Training and Human Capacity Building in the Land Sector in the Context of Implementation of New Land Policies and Reforms in Land Administration Systems: Some Reflections from Kenya

6/16/2014
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Training and Human Capacity Building in the Land Sector in the Context
of Implementation of New Land Policies and Reforms in Land
Administration Systems: Some Reflections from Kenya
Jasper N Mwenda and Peter Ngau (Kenya)

Key words: Capacity building; CPD; Land management;

SUMMARY

Many developing countries are reexamining their land administration systems with the
objective of realigning them to address current challenges within their national contexts. At
attainment of independence from colonial rule, many developing countries particularly those
from Africa, maintained land administration systems that are deeply rooted in previous
colonial systems but current trends indicate an increasing desire to introduce land reforms that
address present-day citizen needs in a more effective manner. For effective implementation of
land reforms and implementation of new land policies it is widely acknowledged that training
and human capacity building are imperative. Various initiatives towards this objective have
been launched by international organizations such as FIG, UN HABITAT, GLTN, FAO and a
number of donor agencies such as SIDA, DFID, GIZ and JICA. Many training and human
capacity initiatives in the land sector have tended to focus on training for specific projects or
subsectors that donors deem to be priority areas. A recent study carried out in Kenya in 2011
has demonstrated the need for holistic and comprehensive sector-wide review of the training
and human capacity assessment in the land sector as a precursor to design of training and
human capacity building programs for effective implementation of new land policies and
implementation of major land reforms. The study also revealed that the design of these
programs is further complicated because it involves a multiplicity of trainees, training
institutions, training programs, professional organizations and stakeholders and requires a
clearly organized and structured approach for effective implementation. It is hoped that this
paper will give a starting point for debate and useful feedback from interested professionals
and organizations with regard to training and human capacity building in the land sector.
Countries that are facing the same challenges as Kenya may also find some of the highlighted
issues to be of benefit.

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