Bio

Publications


2009

2008

2006

A, DROBONDOANNE, M PROFNDETEIDAVID.  2006.  Ngare D, Obondo A. A, Neema S, Oladimeji B.Y, Ndetei D, M, Chikovore J. . In Eds. Ndetei et al (2006). . : International Psychiatry Vol.6 No. 1
A, DROBONDOANNE, M PROFNDETEIDAVID.  2006.  Obondo A.A, Ndetei D.M, Rono R, & Ngare D. . In Eds. Ndetei et al (2006). . : International Psychiatry Vol.6 No. 1
A, DROBONDOANNE, M PROFNDETEIDAVID.  2006.  Onem T, Obondo A.A, Ndetei D.M, Karani K.A, & Wagoro M. . In Eds. Ndetei et al (2006). . : International Psychiatry Vol.6 No. 1
A, DROBONDOANNE, M PROFNDETEIDAVID.  2006.  Mrumbi K, Obondo A.A, Rono R, Ngare D, & Ndetei D.M. . In Eds. Ndetei et al (2006). . : International Psychiatry Vol.6 No. 1
A, DROBONDOANNE, M PROFNDETEIDAVID.  2006.  Mrumbi K, Obondo A.A, Rono R, Ngare D, & Ndetei D.M. . In Eds. Ndetei et al (2006). . : International Psychiatry Vol.6 No. 1
A, DROBONDOANNE, M PROFNDETEIDAVID.  2006.  Mrumbi K, Rono R, Ngare D, Obondo A.A, Olademije Y, & Ndetei D.M. . In Eds. Ndetei et al (2006). . : International Psychiatry Vol.6 No. 1
A, DROBONDOANNE, M PROFNDETEIDAVID.  2006.  Mrumbi K, Ndetei D.M, Ovuga E, Obondo A.A, Gakinya B, Ongecha . In Eds. Ndetei et al (2006). . : International Psychiatry Vol.6 No. 1
A, DROBONDOANNE, M PROFNDETEIDAVID.  2006.  Rono R, Onem T, Kilonzo G, Ndetei D.M, Obondo A.A. . In Eds. Ndetei et al (2006). . : International Psychiatry Vol.6 No. 1
A, DROBONDOANNE.  2006.  Obondo A.A, Mbewe E, Marokinyo O, . In Eds. Ndetei et al (2006). . : International Psychiatry Vol.6 No. 1
A, DROBONDOANNE, M PROFNDETEIDAVID, MAINA DRMBURUJOHN.  2006.  Abdulreshid A. B, Ndetei D.M, Mburu J.M, Obondo A.A, Kokonya D,. In Eds. Ndetei et al (2006). . : International Psychiatry Vol.6 No. 1
A, DROBONDOANNE, M PROFNDETEIDAVID.  2006.  Obondo A.A, Khasakhala L, Ndetei D.M, Mutiso V, Ongecha . In Eds. Ndetei et al (2006). . : International Psychiatry Vol.6 No. 1
A, DROBONDOANNE, M PROFNDETEIDAVID.  2006.  Obondo A.A, Ngare D, Ndetei D.M, Mbewe E, Marakinyo O, Rono R, Addo S.A . In Eds. Ndetei et al (2006). . : International Psychiatry Vol.6 No. 1

2005

M., DRKATHUKUDAMMAS, A DROBONDOANNE, MAINA DRMBURUJOHN, JOSEPH DROTHIENOCALEB.  2005.  Kisivuli J A, Othieno C J, Mburu J M, Kathuku D M, Obondo A A & Nasokho P W (2005). Psychiatric morbidity among leprosy patients in Teso and Busia Districts of Western Kenya. East African Medical Journal, Vol. 82 no9, 452-456.. Journal. : International Psychiatry Vol.6 No. 1 Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To establish the magnitude of psychiatric disorders among leprosy patients in western Kenya. DESIGN: A cross-sectional descriptive study. SETTING: Busia and Teso districts in western Kenya. SUBJECTS: A sample of 152 male and female, adult leprosy patients. RESULTS: The prevalence of psychiatric morbidity (PM) was 53.29%. The PM was positively correlated with physical disability and marital status but not with age, sex, education, type of leprosy, or duration of the illness. The prevalence of psychiatric morbidity was lower among Kenyan leprosy patients compared to studies carried out in India (56% to 78%). It was high compared to the rate of psychiatric morbidity in those seeking medical help in primary health care centres in Kenya, which was recently estimated to be 10%. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of PM in leprosy patients in western Kenya was lower than that in studies carried out in India. This could be attributed to de-institutionalisation and re-integration of leprosy sufferers back into their local communities. Since the rate was more than double that in the general Kenyan population and seemed to be related to presence of physical disability, an appraisal of psychiatric services offered to these patients is needed.

2004

A, DROBONDOANNE.  2004.  Mwanda W. O., Abdallah F. K., Obondo A.A., Musau F., . East African Medical Journal 2004; 81: 341 . : International Psychiatry Vol.6 No. 1 Abstract

BACKGROUND: The quality of life of cancer patients is likely to be influenced by psychological reactions of the cancer patients yet there are no documented issues related to quality of life in cancer patients in Kenyan hospitals. OBJECTIVE: To investigate issues which affect the quality of life in male cancer patients. DESIGN: Prospective cross sectional study. SETTING: Kenyatta National Hospital, Nairobi, Kenya. METHODS AND SUBJECTS: Cancer patients above 12 years of age were interviewed during the course of their stay in the hospital, specifically to gather information on; semi structured questions and a modified Beck's 24 item depression inventory with a view to solicit for their reaction on issues which pertains to quality of life. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Age group, level of education, tribe, geographical place (province) of birth, chief complains, main concerns, views on doctors, contact with psychiatrist and psychologist, the anatomic site of cancer, treatment given and responses on modified Beck's depression inventory. RESULTS: Forty two patients were studied, their age range 13-72 years, mean 43.2 and peak 13-26 years. Forty seven per cent of cases had no formal education. The cancers were gastrointestinal tract 33%, blood and lymphoid tissue (26%), bone and muscle (11.9%), skin (9.4%) and genitourinary tract (4.8%). Treatment given was chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgery. Ninety three per cent were unable to cope. Chief complaints were pain, inability to work, feeling miserable and concerns were families, health and work retardation. Modified Beck's depression score was 20%, with major issues being; work retardation, insomnia, weight loss, and anorexia. Most affected were, age group 27-35 years (and least 13-26 years), uneducated, living in Nairobi (city), having carcinomas, treatment with combined surgery and radiotherapy. Low education level and residence in Nairobi coped poorly. Radiation therapy group appeared to cope better than other modalities. CONCLUSION: The issues affecting the quality of life of male cancer patients stated were pain, inability to work, poor coping with cancer and psychological reactions of work retardation, insomnia, weight loss, fatigability and depression. Gambling, suicidal ideas and social withdrawal were minimal. Other concerns were families, health and work.

A, DROBONDOANNE.  2004.  Obondo A.A, and Mwanda O. W., (2004): . Review article, MEDICOM, 2004; 19, 1: 13 . : International Psychiatry Vol.6 No. 1 Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To establish the magnitude of psychiatric disorders among leprosy patients in western Kenya. DESIGN: A cross-sectional descriptive study. SETTING: Busia and Teso districts in western Kenya. SUBJECTS: A sample of 152 male and female, adult leprosy patients. RESULTS: The prevalence of psychiatric morbidity (PM) was 53.29%. The PM was positively correlated with physical disability and marital status but not with age, sex, education, type of leprosy, or duration of the illness. The prevalence of psychiatric morbidity was lower among Kenyan leprosy patients compared to studies carried out in India (56% to 78%). It was high compared to the rate of psychiatric morbidity in those seeking medical help in primary health care centres in Kenya, which was recently estimated to be 10%. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of PM in leprosy patients in western Kenya was lower than that in studies carried out in India. This could be attributed to de-institutionalisation and re-integration of leprosy sufferers back into their local communities. Since the rate was more than double that in the general Kenyan population and seemed to be related to presence of physical disability, an appraisal of psychiatric services offered to these patients is needed.

2001

A, DROBONDOANNE, M PROFNDETEIDAVID, M. DRKATHUKUDAMMAS, JOSEPH DROTHIENOCALEB.  2001.  Othieno C. J., Obondo A. A., Kathuku D. M., and Ndetei D. M. (2001). Patterns of substance use among Kenya street Children.Southern African Journal of Child and Adolescent Mental Health Vol. 12, no. 2: 154-150. Southern African Journal of Child and Adolescent Mental Health Vol. 12, no. 2: 154-150. : International Psychiatry Vol.6 No. 1 Abstract

BACKGROUND: The quality of life of cancer patients is likely to be influenced by psychological reactions of the cancer patients yet there are no documented issues related to quality of life in cancer patients in Kenyan hospitals. OBJECTIVE: To investigate issues which affect the quality of life in male cancer patients. DESIGN: Prospective cross sectional study. SETTING: Kenyatta National Hospital, Nairobi, Kenya. METHODS AND SUBJECTS: Cancer patients above 12 years of age were interviewed during the course of their stay in the hospital, specifically to gather information on; semi structured questions and a modified Beck's 24 item depression inventory with a view to solicit for their reaction on issues which pertains to quality of life. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Age group, level of education, tribe, geographical place (province) of birth, chief complains, main concerns, views on doctors, contact with psychiatrist and psychologist, the anatomic site of cancer, treatment given and responses on modified Beck's depression inventory. RESULTS: Forty two patients were studied, their age range 13-72 years, mean 43.2 and peak 13-26 years. Forty seven per cent of cases had no formal education. The cancers were gastrointestinal tract 33%, blood and lymphoid tissue (26%), bone and muscle (11.9%), skin (9.4%) and genitourinary tract (4.8%). Treatment given was chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgery. Ninety three per cent were unable to cope. Chief complaints were pain, inability to work, feeling miserable and concerns were families, health and work retardation. Modified Beck's depression score was 20%, with major issues being; work retardation, insomnia, weight loss, and anorexia. Most affected were, age group 27-35 years (and least 13-26 years), uneducated, living in Nairobi (city), having carcinomas, treatment with combined surgery and radiotherapy. Low education level and residence in Nairobi coped poorly. Radiation therapy group appeared to cope better than other modalities. CONCLUSION: The issues affecting the quality of life of male cancer patients stated were pain, inability to work, poor coping with cancer and psychological reactions of work retardation, insomnia, weight loss, fatigability and depression. Gambling, suicidal ideas and social withdrawal were minimal. Other concerns were families, health and work.

1990

A, DROBONDOANNE.  1990.  Obondo, A. A. & Dhadphale, M., (1990): . East African Medical Journal Vol. 67 No. 2, February 1990, pp.100-8. : International Psychiatry Vol.6 No. 1 Abstract
The problem of school non-attendance is an increasing one in our setting and yet its cause has not been established. This paper presents data of work done through interviews with parents and observations of the home environments of the sample cases in attempt to establish factors associated with school non-attendance. After the initial interviews, the children were seen periodically for follow-ups, usually at two to three monthly intervals for at least one year, by the team which consisted of a consultant psychiatrist, a clinical psychologist, a paediatric registrar and a psychiatric social worker. Out of the ten cases sampled for the study, nine were of school phobia and one of conduct disorder (truancy). Generally, family characteristics significantly associated with school non-attendance in this study were neuroticism in parents, unstable family relationships occasioned by marital discord, parental expectations of high academic performance by the child and, to some extent, poverty. The common management approaches used were family therapy, counselling and anti-depressant pharmacotherapy.

200

Obondo, A, Karani A, Wagoro MA.  200.  Rehabilitation and community mental health. Abstract

Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis is an uncommon yet potentially life threatening condition which is often under-diagnosed or misdiagnosed because of the variability of the clinical signs and symptoms. The imaging findings are often subtle thus the need for a high index of suspicion. The superior sagittal and transverse sinuses are the most frequently involved. The correct diagnosis of cerebral venous thrombosis relies on neuroimaging studies. The two cases reported highlight the fact that the radiologist may be the first clinician to suspect and diagnose this condition. This ultimately affects prognosis as early diagnosis and treatment reduces morbidity and mortality.

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