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Mandela P. calling sin, SIN.; Submitted.
R I, Mugambi M. The Curriculum in Perspective. Chisinau: LAP Lambert Academic Publishing ; 2021.
Ebrahim YH. Cambiamento di microtemperatura e forma urbana costruita (Italian) Micro-temperature change and urban built form. Chisinau, Moldova: Edizioni Accademische Italiane, LAP Lambert Academic Publishing; 2020.
I. K, Orodho J. A, J.P M. Concise Statistics; An Illustrative Approach to Problem Solving. MASENO, NAIROBI, KENYA: KANEZJA; 2017.
Enabulele O, Esen E, Gonzalez-Perez MA, Harvey CR, Herrera-Cano A, Herrera-Cano C, Hiko A, Manterola FJ, Kaartemo V, Kihiko MK, Kinoti MW. Climate Change and the 2030 Corporate Agenda for Sustainable Development. Emerald Group Publishing Limited; 2016.
Nguhiu-Mwangi J, Mbithi PMF, Mbuthia P.G. Claw disorders in dairy cows under smallholder zero-grazing units. Saarbrucken: Scholar's Press; 2015.
Nguhiu J, P M F M, Mbuthia P G. Claw Disorders in Dairy Cows Under Smallholder Zero-grazing Units. Saarbrucken, Germany: Scholars' Press; 2015.
Nguhiu-Mwangi J, Mbithi PMF, Mbuthia PG. Claw Disorders in Dairy Cows Under Varying Zero-Grazing Units. Scholars’ Press. ; 2015.
Wasamba P. Contemporary Oral Literature Fieldwork: A Researcher’s Guide. Nairobi: Nairobi University Press; 2015.
In. Counseling skills for counsellors. Nairobi: Jo-Vansallen Publishing Company; 2015.
Nguhiu J, P M F M, Mbuthia P G. Claw Disorders in Dairy Cows Under Smallholder Zero-grazing Units. Saarbrucken, Germany: Scholars’ Press; 2015. Abstract
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Gitao, C.G., Bebora, L.C., Wanjohi. G. Camel Mik Hygiene: Analysis of Camel Milk contamination in Garissa and Wajir Counties in Kenya. OmniScriptum Marketing DEU GmbH Heinrich-Böcking-Straße 6-8 D - 66121 Saarbrücken: LAP LAMBERT Academic Publishing; 2014.978-3-659-58174-8_coverpreview2.pdf
Mogambi H. Chozi Langu. Nairobi: Kenya Literature Bureau; 2014.
Chozi la Jiwe ( children literature) . Nairobi: Kenya Literature Bureau; 2014.
Communication skills for academic excellence. Nairobi: Jo-Vansallen Publishing Company; 2014.
Inyega HN, Inyega JO, Wangamati AS. Communication skills for academic exellence. Nairobi: Jo-Vansallen Publishing Company; 2014.
Maina SM. communication Skills, Edition for University and College Students. Nairobi: The Mwituria Publishers; 2014.
Kaviti L, Gichinga J. Cry of the Heart. Nairobi: Arba Publications Ltd. ; 2014.
Kokwaro JO. Classification of East African Crops. Nairobi: University of Nairobi Press; 2013.University of Nairobi Press
Fanuel Mugwang'a Keheze, Karimi Mwangi Patrick, Walter N, WAITA SEBASTIAN. Copper Based Solar Cell Materials. London: LAP LAMBERT Academic Publishing ; 2013.
Gatumu JC. Counselling and sexually abused children’s academic performance. Saarbrucken, Germany: Lambert academic publishing; 2013.
KIHORO GEOFFREY. CPY 204: Psychology of Ageing. Nairobi: University of Nairobi.; 2013.
KIHORO GEOFFREY. CPY 302: Vocationa l Guidance, Module. Nairobi: University of Nairobi.; 2013.
KIHORO GEOFFREY. CPY 309: Deviant Behaviour. Nairobi: University of Nairobi.; 2013.
Mogambi H. Chozi Langu. Nairobi: Kenya Literature Bureau; 2012.
Oketch Oboth JWB. Cognitive Psychology . Nairobi: Centre for Open and Distant Learning, University of Nairobi; 2012.
P.M M, Okweba D. Combating new Piracy in the Indian Ocean. German: VDM Verlag Dr. Muller; 2012.
Odiemo LO. Community Psychology. Nairobi: University of Nairobi; 2012.
BEN SIHANYA. Constructing Copyright and Creativity in Kenya: Cultural Politics and the Political Economy of Transnational Intellectual Property (due 2012); doctoral dissertation, Stanford Law School (being converted into a book)..; 2012. AbstractWebsite

A cross sectional study of 115 patients admitted at the Department of Orthopedics, Kenyatta National Hospital, Nairobi, Kenya was carried out to determine the prevalence and antibiotic susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from infected wounds. The prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus was 33.0 %. The drugs tested and their corresponding sensitivity was amoxycillin (13.2 %), co-amoxyclav (39.5 %), oxacillin (55.3 %), erythromycin (44.7 %), gentamicin (60.5 %), ciprofloxacin (62.2 %), minocycline (86.8 %), cefuroxime (57.9 %), and clidamycin (84.2 %). These results show the sensitivity profile of Staphylococcus aureus and can be used to choose suitable drugs in the management of wounds for hospitalized patients.

Okumbe(ED)JA. Corporate Governance Training Manual for Corporate Directors. Nairobi: Longhorn Publishers; 2012.
Gatumu HN. CPY 211: BASIC STATISTICS. Nairobi; 2012.
N. WACHEGEPATRICK. CRS 560: AFRICAN CHRISTIAN THEOLOGY. NAIROBI: CENTRE FOR OPEN AND DISTANCE LEARNING ; 2012.crs_560.pdf
N. WACHEGEPATRICK. CRS 561 MODERN TRENDS IN CHRISTIANITY. NAIROBI: CENTRE FOR OPEN AND DISTANCE LEARNING ; 2012.crs_561modern_trends.pdf
MURIITHI EVANSONMURIUKI. CURRICULUM FOR EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION. NAIROBI: CENTRE FOR OPEN AND DISTANCE LEARNING; 2012.
KYALO DN, Nyonje R. Capacity Development for Secondary School Principals in Kenya.. Germany: VDM Verlag Dr. Müller Aktierge Sellschaft & CO.KG, ISBN:978-3-639-349368; 2011.
Obae R. Characteristics of dropouts among upper primary pupils. Beau Bassin, Mauritius: VDM Publishing House Ltd.; 2011.
P.M M, Muluka N. Communication Strategies in Disaster Management. VDM Verlag Dr. Muller, German ISBN 978-3-639358575; 2011.
Oluoch-Kosura W, Wambugu SK;. Conditions for achieving sustained agricultural intensification in Africa: evidence from Kenya.; 2011. AbstractWebsite

This chapter examines the conditions for achieving sustained agricultural intensification using evidence from micro- and macro-data from Kenya, as well as the six 'I's that represent significant proximate variables influencing agricultural performance, namely Incentives, Inputs, Infrastructure, Institutions, Initiatives and Innovations. The chapter further demonstrates how a change in these 'I's affects agricultural productivity. Furthermore, the authors discuss agricultural intensification and a number of public interventions to promote it, and spell out their implications for the realization of Millennium Development Goal of halving, by 2015, the share of people suffering from extreme poverty and hunger. Emphasis is laid on maize production, since the lack of maize signals famine and poverty in Kenya, even when other food crops may be available. The chapter examines the conditions that led to a revitalization of increased agricultural productivity in the period 2003 to 2007, after an enabling policy environment that favoured the six 'I's was put in place. The authors also present scenarios likely to emerge after the skirmishes that rocked the country soon after the December 2007 general elections.

Oluoch-Kosura W, Karugia JT;, Wambugu SK;. Conditions for achieving sustained agricultural intensification in Africa: evidence from Kenya.; 2011. AbstractWebsite

This chapter examines the conditions for achieving sustained agricultural intensification using evidence from micro- and macro-data from Kenya, as well as the six 'I's that represent significant proximate variables influencing agricultural performance, namely Incentives, Inputs, Infrastructure, Institutions, Initiatives and Innovations. The chapter further demonstrates how a change in these 'I's affects agricultural productivity. Furthermore, the authors discuss agricultural intensification and a number of public interventions to promote it, and spell out their implications for the realization of Millennium Development Goal of halving, by 2015, the share of people suffering from extreme poverty and hunger. Emphasis is laid on maize production, since the lack of maize signals famine and poverty in Kenya, even when other food crops may be available. The chapter examines the conditions that led to a revitalization of increased agricultural productivity in the period 2003 to 2007, after an enabling policy environment that favoured the six 'I's was put in place. The authors also present scenarios likely to emerge after the skirmishes that rocked the country soon after the December 2007 general elections.

2. Kyalo DN, Matula DP. Conflict management in Educational Institutions in Kenya: The Art of Avoiding Destructive Conflict Management Strategies in Secondary Schools.. Germany: VDM Verlag Dr. Müller Aktierge Sellschaft & CO.KG, ISBN:978-3-639-337822; 2011.
Jesse N.K. Mugambi CE, Daniel M. Patte GE. Cambridge Dictionary of Christianity. New York: Cambridge University Press; 2010.
Musyoka W. A Casebook on the Law of Succession,. Nairobi: LavvAfrica Publishing (K) Limited,; 2010.
Muchiri J. The Child Narrator: George Lamming’s In the Castle of My Skin. Saarbrucken: VDM Verlag; 2010.
Cockburn J, KABUBO-MARIARA J. Child Welfare in Developing countries ISBN 978-1-4419-6337-6. New York: Springer/PEP/IDRC ; 2010.
OTIENO MROWUOCHESOLOMON. The Church in the Struggle for Democracy in Kenya. MvuleAfrica Publishers, Nairobi; 2010.Website
R.G. OGJJ &. Company Law. Nairobi: Focus Books; 2010.
K.Gakunga D. Comparative Education TFD 401 E-learning Module uploaded in the University of Nairobi E-learning Portal . Nairobi: University of Nairobi e-Learning Portal; 2010.
Muriithi BW;, Ngigi M. Compliance with International food safety standards: Determinants, costs and implications of EurepGap standards on profitability among smallholders' horticultural exporters in Kenya.; 2010. AbstractWebsite

Horticulture provides many developing countries with opportunities for export diversification, poverty alleviation and rural development. However, stringent public and private-sector food-safety standards, for example EurepGap (or GlobalGap), pose a challenge especially to small export farmers. Compliance with these standards entails costly investments that may be a burden to smallholder farmers, failure to which might lead to their exclusion in the global market. This book assesses awareness of the EurepGap standards among smallholder farmers and analyzes the critical factors influencing their compliance. It also identifies the costs of complying with these standards and their implications on profitability of smallholder French bean farming business using a case study of Kirinyaga District in Kenya. The study makes several policy recommendations that could be implemented to enhance and upscale compliance with the standards in the study area. Particularly it highlights the need for synergies between the public and private sector in ensuring compliance with the standards among the smallholder horticultural farmers who face the risk of elimination in the international market.

KORINGURA, J., MACHARIA D, MUNGAI JC, KYALO DN. Conflict Analysis and Resolution . Master in Project Planning and management, Distance learning Study module. Nairobi: University of Nairobi; 2010.
N. WACHEGEPATRICK. CRS 202: INTRODUCTION TO THE NEW TESTAMENT. NAIROBI: CENTRE FOR OPEN AND DISTANCE LEARNING ; 2010.crs_202_final_new_testament.pdf
N. WACHEGEPATRICK. CRS 404: CHRISTIAN THEOLOGY IN AFRICA. NAIROBI: CENTRE FOR OPEN AND DISTANCE LEARNING ; 2010.table_of_content_404.pdfwachege_crs_404_body.pdf
Kiai Wambui, Kiiru Samuel MNUW. The Challenges of Media Training and Practice in East Africa.. Nairobi: University of Nairobi & Ford Foundation; 2009.
Church History 11. Nairobi: Centre for Open and Distance Learning ; 2009.
Sihanya B. Combating Counterfeit Trade in Kenya.; 2009. AbstractWebsite

Product counterfeiting and trade in counterfeit products, labels and packaging involve imitation of genuine products that are marketed under brand names.3 Counterfeit products are becoming a major problem to consumers, innovators and traders in Kenya and globally. Such imitations are usually clones or falsified products, labels and packaging designed to look like those of genuine products. The aim is to confuse or deceive consumers as to their quality, source, origin or legitimacy. Counterfeits are manufactured, processed or supplied by unscrupulous traders who infringe and unlawfully apply other corporations’ or individuals’ innovations and intellectual property (IP).4 The basic thesis in this Chapter is that although there are short-term gains to consumers and the Kenyan economy from counterfeiting, the medium and long-term losses are massive. This Chapter adopts a three-pronged strategy on combating counterfeiting in Kenya. First, I evaluate the nature and extent of counterfeit trade in Kenya in the context of trade liberalization and the development of an information society. I also assess the effects of counterfeit trade on the various economic players including consumers, innovators, traders, investors, and the Kenyan Government. Second, I evaluate the intellectual property regime in Kenya and how IP can combat counterfeiting. I then carefully examine the anti-counterfeiting law and enforcement mechanisms in Kenya, including their effectiveness in addressing the problem. Third, I explore how that law can be reformed to ensure sustainable development by protecting innovators, consumers and other stakeholders.

Sihanya B. Copyright in E-Commerce and Music Industry in Kenya.; 2009. AbstractWebsite

This chapter analyses copyright in the context of e-commerce in Kenya. It explores whether the music industry in Kenya is sufficiently protected in the digital era by focusing on five interrelated themes. Part One explores the interrelationship between e-commerce and intellectual property in Kenya. It discusses e-commerce in the context of patent, trade mark, trade secret and domain names. Part Two, Copyright law in e-commerce. It introduces copyright law; copyright in musical works; music in the Internet; the music industry in Kenya; legal dimensions of online music; and the challenges facing the music industry in Kenya.. Part Three explores copyright enforcement in Kenya with respect to civil and criminal remedies for copyright infringement as well copyright management organizations. We conclude Part Four critically

HAMU PROFHABWEJOHN. Cheche za Moto . Nairobi: Jomo Kenyatta Foundation; 2008.
Collaborative Filtering: A Comparison of Graph-based Semisupervised Learning Methods and Memory-based Methods.; 2008. AbstractWebsite

Collaborative filtering is a method of making predictions about the interests of a user based on interest similarity to other users and consequently recommending the predicted items. There is a widespread use of collaborative filtering systems in commercial websites, such as Amazon.com, which has popularized item-based methods. There are also many music and video sites such as iLike and Everyone’s a Critic (EaC) that implement collaborative filtering systems. This trend is growing in product-based sites. This paper discusses the implementation of graph-based semisupervised learning methods and memory-based methods to the collaborative filtering scenario and compares these methods to baseline methods such as techniques based on weighted average. This work compares the predictive accuracy of these methods on the MovieLens data set. The metrics used for evaluation measure the accuracy of generated predictions based on already known, held-out ratings that constitute the test set. Preliminary results indicate that graph-based semi-supervised learning methods perform better than baseline methods. However, some of the memory-based methods outperform the graph-based semi-supervised learning methods as well as the baseline methods.

Gakunga DK. Comparative Education : East African Perspective. Nairobi: RiverBrooks; 2008.
Gakunga DK. Comparative Education : East African Perspective. Nairobi: RiverBrooks; 2008. Abstract
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Ogana W. Campus Days (Novel). Nairobi: Jomo Kenyatta Foundation; 2007.
WAMBUGU LYDIAH, WANJIRU ANN. Chemistry Practical Book. Nairobi: Pavement Publishers; 2007.
Chaga H. CLS 101 Module: Introduction to Swahili Language Skills . Nairobi: University of Nairobi Press; 2007.
Treue T;. Community-based natural resource management.; 2007. AbstractWebsite

This technical note gives a brief introduction to community-based natural resource management (CBNRM) and how this concept may be used as a development strategy. CBNRM has the triple objective of poverty reduction, natural resource conservation and good governance. The opportunity and challenge is to pursue these objectives simultaneously, as they are not, by default, mutually supportive. Lessons learnt from CBNRM will be useful when designing community-based climate adaptation strategies. Thus, this note is a contribution to an ongoing debate as well as a product of the long-standing experiences of Danida’s environmental portfolio. The note has been produced in cooperation with the Department for Forest, Landscape and Planning, Faculty of Life Sciences at the University of Copenhagen. Many practitioners have contributed through a fruitful peer review process. Dr. Thorsten Treue together with Iben Nathan have been the main contributors to the final note. Involving local communities and securing the rights of poor and marginalised groups in sustainable management of natural resources is a central theme in international development assistance. The poverty-governance-environment link has been further highlighted in recent years through interventions aimed at building capacity for resilience (disaster preparedness) as well as adapting to climate change. A successful implementation of CBNRM often requires changes at three different levels of society: 1) the national level, 2) the local level and the link between these, and 3) the intermediate level. At the national level, policies and the legislative framework normally needs adjustment and revision to establish an enabling environment that makes CBNRM attractive to local communities. At the intermediate level, it is important to promote the model of decentralised natural resource management that is most likely to work under the given political circumstances. In particular, this involves a choice between: (i) devolution of natural resource management authority to elected local governments, and (ii) deconcentration of line agencies, authorising district-level officers to delegate management authority to local communities. At the local level, it is crucial that CBNRM establishes significant economic incentives for managing and conserving the resource, which is closely related to clearly defined and officially supported tenure systems, as well as to revenue-sharing mechanisms. Furthermore, CBNRM should result in a coordination of resource use by numerous individuals, thus establishing an ‘optimal’ rate of production and consumption at the local level as well as for society at large. In practical terms, it is the elaboration, implementation and experience-based revision of resource management plans at local levels that determine the actual performance of CBNRM on the ground. The poverty reduction rationale of CBNRM, as an alternative to open access resource use, is that the total resource value can be maintained or enhanced, and that the costs and benefits of management can be distributed equitably, so that all community members, within a reasonable time horizon, experience a net gain, or at least a zero loss. Resource conservation requires harvest not to exceed increment over the long term. This calls for reasonably accurate knowledge about the extent and growth of the resource, as well as reliable recording of harvest volumes. Even so, CBNRM could still fail at the local level if inefficient rule enforcement allows free-riders to over-harvest the resource, and/or if inequitable distribution of costs and benefits leads to a breakdown of management rules and subsequent over-harvesting or permanent marginalisation of certain groups. Therefore, the establishment and maintenance of good governance or “appropriate decision-making iii arrangements” is the only feasible way to prevent the failure (or ensure the success) of CBNRM. Decision-making arrangements specify who decides what in relation to whom. Good governance at local level can be promoted through CBNRM legislation that establishes democratic conditions of collective choice, so that all members of a community (including women and other potentially vulnerable groups) get the opportunity to participate in defining: (i) the purpose of resource management, and (ii) the resulting management plan, including how it is enforced, and how products and benefits from the common resource are distributed. Furthermore, communities must hold authority to control free-riding by punishing defaulters, and community leaders must be downwards accountable to the people they represent. It would be naïve to assume that, once initiated, CBNRM is a guaranteed self-sustaining success, which needs no monitoring or adjustment. Regular monitoring of CBNRM processes should be conducted to adjust associated policies, legislative framework and implementation strategies, so that failures may be corrected and positive effects enhanced. Monitoring the progress of planned CBNRM activities should be simple and embedded within existing official monitoring systems to ensure sustainability. However, assessment of the degree to which CBNRM is achieving its triple objective should probably be carried out by independent research centres, NGOs and university departments that are not directly engaged in the implementation as such. CBNRM is not a stand-alone solution to poverty, resource degradation and bad governance. Rather it is a development process and constant power struggle. Thus, even after years of implementation, donors are still likely to have a mission in promoting CBNRM. Lessons learnt will feed into the new agenda of community-based adaptation to climate change. Donor support may be channelled as programme-based or as earmarked support for monitoring and research that deliver credible and easily accessible information. Checks and balances can be supported through civil society as well as the media. An informed public debate based on the results of sound monitoring is, in all likelihood, the key to the long-term success of CBNRM.

Rading GO. Concise Notes on Materials Science and Engineering. Victoria BC: Trafford Publishing; 2007.
Rading GO. Concise Notes on Materials Science and Engineering. Victoria: Trafford Publishing; 2007.
Ebrahim YH. Consolidated series: Abstracts . Nairobi, Kenya: Ebenergy Enterprises; 2007.
C0mparative Religion 1. Nairobi: Centre for Open and Distance Learning ; 2006.
Wamitila KW. Chura na ndovu.; 2006.Website
Kameri-Mbote P. Conflict and Cooperation: Making the Case for Environmental Pathways to Peacebuilding in the Great Lakes Region.; 2006. AbstractWebsite

Authoritarian regimes, genocides, and civil wars have plagued countries in the Great Lakes Region in recent years. The region’s nations rely heavily on natural resources—water, minerals, land—for their economic development, as well as for the livelihoods of their people, and many of the region’s conflicts are connected to these resources or other environmental factors. Opportunities for environmental peacemaking in the Great Lakes Region have not yet been isolated, even though there are many examples of cooperation at the national, regional, sub-regional, and local levels. This brief examines the possibility of using environmental management as a pathway to peace in the region.With its prevalence of conflict and transboundary ecosystems, the Great Lakes Region could be a potential model for a future worldwide initiative in environmental peacemaking

Owuor SO, Foeken D. The crops.; 2006.Website
Crossland JIM, Morcom N. The catchment to coast continuum.; 2005.Website
C.O.N K, Anne N. Chosing a Spouse. In Kassim A (2005) True Love Waits(Eds). Nairobi: BARA manual ; 2005.
Shrestha KB;, Jha PK;, Suman S. Commercial distribution of tree seed in small bags - results from a pilot and action research project in Nepal.; 2005. AbstractWebsite

Access to quality tree seed implies specific problems for tree planting farmers in developing countries. Since most of them are smallholders, they need only few seed. Distribution networks usually do not exist for such small quantities. In 2001 it was decided to test a new approach to distribution of tree seed on a pilot basis in Nepal: Commercial distribution of tree seed in small bags through commercial enterprises dealing with horticultural and agricultural seed. In Nepal, such enterprises are known as agro-vets. The development objectives were (a) to increase access to high quality tree seed for farmers, FUG and other small-scale tree-planters, and (b) to support the operations of two tree seed co-operatives, NAFSCOL-Kaski and NAFSCOL-Kabhre by contributing to their increased turnover. The research objectives were to assess the financial, viability and social biodiversity impact of the approach cf. the project description in annex 1. The pilot project ran from 2003-2004 and had two phases. During phase 1, the pilot project was prepared and implemented. Small bags were designed, produced and packed with tree seed from five different fodder species. Agro-vet dealers located in all the different regions of Nepal sold the bags. During phase 2, lessons learned from the pilot project were collected and analysed. Distribution channel: the pilot project confirms that agro-vets can work as channels for reaching small-scale tree planters. There is scope for developing the market further through advertisement and by targeting FUG more directly. Species: the project included five fodder tree species. The choice of these species was appropriate in the sense that the species sold well. Dealers and customers suggested more species to be included. Size of bags: two sizes of bags were produced and distributed with a view to testing which of them would be the most suitable. The smallest bags contained seed for 50 seedlings, the larger bags for 500. The smallest size appeared to be the most suitable, especially for private nurseries, farmers and other small-scale tree planters. The larger size was useful but not required for targeting large-scale tree planters. Design: dealers and customers appreciated the aluminium material and the colourful and attractive design of the bags. The design and the dealers helped convincing the customers to buy the seed. Information on the bags: the respondents found that the information printed on the bags was useful, but requested additional information on sowing season. Some dealers had ordered a second lot of small bags. These bags were not packed properly, which may have implied loss of credibility. Guidelines on germination: guidelines on how to make the seed germinate were elaborated as part of the project. Brochures containing the guidelines were added to the bags and distributed to dealers and other interested persons. Only few of the interviewed customers consulted the guidelines.

Makau BF. Comparative analysis of veterinary drugs delivery mechanisms in the arid lands of Kenya.; 2005. AbstractWebsite

As in other remote, inaccessible pastoral areas of the world, access to quality drugs in a timely and affordable manner remains a major problem in the ASAL areas of Kenya. Several drug delivery mechanisms have been tried by different organisations, but it appears none of them has proved to be satisfactory. This study was therefore launched to carry out a comparative analysis of the different models of running the drug stores, their strengths and limitations, compare their effectiveness and sustainability and provide guidelines for subsequent implementation, monitoring and evaluation of the different delivery systems to ensure effectiveness and value to the pastoral communities. The findings and conclusions in this report are based on observations and interviews with stakeholders and key informants in Nairobi as well as in all the 11 arid districts and one semi- arid district (West Pokot)

Wasamba P, Mutea Z. Curriculum for Trainers on Gender Equality and Women’s Participation in Local Governance. Nairobi: Kenya Oral Literature Association; 2005.
Rose D. CHARACTERISTICS OF DROPOUTS AMONG UPPER PRIMARY PUPILS - TEACHERS' PERCEPTIONS. Germany: VDM Verlag Dr. Muller GmbH & Co. KG; 2004.
PROF. MBITHI PMF. C.M. Mulei and P.M.F. Mbithi (2003). Metabolic and Nutritional Diseases of Food Animals. Published by, University of Nairobi Press.. AWC and FES; 2003. AbstractWebsite

Pain is a perception, an unpleasant experience associated with actual or potential tissue damage. It is usually caused by mechanical, chemical or thermal stimulation of specialised paid receptors (nociceptors) in tissues. In routine veterinary practice, such acute insulsts causing intense stimulation encountered include tissue trauma including surgery, burns and fractures. As veterinary practitioners, we are ethically obliged to prevent paid and suffering where possible and alleviate it, should it occur, as it contributes to increased morbidity and mortality. In order to do this, we needed to be able to assess pain in animals and manage it appropriately. Paid assessment can be made based on anthropomorphism behavioural responses of the patient and clinical signs. The behavioural and physiological responses that accompany paid such as vocalisation, withdrawal reflex guarding of the affected area and increased activity of the sympathetic nervous system are measurable. Pain control in animals can be achieved through limitation of neciceptor stimulation, interruption of peripheral transmission, inhibition of noceceptive transmission at the level of the spinal cord, modulation of brain pathways by systemic administration of analgesics or, though balanced or multimode analgesia by simultaneous use of a number of the above strategies. Although the selection and techniques of administration of individual analgesic drugs vary, local and opioid analgesics, non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, tranquillisers and other combination therapies when used appropriately can control paid and alleviate suffering in animals experiencing pain. This paper looks at paid and its management in animals.

author Jesse N.K. Mugambi. Christian Theology and Social Reconstruction. Nairobi: Acton; 2003.
author Jesse N.K. Mugambi. Christianity and African Culture. Nairobi: Acton; 2002.
Collaborative management of wildlife in Kenya: an empirical analysis of stakeholders' participation, costs and incentives.; 2002. AbstractWebsite

Selected wildlife co-management arrangements in Kenya are analysed using descriptive methods, benefit-cost analysis and econometric models. In 2000, household and community-level data were collected from Kimana and Golini-Mwaluganje (GM) community sanctuaries in the wildlife dispersal areas of Amboseli National Park and Shimba Hills National Reserve, respectively. It is shown that transaction costs arising from landowners' participation in the information acquisition, negotiations and operation activities are not a major factor influencing co-management efficiency. Although the lack of profitability may be a disincentive for landowners' participation, co-management can also create other stronger incentives such as protection of landowners' property rights and economic interests. The importance of structuring the co-management process in such a way that all categories of landowners participate effectively in the information gaining and negotiation phase is emphasized. There is also a need to look into ways of compensating categories or groups of landowners who incur wildlife conservation costs without access to direct benefits.

E.N. PN, Hirschfeld M, Lindsey E, Kimani V, Mwanthi M, Olenja J, Pigott W, Messervy P, Mudongo K, Ncube E, Rantona K, Bale S, Limtragool P, Nunthachaipun P. COMMUNITY HOME-BASED CARE IN RESOURCE-LIMITED SETTINGS. Geneva: THE CROSS CLUSTER INITIATIVE ON HOME-BASED LONG-TERM CARE, NON-COMMUNICABLE DISEASES AND MENTAL HEALTH AND THE DEPARTMENT OF HIV/AIDS, FAMILY AND COMMUNITY HEALTH, WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION; 2002. AbstractWebsite

COMMUNITY HOME-BASED CARE IN RESOURCE-LIMITED SETIINGS
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
6
his document provides a systematic framework for establishing and maintaining community home-based care (CRBC) in resource-limited
settings for people with RIV / AIDS and those with other chronic or disabling conditions. Most CRBC services so far have been established through unsystematic, needs-based efforts. As the RIV / AIDS epidemic continues to grow, many organizations and communities are now considering expanding in a more programmatic approach, and countries are looking for scaled-up responses and national strategies for CRBe. This document therefore provides an important framework to guide governments, national and international donor agencies and community-based organizations (including nongovernmental organizations, faith-based organizations and community groups) in developing or expanding CRBC programmes. The need for such a document has been clearly identified.
CRBC is defined as any form of care given to ill people in their homes. Such care includes physical, psychosocial, palliative and spiritual activities. The goal of CRBC is to provide hope through high-quality and appropriate care that helps ill people and families to maintain their independence and achieve the best possible quality of life.
This document targets three important audiences: policy-makers and senior administrators, middle managers and those who develop and run CRBC programmes. Although the roles and responsibilities of these target audiences differ somewhat, developing effective partnerships among the three is essential. Policy-makers and senior administrators must be involved in developing and monitoring CRBC programmes, and the people who manage and run the programmes must share information and feedback with senior administrators. In this sense, policy and action are interrelated as each partner learns from and guides the other. To this end, this document is divided into four interrelated sections: a policy framework for CRBC; the roles and responsibilities for CRBC at the national, district and local levels of administration; the essential elements of CRBC; and the strategies for action in establishing and maintaining CRBC in resource-limited settings.

Likimani T. Chemistry and its applications.; 2001. Abstract

PREFACE To reap the full benefit of any product available in the market, consumers should know the types of raw materials in the products, the way in which the products perform their job, and the precautions that need to be taken when using the products. With some basic knowledge of chemistry, the small print on the label becomes important to the consumer and may lead to a better selection and use of the product purchased. The first chapter of this book deals primarily with the chemical nature of both living and non-living things. Chapter Two places emphasis on the innate curiosity of man and his use of experimentation in the evolution of important chemical transformation processes that bring about changes in matter. These reaction processes are employed in the chemical industries discussed in the subsequent chapters; their inclusion therefore seeks to bring the study of chemistry into focus in the student's life. The rest of the text material, which can be built on a very thoughtful analysis of chemical theory or a simple notion of atoms, molecules and a few molecular geometries and interactions, enlightens the student on the many ways in which chemical knowledge has been applied to solve practical problems. An innovative approach to the problem of teaching students something about the chemical processes which touch upon their daily lives is discussed under various chemical aspects including: isolation of metals from their ores and salts and their uses, nuclear processes and their applications, the manufacture of soaps and detergents, synthetic fibres and surface-coating products, beauty aids, perfumes and flavouring agents, foods, agrochemical and animal health products, fermentation reaction products and medicines, environmental chemical pollution, chemical poisons and their basis of toxicity, the role of chemistry in industrial and economic development (with a discussion on some critical industries) and, finally, safety precautions against chemical hazards. Although some of the exercises provided at the end of each chapter are meant to test the reader's understanding of concepts, a few open-ended questions have been added to stimulate the bright student and to involve him or her in some of the inevitable controversies of chemical science. A few references have been provided to encourage the enthusiastic student to develop a taste for studying in depth a particular point of interest.

Co-author of Making Informed Choices: A Handbook for Civic Education: Nairobi. CEDMAC, CRE-CO, ECEP, and the Gender Consortium.; 2001.
Njeru G. Co-author of Making Informed Choices: A Trainer’s Manual for Civic Education. . Nairobi: Co-author of Making Informed Choices: A Trainer’s Manual for Civic Education. ; 2001.
O. KG. Changing patterns in water resource tenure in Kenya and mechanisms for resolving emerging conflicts. East African Regional Seminar for Journalists, African Centre for Technology Studies (ACTS), March; 1999. Abstract

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Wang'ombe JK. Capacity of Non.; 1998. Abstract

The author illustrates how qualitative data from open-ended interviews, pile sorts, and triad sorts can be used to test quantitatively for intracultural variation in norms. Specifically, the author tests whether Gusii men and women in the Suneka Division of Kisii District in southwest Kenya have developed a common set of standards in response to symptoms of malaria. In this small sample, the focus is on internal, rather than external, validity. While the findings about Gusii responses to malaria are not generalizable beyond the village where the data were collected, the method described may be used to study cultural similarities across socioeconomic, gender, and other groups.

Control System Analysis and Design.; 1995. AbstractWebsite

This book emphasizes undergraduate topics and the use of CAD programs,while still providing a rigorous treatment of advanced topics and derivation techniques. It instills the basic principles of feedback control essential to all specialty areas of engineering. The first part offers a comprehensive analysis of the fundamentals necessary for feedback control systems analysis. The second part provides thorough coverage of root locus,frequency response and state feedback techniques. The last part includes a number of modern techniques that are useful to the systems design engineer. CAD technology is enhanced by the use of MATLAB problems throughout the text.

Caval syndrome  . Nairobi: University of Nairobi; 1988.
N. WACHEGEPATRICK. CHRIST OUR ELDER: A Christological Study From the Agĩkũyũ Concept of Elder.. NAIROBI: CUEA (Catholic University Of East Africa); 1986.pn_wachegesma.pdf
Yaşargil MG. Clinical {Considerations}, {Surgery} of the {Intracranial} {Aneurysms} and {Results}. Thieme; 1984. Abstract

Clinical Considerations, Surgery of the Intracranial Aneurysma and Results

Yaşargil MG. Clinical {Considerations}, {Surgery} of the {Intracranial} {Aneurysms} and {Results}. Newyork: Thieme; 1984. Abstract

Clinical Considerations, Surgery of the Intracranial Aneurysma and Results

Book Chapter
Kyule MD, Oyamo M. "Cultural resource management in Kenya: a case for legislation review.". In: Kenya from Independence to early 21st century. Nairobi: Nairobi University Press; In Press. Abstract

This paper builds a case for a reconsideration of Kenya’s legislation that relates to cultural and societal heritage resources management by briefly revisiting the circumstances that informed the enactment of the related laws. We present the view that existing legislation has tended to serve corporate, multinational and foreign interests at the expense of local and national interests, and that although these Acts may have somewhat served the country in the past, the legislations have turned the cultural heritage management in Kenya into a lame duck framework of abstractions of policy matters, that are irrelevant and unresponsive to changing local and international circumstances. We highlight contradictions between and within varied Acts, and offer suggestions for remedy that are geared toward the development of a cultural management policy with local ownership and universal compatibility.

Kinoti MW, Meru AK. "Competencies for Green Marketing Success in Emerging Markets.". In: Green Marketing and Management in Emerging Markets. Palgrave Macmillan, Cham; 2021. Abstract

This chapter addresses the critical competencies that provide the requisite skills and knowledge for championing the development and growth of green marketing in emerging markets. The link between environmental responsibility, social change and sustainable business practices has been the concern for practitioners and environmentalist for the past couple of decades in developed countries, and multi-agency teams have been deployed to address emerging issues if any. Besides, deployment of highly focused and committed environmental conscious personnel, there has been a tremendous improvement of innovative manufacturing processes and efficient technologies, leading to successful green marketing systems and programmes. Though, efforts are bearing fruits in emerging markets, on account of countries affiliation to global agencies, such as United Nations Environmental Programme (UNEP) and many others, more need to be done to isolate key soft and hard competencies required to cascade global green marketing solutions to local firms. The chapter illustrates that green competencies, green thinking and rightful employee engagement foster green marketing activities in emerging markets.

Ondicho TG. "Conservation, Power and Politics: Maasai Involvement in Community-Based Conservation in the Amboseli Region of Kenya.". In: African Potentials’ and Natural Resource Management: Against the Image of ‘Deficiency’ and Tyranny of ‘Fortes’. Bamenda: Langaa Research & Publishing Common Initiative Group; 2021.
Kithiia SM. "A Critical Analysis of the Water Quality Impacts on Water Resources in the Athi River Drainage Basin, Kenya.". In: Water Quaity-Factors and Impacts. Rijeka, Croatia: Intech Publishers; 2021.
Otieno SP, Cooke P, Plastow J. "Challenging the Message of the Medium: Scaling Participatory Arts Projects and the Creative Agenda in Kenya.". In: Participatory Arts in International Development . London: Routledge; 2020.
Mwenda JN, Mulaku GC, Chika BA. "Chapter 5: Access to Land for Women in Kenya.". In: A Comparative Study on Access to Land for Women in Eastern Africa . Musanze, Rwanda: EALAN; 2020.
A K, Folayan MO, Sabbah W, El Tantawi M, Ramos-Gomez F. "Country Profile of the Epidemiology and Clinical Management of Early Childhood Caries.". In: Country Profile of the Epidemiology and Clinical Management of Early Childhood Caries. Lausanne: Frontiers Media SA.; 2020.
Otieno, R.O. "The Clouds.". In: Many in One and Other Stories. Nairobi: Nsemia Inc. Publishers; 2019.
Mureithi SM, Verdoodt A, Njoka JT, Olesarioyo JS, Van Ranst E. "Community-Based Conservation: An Emerging Land Use at the Livestock-Wildlife Interface in Northern Kenya. .". In: In Wildlife Management-Failures, Successes and Prospects. London: IntechOpen Limited; 2019.
Mureithi SM, Verdoodt A, Njoka JT, Olesarioyo JS, Van Ranst E. "Community-Based Conservation: An Emerging Land Use at the Livestock-Wildlife Interface in Northern Kenya. .". In: In Wildlife Management-Failures, Successes and Prospects. London: IntechOpen Limited; 2019.
Kemoli AM, Opondo IA. "A compendium on oral health of children around the world: tooth eruption, tooth emergence and developmental dental anomalies of the dental hard tissues.". In: A compendium on oral health of children around the world: tooth eruption, tooth emergence and developmental dental anomalies of the dental hard tissues. NewCastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars publishing; 2019.
“Bahemuka MJ”, “Kivuva J”, “Michuki G”. "Construction of Knowledge Societies: A Postscript.". In: Knowledge for Wealth Creation: A Kenyan Perspective. Nairobi: University of Nairobi Press; 2019.
Kabira WM. "Changing the Mainstream Celebrating Women’s Resilience.". In: Changing the Mainstream Celebrating Women’s Resilience.; 2018.
Jalang’o DA, Otieno DJ, Oluoch-Kosura W. "Commercialisation of African Indigenous Vegetables in Kenya.". In: Value Chain Development for Food Security in the Context of Climate Change: Perspectives and Lessons from a North-South Capacity Building Project. Berlin: Verlag Dr. Koster; 2018.
A. K, Folayan. MO. "A compendium on Oral health of children around the world – Early childhood caries.". In: A compendium on Oral health of children around the world – Early childhood caries. New York: Nova Biomedical Publishers; 2018.
Rukwaro P. "Conservation of Natural and Cultural Heritage in Kenya." www.ucl.ac.uk/ucl-press; 2018.
Kibugi R. "Common but differentiated responsibilities in a North-South context: assessment of the evolving practice under climate change treaties.". In: Elgar Encyclopedia of Environmental Law. Edward Elgar Publishing Limited; 2018:. Abstract
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Maweu JM, Ndohvu JB. "A Case of Voice Poverty? Towards a New Paradigm in the Fight Against Poverty in Kenya.". In: Poverty and Human Rights: East African Experiences. Nairobi: Focus Publishers ltd; 2017.
Ebrahim YH. "Chapter 6: Conclusion and recommendation.". In: The effects of urban built form on micro-temperature change. Nairobi, Kenya: Ebenergy Enterprises; 2017.
Onjala J, OSCAR OTELE. "China’s Africa Policy on Trade, Investment and Development Assistance: An Overview and Assessment.". In: The Background and Practice of China-African Cooperation on Resources Development. Yunnan University Press; 2017.
Phiri IA, et al. "Climate Change and Food Security: A Challenge for African Christianity.". In: Anthology of African Christianity. Oxford: Regnum; 2017.
S MJ, M. G. "Conserving Forest Biodiversity through Value Chain Development: The Case Study of Karura Forest.". In: A review of best practices for selected biodiversity-based value chains that promotes pro-poor conservation in the Horn of Africa. NAIROBI: ICRAF; 2017.
Omosa LK, Midiwo JO, Kuete V. "Curcuma longa.". In: Medicinal Spices and Vegetables from Africa Therapeutic Potential against Metabolic, Inflammatory, Infectious and Systemic Diseases. Academic Press; 2017:. Abstract

Curcuma longa L. (Zingiberaceae), commonly known as turmeric, is native to Southwest India with its rhizomes being the source of a bright yellow spice with various medicinal applications. It is widely cultivated throughout the tropics and similarly used for it medicinal value, in the cosmetic industry, and as a dye. Herein, the medicinal potentials of this plant as well as that of one of its bioactive constituents, curcumin, has been compiled. Turmeric can be regarded as a drug for the management of many diseases, such as cancer, inflammations, microbial infections, diabetes, arthritic, muscular disorders, biliary disorders, anorexia, cough, diabetic wounds, hepatic disorders, and sinusitis. Curcumin also displayed various pharmacological activities including antioxidant, antineoplastic, antiviral, antiinflammatory, antibacterial, antifungal, antidiabetic, anticoagulant, antifertility, cardiovascular protective, hepatoprotective, and immunostimulant activities in animals. This chapter provides baseline information to encourage the use of this plant in the management of various human ailments.

Jerono P. "Changamoto za Wazalendo.". In: Siri ya Bwanyenye. Nairobi: Spotlight Publishers (E.A) Limited; 2016.
BEVLYNE SITHOLE, TORBEN BIRCH-THOMSEN, OLE MERTZ, TREVOR HILL THILDEBECHBRUUNANDTHUITATHENYA, BRUUN THILDEBECH, Thenya T. "Collaborative education across continents: Lessons from a partnership on sustainable resource management education.". In: Higher Education and Capacity Building in Africa. 711 Third Avenue, New York, NY 10017: Routledge; 2016.higher_education_and_capacity_building_i.pdf
"country and regional profiles of volcanic hazards and risks (Part one) Appendix B.". In: GLOBAL VOLCANIC HAZARDS AND RISKS. London: Cambridge Univeristy Press; 2016.global_hazards_and_risks-country_profile.pdf
Njogu PM, Chibale K. "Current and Future Strategies for Improving Drug Discovery Efficiency.". In: Attrition in the Pharmaceutical Industry: Reasons, Implications and Pathways Forward. Hoboken: John Wiley & Sons, Inc; 2016.
Christiana Z. Peppard, Andrea Vicini SJ. "C.A. Mumma-Martinon.". In: Just Sustainability. New york: Orbis books , Maryknoll; 2015.1._towards_environmental_sustainability_-_ctewc.pdf
Wachira-Towey IN. "Chapter 2: Informal skilling in the construction sector of Nairobi, Kenya.". In: USHEPiA CROSSING BOUNDARIES: KNOWLEDGE FROM THE CONTINENT .; 2015.
and Gachene, C. K. K. KBANMW. "Climate change and crop yield in Sub-Saharan Africa.". In: Sustainable Intensification to Advance Food Security and Enhance Climate Resilience in Africa. Springer International Publishing. ; 2015.
and Gachene, C. K. K. KBANMW. "Climate change and crop yield in Sub-Saharan Africa.". In: Sustainable Intensification to Advance Food Security and Enhance Climate Resilience in Africa. Springer International Publishing. ; 2015.
Opondo OE, D.Kaulemu. "C.A. Mumma-Martinon.". In: Catholic Church Leadership in Peace Building in Africa. Paulines Publications Africa; 2014.
Michira JN. "Changamoto katika Uteuzi wa Vitabu vya Kufundishia Kiswahili Nchini Kenya.". In: Dhima na Majukumu ya Asasi Mbali Mbali katika Ukuzaji wa Kiswahili. Nairobi: Focus Books; 2014.
J.N. M. "Changamoto katika Uteuzi wa Vitabu vya Kufundishia Kiswahili nchini Kenya.". In: Ukuzaji wa Kiswahili: Dhima Na Majukumu ya Asasi Mbali Mbali,. nairobi: Focus Books. ISBN 9966-01-224-1; 2014.
Okello-Odongo W, Omulo EOT, Ayienga E. "Chapters: 1 in Trends in distributed computing applications.". In: Trends in distributed computing applications. Nairobi; 2014.
Okello-Odongo W, Omulo EOT, Ayienga E. "Chapters: 10 in Trends in distributed computing applications.". In: Trends in distributed computing applications. Nairobi; 2014.
Okello-Odongo W, Omulo EOT, Ayienga E. "Chapters: 11 in Trends in distributed computing applications.". In: Trends in distributed computing applications. Nairobi; 2014.
Okello-Odongo W, Omulo EOT, Ayienga E. "Chapters: 13 in Trends in distributed computing applications.". In: Trends in distributed computing applications. Nairobi; 2014.
Okello-Odongo W, Omulo EOT, Ayienga E. "Chapters: 6 in Trends in distributed computing applications.". In: Trends in distributed computing applications. Nairobi; 2014.
Okello-Odongo W, Omulo EOT, Ayienga E. "Chapters: 7 in Trends in distributed computing applications.". In: Trends in distributed computing applications. Nairobi; 2014.
Okello-Odongo W, Omulo EOT, Ayienga E. "Chapters: 8 in Trends in distributed computing applications.". In: Trends in distributed computing applications. Nairobi; 2014.

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