Evaluation of a Synthetic Tsetse-repellent Developed for Control of Cattle Trypanosomosis in Kenya

Citation:
M DRKITALAPHILIP. "Evaluation of a Synthetic Tsetse-repellent Developed for Control of Cattle Trypanosomosis in Kenya.". In: conference. Israel Journal of Veterinary Medicine; 2006.

Abstract:

A field trial was carried out in Kajiado and Narok districts to assess the effectiveness of a synthetic tsetse-repellent technology developed for the control of cattle trypanosomosis in Kenya. The trial was conducted over a period of 12 months that was preceded by a baseline period of 4 months. A sample size of 24 herds comprising 12 treatment and 12 control herds was used. The sample size was estimated assuming an a of 5%, b of 20%, intra-herd correlation coefficient of 0.4 and that the repellent technology, if effective, would reduce the incidence of trypanosomosis in treated herds by 50%. Trypanosome infections and tsetse challenge were monitored on monthly basis. The variables used to gauge the effectiveness of the repellent are: the herd-level trypanosomosis incidence and the rate of use of trypanocidal drugs by the recruited farmers. Trypanosomosis incidence was treated as an outcome variable in a population-averaged regression model that had treatment, study area, tsetse density, season, drug use and herd size as independent effects. The results indicate that the technology was not effective in reducing trypanosomosis incidence in cattle. A mathematical model developed for theoretical evaluation of the repellent supports the findings obtained from the field trial.

Notes:

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