Bio

PROF. IRUNGU, LUCY W.

Personal Information

Biography

Publications


Submitted

JP, E, S E, J K, LW I.  Submitted.  Biology of the coconut bug Pseudotheraptus wayi on French Beans. . Journal of Insect Science .

In Press

JP, E, J K, LW I, F H.  In Press.  Description of pre-adult stages of the coconut bug, Pseudotherapthus wayi .. Journal of Insect Science .

2018

Tumuhaise, V, Ekesi S, Maniania NK, Tonnang HEZ, Tanga CM, Ndegwa PN, Irungu LW, Srinivasan R, Mohamed SA.  2018.  Temperature-dependent growth and virulence, and mass production potential of two candidate isolates of Metarhizium anisopliae (Metschnikoff) Sorokin for managing Maruca vitrata …. African Entomology. 26(1):73-83.
Cham, DT, Fombong AT, Ndegwa PN, Irungu LW, Nguku E, Raina SK.  2018.  Megaselia scalaris (Diptera: Phoridae), an Opportunist Parasitoid of Honey Bees in Cameroon. African Entomology. 26(1):254-258.

2017

Mutuku, FM, Ngugi HN, Ndenga BA, Musunzaji PS, Mbakaya JO, Aswani P, IRUNGU LUCYW, Mukoko D, Vulule J, Kitron U, LaBeaud AD.  2017.  Characterization and productivity profiles of Aedes aegypti (L.) breeding habitats across rural and urban landscapes in western and coastal Kenya.
Bobadoye, BO, Ndegwa PN, IRUNGU LUCY, Fombong AT.  2017.  Vulnerable Habitats Alter African Meliponine Bee’s (Hymenoptera: Apidae) Assemblages in an Eastern Afromontane Biodiversity Hotspot. International journal of insect science. 9:1179543317709788.
GITHINJI, EDWARD, IRUNGU LUCY, Ndegwa P, ATIELI FRANCIS, MACHANI MAXWEL.  2017.  Effects of kdr gene frequencies on major malaria vectors’ resting behaviour in Teso sub-counties, western Kenya. THE KASH 7 ABSTRACT SUBMISSION.
GITHINJI, EDWARD, IRUNGU LUCY, Ndegwa P, ATIELI FRANCIS, KEMEI BRIGID, AMITO RICHARD, OMBOK MAURICE, WANJOYA ANTONY, Mbogo CM, MATHENGE EVAN.  2017.  Effects of target-site insecticide resistance on major malaria vectors’ biting patterns and entomological inoculation rates in Teso sub counties, western Kenya. THE KASH 7 ABSTRACT SUBMISSION.
GITHINJ, EDWARD, IRUNGU LUCY, Ndegwa P, ATIELI FRANCIS, KEMEI BRIGID, AMITO RICHARD, OMBOK MAURICE, WANJOYA ANTONY, Mbogo CM, MATHENGE EVAN.  2017.  Effects of target-site insecticide resistance on major malaria vectors’ biting patterns and entomological inoculation rates in Teso sub counties, western Kenya. THE KASH 7 ABSTRACT SUBMISSION.
Cham, DT, Fombong AT, Ndegwa PN, IRUNGU LUCYW, Raina SK.  2017.  Scientific note on the first report of Varroa destructor in Cameroon. Journal of Apicultural Research. 56(4):397-399.
Ngugi, HN, Mutuku F, Ndenga B, Siema P, Maleka H, IRUNGU LUCY, Mukoko D, Vulule J, Kitron U.  2017.  CHARACTERIZATION OF LARVAL HABITATS OF AEDES AEGYPTI IN KENYA. 95(5):56-57.
Ngugi, HN, Mutuku FM, Ndenga BA, Musunzaji PS, Mbakaya JO, Aswani P, IRUNGU LUCYW, Mukoko D, Vulule J, Kitron U, LaBeaud AD.  2017.  Characterization and productivity profiles of Aedes aegypti (L.) breeding habitats across rural and urban landscapes in western and coastal Kenya. Parasites & vectors. 10(1):331.

2016

Kangethe, LN, Ahmed H, Omar S, Gathirwa J, Kirira P, Kaniaru S, Kamau T, Kimani F, Joseph K Nganga, IRUNGU LUCY.  2016.  Synergistic Antiplasmodial Activity of Artemisia annua fractions against in vitro cultures of Plasmodium falciparum. African Journal of Pharmacology and Therapeutics. 5(4)
Bobadoye, BO, Ndegwa PN, IRUNGU LUCY, Ayuka F, Kajobe R.  2016.  Floral Resources Sustaining African Meliponine Bee Species (Hymenoptera: Meliponini) in a Fragile Habitat of Kenya. Journal of Biology and Life Science. 8(1):42-58.

2015

Kasili, S, Ngure PK, Anjili CO, Karanja RM, Kaburi J, Muthoni M, Kinuthia G, MarthKiarie, Nzau A, Kepha S, Maniania NK, IRUNGU LUCYW, Ngumbi PM.  2015.  Effects of Metarhizium anisopliae on sand fly populations in their natural habitats in Marigat sub-County, Baringo County, Kenya.
Irungu, LW, Srinivasan R, Maniania NK.  2015.  V. Tumuhaise, S. Ekesi*, SA Mohamed, PN Ndegwa 2. International Journal of Tropical Insect Science. 35(1):34-47.
Cham, DT, Fombong AT, Ndegwa PN, IRUNGU LUCYW, Raina S.  2015.  Diversity of honey bee (Apis mellifera) subspecies and their pests in Cameroon.
Olanga, EA, Okombo L, IRUNGU LUCYW, Wolfgang R Mukabana.  2015.  Parasites and vectors of malaria on Rusinga Island, Western Kenya. Parasites & vectors. 8(1):250.

2012

PM, N, L. RL, LW. I, C. KJ, O. AC.  2012.  Nocturnal activities of phlebotomine sand flies (Diptera: Psychodidae) in Baringo County, Kenya.. African Journal of Health Sciences . 23:298-305.
CO, A, PM N, LW. I.  2012.  Natural and experimental studies on domestic animal infections with visceral and cutaneous Leishmaniasis in Kenya. African Journal of Health Sciences . 23:292-297.
TF, A, F. H, PN N, LW I.  2012.  Life history of Oplostomus haroldi (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) unde laboratory conditions and a description of its third instar larva.. International Journal of Tropical Insect Science. AbstractInternational Journal of Tropical Insect Science

The life history of Oplostomus haroldi (Witte), a recently reported pest of honeybee colonies in East Africa, was studied for the first time under laboratory conditions. Adult O. haroldi collected from beehives in the coastal part of Kenya were reared on a mixture of moist sterilized soil and cow dung. At 25 ± 2 °C, 50 ± 5% relative humidity and a 10 h light-14 h dark photoperiod, the laid eggs took 11.9 ± 1.3 days to hatch into a curved pear-shaped scarabaeiform larva with a well-developed head and thoracic legs. The first, second and third larval instars lasted 14.6 ± 2.6, 17.5 ± 2.4 and 34.6 ± 2.4 days, respectively. The pupal stage, which was marked by formation of a mud cocoon, lasted 31.1 ± 6.7 days with the adults surviving for 2–6 months under laboratory conditions, suggesting that the beetle is multivoltine. A detailed taxonomic description of the external morphology of the third instar larva is provided

M, MH, LW I, PN N.  2012.  The diseases of coffee under the changing climate: the established situation in Kenya. . Journal of Agricultural Science and Technolog. 2(2):265-267.
M, MH, LW I, PN N.  2012.  Population dynamics of predacious phytoseiid mites, Euseius kenyae and coffee thrips, Diarthrothrips coffeae and their Interactions in coffee agro ecosystems in Kenya.. International journal of Science and nature.. 3(2):316-323. AbstractInternational Journal of Science and Nature

Several strategies are employed in management of insect pests. Among these, chemical control is a priority to most farming communities where pest incidences occur while other existing options such as biological control are rarely considered. In coffee farming agro ecosystems, there are indigenous biological control agents such as the predacious phytoseiid mites, Euseius kenyae (Swirski and Ragusa) that have the potential to manage secondary pests like coffee thrips, Diarthrothrips coffeae Williams. This study was conducted to assess the population dynamics of E. kenyae and D. coffeae as well as their interactions under coffee agro ecosystems where various soil fertilizer sources and selective insecticides were applied as treatments. The populations of both E. kenyae and D. coffeae fluctuated during the three years study period. The E . kenyae suppressed the population of D. coffeae under various treated coffee blocks. There was negative correlation between E. kenyae and D. coffeae in year 2006 and 2008 where the increasing population of E. kenyae decreased that of D. coffeae. In year 2007, positive correlation between E
. kenyae and D. coffeae was observed in some of the treatments where increased population of D. coffeae
caused an increased population of E . kenyae. Euseius kenyae managed to contain the D. coffeae population to below economical injury levels (1- 2 thrips per leaf) during the three years under the various coffee agro ecosystems. The use of chlorpyrifos never affected E. kenyae. Their survival and increased in number under chlorpyrifos treated coffee blocks indicated the development of resistance by the population of
E. kenyae , hence the possibility of using them as a component in an Integrated Pest Management strategy in coffee.

Fombong, AT, Teal TE, Arbogast RT, Ndegwa PN, Irungu LW, Torto B.  2012.  Chemical communication in the honey bee scarab pest Oplostomus haroldi: role of (Z)-9-pentacosene.. Journal of Chemical Ecology. 38(12):1463-1473. AbstractPubMed link

Oplostomus haroldi Witte belongs to a unique genus of afro-tropical scarabs that have associations with honey bee colonies, from which they derive vital nutrients. Although the attributes of the honey bee nest impose barriers to communication among nest invaders, this beetle still is able to detect conspecific mates for reproduction. Here, we show, through behavioral studies, that cuticular lipids serve as mate discrimination cues in this beetle. We observed five steps during mating: arrestment, alignment, mounting, and copulation, and a post-copulatory stage, lasting ~40–70 % of the total mating duration, that suggested mate guarding. Chemical analysis identified the same nine straight-chain alkanes (C23–C31), six methyl-branched alkanes (6), and five mono-unsaturated alkenes in the cuticular lipids of both sexes. Methyl alkanes constituted the major component (46 %) of male cuticular lipids, while mono-unsaturated alkenes were most abundant (53 %) in females. (Z)-9-Pentacosene was twice as abundant in females than in males, and ~20 fold more concentrated in beetles than in worker bees. In mating assays, (Z)-9-pentacosene elicited arrestment, alignment, and mounting, but not copulation, by male beetles. These results represent the first evidence of a contact sex pheromone in a scarab beetle. Such contact pheromones may be an essential, cryptic mechanism for arthropods associated with eusocial insects.

2011

JP, E, S E, J K, LW I, B T.  2011.  Semiochemicals mediating behavioural response of the coconut bug, Pseudtheraptus wayi to conspecific volatile cues.. Book of abstracts, 19th conference of the African Association of Insect Scientists. :20-21., ICIPE, NAIROBI - KENYA: ICIPE
JP, E, S E, J K, LW I, B T.  2011.  Inter and intraspecific olfactory behaviour of the coconut bug, Pseudtheraptus wayi: do males search of the food then invite females?, 12 - 15 NOVEMBER Book of abstracts, Semio 11 workshop. , ICIPE, NAIROBI - KENYA
J.P., E, Ekesi S, Kabaru J, Irungu LW, Torto B.  2011.  Identification of sex pheromones of the coconut bug, Pseudtheraptus wayi, 16 November. icipe science day. , ICIPE, NAIROBI - KENYA
Egonyu, JP, Ekesi S, Kabaru J, Irungu LW, B. T.  2011.  Host Odour responses and experience induced learning in the coonut bug, Pseudotheraptus wayi Brown ( Heteroptera: Coriedae)., 13-18 August. Symposium on Insect-Plant Interactions. , Wageningen, The Netherlands
Anjili, CO, Ngumbi PM, Kaburi JC, Irungu LW.  2011.  The phlebotomine sandfly fauna (Diptera: Psychodidae) of Kenya. Journal of vector borne diseases. 48(4):183–189. AbstractJournal of vector borne diseases

Visceral and cutaneous leishmaniases are endemic in some parts of Kenya, where they are transmitted by phlebobotomine sandflies of genus Phlebotomus. This review is a compilation of the currently known distribution of phlebotomine sandflies in the parts of Kenya that have been studied, from the time sandflies were first reported in the country. So far 48 species of sandflies have been identified falling in the genera Phlebotomus Rondani & Berte and Sergentomyia Franca & Parrot. Genus Phlebotomus in Kenya is represented in five subgenera, namely Phlebotomus, Larroussius, Synphlebotomus, Paraphlebotomus and Anaphlebotomus. Genus Sergentomyia has the largest number of sandflies, and is represented in four subgenera, namely Sergentomyia, Sintonius, Grassomyia and Parvidens.

IRUNGU, LUCYW.  2011.  Plasmodium falciparum transmission and aridity: a Kenyan experience from the dry lands of Baringo and its implications for Anopheles arabiensis control. Malaria Journal. 2011;10(1):121. Acarologia, XLIX, 3-4 : 121-137. : Mala AO, Irungu LW, Shililu JI, Muturi EJ, Mbogo CC, Kiambo JK, Mukabana WR, Githure JI
PROF. IRUNGU, LUCYW.  2011.  Factors influencing differential larval habitat productivity of Anopheles gambiae complex mosquitoes in a western Kenyan village. Acarologia, XLIX, 3-4 : 121-137. : Albert O. Mala & Lucy W. Irungu Abstract
Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0in; mso-para-margin-right:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0in; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;} Background & objectives: The study was undertaken to characterize factors influencing differential productivity of Anopheles gambiae complex mosquitoes at larval habitats in a rural village in western Kenya . Methods: Longitudinal larval sampling was done using an area sampler for 3 months. Emerged adults were identified to species level morphologically using taxonomic keys and to sub-species by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Nutrient content was analyzed using persulphate oxidation method. Water pH was measured using an Orion pH/conductivity meter. Turbidity was measured using a Hach 2100A turbidity meter. Algal count density was estimated using a sedge-wick rafter cell.   Results: A total 3367 larvae were harvested. Out of 500 adults subjected to PCR analysis 358 (71.6%) were Anopheles gambiae s.s., 127 (25.4%) An. arabiensis while PCR amplification failed for 15 (3%) specimens.  Rainwater pools were the most productive habitat type. There was a positive association between algal density and larval density (p<0). Total nitrogen, water pH and turbidity were positively correlated with larval density (p<0.01) and pH was negatively associated with larval density.   Conclusion: Results indicate water nutrient and algal content in larval habitats of An. gambiae play crucial, dual roles in the resource ecology of these mosquitoes. Overall, the findings of this study support the notion that anti-larval source reduction measures aimed at manipulating physicochemical variables in larval habitats to eliminate larval production have a chance of succeeding in an integrated vector control program.   Key words Anopheles gambiae; larval productivity, nutrients; rainwater pools
PROF. IRUNGU, LUCYW.  2011.  Pathogenicity of Metarhizium anisopliae (Metch) Sorok and Beauveria bassiana (Bals) Vuill to adult Phlebotomus duboscqi (Neveu-Lemaire) in the laboratory. Acarologia, XLIX, 3-4 : 121-137. : Philip M. Ngumbi 1,2, Lucy W. Irungu2, Paul N. Ndegwa2 & Nguya K. Maniania3 1Kenya Medical Research

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