Milk Hygiene in Nomadic Herds in Kenya evaluated by Bacterial Isolation, Bacterial Viability trials in Traditionally Fermenting Milk and Drug Sensitivity

Citation:
MUCHAI PROFKAGIKOM, MWANGI PROFGATHUMAJ. "Milk Hygiene in Nomadic Herds in Kenya evaluated by Bacterial Isolation, Bacterial Viability trials in Traditionally Fermenting Milk and Drug Sensitivity.". In: journal. FARA; 1986.

Abstract:

Microbial contamination of both fresh and fermented milk with Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Streptococcus species and some non-identified bacilli was recorded.  Brucella species were not isolated from any sample in this study.  Streptococcus pyogenes survived in fermenting milk up to 96 hours but Staph.  aureus only survived up to 9 hours.  Milk fermentation markedly reduced bacterial load in the milk probably due to the low PH values, which ranged from 4.2 to 4.9.

Most of the bacteria recovered from both fresh and fermented milk samples were readily sensitive to chloramphenicol, ampicillin, streptomycin and kanamycin: sparingly sensitive to tetraclines but resistant to nitrofurantoin, suphafurazole and colistin sulphate.  Multiple drug resistance involving upto 6 drugs was recorded among the organisms recovered from the milk samples.

Notes:

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