate changes in the levels and distribution of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the retina throughout aging and depending on visual experience. METHODS. Protein and mRNA levels of BDNF were quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and semiquantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), respectively. Levels were assayed in the retinas of rats on postnatal day (P)2, P7, and P14 (approximate time of eye opening) and at 1 month (M), 3M, 8M, and 18M of age. Changes in BDNF expression and localization in the retina were assessed by immunohistochemistry. The effect of monocular deprivation during infancy on retinal BDNF expression was also examined, by ELISA and immunohistochemistry. RESULTS. Both protein and mRNA levels of BDNF in the rat retina increased after P14. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed

Seki M, Nawa H, Fukuchi T, Abe H, Takei N. "{BDNF} is upregulated by postnatal development and visual experience: quantitative and immunohistochemical analyses of {BDNF} in the rat retina." Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2003:3211-3218. Abstract

PURPOSE. This study sought to elucidate changes in the levels and distribution of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the retina throughout aging and depending on visual experience. METHODS. Protein and mRNA levels of BDNF were quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and semiquantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), respectively. Levels were assayed in the retinas of rats on postnatal day (P)2, P7, and P14 (approximate time of eye opening) and at 1 month (M), 3M, 8M, and 18M of age. Changes in BDNF expression and localization in the retina were assessed by immunohistochemistry. The effect of monocular deprivation during infancy on retinal BDNF expression was also examined, by ELISA and immunohistochemistry. RESULTS. Both protein and mRNA levels of BDNF in the rat retina increased after P14. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed

Ari̇foğlu Y, Gezen F, Gönül C, Sevi̇nç Ö, İş M. "The {Case} of {Unilateral} {Double} {Superior} {Cerebellar} {Artery}." Duzce Tip Facultesi Dergisi. 2002;4:26-27. Abstract

The superior cerebellar artery is the most constant artery arising from the vertebrobasilar system. Its variation is reported very rarely. In this cadaver study, a fifty-five years old man having duplication of superior cerebellar artery is presented. This report describes its duplication, as one of its anomalies. Additionally, the anatomy and relationship of superior cerebellar artery with various structures are given.

Purves D, Augustine GJ, Fitzpatrick D, Katz LC, LaMantia A-S, McNamara JO, Williams MS. "The {Spinal} {Cord} {Circuitry} {Underlying} {Muscle} {Stretch} {Reflexes}.". 2001. AbstractWebsite

The local circuitry within the spinal cord mediates a number of sensory motor reflex actions. The simplest of these reflex arcs entails the response to muscle stretch, which provides direct excitatory feedback to the motor neurons innervating the muscle that has been stretched (Figure 16.9). As already mentioned, the sensory signal for the stretch reflex originates in muscle spindles, sensory receptors embedded within most muscles (see previous section and Chapter 9). The spindles comprise 8–10 intrafusal fibers arranged in parallel with the extrafusal fibers that make up the bulk of the muscle (Figure 16.9A). Large-diameter sensory fibers, called Ia afferents, are coiled around the central part of the spindle. These afferents are the largest axons in peripheral nerves and, since action potential conduction velocity is a direct function of axon diameter (see Chapters 2 and 3), they allow for very rapid adjustments in this reflex arc when the muscle is stretched. The stretch imposed on the muscle deforms the intrafusal muscle fibers, which in turn initiate action potentials by activating mechanically gated ion channels in the afferent axons coiled around the spindle. The centrally projecting branch of the sensory neuron forms monosynaptic excitatory connections with the α motor neurons in the ventral horn of the spinal cord that innervate the same (homonymous) muscle and, via local circuit neurons, inhibitory connections with the α motor neurons of antagonistic (heteronymous) muscles. This arrangement is an example of what is called reciprocal innervation and results in rapid contraction of the stretched muscle and simultaneous relaxation of the antagonist muscle. All of this leads to especially rapid and efficient responses to changes in the length or tension in the muscle (Figure 16.9B). The excitatory pathway from a spindle to the α motor neurons innervating the same muscle is unusual in that it is a monosynaptic reflex; in most cases, sensory neurons from the periphery do not contact the lower motor neuron directly but exert their effects through local circuit neurons. Figure 16.9Stretch reflex circuitry. (A) Diagram of muscle spindle, the sensory receptor that initiates the stretch reflex. (B) Stretching a muscle spindle leads to increased activity in Ia afferents and an increase in the activity of α motor neurons that innervate the same muscle. Ia afferents also excite the motor neurons that innervate synergistic muscles, and inhibit the motor neurons that innervate antagonists (see also Figure 1.5). (C) The stretch reflex operates as a negative feedback loop to regulate muscle length.

Purves D, Augustine GJ, Fitzpatrick D, Katz LC, LaMantia A-S, McNamara JO, Williams MS. "The {Spinal} {Cord} {Circuitry} {Underlying} {Muscle} {Stretch} {Reflexes}.". 2001. AbstractWebsite

The local circuitry within the spinal cord mediates a number of sensory motor reflex actions. The simplest of these reflex arcs entails the response to muscle stretch, which provides direct excitatory feedback to the motor neurons innervating the muscle that has been stretched (Figure 16.9). As already mentioned, the sensory signal for the stretch reflex originates in muscle spindles, sensory receptors embedded within most muscles (see previous section and Chapter 9). The spindles comprise 8–10 intrafusal fibers arranged in parallel with the extrafusal fibers that make up the bulk of the muscle (Figure 16.9A). Large-diameter sensory fibers, called Ia afferents, are coiled around the central part of the spindle. These afferents are the largest axons in peripheral nerves and, since action potential conduction velocity is a direct function of axon diameter (see Chapters 2 and 3), they allow for very rapid adjustments in this reflex arc when the muscle is stretched. The stretch imposed on the muscle deforms the intrafusal muscle fibers, which in turn initiate action potentials by activating mechanically gated ion channels in the afferent axons coiled around the spindle. The centrally projecting branch of the sensory neuron forms monosynaptic excitatory connections with the α motor neurons in the ventral horn of the spinal cord that innervate the same (homonymous) muscle and, via local circuit neurons, inhibitory connections with the α motor neurons of antagonistic (heteronymous) muscles. This arrangement is an example of what is called reciprocal innervation and results in rapid contraction of the stretched muscle and simultaneous relaxation of the antagonist muscle. All of this leads to especially rapid and efficient responses to changes in the length or tension in the muscle (Figure 16.9B). The excitatory pathway from a spindle to the α motor neurons innervating the same muscle is unusual in that it is a monosynaptic reflex; in most cases, sensory neurons from the periphery do not contact the lower motor neuron directly but exert their effects through local circuit neurons. Figure 16.9Stretch reflex circuitry. (A) Diagram of muscle spindle, the sensory receptor that initiates the stretch reflex. (B) Stretching a muscle spindle leads to increased activity in Ia afferents and an increase in the activity of α motor neurons that innervate the same muscle. Ia afferents also excite the motor neurons that innervate synergistic muscles, and inhibit the motor neurons that innervate antagonists (see also Figure 1.5). (C) The stretch reflex operates as a negative feedback loop to regulate muscle length.

Nyunja C, Maina J, Amimo J, Kibegwa F, Harper D, Junga J. "{Stock Structure Delineation of the African Catfish (Clarius gariepinus) in Selected Populations in Kenya Using Mitochondrial DNA (Dloop) Variability}." Journal of Aquaculture Research {&} Development. 2017;08. AbstractWebsite

This study genetically characterized five populations of the African catfish (Clarius gariepinus) in Kenya. Samples were obtained from five sites in the country–Athi River hatchery, Kisii Fingerling Production Centre (FPC), Jewlett hatchery, Sagana Hatchery Station and Lake Baringo. DNA was extracted from tissue samples, followed by amplification and sequencing of the dloop region. Haplotype diversities, phylogenetic structure and variation at the dloop region of mitochondrial DNA were assessed. Mitochondrial DNA analyses indicated that the sampled species showed genetic diversity between its populations. The genetic results were congruent indicating the differences in diversities and haplotype similarities of catfish samples from different sites. The Sagana, Kisii FPC, Jewlett and Baringo population cluster overlapped indicating possibly shared source of brood stock. The Athi river population was in a different cluster and its distinctiveness is attributed to imported brood stock. Both Athi River hatchery and Lake Baringo populations were highly variable and has great potential for production.

Dagcinar A, Kaya AH, Aydin ME, Kopuz C, Senel A, Demir MT, Corumlu U, Celik F, Sam B. "The {Superior} {Cerebellar} {Artery}: {Anatomic} {Study} {With} {Review}." Neurosurgery Quarterly. 2007;17:235-240. AbstractWebsite
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Perciani CT, Jaoko W, Farah B, Ostrowski MA, Anzala O, MacDonald KS. "αEβ7, α4β7 and α4β1 integrin contributions to T cell distribution in blood, cervix and rectal tissues: Potential implications for HIV transmission." PLoS ONE. 2018;13(2):e0192482. Abstract

Cell surface expression of α4β7, α4β1 and αEβ7 integrins play a key role in T cell distribution. Understanding the contribution of integrins to the density and ratios of CD4+: CD4negT cell at the portals of entry for HIV is of fundamental importance for the advance of more effective HIV prevention strategies. We therefore set out to characterize and compare the expression of α4β7, α4β1 and αEβ7 integrins on systemic, cervical and rectal CD4+ and CD4negT cells isolated from a cohort of healthy Kenyan women at low risk for sexually transmitted infections (STI) (n = 45). Here we show that blood and cervix were enriched in α4+β1+CD4+T cells and α4+β7hiCD4+T cells, whereas the rectum had an equal frequency of α4+β7hiCD4+T cells and αE+β7hiCD4+T cells. Most cervical and rectal αE+β7hiCD4+T cells expressed CCR5 as well as CD69. Interestingly, αEβ7 was the predominant integrin expressed by CD4negT cells in both mucosal sites, outnumbering αE+β7hiCD4+T cells approximately 2-fold in the cervix and 7-fold in the rectum. The majority of αE+β7hiCD4negT cells expressed CD69 at the mucosa. Taken together, our results show unique tissue-specific patterns of integrin expression. These results can help in guiding vaccine design and also the use of therapeutically targeting integrin adhesion as a means to preventing HIV.

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Stigter CJ, den Van B, Daane JRV, Adam HS, Mohammed AE, Ng'ang'a JK, Mungai DN. "The “picnic” model for research training at African Universities: evaluation and preliminary comparison.". 1998. AbstractThe “picnic” model for research training at African Universities: evaluation and preliminary comparison

What distinguishes the “Picnic” model for research training at African universities from more classical models is reviewed and it is shown how the “Picnic” model deals with remaining drawbacks from the now popular “Sandwich” model. Starting with managerial experiences, criteria guiding this evaluation are used as sub-headings: realistic planning; adequate resource provision; partnership instead of aid; long term impact; high quality supervision; quality and quantity of student input; open and interactive communication; willingness to adapt to local circumstances; ongoing critical reflection; gradual expatriate withdrawal. The training output of the “Picnic” model tests in the four TTMI-countries is assessed after the actual and prospective jobs of its former students. The on-farm quantification of protecting systems/structures led in many TTMI PhD-research cases to improved design criteria for such systems/structures, with direct increases of yield or its preservation. In comparison with the “Sandwich” model, the “Picnic” model particularly incorporates institutional strengthening in the aim that the southern countries will become able to provide adequate education at the postgraduate level, teaching their students how to apply knowledge in their own environment. Degrees obtained at southern universities, therefore, have distinct advantages but joint responsibilities of universities for such degrees are difficult to organize, given the presently existing modes of output-related financing of Dutch universities. In a situation of institutional deterioration, such as Africa is experiencing, the best hope probably lies in strengthening networks of individuals and a collective sense of academic commitment, pending the revival of universities themselves. Emergency research related to the protection of the African agricultural environment by African universities, training NARS staff, must in the long run contribute to restoring an agricultural basis for part of the economies of the many poor African countries. Knowledge developed locally remains the most powerful vehicle for change from within.

JANE KABUBO-MARIARA, Linderhof V, Kruseman G, Atieno R, Mwabu G. "“Poverty-environmental Links: The Impact of Soil and Water Conservation and Tenure Security on Household Welfare in Kenya”." Journal of Development and Agricultural Economics. 2010;Vol. 2(1)(February, 2010):041-053.
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Atieno R, Kanyinga K. "“The Revitalisation of Kenya Cooperative Creameries (KCC): The Politics of Policy Reforms in the Dairy Sector in Kenya”." Future Agricultures Working Paper. IDS, Sussex, Future Agricultures Consortium. 2007.
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Amadi JA, Olago DO, Ong’amo GO, Oriaso SO, Nyamongo IK, Estambale BBA. "“We don’t want our clothes to smell smoke”: changing malaria control practices and opportunities for integrated community-based management in Baringo, Kenya." BMC public health. 2018;18(1):609. AbstractFull Text

Background

The decline in global malaria cases is attributed to intensified utilization of primary vector control interventions and artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs). These strategies are inadequate in many rural areas, thus adopting locally appropriate integrated malaria control strategies is imperative in these heterogeneous settings. This study aimed at investigating trends and local knowledge on malaria and to develop a framework for malaria control for communities in Baringo, Kenya.

Methods

Clinical malaria cases obtained from four health facilities in the riverine and lowland zones were used to analyse malaria trends for the 2005–2014 period. A mixed method approach integrating eight focus group discussions, 12 key informant interviews, 300 survey questionnaires and two stakeholders’ consultative forums were used to assess local knowledge on malaria risk and develop a framework for malaria reduction.

Results

Malaria cases increased significantly during the 2005–2014 period (tau = 0.352; p < 0.001) in the riverine zone. March, April, May, June and October showed significant increases compared to other months. Misconceptions about the cause and mode of malaria transmission existed. Gender-segregated outdoor occupation such as social drinking, farm activities, herding, and circumcision events increased the risk of mosquito bites. A positive relationship occurred between education level and opinion on exposure to malaria risk after dusk (χ2 = 2.70, p < 0.05). There was over-reliance on bed nets, yet only 68% (204/300) of respondents owned at least one net. Complementary malaria control measures were under-utilized, with 90% of respondents denying having used either sprays, repellents or burnt cow dung or plant leaves over the last one year before the study was conducted. Baraza, radios, and mobile phone messages were identified as effective media for malaria information exchange. Supplementary strategies identified included unblocking canals, clearing Prosopis bushes, and use of community volunteers and school clubs to promote social behaviour change.

Conclusions

The knowledge gap on malaria transmission should be addressed to minimize the impacts and enhance uptake of appropriate malaria management mechanisms. Implementing community-based framework can support significant reductions in malaria prevalence by minimizing both indoor and outdoor malaria transmissions.

Keywords

Local knowledgeMalaria trendsCommunity-based strategiesFramework

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