Bio

Prof P.G. Mbuthia Biography

Prof. P.G. Mbuthia is an associate Professor of Veterinary Pathology. He has
extensively taught for many years at undergraduate and postgraduate levels. He
has conducted extensive research in veterinary pathology and has supervised
many postgraduate students. He also supports the Department in diagnostic
services in veterinary pathology. He has specialties in large and small animal,
poultry and fish pathology

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Publications


2014

Chege., HW, Kemboi. DC, C.Bebora. L, Maingi. N, Nyaga. PN, Mbuthia. PG, Njagi. LW, Githinji. J.  2014.  Chicken parasites and local treatments used against them in Mbeere District, Kenya.. Kenya. Livestock Research for Rural Development. 26(1)
Kemboi., DC, Nyaga. PN, Mbuthia. PG, Chegeh. HW, Bebora. LC, Njagi. LW, Maingi. N, Githinji. JM.  2014.  Effect of parasite control on immune response to Newcastle Disease vaccination in village chicken, Mbeere sub county.. Livestock Research for Rural Development.. 26.(2)
J.G. Maina, MPG, J. Ngugi OB, P. Orina.WSM, E. G. Karuri, T. Maitho OGO.  2014.  Influence of social-economic factors, gender and the Fish Farming Enterprise and Productivity Project on fish farming practices in Kenya.. Livestock Research for Rural Development. . 26
Orina. P. S, Maina. J. G, WSM, Karuri.E.G, Mbuthia.P.G OB, Owiti. G. O, Musa. S MJM.  2014.  Situational analysis of Nile tilapia and African catfish hatcheries management: a case study of Kisii and Kirinyaga counties in Kenya.. Livestock Research for Rural Development. . Volume 26(Article 87)
Mutinda., WU, Nyaga. PN, Mbuthia. PG, Mbuthia. PG, G.Muchemi..  2014.  Risk factors associated with Infectious Bursal Disease vaccination failures in broiler farms in Kenya. Journal of Tropical animal Health and Production.
Kemboi., DC, Bebora. LC, Maingi. N, Nyaga. PN, Mbuthia. PG, Chege. HW, Njagi. LW, J.Githinji..  2014.  Chicken parasites and local treatments used against them in Mbeere District, Kenya. Livestock Research for Rural Development. vol 26(1)
Kemboi., DC, Chegeh. HW, Bebora. LC, Nyaga. PN, Njagi. LW, Maingi. N, Mbuthia PG, Githinji. JM.  2014.  Effect of parasite control on immune response to Newcastle Disease vaccination in village chicken, Mbeere sub county.. Livestock Research for Rural Development. Vol 26 (2)
Maina., JG, Mbuthia. PG, Ngugi. J, Omolo. B, Orina. P, Wangia. SM, Karuri. EG, Maitho. T, Owiti. GO.  2014.  Influence of social-economic factors, gender and the Fish Farming Enterprise and Productivity Project on fish farming practices in Kenya.. Livestock Research for Rural Development. Vol 26 (2)

2013

Njagi., LW, L.C. B, P.G. M, Minga..  2013.  Effect of immunosuppression on Newcastle disease virus persistence in ducks with different immune status. . International Scholarly Research Network in Veterinary Science (ISRN). Volume 2012:6pages.
Mbuthia, PG, A. SZ, N. M, N. NP, L. N, C. BL, N. MJ.  2013.  Skin lesions associated with ectoparasitic infestations in indigenous chickens in Eastern Province of Kenya. . Research Journal of Poultry Sciences.. 6(3):53–58..
and D.C. Kemboi, H.W. Chegeh, BNMNMNGLCPN.  2013.  Seasonal Newcastle disease antibody titre dynamics in village chickens of Mbeere District, Eastern Province, Kenya. Livestock Research for Rural Development. vol 25(181)

2012

Njagi L.W., Nyaga P.N., BMPGand MLCUM.  2012.  Effect of immunosuppression on Newcastle disease virus persistence in ducks with different immune status. International Scholarly Research Network in Veterinary Science. (253809)
Kemboi, DC, Chege HW;, Bebora LC;, Maingi N;, P.N N;, Mbuthia PG;, Njagi LW;, Githinji JM.  2012.  Seasonal Newcastle disease antibody titres in village chicken of Mbeere District, Eastern Province, Kenya.
Chege, HW;, Kemboi DC;, Bebora LC;, Maingi N;, Mbuthia PG;, Nyaga PN;, Njagi LW;, Githinji J.  2012.  Prevalence of ecto and endo parasites in free-range chickens in Mbeere District, Eastern Province, Kenya.
Kyalo, MM;, Mbuthia PG;, Maingi N;, Nyaga PN;, Njagi LW;, Mutune MN;, Otieno RO;, Gachoka JM;, Musofe PLN;, Bunn D.  2012.  Occurrence and lesions associated with Echinostoma revolutum in free-range chickens in Kenya.
Bebora, LC;, Maingi N;, Nyaga PN;, Mbuthia PG;, Njagi LW;, Githinji J;, Kemboi DC;, Chege HW.  2012.  Intensive And Multi-type Parasite Infection–a Hindrance To Effective Newcastle Disease Control In Village Chickens?
GICHOHI, DRMBUTHIAPAUL.  2012.  Nguhiu-Mwangi J., Mbithi P.M.F., Wabacha J.K., and Mbuthia P.G. 2012. The Challenges of balancing between productivity and claw health of dairy cows in modernized husbandry in smallholder farming units. In the Proceedings of the Faculty of Veterinary medi. 1994 Apr;71(4):253-5.PMID: 8062774 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]. : International Scholarly Research Network Abstract
The study was carried out between November 2008 and April 2009 to investigate the occurrence and pathology due to Echinostomum revolutum in free-range indigenous chickens. One hundred and fifty six (156) indigenous chickens were purchased from various farms and markets in A thorough post mortem examination was performed on each bird and the isolated worms from the ceaca, large intestines, cloaca and oviduct were identified and quantified.  Tissues were collected for histopathology, processed, examined and the severity of the lesions determined. Echinostoma revolutum was recovered in 3/156 (1.9 %) birds examined in the ceaca and large intestines but not in cloaca and oviduct. Affected birds originated from market birds in Kiambu. They caused heamorrhages and typhylo-enteritis in the affected birds. Other worms observed from these organs were Ascaridia galli, Heterakis gallinarum, Heterakis isolonche, Heterakis dispar, Subulura brumpti, Raillietina echinobothrida and Hymenolepis contaniana. The trematodes are reported in Kenya for the first time.
GICHOHI, DRMBUTHIAPAUL.  2012.  Maina A.N., R.M. Waruiru, T.A. Ngatia, P.G. Mbuthia and W.K. Munyua. 2012. Gastrointestinal parasites and other endoparasites of indigenous chickens traded in Nairobi, Kenya. In the Proceedings of the Faculty of Veterinary medicine, UON, CAVS, 8th Biennia. 1994 Apr;71(4):253-5.PMID: 8062774 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]. : International Scholarly Research Network Abstract
The study was carried out between November 2008 and April 2009 to investigate the occurrence and pathology due to Echinostomum revolutum in free-range indigenous chickens. One hundred and fifty six (156) indigenous chickens were purchased from various farms and markets in A thorough post mortem examination was performed on each bird and the isolated worms from the ceaca, large intestines, cloaca and oviduct were identified and quantified.  Tissues were collected for histopathology, processed, examined and the severity of the lesions determined. Echinostoma revolutum was recovered in 3/156 (1.9 %) birds examined in the ceaca and large intestines but not in cloaca and oviduct. Affected birds originated from market birds in Kiambu. They caused heamorrhages and typhylo-enteritis in the affected birds. Other worms observed from these organs were Ascaridia galli, Heterakis gallinarum, Heterakis isolonche, Heterakis dispar, Subulura brumpti, Raillietina echinobothrida and Hymenolepis contaniana. The trematodes are reported in Kenya for the first time.
GICHOHI, DRMBUTHIAPAUL.  2012.  Mavuti S.K., Mbuthia, P.G., Waruiru R.M., Njagi, L.W., Mutune M.N., Otieno R.O., and Msoffe, P.L.M. 2012. Prevalence of haemoparasites in free-ranged local ducks. In the Proceedings of the Faculty of Veterinary medicine, UON, CAVS, 8th Biennial Scientific. 1994 Apr;71(4):253-5.PMID: 8062774 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]. : International Scholarly Research Network Abstract
This study was carried out to verify the possibility that ducks are sources of Newcastle disease (ND) virus infection for chickens in mixed flocks. Immunosuppressed (IS) and non immunosuppressed (NIS) birds, at three different antibody levels (medium, low and absent) were used; the titres having been induced through vaccination, and Immunosuppression done using dexamethazone. Each of the 3 respective groups was further divided into 2 groups of about 12 ducks each: one challenged with velogenic ND virus; the other not challenged. Selected ducks fromall groups had their antibody titres monitored serially using hemagglutination inhibition test, while two birds from each of the challenged groups were killed and respective tissues processed for ND viral recovery, using chicken embryo fibroblasts. In general, antibody titres of IS and NIS challenged ducks were significantly higher than their unchallenged counterparts (P<0.05). Non-challenged pre-immunised ducks had a progressive decrease in antibody levels; non-immunised ducks did not seroconvert. Newcastle disease virus was isolated from livers and kidneys of the challenged ducks throughout the experimental period; indicating a possibility of viral excretion, especially when the birds are stressed. It, therefore, provides another possible model of viral circulation within mixed flocks.
GICHOHI, DRMBUTHIAPAUL.  2012.  Kyalo M.M., Mbuthia, P.G., Maingi, N., Nyaga P.N., Njagi, L.W., Mutune M.N., Otieno R.O., Gachoka J.M., Msoffe, P.L.M. and Bunn, D. 2012. Occurrence and lesions associated with Echinostoma revolutum in free-range indigenous chickens in Kenya. In the Proce. 1994 Apr;71(4):253-5.PMID: 8062774 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]. : International Scholarly Research Network Abstract
The study was carried out between November 2008 and April 2009 to investigate the occurrence and pathology due to Echinostomum revolutum in free-range indigenous chickens. One hundred and fifty six (156) indigenous chickens were purchased from various farms and markets in A thorough post mortem examination was performed on each bird and the isolated worms from the ceaca, large intestines, cloaca and oviduct were identified and quantified.  Tissues were collected for histopathology, processed, examined and the severity of the lesions determined. Echinostoma revolutum was recovered in 3/156 (1.9 %) birds examined in the ceaca and large intestines but not in cloaca and oviduct. Affected birds originated from market birds in Kiambu. They caused heamorrhages and typhylo-enteritis in the affected birds. Other worms observed from these organs were Ascaridia galli, Heterakis gallinarum, Heterakis isolonche, Heterakis dispar, Subulura brumpti, Raillietina echinobothrida and Hymenolepis contaniana. The trematodes are reported in Kenya for the first time.
GICHOHI, DRMBUTHIAPAUL.  2012.  Maina J.G., Mbuthia, P.G., Ngugi J.N., Karuri, E.G. Owiti G.O., Omolo, B., Orina P and Wangia S.M. 2012. Effects of managements practices and economic stimulus program on fish production in Mwea Division of Kirinyaga County. In the Proceedings of the Facu. 1994 Apr;71(4):253-5.PMID: 8062774 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]. : International Scholarly Research Network Abstract
The study was carried out between November 2008 and April 2009 to investigate the occurrence and pathology due to Echinostomum revolutum in free-range indigenous chickens. One hundred and fifty six (156) indigenous chickens were purchased from various farms and markets in A thorough post mortem examination was performed on each bird and the isolated worms from the ceaca, large intestines, cloaca and oviduct were identified and quantified.  Tissues were collected for histopathology, processed, examined and the severity of the lesions determined. Echinostoma revolutum was recovered in 3/156 (1.9 %) birds examined in the ceaca and large intestines but not in cloaca and oviduct. Affected birds originated from market birds in Kiambu. They caused heamorrhages and typhylo-enteritis in the affected birds. Other worms observed from these organs were Ascaridia galli, Heterakis gallinarum, Heterakis isolonche, Heterakis dispar, Subulura brumpti, Raillietina echinobothrida and Hymenolepis contaniana. The trematodes are reported in Kenya for the first time.
GICHOHI, DRMBUTHIAPAUL.  2012.  MathengeC.G.. Mbuthia, P.G., Waruiru R.M., Ngatia, T.A., Mutune M.N., Otieno R.O.Prevalence, Intensity and pathological lesions associated with Contracaecum species infection in farmed and wild catfish in the upper Tana river basin, Kenya. In the Proceedi. 1994 Apr;71(4):253-5.PMID: 8062774 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]. : International Scholarly Research Network Abstract
This study was carried out to verify the possibility that ducks are sources of Newcastle disease (ND) virus infection for chickens in mixed flocks. Immunosuppressed (IS) and non immunosuppressed (NIS) birds, at three different antibody levels (medium, low and absent) were used; the titres having been induced through vaccination, and Immunosuppression done using dexamethazone. Each of the 3 respective groups was further divided into 2 groups of about 12 ducks each: one challenged with velogenic ND virus; the other not challenged. Selected ducks fromall groups had their antibody titres monitored serially using hemagglutination inhibition test, while two birds from each of the challenged groups were killed and respective tissues processed for ND viral recovery, using chicken embryo fibroblasts. In general, antibody titres of IS and NIS challenged ducks were significantly higher than their unchallenged counterparts (P<0.05). Non-challenged pre-immunised ducks had a progressive decrease in antibody levels; non-immunised ducks did not seroconvert. Newcastle disease virus was isolated from livers and kidneys of the challenged ducks throughout the experimental period; indicating a possibility of viral excretion, especially when the birds are stressed. It, therefore, provides another possible model of viral circulation within mixed flocks.
GICHOHI, DRMBUTHIAPAUL.  2012.  Mavuti S.K., Mbuthia, P.G., Waruiru R.M., Njagi, L.W., Mutune M.N., Otieno R.O., and Msoffe, P.L.M., Byarugaba D.K., and Aning G.K. 2012. Prevalence and pathology of Echinophaga gallinacea in free-range local ducks. In the Proceedings of the Faculty of Ve. 1994 Apr;71(4):253-5.PMID: 8062774 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]. : International Scholarly Research Network Abstract
This study was carried out to verify the possibility that ducks are sources of Newcastle disease (ND) virus infection for chickens in mixed flocks. Immunosuppressed (IS) and non immunosuppressed (NIS) birds, at three different antibody levels (medium, low and absent) were used; the titres having been induced through vaccination, and Immunosuppression done using dexamethazone. Each of the 3 respective groups was further divided into 2 groups of about 12 ducks each: one challenged with velogenic ND virus; the other not challenged. Selected ducks fromall groups had their antibody titres monitored serially using hemagglutination inhibition test, while two birds from each of the challenged groups were killed and respective tissues processed for ND viral recovery, using chicken embryo fibroblasts. In general, antibody titres of IS and NIS challenged ducks were significantly higher than their unchallenged counterparts (P<0.05). Non-challenged pre-immunised ducks had a progressive decrease in antibody levels; non-immunised ducks did not seroconvert. Newcastle disease virus was isolated from livers and kidneys of the challenged ducks throughout the experimental period; indicating a possibility of viral excretion, especially when the birds are stressed. It, therefore, provides another possible model of viral circulation within mixed flocks.
GICHOHI, DRMBUTHIAPAUL.  2012.  Njagi L.W., Nyaga P.N., Bebora L.C., Mbuthia P.G. and Minga U.M. 2012. Effect of immunosuppression on Newcastle disease virus persistence in ducks with different immune status. International Scholarly Research Network in Veterinary Science (ISRN), Volume . 1994 Apr;71(4):253-5.PMID: 8062774 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]. : International Scholarly Research Network Abstract
This study was carried out to verify the possibility that ducks are sources of Newcastle disease (ND) virus infection for chickens in mixed flocks. Immunosuppressed (IS) and non immunosuppressed (NIS) birds, at three different antibody levels (medium, low and absent) were used; the titres having been induced through vaccination, and Immunosuppression done using dexamethazone. Each of the 3 respective groups was further divided into 2 groups of about 12 ducks each: one challenged with velogenic ND virus; the other not challenged. Selected ducks fromall groups had their antibody titres monitored serially using hemagglutination inhibition test, while two birds from each of the challenged groups were killed and respective tissues processed for ND viral recovery, using chicken embryo fibroblasts. In general, antibody titres of IS and NIS challenged ducks were significantly higher than their unchallenged counterparts (P<0.05). Non-challenged pre-immunised ducks had a progressive decrease in antibody levels; non-immunised ducks did not seroconvert. Newcastle disease virus was isolated from livers and kidneys of the challenged ducks throughout the experimental period; indicating a possibility of viral excretion, especially when the birds are stressed. It, therefore, provides another possible model of viral circulation within mixed flocks.

2011

Sabuni, ZA, Mbuthia PG, Maingi N, Nyaga PN, Bebora LC, Michieka JN.  2011.  Prevalence of ectoparasites infestation in indigenous free-ranging village chickens in different agroecological zones in Kenya. Abstract

Ectoparasitism is an important factor associated with poor production of village indigenous chickens. A cross-sectional study was carried out to determine the prevalence of ectoparasites in free ranging indigenous chicken from two different agro-ecological zones: Lower highland 1 (LH1) in Embu District and Lower midland 5 (LM5) in Mbeere District, Kenya. A total of 144 chickens of matched age (chicks, growers and adults) and sex groups were examined for the presence of ectoparasites. Of these, 138 (95.8%) had one or more types of ectoparasites, namely; lice, mites, fleas and soft ticks. One thirty one birds had lice, 107 mites, 42 sticktight fleas and 8 had soft ticks. Of the 138 infested birds, 25 had single while 113 had mixed infestations. Lice were the most prevalent parasites. The study documents Epidermoptes species, Laminosioptes cysticola and Megninia species for the first time in Africa as well as Lipeurus caponis and Goniodes gigas in Kenya. All adult birds were infected with ectoparasites followed by 97.7% grower and 89.6% chicks. Both male and female birds had same prevalence (95.8%) of ectoparasites. Lower midland 5 had a slightly higher prevalence of ectoparasites (98.6%) compared to LH1 (93.1%) though not statistically significant. Parasite intensity was significantly different among age groups of chicken and between agro-ecological zones (p<0.05), but not between sexes of birds (p>0.05). Because of the high prevalence of ectoparasites revealed by this study, it is imperative that integrated control strategies need to be put in place to improve chicken productivity and enhance smallholder livelihood in these areas.

GICHOHI, DRMBUTHIAPAUL.  2011.  Lucy Wanjiru Njagi, Paul Gichohi Mbuthia , Phillip Njeru Nyaga, Lilly Caroline Bebora, Uswege M. Minga. 2011. Viral nucleoprotein localization and lesions of Newcastle disease in tissues of indigenous ducks.Trop Anim Health Prod DOI 10.1007/s11250-011-995. Livestock research for Rural development. : Kenya Veterinary association Abstract
bstract Localization of Newcastle disease viral nucleoprotein and pathological lesions was evaluated in tissues of 55 indigenous ducks (45 experimentally infected and 10 sentinel ones). In addition, ten Newcastle disease infected chickens were used to ensure that the virus inoculum administered to the ducks produced the disease in chickens, the susceptible hosts. Ducks were killed on day 1, 4, 8 and 14 post-infection. Postmortem examination was done with six tissues (liver, spleen, lung, caecal tonsils, kidneys and brain) being collected from each bird. The tissues were preserved in 10% neutral formalin for 24 h. They were then transferred to 70% ethanol for histology and immunohistochemical staining. Airsacculitis, necrotic splenic foci, congested intestines, lymphoid depleted caecal tonsils and focal infiltrations by mononuclear cells were the main pathological lesions in infected ducks. Over 28.9% of the infected ducks had Newcastle disease viral nucleoprotein in macrophage-like large mononuclear cells in the caecal tonsils and kidney tubular epithelium. The viral antigens were located in the cytoplasm and nucleolus of the cells. The other organs had no detectable viral antigens. This study shows that the kidneys and caecal tonsils are the likely predilection sites for the virus in ducks. They thus need to be considered as diagnostic indicators for the viral carriage in ducks
GICHOHI, DRMBUTHIAPAUL.  2011.  Sabuni Z A, Mbuthia P G, Maingi N, Nyaga P N, Njagi L W, Bebora L C and Michieka J N. 2011. Prevalence of haemoparasites infection in indigenous chicken in Eastern Province of Kenya. Livestock Research for Rural Development23(11)2011. http://www.lrrd.org/. Livestock research for Rural development. : Livestock research for Rural Development Abstract
Indigenous chickens constitute over 81% of poultry in Kenya and produce 71% of eggs and poultry meat. Ecto- and haemoparasites limit production of these birds in the rural areas. However, there exists scanty information on these parasites infection in indigenous chicken. This study was conducted to determine and document the type and prevalence of haemoparasites affecting different ages and sex groups of free range indigenous chicken from two agro ecological zones: Lower highland 1 (LH1) in Embu District and Lower Midland 5 (LM5) in Mbeere District in Eastern Province, Kenya. Of the 144 birds examined, 79.2% were infected with haemoparasites, with 62.3% single and 37.7% mixed haemoparasitic infections. Plasmodium gallinaceum was the most prevalent haemoparasite (53.5%) followed by Leucocytozoon schoutedeni (52.1%) and Hemoproteus spp., (3.5%). Grower birds had a prevalence of 83.3% for haemoparasites compared to 81.3% of adults, and 72.9% of chicks (p> 0.05). Male birds had 83.3% prevalence, while female birds had 75.0% (p> 0.05). LH1 was found to have a slightly high prevalence of 81.9% compared to LM5, 76.4% (p> 0.05). Hemoproteus spp were isolated in chickens from LH1 but not from LM5. This study has documented a high prevalence of haemoparasites, hence further studies to determine the impact of infection on the health and productivity of these birds, and evaluation of cost benefit of various control strategies need to be undertaken.
GICHOHI, DRMBUTHIAPAUL.  2011.  Gichohi, C.M., Mbuthia P.G., Waruiru R.M., Ngatia T.A., Kamundia P.W., Mutune N.M. and Otieno R.O. prevalence and intensity of paracamallanus species infection in farmed and wild fish. The Kenya Veterinarian 35 (1): 25- 32.. Livestock research for Rural development. : Kenya Veterinary association Abstract
Indigenous chickens constitute over 81% of poultry in Kenya and produce 71% of eggs and poultry meat. Ecto- and haemoparasites limit production of these birds in the rural areas. However, there exists scanty information on these parasites infection in indigenous chicken. This study was conducted to determine and document the type and prevalence of haemoparasites affecting different ages and sex groups of free range indigenous chicken from two agro ecological zones: Lower highland 1 (LH1) in Embu District and Lower Midland 5 (LM5) in Mbeere District in Eastern Province, Kenya. Of the 144 birds examined, 79.2% were infected with haemoparasites, with 62.3% single and 37.7% mixed haemoparasitic infections. Plasmodium gallinaceum was the most prevalent haemoparasite (53.5%) followed by Leucocytozoon schoutedeni (52.1%) and Hemoproteus spp., (3.5%). Grower birds had a prevalence of 83.3% for haemoparasites compared to 81.3% of adults, and 72.9% of chicks (p> 0.05). Male birds had 83.3% prevalence, while female birds had 75.0% (p> 0.05). LH1 was found to have a slightly high prevalence of 81.9% compared to LM5, 76.4% (p> 0.05). Hemoproteus spp were isolated in chickens from LH1 but not from LM5. This study has documented a high prevalence of haemoparasites, hence further studies to determine the impact of infection on the health and productivity of these birds, and evaluation of cost benefit of various control strategies need to be undertaken.
GICHOHI, DRMBUTHIAPAUL.  2011.  Mbuthia, P.G., L.W. Njagi, P.N. Nyaga, L.C. Bebora, U.Minga, J. P. Christensen and J.E.Olsen. 2011. Time course investigation of infection with a low virulent Pasteurella multocida strain in normal and immune-suppressed 12 week-old free range chickens. Av. Avian pathology. : Avian pathology Abstract
Twelve-week-old indigenous chickens, either immune-suppressed using dexamethasone (IS) or non-immunesuppressed (NIS), were challenged with a low virulent strain, Pasteurella multocida strain NCTC 10322, and developed clinical signs and pathological lesions typical of chronic fowl cholera. NIS birds demonstrated much more severe signs of fowl cholera than IS birds. With few exceptions, signs recorded in IS and NIS birds were of the same types, but significantly milder in the IS birds, indicating that immune suppression does not change the course of infection but rather the severity of signs in fowl cholera. P. multocida signals by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) were observed between 1 h and 14 days in the lungs, trachea, air sacs, liver, spleen, bursa of Fabricius and caecal tonsils, while signals from other organs mostly were observed after 24 h. More organs had FISH signals in NIS birds than in IS birds and at higher frequency per organ. Many organs were positive by FISH even 14 days post infection, and it is suggested that these organs may be likely places for long-term carriage of P. multocida following infection. The present study has demonstrated the spread of P. multocida in different tissues in chickens and distribution of lesions associated with chronic fowl cholera, and pointed to a decrease of pathology in IS birds. Since dexamethasone mostly affects heterophils, the study suggests that these cells play a role in the development of lesions associated with chronic fowl cholera in chickens.

2010

Kamundia, PW;, Mbuthia PG;, Waruiru RM;, Njagi LW;, Nyaga PN;, Mdegela RH;, Byarugaba DK;, Otieno RO.  2010.  Trypanosoma infection in carrier fish of Lake Victoria, Kenya..
Gitau, GK;, Aleri JW;, Mbuthia PG;, Mulei C.  2010.  Major causes of calf mortality in peri-urban area of Nairobi, Kenya.
Mbuthia, PG;, Gichohi CM;, Kamundia PW.  2010.  Fish Diseases in Kenya:Current Status and Future Trends in Changing Environment.
GICHOHI, DRMBUTHIAPAUL.  2010.  Kamundia P.W., Mbuthia P.G., Waruiru R. M., Njagi L. W., Nyaga P. N., Mdegela, R.H., Byarugaba, D. K and Otieno R.O. 2010. Occurrence of Trypanosoma in Nile Tilapia in Lake Victoria, Kenya. In the Proceedings of the 7th Biennial Scientific Conference of t. 7th Biennial Scientific Conference of the University of Nairobi, CAVS, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine. : Livestock Research for Rural development Abstract
Ectoparasitism is an important factor associated with poor production of village indigenous chickens. A cross-sectional study was carried out to determine the prevalence of ectoparasites in free ranging indigenous chicken from two different agro-ecological zones: Lower highland 1 (LH1) in Embu District and Lower midland 5 (LM5) in Mbeere District, Kenya. A total of 144 chickens of matched age (chicks, growers and adults) and sex groups were examined for the presence of ectoparasites. Of these, 138 (95.8%) had one or more types of ectoparasites, namely; lice, mites, fleas and soft ticks. One thirty one birds had lice, 107 mites, 42 sticktight fleas and 8 had soft ticks. Of the 138 infested birds, 25 had single while 113 had mixed infestations. Lice were the most prevalent parasites. The study documents Epidermoptes species, Laminosioptes cysticola and Megninia species for the first time in Africa as well as Lipeurus caponis and Goniodes gigas in Kenya. All adult birds were infected with ectoparasites followed by 97.7% grower and 89.6% chicks. Both male and female birds had same prevalence (95.8%) of ectoparasites. Lower midland 5 had a slightly higher prevalence of ectoparasites (98.6%) compared to LH1 (93.1%) though not statistically significant. Parasite intensity was significantly different among age groups of chicken and between agro-ecological zones (p<0.05), but not between sexes of birds (p>0.05). Because of the high prevalence of ectoparasites revealed by this study, it is imperative that integrated control strategies need to be put in place to improve chicken productivity and enhance smallholder livelihood in these areas.
GICHOHI, DRMBUTHIAPAUL.  2010.  Kibebe, H.W., Gathumbi, p.K., kigondu, C.S., Mbuthia, P.G., Karioki, J.W., 2010. Early Detection of Hyperglycemia using glycated hemoglobin in mice model. In the Proceedings of the 7th Biennial Scientific Conference of the University of Nairobi, CAVS, Fac. 7th Biennial Scientific Conference of the University of Nairobi, CAVS, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine. : Livestock Research for Rural development Abstract
Ectoparasitism is an important factor associated with poor production of village indigenous chickens. A cross-sectional study was carried out to determine the prevalence of ectoparasites in free ranging indigenous chicken from two different agro-ecological zones: Lower highland 1 (LH1) in Embu District and Lower midland 5 (LM5) in Mbeere District, Kenya. A total of 144 chickens of matched age (chicks, growers and adults) and sex groups were examined for the presence of ectoparasites. Of these, 138 (95.8%) had one or more types of ectoparasites, namely; lice, mites, fleas and soft ticks. One thirty one birds had lice, 107 mites, 42 sticktight fleas and 8 had soft ticks. Of the 138 infested birds, 25 had single while 113 had mixed infestations. Lice were the most prevalent parasites. The study documents Epidermoptes species, Laminosioptes cysticola and Megninia species for the first time in Africa as well as Lipeurus caponis and Goniodes gigas in Kenya. All adult birds were infected with ectoparasites followed by 97.7% grower and 89.6% chicks. Both male and female birds had same prevalence (95.8%) of ectoparasites. Lower midland 5 had a slightly higher prevalence of ectoparasites (98.6%) compared to LH1 (93.1%) though not statistically significant. Parasite intensity was significantly different among age groups of chicken and between agro-ecological zones (p<0.05), but not between sexes of birds (p>0.05). Because of the high prevalence of ectoparasites revealed by this study, it is imperative that integrated control strategies need to be put in place to improve chicken productivity and enhance smallholder livelihood in these areas.
GICHOHI, DRMBUTHIAPAUL.  2010.  Kamundia P.W., Mbuthia P.G., Waruiru R. M., Njagi L. W., Nyaga P. N., Mdegela, R.H., Byarugaba, D. K and Otieno R.O. 2010. Occurrence of Trypanosoma in Nile Tilapia in Lake Victoria, Kenya. In the Proceedings of the 7th Biennial Scientific Conference of t. 7th Biennial Scientific Conference of the University of Nairobi, CAVS, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine. : Livestock Research for Rural development Abstract
Ectoparasitism is an important factor associated with poor production of village indigenous chickens. A cross-sectional study was carried out to determine the prevalence of ectoparasites in free ranging indigenous chicken from two different agro-ecological zones: Lower highland 1 (LH1) in Embu District and Lower midland 5 (LM5) in Mbeere District, Kenya. A total of 144 chickens of matched age (chicks, growers and adults) and sex groups were examined for the presence of ectoparasites. Of these, 138 (95.8%) had one or more types of ectoparasites, namely; lice, mites, fleas and soft ticks. One thirty one birds had lice, 107 mites, 42 sticktight fleas and 8 had soft ticks. Of the 138 infested birds, 25 had single while 113 had mixed infestations. Lice were the most prevalent parasites. The study documents Epidermoptes species, Laminosioptes cysticola and Megninia species for the first time in Africa as well as Lipeurus caponis and Goniodes gigas in Kenya. All adult birds were infected with ectoparasites followed by 97.7% grower and 89.6% chicks. Both male and female birds had same prevalence (95.8%) of ectoparasites. Lower midland 5 had a slightly higher prevalence of ectoparasites (98.6%) compared to LH1 (93.1%) though not statistically significant. Parasite intensity was significantly different among age groups of chicken and between agro-ecological zones (p<0.05), but not between sexes of birds (p>0.05). Because of the high prevalence of ectoparasites revealed by this study, it is imperative that integrated control strategies need to be put in place to improve chicken productivity and enhance smallholder livelihood in these areas.
GICHOHI, DRMBUTHIAPAUL.  2010.  Mathenge C. G., Mbuthia P. G., Waruiru R. M., Ngatia T. A., Kamundia P. W., Mutune M. N. and Otieno R. O. 2010. Prevalence and Intensity of Paracallanus species infectionin Farmed and wild Catfish (Abstract).. 7th Biennial Scientific Conference of the University of Nairobi, CAVS, Faculty of Veterinary. : Livestock Research for Rural development Abstract
Ectoparasitism is an important factor associated with poor production of village indigenous chickens. A cross-sectional study was carried out to determine the prevalence of ectoparasites in free ranging indigenous chicken from two different agro-ecological zones: Lower highland 1 (LH1) in Embu District and Lower midland 5 (LM5) in Mbeere District, Kenya. A total of 144 chickens of matched age (chicks, growers and adults) and sex groups were examined for the presence of ectoparasites. Of these, 138 (95.8%) had one or more types of ectoparasites, namely; lice, mites, fleas and soft ticks. One thirty one birds had lice, 107 mites, 42 sticktight fleas and 8 had soft ticks. Of the 138 infested birds, 25 had single while 113 had mixed infestations. Lice were the most prevalent parasites. The study documents Epidermoptes species, Laminosioptes cysticola and Megninia species for the first time in Africa as well as Lipeurus caponis and Goniodes gigas in Kenya. All adult birds were infected with ectoparasites followed by 97.7% grower and 89.6% chicks. Both male and female birds had same prevalence (95.8%) of ectoparasites. Lower midland 5 had a slightly higher prevalence of ectoparasites (98.6%) compared to LH1 (93.1%) though not statistically significant. Parasite intensity was significantly different among age groups of chicken and between agro-ecological zones (p<0.05), but not between sexes of birds (p>0.05). Because of the high prevalence of ectoparasites revealed by this study, it is imperative that integrated control strategies need to be put in place to improve chicken productivity and enhance smallholder livelihood in these areas.
GICHOHI, DRMBUTHIAPAUL.  2010.  Mbuthia, P.G., C.M. Gichohi and P.W. Kamundia. 2010.Fish Diseases in Kenya: Current Status and Future Trends in Changing Environment. In the proceedings of the 7th Biennial Scientific Conferenc of University of Nairobi, CAVS, faculty of Veterinary Medicin. Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, 7th Biennial Scientific Conference. : Livestock Research for Rural development Abstract
Ectoparasitism is an important factor associated with poor production of village indigenous chickens. A cross-sectional study was carried out to determine the prevalence of ectoparasites in free ranging indigenous chicken from two different agro-ecological zones: Lower highland 1 (LH1) in Embu District and Lower midland 5 (LM5) in Mbeere District, Kenya. A total of 144 chickens of matched age (chicks, growers and adults) and sex groups were examined for the presence of ectoparasites. Of these, 138 (95.8%) had one or more types of ectoparasites, namely; lice, mites, fleas and soft ticks. One thirty one birds had lice, 107 mites, 42 sticktight fleas and 8 had soft ticks. Of the 138 infested birds, 25 had single while 113 had mixed infestations. Lice were the most prevalent parasites. The study documents Epidermoptes species, Laminosioptes cysticola and Megninia species for the first time in Africa as well as Lipeurus caponis and Goniodes gigas in Kenya. All adult birds were infected with ectoparasites followed by 97.7% grower and 89.6% chicks. Both male and female birds had same prevalence (95.8%) of ectoparasites. Lower midland 5 had a slightly higher prevalence of ectoparasites (98.6%) compared to LH1 (93.1%) though not statistically significant. Parasite intensity was significantly different among age groups of chicken and between agro-ecological zones (p<0.05), but not between sexes of birds (p>0.05). Because of the high prevalence of ectoparasites revealed by this study, it is imperative that integrated control strategies need to be put in place to improve chicken productivity and enhance smallholder livelihood in these areas.
GICHOHI, DRMBUTHIAPAUL.  2010.  A.G Thaiyah, P.N Nyaga, J.M Maribei, D Nduati, P.G Mbuthia, T.A Ngatia. 2010. Experimental solanum incanum l. poisoning in goats.Bulletin of Animal Health and Production in Africa 58: 35-43. Bulletin of Animal Health and Production in Africa Vol 58, No 1. : Bulletin of Animal Health and Production in Africa Abstract
bstract Localization of Newcastle disease viral nucleoprotein and pathological lesions was evaluated in tissues of 55 indigenous ducks (45 experimentally infected and 10 sentinel ones). In addition, ten Newcastle disease infected chickens were used to ensure that the virus inoculum administered to the ducks produced the disease in chickens, the susceptible hosts. Ducks were killed on day 1, 4, 8 and 14 post-infection. Postmortem examination was done with six tissues (liver, spleen, lung, caecal tonsils, kidneys and brain) being collected from each bird. The tissues were preserved in 10% neutral formalin for 24 h. They were then transferred to 70% ethanol for histology and immunohistochemical staining. Airsacculitis, necrotic splenic foci, congested intestines, lymphoid depleted caecal tonsils and focal infiltrations by mononuclear cells were the main pathological lesions in infected ducks. Over 28.9% of the infected ducks had Newcastle disease viral nucleoprotein in macrophage-like large mononuclear cells in the caecal tonsils and kidney tubular epithelium. The viral antigens were located in the cytoplasm and nucleolus of the cells. The other organs had no detectable viral antigens. This study shows that the kidneys and caecal tonsils are the likely predilection sites for the virus in ducks. They thus need to be considered as diagnostic indicators for the viral carriage in ducks

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