Bio

Prof P.N. Nyaga Biography

Prof. P. N. Nyaga is Professor of Veterinary virology. He has extensively taught for
many years at undergraduate and postgraduate levels. He has conducted
extensive research in veterinary virology and has supervised many postgraduate
students. He also supports the Department in diagnostic services in veterinary
virology and poultry pathology. He also has specialties in poultry pathology.

Publications


Submitted

Mbuthia, PG, Njagi AW, Bebora LC, Minga UM, Christensen JP, Olsen JE.  Submitted.  Time-course investigation of infection with a low virulent Pasteurella multocida strain in normal and immune-suppressed 12-week-old free-range chickens. AbstractWebsite

Twelve-week-old indigenous chickens, either immune-suppressed using dexamethasone (IS) or non-immunesuppressed (NIS), were challenged with a low virulent strain, Pasteurella multocida strain NCTC 10322T, and developed clinical signs and pathological lesions typical of chronic fowl cholera. NIS birds demonstrated much more severe signs of fowl cholera than IS birds. With few exceptions, signs recorded in IS and NIS birds were of the same types, but significantly milder in the IS birds, indicating that immune suppression does not change the course of infection but rather the severity of signs in fowl cholera. P. multocida signals by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) were observed between 1 h and 14 days in the lungs, trachea, air sacs, liver, spleen, bursa of Fabricius and caecal tonsils, while signals from other organs mostly were observed after 24 h. More organs had FISH signals in NIS birds than in IS birds and at higher frequency per organ. Many organs were positive by FISH even 14 days post infection, and it is suggested that these organs may be likely places for long-term carriage of P. multocida following infection. The present study has demonstrated the spread of P. multocida in different tissues in chickens and distribution of lesions associated with chronic fowl cholera, and pointed to a decrease of pathology in IS birds. Since dexamethasone mostly affects heterophils, the study suggests that these cells play a role in the development of lesions associated with chronic fowl cholera in chickens.

Githigia, SM, Njagi LW, Mbuthia PG, Gathumbi PK, Cooper ME, Cooper JE.  Submitted.  veterinary forensic medicine: an emerging and important discipline. Website
Njagi, LW, Mbuthia PG, Bebora LC, Minga UM.  Submitted.  Viral nucleoprotein localization and lesions of Newcastle disease in tissues of indigenous ducks. AbstractWebsite

Localization of Newcastle disease viral nucleoprotein and pathological lesions was valuated in tissues of 55 indigenous ducks (45 experimentally infected and 10 sentinel ones). In addition, ten Newcastle disease infected chickens were used to ensure that the virus inoculum administered to the ducks produced the disease in chickens, the susceptible hosts. Ducks were killed on day 1, 4, 8 and 14 post-infection. Postmortem examination was done with six tissues (liver, spleen, lung, caecal tonsils, kidneys and brain) being collected from each bird. The tissues were preserved in 10% neutral formalin for 24 h. They were then transferred to 70% ethanol for histology and immunohistochemical staining. Airsacculitis, necrotic splenic foci, congested intestines, lymphoid depleted caecal tonsils and focal infiltrations by mononuclear cells were the main pathological lesions in infected ducks. Over 28.9% of the infected ducks had Newcastle disease viral nucleoprotein in macrophage-like large mononuclear cells in the caecal tonsils and kidney tubular epithelium. The viral antigens were located in the cytoplasm and nucleolus of the cells. The other organs had no detectable viral antigens. This study shows that the kidneys and caecal tonsils are the likely predilection sites for the virus in ducks. They thus need to be considered as diagnostic indicators for the viral carriage in ducks.

2012

Kemboi, DC;, Chege HW;, Bebora LC;, Maingi N;, P.N N;, Mbuthia PG;, Njagi LW;, Githinji JM.  2012.  Seasonal Newcastle disease antibody titres in village chicken of Mbeere District, Eastern Province, Kenya.
Chege, HW;, Kemboi DC;, Bebora LC;, Maingi N;, Mbuthia PG;, Nyaga PN;, Njagi LW;, Githinji J.  2012.  Prevalence of ecto and endo parasites in free-range chickens in Mbeere District, Eastern Province, Kenya.
Kyalo, MM;, Mbuthia PG;, Maingi N;, Nyaga PN;, Njagi LW;, Mutune MN;, Otieno RO;, Gachoka JM;, Musofe PLN;, Bunn D.  2012.  Occurrence and lesions associated with Echinostoma revolutum in free-range chickens in Kenya.
Bebora, LC;, Maingi N;, Nyaga PN;, Mbuthia PG;, Njagi LW;, Githinji J;, Kemboi DC;, Chege HW.  2012.  Intensive And Multi-type Parasite Infection–a Hindrance To Effective Newcastle Disease Control In Village Chickens?

2010

Kamundia, PW;, Mbuthia PG;, Waruiru RM;, Njagi LW;, Nyaga PN;, Mdegela RH;, Byarugaba DK;, Otieno RO.  2010.  Trypanosoma infection in carrier fish of Lake Victoria, Kenya..
Njagi, LW, Nyaga PN, Mbuthia PG, Bebora LC, Michieka JN, Kibe JK, Minga UM.  2010.  Prevalence of Newcastle disease virus in village indigenous chickens in varied agro-ecological zones in Kenya. Abstract

It was hypothesized that the agro-ecological zone in which village indigenous chickens were farmed influenced the level of diseases occurrence. One hundred and forty four apparently healthy chickens (71 from lower highland 1, a cold zone and 73 from lower midland 5, a hot zone) were randomly sampled. Oro–pharyngeal and cloacal swabs were collected from each bird and processed for virus isolation in 10-12 day old embryonated chicken eggs. In addition, blood, without anticoagulant was obtained from each bird through wing venipuncture. Haemagglutination inhibition assay was performed for all sera samples. Prevalence of Newcastle disease (NDV) virus was significantly higher (17.8%) in the dry hot zone (lower midland 5) compared to the cool wet zone (lower highland 1) at 9.9% showing evidence for climate as a risk factor in the occurrence of NDV in village chicken. Female birds had higher mean Newcastle disease viral titers than their male counterparts. All Newcastle disease virus isolates recovered were from healthy appearing birds and were all velogenic. Sero-prevalence was significantly highest (p<0.05) in adult birds (10%) while growers had 5.1% and chicks 2.9%. Apparently healthyappearing birds were reported to be reservoirs of velogenic Newcastle disease virus strains that could initiate endemicity NDV cycles in the village setting.

GITAU, DRTHAIYAHANDREW, N PROFNYAGAP, MATHENGE PROFMARIBEIJAMES.  2010.  Experimental Solanum incanum L poisoning in goats. Thaiya, A.G., Nyaga, P.N., Maribei, J.M., Nduati, D., Mbuthia, P.G. and Ngatia, T.A.. Bull. Anim. Hlth. Prod. Afr. vol.58. no.1. : au-ibar Abstract

According to the statements made by a number of scholars, in the 80's East African Anglophone novel, which once received a nickname of "social documentary", began to lose gradually its social commitment. Many of the writers known previously as the most active supporters of the social trend, moved their attempts to other literan areas - criminal novel ("Weapon of hunger" by Meja Mцangi, 1989), love story (Yussuf Dawood's "Off my chest", 1988), even children's literature (books for children in Gikuyu, written by Ngugi wa Thiong'o). However, in the late 80's and early 90's East African Anglophone novel stepped onto a new level of social trend, moving from "social documentary" to "social epic". The authors now are trying to sum up the historical experience of East African countries over a large time span, and to that effect appeal mostly to elaborate and spacious literary forms, such as epic novel. These authors, although chosen one and the same literary form, are showing clearly their inclinations towards different styles of writing. For example, Tanzanian author Moyez Vassanji in his novel "The gunny sack" (1989) makes a rather convincing attempt to replant on East African soil the method of "mythological writing", previously used by such author as Gabriel Garcia Marquez. The novel definitely appeals not only to local reader, but to a wider international audience; on its pages the author manages to restore not only the fate of several generations of Indian family, but even the slightest details of their mentality, using myth as one of the basic means for changing the dimensions of time and space, according to the logic of the narration. The development of Kenyan novel in the early 90's confirms also one of the main tendencies in modem literature - bridging between "elite" and popular fiction. The first attempt of an epic novel in Kenyan Anglophone literature was, oddly enough, made by the veteran of Kenyan popular fiction David Maillu in his "Broken drum" H991). The novel hardly aims the widest reading public - nevertheless, stylistically it bears distinct features of popular fiction, such as crime story, romance, etc. Popular novel in East Africa also shows certain inclination towards urgent social themes, but the authors inevitably uses the artistic means they feel most happy with - that is, the style of popular fiction. For example, the "clash of cultures" - the experience of young Africans studying abroad - is presented in the form of a picaresque ("Times beyond" by Omondi Makoloo, 1992) or love story ("The girl from Uganda" by Tengio Urrio, 1993); feministic problems are spiced with sentimentalism ("Judy the nun" by P .Waweru, 1990); the thoughts on the hardships of younger generation are guised in Bildungs roman ("The plight of succession" by a Tanzanian Prosper Rwegoshora, 1990). At the same time, some authors, who have been ploughing successfully the field of pop fiction for a few decades, show their interest in more elaborate literary forms ("Dedan Kimathi: the real story" by Samuel Kaluga, 1990). All the mentioned facts do not allow us to state that the division into popular and elite novel will disappear within the foreseeable future. However, the most interesting developments seem to take place precisely in the field of bridging between these two branches of East African fiction.

2009

Thaiya, AG, Gitau P, Gitau GK, Nyaga PN.  2009.  Research Article: Food Animal Practice Bovine Papillomatosis and its Management with an Autogenous Virus Vaccine in Kiambu District, Kenya. Abstract

Six cases of bovine papillomatosis were reported to the University of Nairobi veterinary clinic. Diagnosis was based on presented clinical signs and histopathology of affected skin lesions. The histological samples of the warts confirmed the diagnosis of papillomatosis. An autogenous formalin killed bovine specific wart vaccine was prepared from the wart samples and injected into four calves on day 0, 10 and 30, while two calves were left as undosed controls. The warts started regressing three weeks post vaccination and completely disappeared by the seventh week. This case represents a successfully management of a case of papillomatosis with a bovine specific autogenous vaccine

Nyaga, PN.  2009.  Strategies for the Prevention and Control of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI) in Eastern Africa. Abstract

Although Uganda has many wetlands and lies on the migratory flyway for birds flying from Siberia through the Middle East and moving along the great Rift Valley to Southern Africa, it has not yet experienced avian influenza infection. However, the risks of exposure are extremely high given the fact that outbreaks have occurred and continue to occur in Egypt which lies directly along this flyway. It is therefore appropriate to assess the possible bio-security flaws that may arise in all the poultry sectors placing special emphasis on the more vulnerable poultry production systems of sectors 3 and 4. In this regard FAO has commissioned a biosecurity study of all the poultry production sectors in Uganda to identify the potential bio-security risks in order to lay a basis for developing effective control measures and provide guidelines for appropriate bio-security interventions. Bio-security principles are to be incorporated at the conceptual stage of each component of the poultry value chain and then during the actual implementation of the structures to carry out the business. Once these are in place, operational biosecurity principles are designed for the day to day simple procedures and practices which when applied prevent entry into or spread within a farm of disease agents, or the exit of the disease agent from infected premises. The operational protocols are summed up into three principles, namely: Isolation which involves procedures, practices, and manouvres to ensure that clean flocks remain free from disease agents and that disease agents remain confined in infected flocks and do not spread to other premises; Traffic control which includes signage to warn visitors that biosecurity protocols are being observed; controlling movement of stock, persons, goods, equipment and products into the clean farm and out of infected premises; and finally Sanitation, which involves methods that enable farmers to maintain farm houses, vehicles, implements and equipment, remain in a state of sustained cleanliness, and are disinfected. Thus, the flaws and strengths in any of these biosecurity issues were investigated throughout the poultry value chain in Uganda. The exposure to biosecurity risks was found to differ for the respective poultry sectors, as follows:

2008

Sabuni, A.Z, Mbuthia, P.G., Maingi, N., P.N. Nyaga, L.W. Njagi, L.C. Bebora, Michieka JN.  2008.  Prevalence of haemoparasites infections in indigenous chickens in Eastern Province, Kenya..
Sabuni, AZ;, Mbuthia PG;, Maingi N;, Nyaga, P. N., L.W. Njagi, L.C. Bebora, Michieka. JN.  2008.  Prevalence of ectoparasites infestations in indigenous chickens in Eastern Province, Kenya.
Njagi, LW;, Mbuthia PG;, Nyaga PN;, Bebora LC;, Michieka JN;, Minga UM.  2008.  Localisation Of Newcastle Disease Viral Nucleoprotein In The Tissues Of Carrier Ducks.. Abstract

Localisation of Newcastle disease viral nucleo protein in the tissues of carrier ducks was evaluated in 45 experimentally infected and 10 sentinel ducks. Ten chickens were used as positive control bir ds. The ducks were sacrificed serially on days 1, 4, 8 and 14 – post - inoculation. Six tissues (liver, spleen, lung, cecal tonsils, kidneys and brain) were collected from each bird, preserved in 10% neutral formalin for 24 hours, and then transferred to 70% ethanol. Indirect alkaline phosphatase – antialkaline phosphatase immunoperoxidase staining was performed to detect viral nucleoprotein. The ducks (28.9 %) had Newcastle disease viral nucleoprotein in their tissues. The viral nucleoprotein s were found in l arge mononuclear cells of cecal tonsils and tubular epithelial cells in the kidneys of infected ducks. The viral antigens were located in the cytoplasm and nucleolus of the respective cells. Liver, lungs, spleen and brain of all infected ducks did not have detectable viral antigens. The number of ducks with viral antigen increased with duration of infection from 22.2%, 16.7%, 33.3% and 41.7% on days 1, 4, 8 and 14 post - inoculation , respectively (p<0.05).Viral antigen intensity in cecal tonsil tissue section s was 4, 5, and > 5 cells in 15.4%, 53.8% and 30.8%, respectively, of the infected ducks. In the kidneys, more than 5 positive cells were recorded. Thus, in Newcastle disease virus carrier ducks, the kidneys and cecal tonsils need to be sampled for virus i solation besides other tissues.

Sabuni, AZ;, Mbuthia PG;, Maingi N;, Nyaga PN;, L.W N;, L.C B;, J. N. M;, R.O O.  2008.  Intensity of ectoparasites in free-range family chicken in Eastern province, Kenya.
Mbuthia, PG;, L.C. B;, G M;, L.W N;, P.N N;, M. M.  2008.  Histomoniasis and other conditions in peacocks.
Mutune, M, Nyaga PN, Njagi LW, Sourou SY, Mwaniki G, Bebora LC, Mbuthia PG.  2008.  Myopathy and Parasitism in a guinea fowl: a case report. Abstract

Guinea fowls are formed and found in the wild in Africa. they are kept by farmers mainly to prodice eggs, meat and as pet birds. These birds are affected by many conditions that would cause death or reduce their proction. Some conditions are managemental in nature while others are infectious. Occurrence of diseases and conditions in therse birds are rarely reported in Africa. This is a report of a guinea folw that died after protracted diarrhea and was brought for post mortem at the poultry clinic in kabete. On examination the bird had muscular degeneratio (myopathy) involving the leg muscles and heavy ascaridia galli infestations. possible impact on guinea fowl production is discussed.

2007

Nyaga, PN.  2007.  Kenya poultry sector review.

2006

Njagi, LW;, Nyaga PN;, Mbuthia PG;, Michieka JN;, Bebora LC;, Minga UM;, Olsen JE.  2006.  Factors Associated With Newcastle Disease Occurrence In Indigenous Free-range Chickens In Embu And Mbeere Districts. Abstract

A study of factors associated with outbreaks of Newcastle disease (ND) in indigenous free - range chickens was carried out in five agro - ecological zones in t wo districts of Eastern province of Kenya. Seventy five households keeping chickens were randomly selected. Data on management practices, incidence of diseases and factors associated with ND outbreaks were collected using interviewer - administered questionn aire. The prevalence rate of Newcastle disease was highest (93.8%) in the dry zone (Low midland 5) and lowest (50%) in cool wet zone (Lower highland 1). The ND outbreaks were significantly associated with stress inducing factors, namely: confinement of bir ds, lack of supplementation of feed and seasons. It was found to be more prevalent in wet seasons than dry seasons in all agro - ecological zones, except the Lower midland 5, where it occurred during the hot season. Other important factors for the outbreaks were: mode of disposal of infected birds, carcasses and fecal matter, windy conditions and the restocking of farms with chickens from the markets. Mixing of chickens with other poultry, green vegetation on the farm, dust storms, gift birds to farms, short intermittent temperature changes and flowering of the crops had minimal association with these outbreaks. The study also revealed that only 17.3% of the farmers were controlling ND through vaccination. It was concluded that besides using vaccination as a c ontrol measure for ND in rural free - range poultry, the flock owners should be educated on the modes of transmission of ND virus, in addition to being discouraged from purchasing restocking chickens from the market

Thaiyah, AG;, Nyaga PN;, Maribei JM;, Mbuthia PG;, Ngatia TA;, Kimeto BA.  2006.  The clinical, biochemical, haematological and pathological effects of long-term administration of Solanum incanum L. to goats.
  2006.  Bird Flu: The imminent pandemic and how we may prepare, 7th April, 2006. Annual meeting of Kenya Association of Paediatricians . , Nairobi, Kenya

2005

Bebora, LC, Mbuthia PG, Macharia JN, Mwaniki G, Njagi LW, Nyaga PN.  2005.  Appraisal of Village Chickens Potential in Egg Production. Abstract

A study was carried out on the laying capacities of Village / indigenous and exotic / commercial hens that were brought to the Agricultural Society of Kenya show, Nairobi, over a period of 10 years. The parameter of egg-production capacity was estimated by the pliability of bones, especially the pubic bone spread and the space between the pubic bone and the keel bone; measured as number of fingers that can fit between each space, respectively. The results showed that some of the indigenous birds had good laying capacities, contrary to popular belief. Some indigenous birds were close to, and others had higher laying capabilities than the respective commercial ones. This observation indicates that, with a little extra effort in management and genetic selection, these village birds have a potential of increasing their egg yields.

2004

Njagi, LW;, Nyaga PN;, Bebora LC;, Mugera GM;, Minga U;, Olsen JE.  2004.  Ease of transmitting P.multocida between indigenous chickens and ducks through contact transmission.
Mbuthia, PG;, Njagi LW;, Nyaga PN;, Bebora LC;, Mugera GM;, Minga U;, Olsen. JE.  2004.  Comparison between the carrier status of P. Multocida on farm and live traded market indigenous birds.
Mbuthia, PG;, Njagi LW;, Nyaga PN;, Bebora LC;, Mugera. GM;, Minga U;, Olsen JE.  2004.  Comparison between fluorybridization (FISH) and culture method in the detection of Pasteurella multocidain organs of indigenous birds..
N, PROFNYAGAP.  2004.  E.S Bizimenyera, P.N. Nyaga and J.O. Oloya: In-vitro disinfectant sensitivity tests on bacteria isolated from commercial poultry hatcheries in Kenya. Bull. Hlth. Prod. Afri. (2004): 52: 271-274.. Bull. Anim. Hlth. Prod. Afr. vol.58. no.1. : au-ibar Abstract

According to the statements made by a number of scholars, in the 80's East African Anglophone novel, which once received a nickname of "social documentary", began to lose gradually its social commitment. Many of the writers known previously as the most active supporters of the social trend, moved their attempts to other literan areas - criminal novel ("Weapon of hunger" by Meja Mцangi, 1989), love story (Yussuf Dawood's "Off my chest", 1988), even children's literature (books for children in Gikuyu, written by Ngugi wa Thiong'o). However, in the late 80's and early 90's East African Anglophone novel stepped onto a new level of social trend, moving from "social documentary" to "social epic". The authors now are trying to sum up the historical experience of East African countries over a large time span, and to that effect appeal mostly to elaborate and spacious literary forms, such as epic novel. These authors, although chosen one and the same literary form, are showing clearly their inclinations towards different styles of writing. For example, Tanzanian author Moyez Vassanji in his novel "The gunny sack" (1989) makes a rather convincing attempt to replant on East African soil the method of "mythological writing", previously used by such author as Gabriel Garcia Marquez. The novel definitely appeals not only to local reader, but to a wider international audience; on its pages the author manages to restore not only the fate of several generations of Indian family, but even the slightest details of their mentality, using myth as one of the basic means for changing the dimensions of time and space, according to the logic of the narration. The development of Kenyan novel in the early 90's confirms also one of the main tendencies in modem literature - bridging between "elite" and popular fiction. The first attempt of an epic novel in Kenyan Anglophone literature was, oddly enough, made by the veteran of Kenyan popular fiction David Maillu in his "Broken drum" H991). The novel hardly aims the widest reading public - nevertheless, stylistically it bears distinct features of popular fiction, such as crime story, romance, etc. Popular novel in East Africa also shows certain inclination towards urgent social themes, but the authors inevitably uses the artistic means they feel most happy with - that is, the style of popular fiction. For example, the "clash of cultures" - the experience of young Africans studying abroad - is presented in the form of a picaresque ("Times beyond" by Omondi Makoloo, 1992) or love story ("The girl from Uganda" by Tengio Urrio, 1993); feministic problems are spiced with sentimentalism ("Judy the nun" by P .Waweru, 1990); the thoughts on the hardships of younger generation are guised in Bildungs roman ("The plight of succession" by a Tanzanian Prosper Rwegoshora, 1990). At the same time, some authors, who have been ploughing successfully the field of pop fiction for a few decades, show their interest in more elaborate literary forms ("Dedan Kimathi: the real story" by Samuel Kaluga, 1990). All the mentioned facts do not allow us to state that the division into popular and elite novel will disappear within the foreseeable future. However, the most interesting developments seem to take place precisely in the field of bridging between these two branches of East African fiction.

N, PROFNYAGAP.  2004.  L.W. Njagi, P.G. Mbuthia, L.C. Bebora, P.N. Nyaga, U. Minga and J.E. Olsen. Sensitivity of Listeria species, recovered from indigenous chickens to antibiotics and disinfectants. E.A.M.J. (2004): 81:44-47.. Bull. Anim. Hlth. Prod. Afr. vol.58. no.1. : au-ibar Abstract

According to the statements made by a number of scholars, in the 80's East African Anglophone novel, which once received a nickname of "social documentary", began to lose gradually its social commitment. Many of the writers known previously as the most active supporters of the social trend, moved their attempts to other literan areas - criminal novel ("Weapon of hunger" by Meja Mцangi, 1989), love story (Yussuf Dawood's "Off my chest", 1988), even children's literature (books for children in Gikuyu, written by Ngugi wa Thiong'o). However, in the late 80's and early 90's East African Anglophone novel stepped onto a new level of social trend, moving from "social documentary" to "social epic". The authors now are trying to sum up the historical experience of East African countries over a large time span, and to that effect appeal mostly to elaborate and spacious literary forms, such as epic novel. These authors, although chosen one and the same literary form, are showing clearly their inclinations towards different styles of writing. For example, Tanzanian author Moyez Vassanji in his novel "The gunny sack" (1989) makes a rather convincing attempt to replant on East African soil the method of "mythological writing", previously used by such author as Gabriel Garcia Marquez. The novel definitely appeals not only to local reader, but to a wider international audience; on its pages the author manages to restore not only the fate of several generations of Indian family, but even the slightest details of their mentality, using myth as one of the basic means for changing the dimensions of time and space, according to the logic of the narration. The development of Kenyan novel in the early 90's confirms also one of the main tendencies in modem literature - bridging between "elite" and popular fiction. The first attempt of an epic novel in Kenyan Anglophone literature was, oddly enough, made by the veteran of Kenyan popular fiction David Maillu in his "Broken drum" H991). The novel hardly aims the widest reading public - nevertheless, stylistically it bears distinct features of popular fiction, such as crime story, romance, etc. Popular novel in East Africa also shows certain inclination towards urgent social themes, but the authors inevitably uses the artistic means they feel most happy with - that is, the style of popular fiction. For example, the "clash of cultures" - the experience of young Africans studying abroad - is presented in the form of a picaresque ("Times beyond" by Omondi Makoloo, 1992) or love story ("The girl from Uganda" by Tengio Urrio, 1993); feministic problems are spiced with sentimentalism ("Judy the nun" by P .Waweru, 1990); the thoughts on the hardships of younger generation are guised in Bildungs roman ("The plight of succession" by a Tanzanian Prosper Rwegoshora, 1990). At the same time, some authors, who have been ploughing successfully the field of pop fiction for a few decades, show their interest in more elaborate literary forms ("Dedan Kimathi: the real story" by Samuel Kaluga, 1990). All the mentioned facts do not allow us to state that the division into popular and elite novel will disappear within the foreseeable future. However, the most interesting developments seem to take place precisely in the field of bridging between these two branches of East African fiction.

N, PROFNYAGAP.  2004.  O.N. Njagi, R. Entzeroth, P.N. Nyaga, A.J. Musoke. Monoclonal antibodies identify two neutralization-sensitive epitopes in Besnoitia besnoiti endozoites. Parasit. Res. (2004) 94: 247-253.. Bull. Anim. Hlth. Prod. Afr. vol.58. no.1. : au-ibar Abstract

According to the statements made by a number of scholars, in the 80's East African Anglophone novel, which once received a nickname of "social documentary", began to lose gradually its social commitment. Many of the writers known previously as the most active supporters of the social trend, moved their attempts to other literan areas - criminal novel ("Weapon of hunger" by Meja Mцangi, 1989), love story (Yussuf Dawood's "Off my chest", 1988), even children's literature (books for children in Gikuyu, written by Ngugi wa Thiong'o). However, in the late 80's and early 90's East African Anglophone novel stepped onto a new level of social trend, moving from "social documentary" to "social epic". The authors now are trying to sum up the historical experience of East African countries over a large time span, and to that effect appeal mostly to elaborate and spacious literary forms, such as epic novel. These authors, although chosen one and the same literary form, are showing clearly their inclinations towards different styles of writing. For example, Tanzanian author Moyez Vassanji in his novel "The gunny sack" (1989) makes a rather convincing attempt to replant on East African soil the method of "mythological writing", previously used by such author as Gabriel Garcia Marquez. The novel definitely appeals not only to local reader, but to a wider international audience; on its pages the author manages to restore not only the fate of several generations of Indian family, but even the slightest details of their mentality, using myth as one of the basic means for changing the dimensions of time and space, according to the logic of the narration. The development of Kenyan novel in the early 90's confirms also one of the main tendencies in modem literature - bridging between "elite" and popular fiction. The first attempt of an epic novel in Kenyan Anglophone literature was, oddly enough, made by the veteran of Kenyan popular fiction David Maillu in his "Broken drum" H991). The novel hardly aims the widest reading public - nevertheless, stylistically it bears distinct features of popular fiction, such as crime story, romance, etc. Popular novel in East Africa also shows certain inclination towards urgent social themes, but the authors inevitably uses the artistic means they feel most happy with - that is, the style of popular fiction. For example, the "clash of cultures" - the experience of young Africans studying abroad - is presented in the form of a picaresque ("Times beyond" by Omondi Makoloo, 1992) or love story ("The girl from Uganda" by Tengio Urrio, 1993); feministic problems are spiced with sentimentalism ("Judy the nun" by P .Waweru, 1990); the thoughts on the hardships of younger generation are guised in Bildungs roman ("The plight of succession" by a Tanzanian Prosper Rwegoshora, 1990). At the same time, some authors, who have been ploughing successfully the field of pop fiction for a few decades, show their interest in more elaborate literary forms ("Dedan Kimathi: the real story" by Samuel Kaluga, 1990). All the mentioned facts do not allow us to state that the division into popular and elite novel will disappear within the foreseeable future. However, the most interesting developments seem to take place precisely in the field of bridging between these two branches of East African fiction.

N, PROFNYAGAP.  2004.  L.W. Njagi, P.G. Mbuthia, L.C. Bebora, P.N. Nyaga, U. Minga and J.E. Olsen. Carrier status for Listreria monocytogenes and other Listeria species in free range farm and market healthy indigenous chickens and ducks. E.A.M.J.( 2004): 81:39-43.. Bull. Anim. Hlth. Prod. Afr. vol.58. no.1. : au-ibar Abstract

According to the statements made by a number of scholars, in the 80's East African Anglophone novel, which once received a nickname of "social documentary", began to lose gradually its social commitment. Many of the writers known previously as the most active supporters of the social trend, moved their attempts to other literan areas - criminal novel ("Weapon of hunger" by Meja Mцangi, 1989), love story (Yussuf Dawood's "Off my chest", 1988), even children's literature (books for children in Gikuyu, written by Ngugi wa Thiong'o). However, in the late 80's and early 90's East African Anglophone novel stepped onto a new level of social trend, moving from "social documentary" to "social epic". The authors now are trying to sum up the historical experience of East African countries over a large time span, and to that effect appeal mostly to elaborate and spacious literary forms, such as epic novel. These authors, although chosen one and the same literary form, are showing clearly their inclinations towards different styles of writing. For example, Tanzanian author Moyez Vassanji in his novel "The gunny sack" (1989) makes a rather convincing attempt to replant on East African soil the method of "mythological writing", previously used by such author as Gabriel Garcia Marquez. The novel definitely appeals not only to local reader, but to a wider international audience; on its pages the author manages to restore not only the fate of several generations of Indian family, but even the slightest details of their mentality, using myth as one of the basic means for changing the dimensions of time and space, according to the logic of the narration. The development of Kenyan novel in the early 90's confirms also one of the main tendencies in modem literature - bridging between "elite" and popular fiction. The first attempt of an epic novel in Kenyan Anglophone literature was, oddly enough, made by the veteran of Kenyan popular fiction David Maillu in his "Broken drum" H991). The novel hardly aims the widest reading public - nevertheless, stylistically it bears distinct features of popular fiction, such as crime story, romance, etc. Popular novel in East Africa also shows certain inclination towards urgent social themes, but the authors inevitably uses the artistic means they feel most happy with - that is, the style of popular fiction. For example, the "clash of cultures" - the experience of young Africans studying abroad - is presented in the form of a picaresque ("Times beyond" by Omondi Makoloo, 1992) or love story ("The girl from Uganda" by Tengio Urrio, 1993); feministic problems are spiced with sentimentalism ("Judy the nun" by P .Waweru, 1990); the thoughts on the hardships of younger generation are guised in Bildungs roman ("The plight of succession" by a Tanzanian Prosper Rwegoshora, 1990). At the same time, some authors, who have been ploughing successfully the field of pop fiction for a few decades, show their interest in more elaborate literary forms ("Dedan Kimathi: the real story" by Samuel Kaluga, 1990). All the mentioned facts do not allow us to state that the division into popular and elite novel will disappear within the foreseeable future. However, the most interesting developments seem to take place precisely in the field of bridging between these two branches of East African fiction.

2002

Nyaga, PN;, Njagi LW;, Bebora LC;, Mbuthia PG.  2002.  Productivity of local scavenging ducks under village conditions in Kenya.

2001

N, PROFNYAGAP.  2001.  Mbuthia PG, Christensen H, Boye M, Petersen KM, Bisgaard M, Nyaga, PN, Olsen JE. Specific Detection of Pasteurella multocida in Chickens with Fowl Cholera and in pig lung tissues using Fluorescent rRNA in situ hybridization. J. Clin. Microbiol. 2001; 39(7. Bull. Anim. Hlth. Prod. Afr. vol.58. no.1. : au-ibar Abstract

According to the statements made by a number of scholars, in the 80's East African Anglophone novel, which once received a nickname of "social documentary", began to lose gradually its social commitment. Many of the writers known previously as the most active supporters of the social trend, moved their attempts to other literan areas - criminal novel ("Weapon of hunger" by Meja Mцangi, 1989), love story (Yussuf Dawood's "Off my chest", 1988), even children's literature (books for children in Gikuyu, written by Ngugi wa Thiong'o). However, in the late 80's and early 90's East African Anglophone novel stepped onto a new level of social trend, moving from "social documentary" to "social epic". The authors now are trying to sum up the historical experience of East African countries over a large time span, and to that effect appeal mostly to elaborate and spacious literary forms, such as epic novel. These authors, although chosen one and the same literary form, are showing clearly their inclinations towards different styles of writing. For example, Tanzanian author Moyez Vassanji in his novel "The gunny sack" (1989) makes a rather convincing attempt to replant on East African soil the method of "mythological writing", previously used by such author as Gabriel Garcia Marquez. The novel definitely appeals not only to local reader, but to a wider international audience; on its pages the author manages to restore not only the fate of several generations of Indian family, but even the slightest details of their mentality, using myth as one of the basic means for changing the dimensions of time and space, according to the logic of the narration. The development of Kenyan novel in the early 90's confirms also one of the main tendencies in modem literature - bridging between "elite" and popular fiction. The first attempt of an epic novel in Kenyan Anglophone literature was, oddly enough, made by the veteran of Kenyan popular fiction David Maillu in his "Broken drum" H991). The novel hardly aims the widest reading public - nevertheless, stylistically it bears distinct features of popular fiction, such as crime story, romance, etc. Popular novel in East Africa also shows certain inclination towards urgent social themes, but the authors inevitably uses the artistic means they feel most happy with - that is, the style of popular fiction. For example, the "clash of cultures" - the experience of young Africans studying abroad - is presented in the form of a picaresque ("Times beyond" by Omondi Makoloo, 1992) or love story ("The girl from Uganda" by Tengio Urrio, 1993); feministic problems are spiced with sentimentalism ("Judy the nun" by P .Waweru, 1990); the thoughts on the hardships of younger generation are guised in Bildungs roman ("The plight of succession" by a Tanzanian Prosper Rwegoshora, 1990). At the same time, some authors, who have been ploughing successfully the field of pop fiction for a few decades, show their interest in more elaborate literary forms ("Dedan Kimathi: the real story" by Samuel Kaluga, 1990). All the mentioned facts do not allow us to state that the division into popular and elite novel will disappear within the foreseeable future. However, the most interesting developments seem to take place precisely in the field of bridging between these two branches of East African fiction.

2000

1999

Nyaga, PN, Kasiti J, Kilelu ES, Nyamwange JB, Nyamwange S.  1999.  Prevalence of foot and mouth disease in Kitale District.

1998

N, PROFNYAGAP.  1998.  Lilly C. Bebora, P.N. Nyaga and C.O. Kimoro. (1998). Comparason of immune responses of two Salmonella gallinarum strains viewed as posssible vaccines for fowl typhoid in Kenya. Onderspoort Journal of Vet. Res. Vol. 65.67-73.. Bull. Anim. Hlth. Prod. Afr. vol.58. no.1. : au-ibar Abstract

According to the statements made by a number of scholars, in the 80's East African Anglophone novel, which once received a nickname of "social documentary", began to lose gradually its social commitment. Many of the writers known previously as the most active supporters of the social trend, moved their attempts to other literan areas - criminal novel ("Weapon of hunger" by Meja Mцangi, 1989), love story (Yussuf Dawood's "Off my chest", 1988), even children's literature (books for children in Gikuyu, written by Ngugi wa Thiong'o). However, in the late 80's and early 90's East African Anglophone novel stepped onto a new level of social trend, moving from "social documentary" to "social epic". The authors now are trying to sum up the historical experience of East African countries over a large time span, and to that effect appeal mostly to elaborate and spacious literary forms, such as epic novel. These authors, although chosen one and the same literary form, are showing clearly their inclinations towards different styles of writing. For example, Tanzanian author Moyez Vassanji in his novel "The gunny sack" (1989) makes a rather convincing attempt to replant on East African soil the method of "mythological writing", previously used by such author as Gabriel Garcia Marquez. The novel definitely appeals not only to local reader, but to a wider international audience; on its pages the author manages to restore not only the fate of several generations of Indian family, but even the slightest details of their mentality, using myth as one of the basic means for changing the dimensions of time and space, according to the logic of the narration. The development of Kenyan novel in the early 90's confirms also one of the main tendencies in modem literature - bridging between "elite" and popular fiction. The first attempt of an epic novel in Kenyan Anglophone literature was, oddly enough, made by the veteran of Kenyan popular fiction David Maillu in his "Broken drum" H991). The novel hardly aims the widest reading public - nevertheless, stylistically it bears distinct features of popular fiction, such as crime story, romance, etc. Popular novel in East Africa also shows certain inclination towards urgent social themes, but the authors inevitably uses the artistic means they feel most happy with - that is, the style of popular fiction. For example, the "clash of cultures" - the experience of young Africans studying abroad - is presented in the form of a picaresque ("Times beyond" by Omondi Makoloo, 1992) or love story ("The girl from Uganda" by Tengio Urrio, 1993); feministic problems are spiced with sentimentalism ("Judy the nun" by P .Waweru, 1990); the thoughts on the hardships of younger generation are guised in Bildungs roman ("The plight of succession" by a Tanzanian Prosper Rwegoshora, 1990). At the same time, some authors, who have been ploughing successfully the field of pop fiction for a few decades, show their interest in more elaborate literary forms ("Dedan Kimathi: the real story" by Samuel Kaluga, 1990). All the mentioned facts do not allow us to state that the division into popular and elite novel will disappear within the foreseeable future. However, the most interesting developments seem to take place precisely in the field of bridging between these two branches of East African fiction.

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