Bio

PROF. AKUNDABWENI LEVI S.

BIOGRAPHY – PROF.  LEVI SHADEYA-MUDOGO AKUNDABWENI, PhD, MSc. BSc

KEY QUALIFICATIONS

Publications


2012

Ssozi, J; Akundabweni, LSM; NA.  2012.  Verifying the premium value of selected African indigenous vegetables in target sites of the Lake Victoria basin. Abstract

The purpose of this research was to verify the premium value in terms of nutritional and economic potential of selected African indigenous vegetable plants (AIVPs) along the Lake Victoria basin. Partial findings of this study being reported are on the smallholder farmer indigenous knowledge of vegetable production and utilisation in Jinja (Uganda) and Vihiga (Kenya). A survey was conducted to establish the status and level of utilisation of indigenous vegetable plants. whereby total of 163 households in each site were interviewed. Vegetables selected by smallholder farmers for production trials and nutrient quality analysis were Cleome gyandra (Saga, Eiyobyo/Ejobyo), Amaranthus lividus (Booga, Doodo), Solanum scarbrum (nakati) as indigenous vegetables. Solanum melongena (egg plant), Daucus carota (carrot), Capsicum spp. (pepper) were selected as the exotic vegetables. Laboratory analysis of these vegetables for phyto-nutrient characterisation is ongoing. The survey revealed that most farmers (90%) engaged indigenous vegetable farming for both food consumption and income generation. Most farmers regarded exotic vegetable farming as an income generation venture rather than home consumption. Most farmers were knowledgeable of the health and medicinal benefits of the indigenous vegetables.

  2012.  Creation of research linkages in Africa by regional bodies. The 3rd RUFORUM Biennial Conference. , Entebbe

2011

S., PROFAKUNDABWENILEVI.  2011.  Maobe S.N, Mburu M.W.K, Akundabweni L. S, Ndufa J. K, Mureithi J. G, Gachene C. K. K, Okello J. J, Makini F. Economic Analysis of Mucuna Green Manure Nitrogen Application in Maize Production: I. with Green Manure Incorporation Cost. J. of Sustainable Development in Agriculture & Environment Vol. 6(1):xx-xx: June. 2011. : Paraclete Publishers Abstract
AbstractOn-farm experiment was carried out in southwest Kenya in the period 2002 to 2005. The objective was to determine the most profitable source of nitrogen for maize production, and assess various application quantities to identify the most profitable rate. Treatments investigated were: mucuna green manure applied at rates of 30, 60, 120, 240 and 480 kg N ha-1; inorganic fertilizer-urea ratesof 0, 30, 60 and 120 kg N ha-1. At tissue N concentration of 1.85 to 2 % for mucuna, the rates worked to 1.5, 3, 6, 12 and 24 t DM ha-1 equivalent of its green biomass, respectively. Randomized complete block design with four replications was used. Data was collected on maize grain yield and price, costof mucuna N and its application. Procedures applied in economic analysis were net benefits, dominance and marginal analyses. The beneficial rate of mucuna green manure was 6 t DM ha-1 to supply 120 kg N ha-1 with marginal rate of return (MRR) of 123%. In absence of capital to invest in mucuna N production, the inorganic fertilizer rate of 60 kg N ha-1 is profitable and can be used butwith expectation of comparatively lower MRR of 73%. In the absence of required capital to produce the target 120 kg N ha-1 equivalent of mucuna biomass, application of inorganic N at 30 kg ha-1 is the most beneficial practice in all seasons. Lower application rates might require supplementation withinorganic N to make up to the required amount.

2010

Maobe, S.N.; Mburu, ANMMOMWK; L.  2010.  Decomposition, Mineralization And Nitrogen Loss Following Application Of Different Rates Of Mucuna Green Biomass Under Field Conditions In Kenya. Abstract

Knowledge on the relationship amongst mucuna green biomass application rate, decomposition pattern, mineralization and its distribution in rooting zone of maize is essential for efficient utilization of the legume as N source for maize production. Consequently, on-farm research was carried out for two seasons on sandy clay soil of southwest Kenya in 2004. The objective was to determine effect of different application rates of mucuna green biomass on its decomposition pattern, available soil N, distribution in rooting zone of maize, and leaching beyond the zone during the season when the biomass is incorporated into the soil. The treatments were mucuna applied at rates of 0, 30, 60, 120, 240 and 480 kg N ha-1; and inorganic fertilizer-urea at 30, 60 and 120 kg N ha-1 included for comparison. The approaches employed in evaluating the treatments were: Field incubation using micro-lysimeter technique and, direct field sampling method. Randomized complete block design with three replications was used. Results showed that mucuna decomposition pattern remained same irrespective of application rate. Soil available N (SAN) increased over time after application of either source of N. The SAN level reached a significantly higher peak at 2 weeks after application (WAA). Direct field sampling showed that at 2 WAA most of the N accumulated at 50–100 cm depth, regardless of the N source. Significant differences in SAN level attributed to application of the various rates of mucuna and fertilizer were notable at 2 WAA, but had disappeared by 4 WAA. At the 2 WAA, fertilizer and mucuna applied at 60 and 120 kg N ha-1 respectively gave comparable SAN level and had non-significant effect on it at 0-15 and 15–30 cm depths. It required 240 kg N ha-1 equivalent of mucuna green biomass, or 120 kg N ha-1 of inorganic fertilizer-urea to substantially increase SAN level over the control. The loss of N beyond maize rooting zone was significantly higher from inorganic fertilizer than mucuna and the control, which were the same.

Namutebi, A; Akundabweni, LSM.  2010.  Conserve and screen premium value indigenous plant biodiversity and products on women smallholder farming systems of East Africa. Abstract

Various interventions for promoting the premium value of indigenous plants (IPs) are being adopted to enhance their status in the food sub sector. The project aims to enhance women smallholder farmers’ capacity in target Lake Victoria Basin sites of Kenya and Uganda, to conserve and promote premium indigenous plant biodiversity for value added processes, and provide a basis for policy formulation on promoting IPs with a potential market value. The project involves mapping IPs in relation to land-use types, and characterization of physicochemical and nutraceutical attributes of screened IPs. The study involves a survey; rural participatory appraisal; focused group discussions; laboratory methods viz.: Near Infrared Reflectance spectroscopy and Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy, as rapid techniques for screening the IP germplasm and soil samples; and high performance liquid chromatography and UV spectroscopy reserved for establishing the nutraceutical value of the screened IPs.

S., PROFAKUNDABWENILEVI.  2010.  Akundabweni L.S.M., Mulokozi G. and D.M. Maina. IONOMIC VARIATION CHARACTERIZATION IN AFRICAN LEAFY VEGETABLES FOR MICRONUTRIENTS USING XRF AND HPLC. African Journal of Food Agriculture Nutrition and Development. : African Scholarly Science Communications Trust
S., PROFAKUNDABWENILEVI.  2010.  Maobe S. N, Mburu M.W. K, Akundabweni L. S, Ndufa J. K, Mureithi J. G, Gachene C. K. K, Okello J. J, Makini F. Effect of Mucuna Green Manure Rate Applied on Maize Grain Yield During the Application Season. J. of Sustainable Development in Agriculture & Environment Vol. 5(1):54-64 Mach. 2010. : Paraclete Publishers Abstract
AbstractMaize yield in Kenya is constrained by inadequate supply of nitrogen and there is need to search for locally available and potentially low-cost N sources. Consequently, on-farm research was carried out in southwest Kenya in the period 2002-2005. The objective was to evaluate effect of Mucuna pruriens green manure biomass application rate on maize grain yield in sandy clay soil. Treatments evaluated were: mucuna green manure applied at rates of 0, 30, 60, 120, 240 and 480 kg N ha-1; and inorganic fertilizer-urea at 0, 30, 60 and 120 kg N ha-1. The experimental design was randomized complete block with four replications. Results obtained showed that mucuna application rate of 30 kgN ha-1 did not significantly improve maize grain yield. Its application at 60 kg N ha-1 significantly increased maize grain yield only in seasons when rainfall was high notably in long rains. But, mucuna green manure applied at a rate of 120 kg N ha-1 significantly improved maize grain yield in both short and long rain seasons when rainfall amounts received were variable. Application of mucuna green manure at higher rates of 240 and 480 kg N ha-1 made no further significant increase in maize grain yield. Therefore, application rates lower than 120 kg N ha-1 equivalent of mucuna green manure biomass may be inadequate and would require supplementation with inorganic fertilizer N if maize grain yield is to be increased.
S., PROFAKUNDABWENILEVI.  2010.  Akundabweni L.S.M, Munene R.W., Maina D.M and S.K. Bartilol. MINERAL MICRONUTRIENT DENSITY IN LOCAL CEREALS SAMPLED FROM BUNGOMA, MASENO AND KIBWEZI AREAS. African Journal of Food Agriculture Nutrition and Development. : African Scholarly Science Communications Trust
S., PROFAKUNDABWENILEVI.  2010.  Maobe S. N, Mburu M.W. K, Ndufa J. K, Akundabweni L. S, Mureithi J. G, Gachene C. K. K, Makini F, Okello J. J. Influence of Seedling Age at Transplanting on Growth and Grain Yield of Medium Duration Lowland Rice (Oryza sativa l.) at Ibadan, Nigeria. J. of Sustainable Development in Agriculture & Environment Vol. 5(1):x-xx Mach. 2010. : Paraclete Publishers Abstract
AbstractField experiments were conducted at the International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Ibadan, Nigeria in the long and short rainy seasons of 1987 to study effect of seedling age (21, 31 and 41 days old seedlings) at transplanting on growth and grain yield of medium duration irrigated lowland rice. Randomized complete block design with four replications, and plot size of 3 m x 4 m, planted with an improved medium duration (128 days to maturity) rice variety, ITA 212 were used. Plant height, tiller production, and dry matter production were determined at 30 and 50 days after transplanting, at flowering and at harvest. Leaves of the eight rice plants sampled at flowering were used for leaf area index determination. Harvest index, panicle production, grain production, percentage of ripened grains and 1000-grain weight were recorded at harvest. Grain yield was determined from 5 m2 in the middle of each plot. Results obtained showed that 21 days old seedlings gave significantly taller rice plants, higher tiller and panicle number per m2 than the 31 and 41 days old ones. Seedling age had non-significant effect on leaf area index and 1000-grain weight. The 31 and 41 days old seedlings gave significantly higher harvest index and percentage of filled grains than the 21 days old ones. However, seedling age at transplanting had a non-significant effect on grain yield. It is suggested that a delay in transplanting of 21 days old seedlings for up to 20 days may not have pronounced effect on grain yield of medium duration lowland rice
S., PROFAKUNDABWENILEVI.  2010.  Maobe, S. N Mburu, M.W. K, Ndufa, J. K, Akundabweni, L. S, Mureithi, J. G, Gachene, C. K. K, Makini, F, Okello, J. J. 2010. Effect of Mucuna Green Manure Rate Applied on Maize Grain Yield During the Application Season. J. of Sustainable Development in Agr. Vol. 5(1). 2010 ISSN 0794-8867. (. : Paraclete Publishers Abstract
AbstractOn-farm experiment was carried out in southwest Kenya in the period 2002 to 2005. The objective was to determine the most profitable source of nitrogen for maize production, and assess various application quantities to identify the most profitable rate. Treatments investigated were: mucuna green manure applied at rates of 30, 60, 120, 240 and 480 kg N ha-1; inorganic fertilizer-urea ratesof 0, 30, 60 and 120 kg N ha-1. At tissue N concentration of 1.85 to 2 % for mucuna, the rates worked to 1.5, 3, 6, 12 and 24 t DM ha-1 equivalent of its green biomass, respectively. Randomized complete block design with four replications was used. Data was collected on maize grain yield and price, costof mucuna N and its application. Procedures applied in economic analysis were net benefits, dominance and marginal analyses. The beneficial rate of mucuna green manure was 6 t DM ha-1 to supply 120 kg N ha-1 with marginal rate of return (MRR) of 123%. In absence of capital to invest in mucuna N production, the inorganic fertilizer rate of 60 kg N ha-1 is profitable and can be used butwith expectation of comparatively lower MRR of 73%. In the absence of required capital to produce the target 120 kg N ha-1 equivalent of mucuna biomass, application of inorganic N at 30 kg ha-1 is the most beneficial practice in all seasons. Lower application rates might require supplementation withinorganic N to make up to the required amount.
S., PROFAKUNDABWENILEVI.  2010.  Maobe, S. N Mburu, M.W. K, Ndufa, J. K, Akundabweni, L. S, Mureithi, J. G, Gachene, C. K. K, Makini, F, Okello, J. J. 2010. Potential Effect of Mucuna Green Manure Application Rates on the Decomposition and Availability of Nitrogen in Varying Soil Moistur. World Journal of Agric Scie 6 (5) 532-539. : Paraclete Publishers Abstract
AbstractOn-farm experiment was carried out in southwest Kenya in the period 2002 to 2005. The objective was to determine the most profitable source of nitrogen for maize production, and assess various application quantities to identify the most profitable rate. Treatments investigated were: mucuna green manure applied at rates of 30, 60, 120, 240 and 480 kg N ha-1; inorganic fertilizer-urea ratesof 0, 30, 60 and 120 kg N ha-1. At tissue N concentration of 1.85 to 2 % for mucuna, the rates worked to 1.5, 3, 6, 12 and 24 t DM ha-1 equivalent of its green biomass, respectively. Randomized complete block design with four replications was used. Data was collected on maize grain yield and price, costof mucuna N and its application. Procedures applied in economic analysis were net benefits, dominance and marginal analyses. The beneficial rate of mucuna green manure was 6 t DM ha-1 to supply 120 kg N ha-1 with marginal rate of return (MRR) of 123%. In absence of capital to invest in mucuna N production, the inorganic fertilizer rate of 60 kg N ha-1 is profitable and can be used butwith expectation of comparatively lower MRR of 73%. In the absence of required capital to produce the target 120 kg N ha-1 equivalent of mucuna biomass, application of inorganic N at 30 kg ha-1 is the most beneficial practice in all seasons. Lower application rates might require supplementation withinorganic N to make up to the required amount.
S., PROFAKUNDABWENILEVI.  2010.  Maobe S. N, L.S.M Akundabweni, M.W.K. Mburu, Ndufa J.K. J.G. Mureithi, C.C.K Gachene, F.W. Makini and J.J. Okello. 2010. Effect of Green manure and inorganic Fertilizer Urea Nitrogen Sources And Application Rates on Harvest of maize (Zea mays L.).. World Journal of Agric Scie 6 (5) 532-539. : Paraclete Publishers Abstract
AbstractOn-farm experiment was carried out in southwest Kenya in the period 2002 to 2005. The objective was to determine the most profitable source of nitrogen for maize production, and assess various application quantities to identify the most profitable rate. Treatments investigated were: mucuna green manure applied at rates of 30, 60, 120, 240 and 480 kg N ha-1; inorganic fertilizer-urea ratesof 0, 30, 60 and 120 kg N ha-1. At tissue N concentration of 1.85 to 2 % for mucuna, the rates worked to 1.5, 3, 6, 12 and 24 t DM ha-1 equivalent of its green biomass, respectively. Randomized complete block design with four replications was used. Data was collected on maize grain yield and price, costof mucuna N and its application. Procedures applied in economic analysis were net benefits, dominance and marginal analyses. The beneficial rate of mucuna green manure was 6 t DM ha-1 to supply 120 kg N ha-1 with marginal rate of return (MRR) of 123%. In absence of capital to invest in mucuna N production, the inorganic fertilizer rate of 60 kg N ha-1 is profitable and can be used butwith expectation of comparatively lower MRR of 73%. In the absence of required capital to produce the target 120 kg N ha-1 equivalent of mucuna biomass, application of inorganic N at 30 kg ha-1 is the most beneficial practice in all seasons. Lower application rates might require supplementation withinorganic N to make up to the required amount.
S., PROFAKUNDABWENILEVI.  2010.  Levi-Shadeya-M Akundabweni, R.W. Munene, D M Maina and J.M. Mangala. 2010. Mineral Micronutrient Density Characterization Using Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) Analysis in Four On-Farm Kenyan Wild African Fruit tree Germplasm. JAfrican Journal . (AJFAND On Line) Volume 20 No 8.. : Paraclete Publishers Abstract
AbstractOn-farm experiment was carried out in southwest Kenya in the period 2002 to 2005. The objective was to determine the most profitable source of nitrogen for maize production, and assess various application quantities to identify the most profitable rate. Treatments investigated were: mucuna green manure applied at rates of 30, 60, 120, 240 and 480 kg N ha-1; inorganic fertilizer-urea ratesof 0, 30, 60 and 120 kg N ha-1. At tissue N concentration of 1.85 to 2 % for mucuna, the rates worked to 1.5, 3, 6, 12 and 24 t DM ha-1 equivalent of its green biomass, respectively. Randomized complete block design with four replications was used. Data was collected on maize grain yield and price, costof mucuna N and its application. Procedures applied in economic analysis were net benefits, dominance and marginal analyses. The beneficial rate of mucuna green manure was 6 t DM ha-1 to supply 120 kg N ha-1 with marginal rate of return (MRR) of 123%. In absence of capital to invest in mucuna N production, the inorganic fertilizer rate of 60 kg N ha-1 is profitable and can be used butwith expectation of comparatively lower MRR of 73%. In the absence of required capital to produce the target 120 kg N ha-1 equivalent of mucuna biomass, application of inorganic N at 30 kg ha-1 is the most beneficial practice in all seasons. Lower application rates might require supplementation withinorganic N to make up to the required amount.
S., PROFAKUNDABWENILEVI.  2010.  Levi-Shadeya-M Akundabweni, G. Mulokozi and D M Maina. 2010. Characterization of African leafy Vegetables for Organo- and Mineral Micronutrient Densities based on X- ray Fluorescence and High Performance Liquid Chromatography. African Journal of Food and . (AJFAND) 10: No. 11 (2010). : Paraclete Publishers Abstract
AbstractOn-farm experiment was carried out in southwest Kenya in the period 2002 to 2005. The objective was to determine the most profitable source of nitrogen for maize production, and assess various application quantities to identify the most profitable rate. Treatments investigated were: mucuna green manure applied at rates of 30, 60, 120, 240 and 480 kg N ha-1; inorganic fertilizer-urea ratesof 0, 30, 60 and 120 kg N ha-1. At tissue N concentration of 1.85 to 2 % for mucuna, the rates worked to 1.5, 3, 6, 12 and 24 t DM ha-1 equivalent of its green biomass, respectively. Randomized complete block design with four replications was used. Data was collected on maize grain yield and price, costof mucuna N and its application. Procedures applied in economic analysis were net benefits, dominance and marginal analyses. The beneficial rate of mucuna green manure was 6 t DM ha-1 to supply 120 kg N ha-1 with marginal rate of return (MRR) of 123%. In absence of capital to invest in mucuna N production, the inorganic fertilizer rate of 60 kg N ha-1 is profitable and can be used butwith expectation of comparatively lower MRR of 73%. In the absence of required capital to produce the target 120 kg N ha-1 equivalent of mucuna biomass, application of inorganic N at 30 kg ha-1 is the most beneficial practice in all seasons. Lower application rates might require supplementation withinorganic N to make up to the required amount.
S., PROFAKUNDABWENILEVI.  2010.  Levi-Shadeya-M Akundabweni, R.W. Munene, D M Maina and S.K Bartilol. 2010. Mineral Micronutrient Density in Local Cereals Sample from Bungoma, Maseno and Kibwezi areas. (AJFAND) 10: 11 (2010). (AJFAND) 10: 11 (2010). : Paraclete Publishers Abstract
AbstractOn-farm experiment was carried out in southwest Kenya in the period 2002 to 2005. The objective was to determine the most profitable source of nitrogen for maize production, and assess various application quantities to identify the most profitable rate. Treatments investigated were: mucuna green manure applied at rates of 30, 60, 120, 240 and 480 kg N ha-1; inorganic fertilizer-urea ratesof 0, 30, 60 and 120 kg N ha-1. At tissue N concentration of 1.85 to 2 % for mucuna, the rates worked to 1.5, 3, 6, 12 and 24 t DM ha-1 equivalent of its green biomass, respectively. Randomized complete block design with four replications was used. Data was collected on maize grain yield and price, costof mucuna N and its application. Procedures applied in economic analysis were net benefits, dominance and marginal analyses. The beneficial rate of mucuna green manure was 6 t DM ha-1 to supply 120 kg N ha-1 with marginal rate of return (MRR) of 123%. In absence of capital to invest in mucuna N production, the inorganic fertilizer rate of 60 kg N ha-1 is profitable and can be used butwith expectation of comparatively lower MRR of 73%. In the absence of required capital to produce the target 120 kg N ha-1 equivalent of mucuna biomass, application of inorganic N at 30 kg ha-1 is the most beneficial practice in all seasons. Lower application rates might require supplementation withinorganic N to make up to the required amount.
S., PROFAKUNDABWENILEVI.  2010.  Levi-Shadeya-M Akundabweni, G. Mulokozi and D M Maina. 2010. Characterization of African leafy Vegetables for Organo- and Mineral Micronutrient Densities based on X- ray Fluorescence and High Performance Liquid Chromatography. African Journal of Food and . (AJFAND) 10: No. 11 (2010). : Paraclete Publishers Abstract
AbstractOn-farm experiment was carried out in southwest Kenya in the period 2002 to 2005. The objective was to determine the most profitable source of nitrogen for maize production, and assess various application quantities to identify the most profitable rate. Treatments investigated were: mucuna green manure applied at rates of 30, 60, 120, 240 and 480 kg N ha-1; inorganic fertilizer-urea ratesof 0, 30, 60 and 120 kg N ha-1. At tissue N concentration of 1.85 to 2 % for mucuna, the rates worked to 1.5, 3, 6, 12 and 24 t DM ha-1 equivalent of its green biomass, respectively. Randomized complete block design with four replications was used. Data was collected on maize grain yield and price, costof mucuna N and its application. Procedures applied in economic analysis were net benefits, dominance and marginal analyses. The beneficial rate of mucuna green manure was 6 t DM ha-1 to supply 120 kg N ha-1 with marginal rate of return (MRR) of 123%. In absence of capital to invest in mucuna N production, the inorganic fertilizer rate of 60 kg N ha-1 is profitable and can be used butwith expectation of comparatively lower MRR of 73%. In the absence of required capital to produce the target 120 kg N ha-1 equivalent of mucuna biomass, application of inorganic N at 30 kg ha-1 is the most beneficial practice in all seasons. Lower application rates might require supplementation withinorganic N to make up to the required amount.

2009

Kimiywe, J, Namutebi A.  2009.  X-Ray Fluorescence Detected Variation in Nutraceutic-Implied Mineral Density in Underutilized Plants Mapped as Women-Operated Smallholder Units in the Lake Victoria Basin. AbstractWebsite

Indigenous plant biodiversity plays a key role in providing nutritional and medicinal (nutraceutical) need for smallholder farming communities. The objective of this paper was to relate farming decisions, farm landscape morphology, crop species placement points, and the nutraceutical-implied micronutrient mineral (NIMM) density. The Kisumu (Kenya), Iganga (Uganda) and Bukoba (Tanzania) lake basins were the three eco-regional environs studied and were treated as the primary hierarchical level. Two visited sites (secondary level) for reconnaissance/collection were nested within the primary level. Fifteen dominantly female households were further nested within sites (tertiary level). By means of X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy, indigenous variant plants (accessions) encountered were collected for density. XRF analyses were backed by key informant interviews. Empirically, indigenous/traditional plant species and, by extension, their diversity in NIMM density, was a three-factor dependent variable in terms of: (a) the ethnobotanic-based farming decisions by which the NIMM indigenous/ underutilized plant bio-resources encountered were purposively grown; (b) choices that were dictated by the topographic soil surface characteristics (terrain upland, steep and valley land properties); (c) near residence-referenced sequent activity occupancy (NR-SACO) episodes; and (d) natural cum farmer-guided plant selections.

2008

S., PROFAKUNDABWENILEVI.  2008.  Levi-Shadeya M Akundabweni, et. al,- 2008. Screening and Mapping Nutraceutical Dense Biodiversity on Women Smallholder Farms Based on Farmer. International Society for Horticultural Science; Leuven, Belgium. 739 pp.. : African Scholarly Science Communications Trust

2007

Kiprop, EK;, Narla, R. D.; Mibey ARK; LM, Mibey RK;, Akundabweni LMS.  2007.  Chemical Control Of Septoria Leaf Spot On Cowpea (Vigna Unguiculata (L.) Walp,) In Kenya. Abstract

Three foliar fungicides namely, Antracol, Kocide 101 and Folicur were evaluated for the control of Septoria leaf spot caused by S. vignicola V.G. Rao on cowpea [Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp.] at two field sites in Kenya: Kabete and Katumani. The cowpea variety used was the high yielding Machakos 66 that was also susceptible to Septoria leaf spot. Reduction in disease incidence and severity of Septoria leaf spot on cowpea was obtained with the three fungicides. However, significant (P≤0.05) increase in seed yields was obtained when Kocide 101 and Antracol were applied to cowpea plants with the disease at Katumani. Folicur was found to be phytotoxic to cowpea plants and hence reduced plant dry weight and seed yield at both sites. Based on the cost-benefit analysis of the fungicides in the present study, Antracol and Kocide 101 are recommended for the control of Septoria leaf spot on high yielding cowpea varieties in arid and semi-arid areas. The Pearson correlation (r) between the disease incidence and seed yield was 0.75 (P=0.46), while that between disease severity and seed yield was 1.00 (P=0.01).

2006

2004

Kiprok, EK;, Narla RD;, Mibey, RK; Akundabweni LMS, Akundabweni LMS.  2004.  Screening Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp). Genotypes for Resistance to Septoria Leaf Spot in Kenya..

2003

Narla, RD;, Kiprop EK;, Mibey RK;, Akundabweni LMS.  2003.  Etiology of Septoria Leaf Spot of Cowpea (Vigna Unguiculata (L.) Walp.) in Kenya..
Kipkosgei, LK;, Akundabweni LSM;, Hutchinson MJ.  2003.  The effect of farmyard manure and nitrogen fertilizer on vegetative growth, leaf yield and quality attributes of Solanum villosum (Black nightshade) in Keiyo district, rift valley. Abstract

The African Leafy Vegetables (ALVs) are particularly important as adjunct accompaniment to the staple cereal foods such as the East African corn meal (ugali). In order to increase productivity and utilization of these ALVs, there is needed to develop suitable agronomic practices suited for farmers in specific agro-ecological zones. A study was carried with an objective of determining the effects of various levels of Farmyard manure and Calcium Ammonium nitrate (CAN) on vegetative growth, yield and quality (Vitamins A & C, Nitrates) of Solanum villosum in Keiyo district, between long rains and short rains of Year 2002. Effect of prolonged cooking by the Keiyos on vitamin A and C as well as anti-nutrient (nitrate) content of this vegetable was also determined. The experimental layout was a RCBD with four replicates. The treatments were four levels of organic manure (5, 10, 15, 20 t/ha) and four rates of nitrogen fertilizers (100, 200, 300, 400 kg/ha). The addition of various rates of organic and inorganic fertilizers that were tested significantly improved vegetative growth and increased leaf yields of Solanum villosum (p<0.05). The yields obtained from plants grown with organic manure were generally higher than from those with inorganic fertilizers. The incorporation of either organic or inorganic fertilizer increased Vitamin A content especially in older (14 week) tissues during both seasons. The organic manures at high levels (20t/ha) increased, while application of C.A.N at 200-400 kg/ha decreased Vitamin C content in both young and older tissues. During the first season, application of both organic and inorganic fertilizers decreased the accumulation of nitrates in young tissues. Traditional methods of boiling the ALV’s for long significantly reduced vitamin A and C and nitrates content. In all experiments, the farmer’s crop, though better than the controls, were comparable to low fertilizer levels, in all attributes determined. In conclusion the quality attributes of Solanum villosum was influenced, significantly, by the kind and rate of fertilizer applied, the season of growth, plant age, farmer’s agronomic practices as well as cooking.

S., PROFAKUNDABWENILEVI.  2003.  Akuja, T E, Akundabweni, L.S., Chweya, J.A. 2003. Effect of Intercropping Finger Millet with two Indigenous Legumes at different Nitrogen Levels in Kabete and Njoro, Kenya.. Eastern Africa Journal of Rural Development Vol. 19, No. 1 (2003). : NISC Pty Ltd

2002

2000

S., PROFAKUNDABWENILEVI, S. PROFAKUNDABWENILEVI.  2000.  Detached Leaf Test as a Rapid Stress appraisal in Cowpea Germplasm, Vigna unguiculata (L) Walp) for Draught Resistance.. Discovery and Innovation 42: 139-141.. : NISC Pty Ltd

1996

S., PROFAKUNDABWENILEVI.  1996.  Cardinal Temperatures and Thermal times for vernalization in carrot cv. "Nantes".. African Crop Science Journal.. : NISC Pty Ltd
S., PROFAKUNDABWENILEVI.  1996.  Seed production of native hay clovers in the highlands of eastern Africa.. Tropical Grasslands Vol. 30. : NISC Pty Ltd

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