Screening of goats for Contagious Caprine Plueropneumonia caused by Mycoplasma capricolum subspecies capripneumoniae (biotype F38) in ranches with potential for export

Citation:
Ithondeka, P; Wafula MWIWEN; TN;. Screening of goats for Contagious Caprine Plueropneumonia caused by Mycoplasma capricolum subspecies capripneumoniae (biotype F38) in ranches with potential for export.; 2013.

Abstract:

Contagious Caprine Plueropneumonia (CCPP) caused by Mycoplasma capricolum subspecies capripneumoniae (M. capripneumoniae, biotype F38) is the most contagious and virulent type of pneumonia in goats. It is an important trade disease associated with both direct and indirect costs arising from mortality (ranges from 60-100%) and trade restrictions (in import and export) respectively. The OIE Terrestrial code requires that in endemic regions, goats for export be vaccinated within a period of 4 months prior to shipment or be subjected to a complement fixation test with negative results, on two occasions. The two tests should be at an interval of not less than 21 days and not more than 30 days between each test, with the second test being performed within 14 days prior to shipment. In Kenya, it is a requirement that both vaccination and testing be carried out prior to export. A study was undertaken to access the CCPP situation in selected ranches that have potential for export. A total of 1400 goats were observed in Taru ranches before 140 goats were randomly selected, bled and tested for important trade diseases, including CCPP, PPR, Brucellosis and RFV. Approximately 2 goats in each flock were in poor body condition and showed signs of persistent cough. In Laikipia district, a total of 100 goats and 100 sheep were sampled. To test for CCPP, the compliment fixation test (CFT) was used. Out of the 140 serum samples from Taru ranches, 4 (3%) were found positive for CCPP. All goats from Lakipia district were negative for CCPP, while 5 sheep were positive on CFT for CCPP. These findings indicate that Kenya is able to export CCPP free goats as per the Sanitary and phytosanitary (SPS) requirements.

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