Bio

Prof. Madara Ogot

Prof. Madara Ogot holds a BSE in Mechanical Engineering from Princeton University, PhD in Mechanical Engineering from Penn State University, MBA (Strategic Management) from Rutgers University and a PhD in Business Administration (Strategic Management) from the University of Nairobi. Prof. Ogot has published widely in refereed journals and has mentored and supervised post-graduate students both in Mechanical Engineering (with a focus on stochastic design optimization, transportation and engineering education) and strategic management (with a focus on small and medium enterprises).

PreviewAttachmentSize
madara-ogot-cv_no-pics.pdf1.32 MB

Publications


2019

Kovacic, Z, Musango JK, Ambole LA, Buyana K, Smit S, Anditi C, Mwau B, Ogot M, Lwasa S, Brent AC, others.  2019.  Interrogating differences: A comparative analysis of Africa’s informal settlements. World Development. 122:614–627.: Elsevier Abstract

Urban development in Africa is a very diverse and ambivalent phenomenon with aspects that do not fall neatly into global standards. Informal settlements therefore challenge governance by standards. We argue that quantifying and interrogating differences offers a better basis for governance. By drawing on a comparative analysis of three different informal settlements in Sub-Saharan Africa, this paper explores what differences reveal about the governance of informal settlements. The paper uses an urban societal metabolism approach, focussed on gender, energy and health, based on questionnaires and focus group discussions in Enkanini (Stellenbosch, South Africa), Mathare (Nairobi, Kenya), and Kasubi-Kawaala (Kampala, Uganda). The contribution of the paper is both empirical and theoretical. Empirically, we provide new evidence about the metabolism of urban informality at multiple levels of analysis: the individual, the household and the settlement. Findings show the gender asymmetries in urban poverty and the intricate links between energy choices, health and economic status. Theoretically, we argue that different levels of analysis produce different understandings of urban informality, and that analyzing informal settlements only by population aggregates means missing information. We conclude by arguing that understanding differences leads to the formulation of modest and localised goals, which are better able to take into account the complexity of urban informality.

Ambole, A, Musango JK, Buyana K, Ogot M, Anditi C, Mwau B, Kovacic Z, Smit S, Lwasa S, Nsangi G, others.  2019.  Mediating household energy transitions through co-design in urban Kenya, Uganda and South Africa. Energy Research & Social Science. 55:208–217.: Elsevier Abstract

Approaches to providing sustainable energy in cities have generated considerable interest in academic and policy circles. The development of this body of work, however, has not shed much light on the modes of intermediation that are needed to reconfigure urban energy systems towards sustainability in energy-poor countries. This paper focuses on the role of academics as knowledge intermediaries who can trigger cross-sector collaborations around innovations for a sustainable energy transition in African cities. The research presented here was generated by an interdisciplinary research team made up of partners in Kenya, Uganda and South Africa. The research partners set out to better understand how sustainable energy transitions can be achieved through collaborative efforts between community members, experts and policy actors in the three countries. This paper provides evidence-based reflections on how the research partners used participatory methods to facilitate solution co-design and knowledge co-production over a period of two years under the Leading Integrated Research for Agenda 2030 in Africa (LIRA 2030) program. A key knowledge outcome of the research partnership is an improved understanding of how transdisciplinary research across the sub-region can be used to unearth the socio-spatial, cultural and political dimensions of energy in relation to other urban services such as health and housing. Based on this understanding, the paper proposes transdisciplinary co-design as a promising approach to providing sustainable energy in urban informal settlements in Sub-Saharan Africa.

2018

Muriuki, BK, Ogot M.  2018.  Online food ordering among food outlets in Nairobi. AJBUMA JOURNAL. 4, Number 1 Abstract

Internet is the prototype of the global information infrastructure. Firms are using the Internet primarily for sales and service by advertising and providing customers with relevant information about a product or service. This paper describes the emerging implications of Internet technology as an evolving medium that offers restaurants limitless opportunities for e-commerce and for creating lasting relationships with customers. It dampens the bargaining power of channels by providing companies with new and more direct avenues to customers .The Internet provides an efficient means to order products. Online ordering being one of the e-commerce initiatives has emerged as an alternative avenue for food outlets to grow their sales. It offers more opportunities for interactive and personalised marketing as well as ease, speed and precision for the consumer. Food-outlets are able to offer the service through their own websites, multi-restaurant sites, mobile applications, and text ordering. Studies have shown that online food ordering can result in an increase in revenue, average check value, volume of sales, frequency of sales, order accuracy, productivity, improved convenience and customer relationship management. On line food ordering is new in Kenya. Few studies have been done in Kenya to determine the extent and distribution of online ordering by food outlets, and preference for distribution channels. From a population of 408 middle to upscale food outlets in Nairobi, this study sought answers to these questions. The results show that 23.7% of the outlets currently offer online ordering. The offerings were found to be independent of the restaurant type, but dependent on the type of cuisine offered. The characterization provided by this study lays the ground work for future work on the impact adoption has had on business performance.

Ogot, M.  2018.  Innovation Research Symposium. Abstract

The overarching argument in this paper is two-pronged. First, it is asserted that Kenya
has a lot of potential for innovation, technology development, and the creation of intellectual
property intensive goods, services, and works. However, there are serious weaknesses or
limitations in the legal and regulatory frameworks on intellectual property and innovation
valuation, and commercialisation as well as general corporate and constitutional governance.
The second argument is to the effect that scholarship and practice in business and law in
Kenya need to urgently focus on intellectual property audit, valuation, commercialization,
securitization and taxation. This will enable innovators and all key stakeholders to benefit
from the copyright, trade mark, patent, trade secret, utility model, industrial design, plant
or animal breeder’s rights and other forms of intellectual property and innovation that have
been developed and that need to be nurtured.

Key Words. Intellectual property, innovation valuation, commericalisation

2017

Ogot, MM.  2017.  Feasibility on the Use of Pre-Compressed Scrap Tire Strips as Components of Laminated Building Structures. International Journal of Engineering Research in Africa. 28:21–31.: Trans Tech Publ Abstract

This study developed the necessary underlying experimental data and models to demonstrate the feasibility of using pre-compression of scrap tire strips as components of laminates within building structures. The approach presents an economical alternative for the reuse of scrap tires, while accounting for the tire material properties that may not be directly suitable for use in building structures. The proposed approach exploits the elasticity of the tire material as the basis for creating adhesion between the strip tire laminates. Pre-compression of the tire laminates creates frictional forces that prevent layer separation, and able to withstand winds up to 140 mph. Both experimental and theoretical approaches are presented to show the approaches potential.

Ogot, M, Okudan Gül E.  2017.  Educating for Complex Problem Solving Using Theory of Inventive Problem Solving (TRIZ). Learning to Solve Complex Scientific Problems. :271–298.: Routledge Abstract

This chapter focuses on a potential remedy for the situation: adoption of the Theory of Inventive Problem Solving (TRIZ), a systematic problem-solving methodology that provides a structured process during the initial stages of design and supports the problem-solving process by providing design information that novice designers may not possess. It provides steps that allow design teams to explore nontraditional solutions and not restrict themselves to common, comfortable ones. The latter problem can be addressed by introducing a small subset of the TRIZ toolset as part of existing design courses. The case study presents a brief summary of results from a formal ideation assessment of two cohorts of first-year students in the same introductory engineering design course. Although it provides a vast and powerful set of tools, this chapter has presented a reduced toolset that is easy to learn and can be incorporated into …

Mungai, E, Ogot M.  2017.  Generic strategies and firm performance: An investigation of informal sector micro-enterprises in Kenya. International Journal of Business and Management. 12:148., Number 3 Abstract

Micro-enterprises (MEs) have been shown to collectively be the largest employer in most developing countries
thus playing a significant role in the countries economies. Using informal sector micro-enterprise furniture
makers (wood and metal) in Nairobi, Kenya and based on Porter's competitive business strategies typology, this
study sought to determine if the strategies employed by the informal sector MEs fit within the typology
framework, and if membership within the strategic groups in the typology are a predictor of better business
business performance. From the study, although membership within the two focus strategic groups of
differentiation and low cost was confirmed, unlike studies done with medium and large enterprises, membership
was not found to be a predictor of better business performance. Porter's typology may therefore not adequately
capture the competitive business activities relevant to and directly by MEs, presenting an opportunity for
research into the development of competitive business strategy typologies directly derived from their activities
and therefore applicable to them.

Keywords: competitive business typology, micro-enterprises, business performance, informal sector

2014

Ogot, M.  2014.  Evidence on Challenges Faced by Manufacturing Informal Sector Micro-Enterprises in Nairobi and Their Relationship with Strategic Choice. International Business Research. 7:119., Number 6: Canadian Center of Science and Education Abstract

The study sought to determine the challenges faced by Informal Sector Micro-Enterprises in the manufacturing sector as well as establish what influences, if any, they have on their strategic choice. Porter's competitive business strategy model formed the theoretical framework for strategic choice. A total of 135 enterprises were sampled from six regions in Nairobi, Kenya. From the study, 30 main challenges were identified and ranked. The top three challenges for the sector were Competition, High Cost of Production and Lack of Adequate Capital. A cross-reference with strategic choice found that, enterprises experiencing challenges of High Cost of Production,

2013

Nyasetia, OTACHIBARNABAS.  2013.  The Influence of Entreprenuarial Personality, Human Capital and Entry Barriers on Performance of Entreprenuers in The Informal Transport Business In Nairobi, Kenya. Kenya (Doctoral dissertation, school of business, University of Nairobi). Abstract

Entrepreneurship is believed to be the driving force behind economic and social development of nations. In today‘s capitalistic system, entrepreneurs make an accelerated contribution to the economic growth and development of countries through the creation of small enterprises. In major world economies, these enterprises are associated to their overall economic growth and employment, hence the reason why research on this area is very critical. In carrying out the above study, the researcher was guided by five theories of entrepreneurship; the resourced-based, the social cultural, the psychological approach, the ecological and the institutional theory. Due to the nature and requirement of the study, the researcher was biased towards the use of two of the five theories mentioned above; the resourced-based and the psychological approach theory. The study was conducted in Nairobi, Kenya and the target was the Matatu entrepreneurs, operating the fourteen sitter public vehicles. Since its inception in Nairobi, the Matatu business has grown both in size and volume. This is assumed to indicate good business performance. However, despite the growth, it is only a few entrepreneurs who have succeeded. This is the problem this study attempted to investigate. The overall objective of this study was to determine the factors influencing performance of Matatu business in Nairobi, Kenya. This was a cross-sectional study and stratified random sampling technique was used to select the sample. Based on the routes and regions, a sample of 364 registered Matatu owners was picked and questionnaires given out giving a response rate of 95%. Results from respondents were analysed using both descriptive and inferential statistics which indicated that performance in Matatu business was a function of but not limited to, personality traits, human capital, government policies, entry barriers and the management of registered Matatu welfare bodies. The findings from the study revealed that vital information touching on this business were missing in government records. One of the major findings of the study was the positive contribution of the registered industry welfare bodies towards the success of the Matatu business. Another major finding from the study touched on the human capital. That though education is important, the same was not a major performance factor in Matatu business.

2012

Ogot, M, Nganga W.  2012.  Anchoring and Weighting Knowledge Economy and Knowledge Indices as Improved Measures of a Country's Readiness for the Knowledge Economy: A Case Study of Kenya. OIDA International Journal of Sustainable Development. 4:25–40., Number 10 Abstract

This study sought to develop a set of indices better able to track a country's readiness for the knowledge economy. The new indices, the Anchored Knowledge Index and the Anchored Knowledge Economy Index are based on the World Bank (WB) knowledge economy framework. The rationale for the introduction, and the procedures to calculate the new indices are presented. The WB indices provide for rank-ordered normalization based on the latest data available for a benchmarking group of countries. The proposed anchored set of indices, however, provides for a relative ordering of the data. Relative-order (weighting) determines by how much each country, along a particular indicator, is better (or worse) than the others. The new indices address the short-coming of rank-order where as long as the relative positions of the benchmarking countries remain the same, the indices do not change even though the gaps between countries could be decreasing (desired) or increasing (cause for alarm). Further, the subject country now appears twice, based on both the latest data available, and a baseline (anchor) from the World Bank Knowledge Assessment Methodology 2009 data. Using Kenya as a case study, a basic scorecard for Kenya is proposed and used for the calculation of the indices for Kenya and five benchmark countries, Singapore, South Africa, Japan, South Korea. The results clearly illustrate the efficacy of the proposed approach in tracking a countries readiness for the knowledge economy.

Ogot, MM.  2012.  A generic competitive business strategies typology for micro-enterprises. European Journal of Business and Management. 4, Number 20: Citeseer Abstract

The important role of the micro enterprises (ME) sector in generating growth, creating jobs and reducing poverty,
especially in developing countries is widely acknowledged. Literature on competitive business strategy typology
development and validation, however, reveals a significant focus on small, medium and large enterprises, with virtual absence of any discourse on MEs. Although several competitive business strategies (CBS) typologies can be found in the literature, they have mainly been developed from and validated on medium to large enterprise data. These
typologies, therefore, may not be fully applicable to MEs. The new typology of generic competitive business
strategies for MEs described in this paper is built on two dimensions of Collaboration and Competency, yielding
four generic types, representing four broad types of strategic groups better suited than current models, in providing avenues for MEs seeking competitive advantage. The new typology provides a concise model relevant to MEs, providing a structured set of consistent and well understood guidelines for choice of adaptation by owner/managers who are typically involved, whether formally or informally, in an incremental process of strategic formulation and implementation.

Keywords: Generic Strategy Typology, Informal Sector, Micro Enterprises, Competitive Advantage

Mungai, EN, Ogot M.  2012.  Gender, culture and entrepreneurship in Kenya. International Business Research. 5:175., Number 5: Canadian Center of Science and Education Abstract

n/a

2011

Ogot, MM.  2011.  Game Theory in Strategic Management. Abstract

Game theory provides a formal language for describing conscious, goal-oriented, decision-making processes involving one or more players, where there is an interdependence of outcomes. This paper seeks to explore the potential of using game theory in strategic management. From the presented review of the current literature, the paper illustrates that the strength of game theory in strategic management lies in its ability to provide insights into competitive environments and strategies.

Ogot, M.  2011.  Conceptual design using axiomatic design in a TRIZ framework. Procedia Engineering. 9:736–744.: Elsevier Abstract

This paper explores the symbiotic relationship that can be established between axiomatic design and TRIZ, capitalizing on each method‘s strengths and simultaneously minimizing their weaknesses. Through a contextual example the paper illustrates how axiomatic independence axiom principles can be utilized to select appropriate standard solutions once a physical contradiction has been identified. It concludes by showing ways to use the same AD principles to qualitatively evaluate generated designs.

2009

Mungai, EN, Ogot M.  2009.  Ethnicity, culture and entrepreneurship in Kenya. Abstract

This study presents a preliminary investigation into the differences amongst four ethnic communities in Kenya–Kamba, Kalenjin, Kikuyu and Luo–on their perceptions on entrepreneurship, as well as the cultural influences on their members motivational and core self-evaluation psychological factors. Two such factors known to be closely linked to one’s propensity to entrepreneurship were investigated: risk aversion and locus of control. The study found significant differences between communities, suggesting that certain cultures may foster an entrepreneurial spirit within its members more than others. In addition, the levels of risk aversion and locus of control within members of the different ethnic communities were found to be positively correlated to the perception those communities have on entrepreneurship.

2008

Pradeep, G, Ogot MM.  2008.  A compromise experimental design method for parametric polynomial response surface approximations. Quality control and applied statistics. 53:69–74., Number 1: Executive Sciences Institute Abstract

Información del artículo A compromise experimental design method for parametric polynomial response surface approximations.

Ogot, MM, Okudan GE, Simpson TW, Lamancusa JS.  2008.  A framework for classifying disassemble/analyse/assemble activities in engineering design education. Journal of Design Research. 7:120–135., Number 2: Inderscience Publishers Abstract

Disassemble/analyse/assemble (DAA) activities of an artifact pervade many undergraduate engineering courses in the USA as they provide useful ‘hands-on’learning components. DAA activities are central to product dissection and reverse engineering activities used by many engineering practitioners as part of their industry’s benchmarking and competitive analysis processes. Although the two terms are used interchangeably in the literature and as part of course titles, we argue that they are different activities based on their roles, objectives and outcomes when used in engineering education. This paper presents a classification framework for DAA activities in engineering education that differentiates between product dissection and reverse engineering in the context of the desired educational goals. Relevant examples from existing classes and the literature are presented, and implementation challenges are discussed.

2007

Ogot, M, Okudan Gül E.  2007.  The Needs Problem Matrix: Providing Some Order to the Chaotic Ideation Fuzzy Front End. age. 12:1. Abstract

The fuzzy front end of the ideation process can often be chaotic, disorganized and seemingly haphazard, especially to student novice designers. Presented with a large array of pre-ideation tools and methods that are supposed to assist them in generating concepts that solve the correct problem, and take into account all aspects of the problem, students are often overwhelmed with information, or simply unable to see the connections or relevance of the data generated from the tools, students begin to view these pre-ideation design process steps as ‘busy work’. The Needs-Problem Matrix (NPM) aims to tie seemingly disparate data from several pre-ideation tools together, presenting student designers with clear connections and a path forward in the ideation process. Use of the NPM ensures that relevant information is not omitted or ignored during concept generation. The NPM incorporates information garnered from patent analyses, black-box models, detailed customer needs analyses, and a design structure matrix used to establish design functional hierarchy. The NPM provides a flow of information from one tool to the next, clearly showing how they are all related, and illustrating what role each plays in the ideation process. Finally, the NPM also serves as a means to clearly document collected pre-ideation information and to aid in the decision making process.

Ogot, M, Okudan G.  2007.  A student-centred approach to improving course quality using quality function deployment. International Journal of Engineering Education. 23:916., Number 5: TEMPUS PUBLICATIONS IJEE, ROSSMORE,, DURRUS, BANTRY, COUNTY CORK 00000, IRELAND Abstract

The aim of this study was to develop an approach based on the QFD method to use appropriate pedagogies found in the literature, that will lead to an increase in student satisfaction with their education experience in a redesigned course. The key elements of the approach are to obtain and categorize in the students’ own words, attributes that would constitute a good course, and a good instructor. Mapping these attributes to established pedagogies, coupled with continuous assessment and refinement ensures that there is not a mismatch between the student and faculty expectations. The approach was successfully implemented in a first-year engineering design course that had previously undergone a major revision in course content and delivery, resulting in very poor student evaluations at semester’s end and general student dissatisfaction. Maintaining the new content, the QFD-based approach was able to significantly increase student satisfaction.

Ogot, M, Okudan Gül E.  2007.  Systematic creativity methods in engineering education: a learning styles perspective. International Journal of Engineering Education. 22:566., Number 3: TEMPUS PUBLICATIONS Abstract

The traditional approach to creativity (using methods such as brainstorming, C-sketch, morphological charts, scamper, etc.) calls upon the designer to look inward for inspiration. TRIZ, on other hand, invites the designer to use a ready pool of knowledge for inspiration. TRIZ does not discount the use of the traditional approaches. On the contrary, TRIZ ensures that design teams use these traditional methods in a systematically directed manner by carrying out intelligent idea generation in areas where other people have solved a similar general design problem. The main focus of this paper is to look at systematic creativity methods, such as TRIZ, from a learning styles perspective. Three learning styles dominant in the engineering education literature are explored: MBTI, Kolb and Felder-Silverman. For each it was found that the tasks required of each of the TRIZ steps matches a broader range of engineering student learning styles, than the sole use of brainstorming.

2006

Okudan, Gül E, Ogot M, Rao G.  2006.  An Investigation On Design Effectiveness And Efficiency Of Teams Equipped With Design Information Support Tool (Dist). age. 11:1. Abstract

Design ideation continues to be one of the mysterious and yet a very important part of the design process. In the past, there have been studies related to how people generate ideas, why some are more productive in idea generation than others, etc. However, the mystery remains because not being able to directly reach designer’s mind limits our comprehension of the process. Despite this fact however, by studying the use of various idea generation methods, we can better support the idea generation process. As such, this paper presents a study on the effectiveness of TRIZ, a systematic ideation technique, in comparison to most widely used brainstorming. Results indicate that design teams that apply TRIZ during the idea generation are more productive.

Ogot, M, Kelly B.  2006.  Simulated Annealing Computational Requirements Reduction for Reliability-Based High-Fidelity Aerodynamic Shape Design. 44th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting and Exhibit. :339. Abstract

Recent research efforts in Multi-disciplinary Design Optimization (MDO) have concentrated
on the development of optimization methods that incorporate uncertainty present in design
variables and/or from noise variables to perform robust or reliability-based design. This work
presents a simulated annealing (SA) approach within the framework of highfidelity 'black-
box'analysis codes for aerodynamic shape design. The analysis codes are restricted to
inexpensive (seconds per analysis iteration) or moderately expensive (minutes per analysis …

Okudan, G, Ogot M, Rao G, others.  2006.  Design Information Support Tool (DIST): Its Development and Effectiveness Investigation. ASME 2006 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference. :341–348.: American Society of Mechanical Engineers Digital Collection Abstract
n/a
Mohammed, S, Okudan Gül E, Ogot M.  2006.  Tolerance for Ambiguity: An Investigation on Its Effect on Student Design Performance? age. 11:1. Abstract

Design is a common activity for most disciplines in engineering. Therefore, introductory
engineering courses are developed to include design activities as the main driver for the
curriculum. Despite this fact, however, it can not be concluded that the implementation of
design teaching is done in a way conducive to student learning. While there could be several
reasons for this, this paper specifically investigates the effect of tolerance for ambiguity on
student design performance. An analysis of the data collected for this investigation reveals the
beneficial effects of higher tolerance for ambiguity on increased efficacy, satisfaction, and
conflict resolution in the context of an open-ended, team-based, industry-sponsored engineering
design project.

Keywords: Design teams, tolerance for ambiguity, efficacy, design performance.

George, P, Ogot MM.  2006.  A compromise experimental design method for parametric polynomial response surface approximations. Journal of Applied Statistics. 33:1037–1050., Number 10: Taylor & Francis Abstract

This study presents a compromise approach to augmentation of experimental designs, necessitated by the expense of performing each experiment (computational or physical), that yields higher quality parametric polynomial response surface approximations than traditional augmentation. Based on the D-optimality criterion as a measure of experimental design quality, the method simultaneously considers several polynomial models during the experimental design, resulting in good quality designs for all models under consideration, as opposed to good quality designs only for lower-order models, as in the case of traditional augmentation. Several numerical examples and an engineering example are presented to illustrate the efficacy of the approach.

Keywords: Response surface method, surrogate models

Okudan, Gül E, Mohammed S, Ogot M.  2006.  An investigation on industry-sponsored design projects' effectiveness at the first-year level: potential issues and preliminary results. European Journal of Engineering Education. 31:693–704., Number 6: Taylor & Francis Abstract

This paper presents the preliminary work for developing guidelines to ensure that industry-sponsored projects in first-year courses aid, not hamper, retention of students. Specifically, the overall research plan includes the following steps: (1) investigating the appropriateness of industry projects in a required introduction to engineering design course (approximately 1000 students per year), (2) assessing the impact of industry-sponsored projects on first-year students' learning and retention, and (3) promoting an awareness of issues involved in successfully introducing industry projects in the first year. It is expected that the outcomes of this work will result in guidelines widely applicable by other institutions looking into or currently using industry projects in the first year, thereby addressing the recognized national need of increasing retention rates, especially amongst women and minorities.

This paper covers a review of potential factors affecting industry-sponsored projects' appropriateness at the first year, and related preliminary data.

Keywords: Engineering design, Industry-sponsored projects

Okudan, G, Ogot M, Shirwaiker R, others.  2006.  An investigation on the effectiveness of design ideation using TRIZ. ASME 2006 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference. :953–961.: American Society of Mechanical Engineers Digital Collection Abstract

Design ideation continues to be one of the mysterious and yet a very important part of the design process. In the past, there have been studies related to how people generate ideas, why some are more productive in idea generation than others, etc. However, the mystery remains because not being able to directly reach designer’s mind limits our comprehension of the process. Despite this fact however, by studying the use of various idea generation methods, we can better support the idea generation process. As such, this paper presents a study on the effectiveness of TRIZ, a systematic ideation technique, in comparison to most widely used brainstorming. Results indicate that design teams that apply TRIZ during the idea generation are more productive.

Ogot, M, Okudan Gül E.  2006.  The five-factor model personality assessment for improved student design team performance. European Journal of Engineering Education. 31:517–529., Number 5: Taylor & Francis Abstract

Researchers have long noted the correlation of various personality traits and team performance. Studies relating aggregate team personality traits to team performance are scattered in the literature and may not always be relevant to engineering design teams. This paper synthesizes the results from applicable Five-Factor Model (FFM)-based personality studies related to engineering design team performance, into a form that can be readily used by non-experts—engineering faculty and students. In addition, an approach is presented where aggregate data is visually presented to recognize patterns that correspond to strength and existence of personality traits within the team as measured by the FFM model while maintaining student confidentiality. With this approach, identification of team strengths and weaknesses stemming from the personality trait distribution is simplified. An assessment of the usability of the approach—completed in two first-year engineering courses—is presented to demonstrate its potential.

Keywords: Team performance, Five-Factor Model, Design teams

Ogot, M, Okudan GE.  2006.  Integrating systematic creativity into first-year engineering design curriculum. International Journal of Engineering Education. 22:109., Number 1: TEMPUS PUBLICATIONS DUBLIN INST TECHNOLOGY, BOLTON ST, DUBLIN, IRELAND Abstract

Since the lack of creative potential in graduating engineers has been and continues to be a concern
for industry leaders, most educators have added a common ideation approachÐbrainstormingÐto
engineering design curricula. However, because brainstorming requires the designer to look inward
for inspiration, it can be a daunting task, which is not always fruitful. Some systematic creativity
methods, on the other hand, use solution patterns derived from problems similar to the one being
solved. These methods have typically been introduced in senior or graduate elective courses, if at all.
This paper presents the rationale for, and our experience with introducing one of these methods, the
theory of inventive problem solving (TRIZ) in a first-year engineering design course. In addition, a
study, comparing the ideation quantity in course sections that used TRIZ against control sections
that did not, is presented. Results indicate that student teams from sections, where TRIZ was
taught, generated substantially more feasible design concepts for an industry-sponsored design
problem that was common to all sections.

Keywords: creativity; inventive problems; TRIZ

2005

Okudan, GE, Ogot MM, Mohammed S, Wu X.  2005.  Effective Design Project Management with a Spreadsheet Based Approach. Abstract

The use of team projects as a way to teach engineering design is pervasive across all
engineering disciplines and throughout the curriculum. The success of any design team--
both in learning design concepts and performing well--requires that students have a good
grasp of technical and management aspects of the design process. Accordingly, poor
management or lack of communication within a team and between teams and their faculty
advisor/instructor will typically result in a mediocre project, no matter how technically …

Okudan, Gül E, Mohammed S, Ogot M, Wu X.  2005.  A Comprehensive Investigation on Industry-Sponsored Design Projects’ Effectiveness at the First-Year Level: Phase I. age. 10:1. Abstract

This paper presents the preliminary work for developing guidelines to ensure that the
industry sponsored projects in first-year courses aid, not hamper retention of students.
Specifically, the overall research includes the following steps: (1) investigating the
appropriateness of industry projects in a required introduction to engineering design course
(~1,000 students/year), (2) assessing the impact of industry- sponsored projects on first-year
students’ learning and retention, and (3) promoting an awareness of issues involved in
successfully introducing industry projects at the first year. It is expected that the outcomes of
this work will result in guidelines widely applicable by other institutions looking into or
currently using industry projects at the first year, thereby addressing the recognized national
need of increasing retention rates, especially amongst women and minorities.

This paper covers a review of potential factors affecting industry-sponsored projects’
appropriateness at the first year, and related preliminary data.

Okudan, Gül E, Ogot M.  2005.  A Student Centered Approach to Improving Course Quality Using Quality Function Deployment (QFD). age. 10:1. Abstract

The aim of this study was to develop an approach based on the QFD method to use appropriate
pedagogies found in the literature, that will lead to an increase in student satisfaction with their
education experience in a redesigned course. The key elements of the approach are to obtain and
categorize in the students’ own words, attributes that would constitute a good course, and a good
instructor. Mapping these attributes to established pedagogies, coupled with continuous
assessment and refinement ensures that there is not a mismatch between the student and faculty
expectations. The approach was successfully implemented in a first-year engineering design
course that had previously undergone a major revision in course content and delivery, resulting
in very poor student evaluations at semester’s end and general student dissatisfaction.
Maintaining the new content, the QFD-based approach was able to significantly increase student
satisfaction.

Rutkowski, R, Okudan Gül E, Ogot M.  2005.  Transfer of Learning Between Solid Modelers: An Investigation of Icon Recognition. age. 10:1. Abstract

Selecting the right solid modeling software is a complex, multi-criteria decision making problem.
There are many issues a decision-maker needs to take into account, such as ease of learning,
educational materials built into the software, learning curve issues, performance of the software
for different solid modeling functions, operations and utilities, and cost. Beyond selecting the
right software, the decision-maker should also be concerned about (1) conceptual learning of the
solid modeling topics while “the right software” is being used, and (2) transfer of conceptual
learning between solid modelers. This is because a sound conceptual learning might increase the
probability of learning another solid modeling software in less time.

Accordingly this paper investigates the impact of icon recognition as an aid to transfer
conceptual learning between solid modelers. The investigation includes a review of the literature
on icon design and usage as it relates to solid modeling, in addition to an experiment in which
the icon recognition correctness and duration for over 20 operation icons were compared across
two modelers. The results shed light into the impact of icon designs on the transfer of learning
between solid modelers using the correct recognition counts as the transfer measure.

Madara, O.  2005.  Improving the acoustics in a historic building using axiomatic design and TRIZ. Proceedings of the TRIZ Conference, Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, State University, Pennsylvania. Abstract

This article investigates the use of TRIZ and Axiomatic Design to solve the problem of poor acoustics in
the historic Schwab Auditorium on the Penn State University Park campus. The problem is dissected to its
functional requirements and the design parameters which govern the requirements. TRIZ and Axiomatic
Design are then used to create an uncoupled design which solves all the functional requirements with one
design parameter each. Finally there is a suggestion on how to combine all of the solutions to solve the
poor acoustic problem in Schwab Auditorium.

Keywords: Axiomatic Design, Acoustics, Physical Contradictions

George, P, Ogot M.  2005.  A compromise method for the design of parametric polynomial surrogate models. ASME 2005 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference. :799–806.: American Society of Mechanical Engineers Digital Collection Abstract

This study presents a compromise approach to augmentation of response surface (RS) designs to achieve the desired level of accuracy. RS are frequently used as surrogate models in multidisciplinary design optimization of complex mechanical systems. Augmentation is necessitated by the high computational expense typically associated with each function evaluation. As a result previous results from lower fidelity models are incorporated into the higher fidelity RS designs. The compromise approach yields higher quality parametric polynomial response surface approximations than traditional augmentation. Based on the D-optimality criterion as a measure of RS design quality, the method simultaneously considers several polynomial models during the RS design, resulting in good quality designs for all models under consideration, as opposed to good quality designs only for lower order models as in the case of traditional augmentation. Several numerical and an engineering example are presented to illustrate the efficacy of the approach.

Kankey, A, Ogot M.  2005.  Improving the acoustics in a historic building using axiomatic design and TRIZ. The TRIZ Journal. Abstract

This article investigates the use of TRIZ and Axiomatic Design to solve the problem of poor acoustics in
the historic Schwab Auditorium on the Penn State University Park campus. The problem is dissected to its
functional requirements and the design parameters which govern the requirements. TRIZ and Axiomatic
Design are then used to create an uncoupled design which solves all the functional requirements with one
design parameter each. Finally there is a suggestion on how to combine all of the solutions to solve the
poor acoustic problem in Schwab Auditorium.

Keywords: Axiomatic Design, Acoustics, Physical Contradictions

2004

Ogot, MM, Okudan Gül E.  2004.  School of Engineering Design and Professional Programs The Pennsylvania State University. age. 9:1. Abstract

This paper introduces a spreadsheet-based method of integrating project management
techniques into project-based engineering courses. The use of a spreadsheet approach
alleviates (1) the need for institutions to purchase additional commercial project
management software and (2) additional training of faculty and students on how to use
the software. Spreadsheet programs, for example Microsoft Excel, are already
entrenched in college computer laboratories with students and faculty having familiarity
with their use. We present our experiences in implementing this approach in one section
(32 students) of a freshman introduction to engineering design course. A preliminary
assessment is also presented.

Okudan, Gül E, Ogot M.  2004.  Incorporating Project Management Methods Into Engineering Design Projects: A Spreadsheet Based Approach. age. 9:1. Abstract

This paper introduces a spreadsheet-based method of integrating project management techniques into project-based engineering courses. The use of a spreadsheet approach alleviates (1) the need for institutions to purchase additional commercial project management software and (2) additional training of faculty and students on how to use the software. Spreadsheet programs, for example Microsoft Excel, are already entrenched in college computer laboratories with students and faculty having familiarity with their use. We present our experiences in implementing this approach in one section (32 students) of a freshman introduction to engineering design course. A preliminary assessment is also presented

UoN Websites Search