Bio

Publications


2016

Macigo, FG, James RM, Ogunbodede E, Gathece LW.  2016.  Sugar consumption and dental caries experience in Kenya. International Dental Journal.

2015

Wangari, VW, Matu NK, Mutave RJ.  2015.  Oral Health practices and gingival status of postpartum women in Kenyatta National Hospital, Kenya. African Journal of oral Health Sciences. 2(2):16-20.
Kimutai, B, Kihara EN, Mutave R, Chindia ML.  2015.  Audit of imaging request forms at a teaching dental hospital. African Journal of oral Health Sciences. 2(2):10-15.
Ogunbodede, EO, Kida IA, Madjapa HS, Amedari M, Ehizele A, Mutave R, Sodipo B, Temilola S, Okoye L.  2015.  Oral Health Inequalities between Rural and Urban Populations of the African and Middle East Region. Advances in Dental Research. 27(1):18–25.
Munene, DM, Mutave RJ, BK K.  2015.  Knowledge, selection and use of bonding agents by dentists in Nairobi. Journal of the Kenya Dental Association. 6(2):281-294.
James, RM, Gathece LW, Kemoli AM.  2015.  Association of fever and diarrhea with infant teething among mothers attending two health centres in Nairobi. Journal of the Kenya Dental Association. 6(2):265-272.

2014

Muange, P, Chindia M, Njiru W, Dimba E, Mutave R.  2014.  Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma: A 6-Month Clinico-Histopathologic Audit in a Kenyan Population. Open Journal of Stomatology. 4:475-483.

2011

Gohil, TR, Mutave RJ, Dimba EAO.  2011.  Effects of chemotherapy on oral health in paediatric oncology patients at the Kenyatta National Hospital. Kenya Dental Association. 2:184-189.

2010

MUTAVE, DRJAMESREGINA.  2010.  Gakonyo M. J, Mutave R.J, Matu N.K, Gathece L.W. Knowledge, practices and attitudes of dental students at the University of Nairobi towards HIV/AIDS patients. Scientific Conference of the Kenya Surgical Society. : Journal of the Kenya Dental Association

2009

Kyale, DS, Mutave JR, W GL, Kisumbi BK.  2009.  Source of oral health motivation, attitudes and practices in adolescents 12-13 years old in Nairobi. Abstract

The aim of the study was to determine the sources of oral health motivation, attitudes and practices of adolescents. A descriptive cross sectional study was conducted among 12-13 year olds in a primary school in Nairobi, Kenya. One hundred and eight pupils participated in the study. A convenience sampling method was used to select the study area. Data was collected using a self administered questionnaire. All children who met the inclusion criteria were recruited to the study. The study revealed that parents were the main source of oral health motivation 88 (96.7%), with teachers contributing the remaining 3 (3.3%). Majority 63 (69.2%) of the respondents had a positive attitude towards their oral health. Most of the respondents brushed daily 85 (93.4%) and were aware that they were using toothpaste containing fluoride. A large percentage of respondents 55 (60.4%) ate cariogenic diet daily and none of them reported any form of tobacco use. Within the findings of this study, it is concluded that the main source of oral health motivation was parents. However, although the children had a positive attitude towards oral health and brushed daily they ate cariogenic diet items daily and half of the study population visited the dentist when they had dental problems.

MUTAVE, DRJAMESREGINA.  2009.  Dental fluorosis, caries experience and snack intake of 13-15 year olds in Kenya M Makhanu, G Opinya, R.J Mutave. East African Medical Journal vol 86 No3; 2009. : East African Medical Journal
MUTAVE, DRJAMESREGINA.  2009.  Compliance to cross infection control measures among Dental students and support staff at the University of Nairobi Dental Hospital. Journal of the Kenya Dental Association vol 1 issue 2, 2009. : Journal of the Kenya Dental Association

2005

MUTAVE, DRJAMESREGINA.  2005.  Management of Dental Waste by Practitioners in Nairobi, Kenya.. African Journal of oral Health Volume 2 Numbers 1 & 2 2005: 24-29. : Osamong LA, Gathece LW, Kisumbi BK, Mutave RJ Abstract
ABSTRACTObjective: Dental wastes are material that has been utilized in dental clinics, which are no longerwanted for use and therefore discarded. Improper disposal of these dental wastes can cause harmto the dentist, the people in immediate vicinity of the dentist, waste handlers and general publicand the environment through production of toxins or as by products of the destruction process.This study aims to determine the knowledge, attitudes and practice on management of dentalwastes among dental practitioners in Nairobi, Kenya.Methods: Descriptive cross-sectional study of 70 dental practitioners practicing in Nairobi,Kenya.Results: A total of 50 dental practitioners were included in the study. Majority had graduatedbetween 1991-1995. 47.5% had only a bachelors degree, 25% had masters 7.5% had PhD and12.5% had postgraduate diploma. Forty five percent of the respondents indicated they haveattended training on management of dental waste while 89.5% had been attending continuousdental education. Forty-two percent of the respondents worked in public institution while the restwere in private practice. Only 48.7% of the practitioners were aware of the existence of wastemanagement guidelines. Only 64% felt it was important to follow the set guidelines, 5% thought itwas tedious, 2% said they were not practical and the rest were not interested in the guidelines.Eighty-two percent of the respondents said that amalgam was toxic if disposed improperly withonly 10.7% indicating pollution to be a consequence of improper disposal of amalgam. Seventysevenpercent of the respondents did not know the hazardous effects of improper disposal ofamalgam. Only half of the respondents stored waste amalgam under water, 25% said they did notknow how to dispose amalgam. All (100%) knew about occurrence of cross-infection withimproper disposal of bloody waste but only 56.1% said they incinerated bloody body waste while24.4% disposed off bloody waste with general waste 35.7% of the respondents indicated thatsharps were hazardous if improperly disposed. Only 52.4% incinerated their pathological wasted.On expired drugs, 7.3% disposed them off as part of general wastes.Conclusion: There is need for continuous professional development on waste management amongdentists in Kenya.
MUTAVE, DRJAMESREGINA.  2005.  Mutave R, Chindia ML, Guthua SW. East Afr Med J. 2005 Jun;82(6):311-3. Post-operative re-construction of dentoalveolar tissue and the mandible and maxillae using prosthetic therapy. East Afr Med J. 2005 Jun;82(6):311-3.. East Afr Med J. 2005 Jun;82(6):311-3.. : East African Medical Journal Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To determine the range of ablative surgery and rehabilitative procedures performed on maxillofacial structures. DESIGN: A retrospective descriptive study. SETTING: University of Nairobi Dental Teaching Hospital. SUBJECTS: Patients operated on at the institutions theatre, and followed up at the University of Nairobi Dental Teaching Hospital Oral Surgery Outpatient Clinic during the period February 1996, August 1998. RESULTS: Forty four patients underwent ablative surgery during the study period. Complete records were available for 38 patients, 27 females and 11 males aged 10 to 79 years (mean 32.6 years). Surgical procedures performed included: partial mandibulectomy, marginal mandibular resection, subtotal maxillectomy, sequestrectomy and enucleation. Six (15.8%) patients who underwent mandibular resection had rigid bone plating. Five (13.2%) patients who had maxillary involvement were given surgical obturators post-operatively with one receiving a complete denture after full recovery. A total of 22 (57.9%) patients who would have reaped benefits from prostheses therapy received none. Individual patient follow-up periods ranged from seven days for two patients who had cyst enucleation to two years for three cases with ameloblastoma, and two cases with squamous cell carcinoma. CONCLUSION: It is concluded that prosthetic rehabilitation of patients undergoing extensive surgery at the University of Nairobi Dental Teaching Hospital is largely inadequate.

2000

1999

MUTAVE, DRJAMESREGINA.  1999.  Mutave R.J. and Kisumbi B.K: Attitude of urban Kenyan population towards replacement of teeth. Preliminary findings.. IADR conference - Kampala 1999. : Journal of Dental Research. Abstract
ABSTRACTObjective: Dental wastes are material that has been utilized in dental clinics, which are no longerwanted for use and therefore discarded. Improper disposal of these dental wastes can cause harmto the dentist, the people in immediate vicinity of the dentist, waste handlers and general publicand the environment through production of toxins or as by products of the destruction process.This study aims to determine the knowledge, attitudes and practice on management of dentalwastes among dental practitioners in Nairobi, Kenya.Methods: Descriptive cross-sectional study of 70 dental practitioners practicing in Nairobi,Kenya.Results: A total of 50 dental practitioners were included in the study. Majority had graduatedbetween 1991-1995. 47.5% had only a bachelors degree, 25% had masters 7.5% had PhD and12.5% had postgraduate diploma. Forty five percent of the respondents indicated they haveattended training on management of dental waste while 89.5% had been attending continuousdental education. Forty-two percent of the respondents worked in public institution while the restwere in private practice. Only 48.7% of the practitioners were aware of the existence of wastemanagement guidelines. Only 64% felt it was important to follow the set guidelines, 5% thought itwas tedious, 2% said they were not practical and the rest were not interested in the guidelines.Eighty-two percent of the respondents said that amalgam was toxic if disposed improperly withonly 10.7% indicating pollution to be a consequence of improper disposal of amalgam. Seventysevenpercent of the respondents did not know the hazardous effects of improper disposal ofamalgam. Only half of the respondents stored waste amalgam under water, 25% said they did notknow how to dispose amalgam. All (100%) knew about occurrence of cross-infection withimproper disposal of bloody waste but only 56.1% said they incinerated bloody body waste while24.4% disposed off bloody waste with general waste 35.7% of the respondents indicated thatsharps were hazardous if improperly disposed. Only 52.4% incinerated their pathological wasted.On expired drugs, 7.3% disposed them off as part of general wastes.Conclusion: There is need for continuous professional development on waste management amongdentists in Kenya.

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