Bio

Publications


2006

Achola, MA.  2006.  Nationalism and the Struggle for Independence in Kenya, 18th and 19th M. The Contribution of the Luo and Abaluyia. , Naivasha
Achola, MA.  2006.  Youth, Poverty and Destitution in Nairobi: 1945-60, 28th – 30th June. Past and Past Perspective. , IFRA and British Institute in Eastern Africa in Nyeri
Achola, MA.  2006.  Maternal and Child Welfare in Nairobi to 1960, July 7th and 8th. Maternal and Child Welfare in Nairobi to 1960. , Ruaraka,Nairobi

2005

AMOLO, PROFACHOLAMILCAH.  2005.  “Public Health Policy in an Urban Setting: The Case of Maternal and Child Welfare in the First Ten Years of Moi’s Rule”, Proceedings of African Health and Illness Conference at University of Texas in Austin, USA.. Abstract

Colonial Health Policies were characterized by strict racial segregation .  This described  residence, services and consequently the levels of health and the causes of death among the different races.  On the eve of independence , health services were  amalgamated  and the first post colonial government declared its intention of ensuing equality of services  for all and therefore greatly improved health and well being for those who had suffered discrimination before, namely Africans and poor Asians. This paper explores the policies and challenges of health delivery in the first fifteen years of post colonial rule, in   Nairobi, Kenya.  It bases its arguments from  data drawn  from and examination of maternal and child welfare policies and their implementations.  The central  argument is that intentions were laudable.  But  by the end of  Kenyatta’s regime the challenges  faced by the government were beginning to impact negatively on maternal and child welfare programmes in Nairobi.

2002

AMOLO, PROFACHOLAMILCAH.  2002.  “Colonial Policy and Urban Health in Nairobi” in Azania, Journal of the British Institute in Eastern Africa Vol XXXVI – XXXVII – 2001 – 2002 by Andrew Burton (ed) British Institute in Eastern Africa, Nairobi.. Abstract

Colonial policy makers argued that they were  bringing civilization and better standards of living to Africans.  One perceived problem they had to contend with  was the “ignorance” of their subject peoples.  In health delivery, in particular, colonial administrators believed that ignorance accounted for the poor levels of health among Africans, and that knowledge and that knowledge and other preventive measures would greatly enhance standards of living, for instance, among urban Africans. In this paper we test this philosophy against colonial urban health policy’s and show that racism in the delivery of services  greatly undermined African and Asian health in order to afford  high quality services for Europeans in Nairobi.

2000

AMOLO, PROFACHOLAMILCAH.  2000.  A History of the Agricultural Society of Kenya 1901 - 1996 to be published by News Pack Series, Nairobi.. In Nairobi 1928-62 in African Urban Quaterly.. Abstract

Colonial policy makers argued that they were  bringing civilization and better standards of living to Africans.  One perceived problem they had to contend with  was the “ignorance” of their subject peoples.  In health delivery, in particular, colonial administrators believed that ignorance accounted for the poor levels of health among Africans, and that knowledge and that knowledge and other preventive measures would greatly enhance standards of living, for instance, among urban Africans. In this paper we test this philosophy against colonial urban health policy’s and show that racism in the delivery of services  greatly undermined African and Asian health in order to afford  high quality services for Europeans in Nairobi.

AMOLO, PROFACHOLAMILCAH.  2000.  Preventive Health and Colonial African Urban.. Policies in Nairobi in African Urban Quarterly.. Abstract

Colonial policy makers argued that they were  bringing civilization and better standards of living to Africans.  One perceived problem they had to contend with  was the “ignorance” of their subject peoples.  In health delivery, in particular, colonial administrators believed that ignorance accounted for the poor levels of health among Africans, and that knowledge and that knowledge and other preventive measures would greatly enhance standards of living, for instance, among urban Africans. In this paper we test this philosophy against colonial urban health policy’s and show that racism in the delivery of services  greatly undermined African and Asian health in order to afford  high quality services for Europeans in Nairobi.

AMOLO, PROFACHOLAMILCAH.  2000.  Proverty, Health and Race in a Colonial Setting: The Case of Maternal and Child Welfare Services.. In Nairobi 1928-62 in African Urban Quaterly.. Abstract

Colonial policy makers argued that they were  bringing civilization and better standards of living to Africans.  One perceived problem they had to contend with  was the “ignorance” of their subject peoples.  In health delivery, in particular, colonial administrators believed that ignorance accounted for the poor levels of health among Africans, and that knowledge and that knowledge and other preventive measures would greatly enhance standards of living, for instance, among urban Africans. In this paper we test this philosophy against colonial urban health policy’s and show that racism in the delivery of services  greatly undermined African and Asian health in order to afford  high quality services for Europeans in Nairobi.

AMOLO, PROFACHOLAMILCAH.  2000.  Troubled to Death in Religion and Health by Kinot, H.W. and Getui, M. (eds.) Transafric Press, Nairobi.. By E.A. Atieno-Odhiambo (ed), pp 145-183, Based, Switzerland, PSP Publishers.. Abstract

Colonial policy makers argued that they were  bringing civilization and better standards of living to Africans.  One perceived problem they had to contend with  was the “ignorance” of their subject peoples.  In health delivery, in particular, colonial administrators believed that ignorance accounted for the poor levels of health among Africans, and that knowledge and that knowledge and other preventive measures would greatly enhance standards of living, for instance, among urban Africans. In this paper we test this philosophy against colonial urban health policy’s and show that racism in the delivery of services  greatly undermined African and Asian health in order to afford  high quality services for Europeans in Nairobi.

AMOLO, PROFACHOLAMILCAH.  2000.  The Public Health Policies of the Nairobi Municipal/City Council 1945-63 in African Historians and African Voices: Essays Presented to Professor Bethwell A. Ogot on his Seventieth Birthday.. By E.A. Atieno-Odhiambo (ed), pp 145-183, Based, Switzerland, PSP Publishers, April.. Abstract

Colonial policy makers argued that they were  bringing civilization and better standards of living to Africans.  One perceived problem they had to contend with  was the “ignorance” of their subject peoples.  In health delivery, in particular, colonial administrators believed that ignorance accounted for the poor levels of health among Africans, and that knowledge and that knowledge and other preventive measures would greatly enhance standards of living, for instance, among urban Africans. In this paper we test this philosophy against colonial urban health policy’s and show that racism in the delivery of services  greatly undermined African and Asian health in order to afford  high quality services for Europeans in Nairobi.

AMOLO, PROFACHOLAMILCAH.  2000.  The Public Health Policies of the Nairobi Municipal/City Council 1945-63 in African Historians and African Voices: Essays Presented to Professor Bethwell A. Ogot on his Seventieth Birthday.. By E.A. Atieno-Odhiambo (ed), pp 145-183, Based, Switzerland, PSP Publishers.. Abstract

Colonial policy makers argued that they were  bringing civilization and better standards of living to Africans.  One perceived problem they had to contend with  was the “ignorance” of their subject peoples.  In health delivery, in particular, colonial administrators believed that ignorance accounted for the poor levels of health among Africans, and that knowledge and that knowledge and other preventive measures would greatly enhance standards of living, for instance, among urban Africans. In this paper we test this philosophy against colonial urban health policy’s and show that racism in the delivery of services  greatly undermined African and Asian health in order to afford  high quality services for Europeans in Nairobi.

1991

AMOLO, PROFACHOLAMILCAH.  1991.  Imperialism, Nationalism and Communalism; The Lessons of India in Proceedings of Seminar Commerating the Birth Centenary of Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru, Nairobi.. Published by Were Press.. Abstract

Colonial policy makers argued that they were  bringing civilization and better standards of living to Africans.  One perceived problem they had to contend with  was the “ignorance” of their subject peoples.  In health delivery, in particular, colonial administrators believed that ignorance accounted for the poor levels of health among Africans, and that knowledge and that knowledge and other preventive measures would greatly enhance standards of living, for instance, among urban Africans. In this paper we test this philosophy against colonial urban health policy’s and show that racism in the delivery of services  greatly undermined African and Asian health in order to afford  high quality services for Europeans in Nairobi.

AMOLO, PROFACHOLAMILCAH.  1991.  Women in Economic Activities - Siaya District in Women and Development in Kenya - Siaya District, by G. Were, C. Suda and J. Olenja, eds. Institute of African Studies, University of Nairobi.. In Nairobi 1928-62 in African Urban Quaterly.. Abstract

Colonial policy makers argued that they were  bringing civilization and better standards of living to Africans.  One perceived problem they had to contend with  was the “ignorance” of their subject peoples.  In health delivery, in particular, colonial administrators believed that ignorance accounted for the poor levels of health among Africans, and that knowledge and that knowledge and other preventive measures would greatly enhance standards of living, for instance, among urban Africans. In this paper we test this philosophy against colonial urban health policy’s and show that racism in the delivery of services  greatly undermined African and Asian health in order to afford  high quality services for Europeans in Nairobi.

AMOLO, PROFACHOLAMILCAH.  1991.  With N. Senkomago: Themes in East African History.. University of Nairobi Press.. Abstract

Colonial policy makers argued that they were  bringing civilization and better standards of living to Africans.  One perceived problem they had to contend with  was the “ignorance” of their subject peoples.  In health delivery, in particular, colonial administrators believed that ignorance accounted for the poor levels of health among Africans, and that knowledge and that knowledge and other preventive measures would greatly enhance standards of living, for instance, among urban Africans. In this paper we test this philosophy against colonial urban health policy’s and show that racism in the delivery of services  greatly undermined African and Asian health in order to afford  high quality services for Europeans in Nairobi.

1990

AMOLO, PROFACHOLAMILCAH.  1990.  Women in Economic Activities - Laikipia District in Women and Development in Kenya - Laikipia District by G. Were, C. Suda and J. Olenja eds. Institute of African Studies, University of Nairobi.. Journal Vol.4 No.2, 1990.. Abstract

Colonial policy makers argued that they were  bringing civilization and better standards of living to Africans.  One perceived problem they had to contend with  was the “ignorance” of their subject peoples.  In health delivery, in particular, colonial administrators believed that ignorance accounted for the poor levels of health among Africans, and that knowledge and that knowledge and other preventive measures would greatly enhance standards of living, for instance, among urban Africans. In this paper we test this philosophy against colonial urban health policy’s and show that racism in the delivery of services  greatly undermined African and Asian health in order to afford  high quality services for Europeans in Nairobi.

AMOLO, PROFACHOLAMILCAH.  1990.  Towards the Definition of a British Colonial Labour Policy, Makerere Historical.. Journal Vol.4 No.2, 1990.. Abstract

Colonial policy makers argued that they were  bringing civilization and better standards of living to Africans.  One perceived problem they had to contend with  was the “ignorance” of their subject peoples.  In health delivery, in particular, colonial administrators believed that ignorance accounted for the poor levels of health among Africans, and that knowledge and that knowledge and other preventive measures would greatly enhance standards of living, for instance, among urban Africans. In this paper we test this philosophy against colonial urban health policy’s and show that racism in the delivery of services  greatly undermined African and Asian health in order to afford  high quality services for Europeans in Nairobi.

AMOLO, PROFACHOLAMILCAH.  1990.  Labour Metropolitan Capital and the Colonial State.. Transafrican Journal of History Vol. 19, 1990.. Abstract

Colonial policy makers argued that they were  bringing civilization and better standards of living to Africans.  One perceived problem they had to contend with  was the “ignorance” of their subject peoples.  In health delivery, in particular, colonial administrators believed that ignorance accounted for the poor levels of health among Africans, and that knowledge and that knowledge and other preventive measures would greatly enhance standards of living, for instance, among urban Africans. In this paper we test this philosophy against colonial urban health policy’s and show that racism in the delivery of services  greatly undermined African and Asian health in order to afford  high quality services for Europeans in Nairobi.

1989

1988

AMOLO, PROFACHOLAMILCAH.  1988.  History of West Africa to 1800. University of Nairobi Press.. Journal Vol.4 No.2, 1990.. Abstract

Colonial policy makers argued that they were  bringing civilization and better standards of living to Africans.  One perceived problem they had to contend with  was the “ignorance” of their subject peoples.  In health delivery, in particular, colonial administrators believed that ignorance accounted for the poor levels of health among Africans, and that knowledge and that knowledge and other preventive measures would greatly enhance standards of living, for instance, among urban Africans. In this paper we test this philosophy against colonial urban health policy’s and show that racism in the delivery of services  greatly undermined African and Asian health in order to afford  high quality services for Europeans in Nairobi.

1979

AMOLO, PROFACHOLAMILCAH.  1979.  Trade Unionism and Colonial Authority; A Case Study of Sierra Leone, 1930-1945.. Transafrican Journal of History, Vol VII Nos. 1and 2, 1979.. Abstract

Colonial policy makers argued that they were  bringing civilization and better standards of living to Africans.  One perceived problem they had to contend with  was the “ignorance” of their subject peoples.  In health delivery, in particular, colonial administrators believed that ignorance accounted for the poor levels of health among Africans, and that knowledge and that knowledge and other preventive measures would greatly enhance standards of living, for instance, among urban Africans. In this paper we test this philosophy against colonial urban health policy’s and show that racism in the delivery of services  greatly undermined African and Asian health in order to afford  high quality services for Europeans in Nairobi.

1977

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