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Publications


2012

Osanjo, L.  2012.  Product Design Practice within Micro and Small Enterprises in Kenya. , Nairobi: University of Nairobi

2011

Osanjo, L.  2011.  The Emerging Opportunities for Design Development in the new Kenya, 26 May 2011. Nairobi International Design Conference. , National Museums of Kenya, Nairobi
Osanjo, L.  2011.  Popular culture, education and ubuntu in Kenya, 26 august 2011. India Africa: A shared Future . , University of Nairobi

2010

Lorraine, A, Osanjo L.  2010.  Tinga Tinga Tales: Reawakening Folktales from Africa. Design Magazine,SA. (No. 2):108-113.
Osanjo, L.  2010.  Entertainment on Wheels: Matatu mania. Design Magazine, SA. 2(Issue No. 15):284-287.
Osanjo, L, Amollo L.  2010.  Design Policy and Promotion Map. SEE Bulletin. 3 (Issue 3 - May 2010):8.

2009

Osanjo, L.  2009.  product Design Influencers and Triggers in Micro and Small Enterprises in Kenya. Changing the Change Conference. , Turin: Allemandi

2008

Osanjo, L.  2008.  The Challenges of Design Business in Africa, 1 October 2008. Africa Design Day. , Cape Town,SA
Osanjo, L.  2008.  Turning Idea into Enterprise, 14 March 2008. SSAFW Arts and Culture Fashion Seminar. , Johannesburg, SA

2007

Osanjo, L.  2007.  Kaloli Letterforms. :Alphabetletters., New York: Afrikan Alphabets - Book

2006

ADHIAMBO, MRSOSANJOL.  2006.  Stamp series for Postal Corporation of Kenya: Design and illustration of . Postal Corporation of Kenya. : ISCTRC Abstract
This article seeks to identify some of the factors underlying regional variation in child mortality in Kenya. The data drawn from the 1988/89 Kenya Demographic and Health Survey are used for the purpose. Logistic regression is used to analyse the data. On the basis of child mortality estimates obtained, provinces were grouped into two mortality groups: High (HLM) and Low (LMP). The results show that the values of explanatory variables in LMP were significantly high than in the high mortality region. However, their differences did not explain much of the differences in the variation in child mortality between the two regions. Decomposing the results revealed that the differences were largely due to nature or structure of relations between mortality and explanatory variables.

2005

ADHIAMBO, MRSOSANJOL.  2005.  Application of Information and Communications Technologies (ICTs) in Product Design within Micro and Small Enterprises (MSEs) in Mozambique and Kenya. Mozambique. : ISCTRC Abstract

Designers, architects and artists have invariably relied on their portfolios to record their work and to exhibit their capabilities. Unfortunately there is very little reference from which to draw tips on how to effectively utilize a portfolio. Sometimes the attention given to the production of the work is not complemented with strong oral and visual, presentations. The continued failure to pay due attention to portfolio has led to loss of job opportunities. The portfolio can open doors and close them with equal speed. To people shopping for jobs, it's a calling card, the advance guard, the marketing tool, often the only opportunity to make an impression. Many companies do not hire people but rather hire portfolios. When a prospective employer requests for a portfolio it is because they are seeking certain attributes or traits that may be of service to them. Typically, the employer will say they are looking for somebody "creative". How does your portfolio show that you are creative? Is it in the way it is organized? The work you have put in it? Or is it the bag/booklet? The answer to this is "all of the above". It does not do good work justice if it's put together in a tattered envelope. Neither can a very expensive bag/booklet camouflage bad work. There must be a sense of your presence in the work you do, the way you do it, the way you present it and what you want to do with it. And, not to forget, what you want the work to do for you.

ADHIAMBO, MRSOSANJOL.  2005.  You, Yourself and Your Portfolio. Faculty of ADD, University of Nairobi. : ISCTRC Abstract

Designers, architects and artists have invariably relied on their portfolios to record their work and to exhibit their capabilities. Unfortunately there is very little reference from which to draw tips on how to effectively utilize a portfolio. Sometimes the attention given to the production of the work is not complemented with strong oral and visual, presentations. The continued failure to pay due attention to portfolio has led to loss of job opportunities. The portfolio can open doors and close them with equal speed. To people shopping for jobs, it's a calling card, the advance guard, the marketing tool, often the only opportunity to make an impression. Many companies do not hire people but rather hire portfolios. When a prospective employer requests for a portfolio it is because they are seeking certain attributes or traits that may be of service to them. Typically, the employer will say they are looking for somebody "creative". How does your portfolio show that you are creative? Is it in the way it is organized? The work you have put in it? Or is it the bag/booklet? The answer to this is "all of the above". It does not do good work justice if it's put together in a tattered envelope. Neither can a very expensive bag/booklet camouflage bad work. There must be a sense of your presence in the work you do, the way you do it, the way you present it and what you want to do with it. And, not to forget, what you want the work to do for you.

2003

ADHIAMBO, MRSOSANJOL.  2003.  New Product Development in the Micro Enterprise Sector, Report from fieldwork undertaken in Maputo, Mozambique. Faculty of ADD, University of Nairobi. : ISCTRC Abstract

Various stakeholders come together to conceptualise, analyse and commercialise new products. This was the case recently when designers, artisans, marketers and facilitating institutions came together to engage in new product development for the micro enterprise sector. Through the effort of Terra Nuova (the facilitating agency), Department of Design (providing designers), Aid to Artisans and Institute for the Development of Local Industry (IDIL), Undugu Kenya and artisans in both Kenya and Mozambique, a number of new products were developed. The artisan works in difficult circumstances in many parts of Africa such as Mozambique and Kenya. Most artisans provide technical and entrepreneurial inputs in the enterprises and are therefore invariably referred to as artisans and entrepreneurs in this report. They support their families from proceeds of the enterprise. Often they do not pay attention to detail and not enough attention to product quality. Inspite of this, the benefits of the artisan's products to many people far outweigh these shortcomings. Customers buy from micro enterprises because their prices are fair. The entrepreneurs understand the customer tastes in terms of colour and form, and the entrepreneurs provide easy payment terms and are available or easily accessible to them. The entrepreneurs often work near their ancestral homes so they understand the culture and traditions of the customers they serve. This can be deduced from observations, interviews and sales figures. Product development can take the form of an innovation, change of use, adaptation and bundling of features among other things. This report outlines the process of product development that was undertaken in Mozambique in the course of the project. Lueti is a set of coasters developed through a product design process that took into account the various stakeholders in the success of a product. These were the designer, marketer and artisan all working together. The process involved a critical examination of material, the ability of the artisan and the availability of a market. The availability of good quality and varied hard wood in Mozambique also influenced the identification of the product. The working environment at IDIL, where equipment and machinery for working wood was also complementary to the product development. In the case of lueti there was redefinition of use and adaptation. The idea was developed through consultation, sketching and specification. A prototype was developed and after further consultation and modification a series of three coasters were available for test marketing. Lueti coasters design was inspired by the afro-comb. Afro combs can be found in most parts of the world particularly where afro hair is predominant. The original combs were made from wood whereas the more conventional ones are made from plastic. The basic shape remains the same with the teeth on one side and a handle on the other side. Whereas the basic shape has remained the same, nowadays you can find combs whose main use is adornment on walls.

2000

ADHIAMBO, MRSOSANJOL.  2000.  Lands on Campus, Report: African Design Perspectives as Discussed by PJ Aranador (Philippines). Faculty of Architecture, Design and Development, facilitated by Product Design and Development Center, Nairobi.. : ISCTRC Abstract

The Department of Design, University of Nairobi recently hosted internationally reknowed Filipino Design Consultant, PJ Aranador. This event was a milestone, in many ways, for design in Kenya in that we had a distinguished designer, with an equally distinguished audience, discussing an important economic aspect lof national development. PJ is a design consultant for all major Philippine Trade Fares and a product development consultant for his government. He has been interviewed by CNNs' Elsa Klench in "Style:. And, "PJ" products sell on the international market with the buy line - "Style made modern". These styles include casual wear, swim wear and youthful clothes. PJ also indulges in interior and industrial design. The lecture included slides, posters and transparencies and was attended by a record assembly of over 100 participants from the major tertiary institutions in Kenya that offer design courses such as Evelyn College of Design, Marion Institute College, The Kenya Polytechnic and the University of Nairobi itself". This is the first assembly of these various tertiary institutions in pursuit of one goal - to listen and share in the experience of a fellow designer. PJ, on his part, gave a broad overview of the design profession, touching on its importance as an economic activity and its difference and similarities with Fine art. Design engages art and other factors in conception, but is driven by market forces because design is primarily, a marketing function. Design must concern itself with production unlike Art, which is not driven by reproduction. As a function of marketing, designers need to be sensitive to consumers of their products.

ADHIAMBO, MRSOSANJOL.  2000.  Artists in Development: Creativity Workshop Report and Exhibition. Makerere University. : ISCTRC Abstract
The culture, values and standard of living of people is reflected in their art and design, and, for centuries art has been used to communicate and reflect the lives and times of people. Somewhere along the line, however, there has developed a belief that art and design parted ways with "people". On one hand, "people" have developed % belief that design is the preserve of a talented few, while, on the other hand, designer* claim that "...people do not understand us". Yet, design can only thrive where the community or people, is more artistic. Because of technological developments, the world around, has become one big homestead, the global village. The development of these high technologies is attributed to and spearheaded by the more developed countries. The rate of development of these technologies has been so high such that many of the less developed countries (LDCs) are left breathless and beaten. The United Nations (UN) in its concern for sustainable global development has in recent years sought to re-examine ways of pulling the LDCs into the mainstream of global development. The World Commission on Culture and Development (WCCD) that was established in 1992 provided 1jie framework to extend the development paradigm beyond economic criteria. Among other things, the WCCD "...explores many dimensions of culture and development -as well as their interactions -in an increasingly complex and interconnected and rapidly changing world". In the case of Africa, this has led to the wider special initiative for Africa. This initiative is deeply rooted in the belief that Africa has something to contribute to global development. The initiative seeks to identify aspects of Africa, be they cultural, environmental, craft or anything else, develop and package or repackage them and avail them to the rest of the world. UNESCO, has set out to intervene, initially, in the areas of Industrial, Textile and Graphic Design, Photography and Music. Textile and Graphic Design workshop was therefore, the first of these high level interaction of African artists in Development.
ADHIAMBO, MRSOSANJOL.  2000.  Kaloli Letterforms; Registered by the International Typeface Corporation (ITC). Makerere University and University of Nairobi, FADD. : ISCTRC Abstract

Design has, over the years been a reflection of creative individuals who seek to foster a style. In the early part of the 21st Century designers experimented with free form and looked for relationships with the environment particularly nature. Designers examined the things that nature provided such as seeds the stars, animals and the clouds and combined these with their innermost selves in order to conceive creative form. Then, as it is now, the early chemistry worked to produce design that touches the depths of the viewer's sout while reflecting the designer's own perceptions of visual experience. This concept is manifested and reflected in the development of Kaloli letterfbrms that were developed after an intensive creativity workshop that brought together Africa's artists and designers. In order to appreciate this letterform, this paper outlines the motivation, aesthetic and artistic qualities and7 the functional capacity of Kaloli letterfbrms. Design has a unique relationship with nature and it has been stated that design is a reflection of nature. This implies that design is a custodian of nature and, has the duty to protect, reflect and enhance the position of nature in human life. Paul Klee (1879-1933), one of the greatest architect and designer, stated that, '...artistic form without direct connection to natural form was inconceivable.' If we examine the design around us. we can say that it is inspired by the flora and fauna, the birds and the bees, the things that infer good feelings, in the process, the things that infer bad or unpleasant or dangerous feelings become secondary. Kaloli is not dangerous, but, as a source of inspiration for letterforms. it was as unlikely as any dangerous snake.

1996

Osanjo, L.  1996.  The Role of Management Training in the Development of Design Enterprises. Design Education and Small Business Development. , Cape Town,SA: Design Institute,SABS
ADHIAMBO, MRSOSANJOL.  1996.  Voices: The British Council Nairobi. The British Council. : ISCTRC Abstract
The culture, values and standard of living of people is reflected in their art and design, and, for centuries art has been used to communicate and reflect the lives and times of people. Somewhere along the line, however, there has developed a belief that art and design parted ways with "people". On one hand, "people" have developed % belief that design is the preserve of a talented few, while, on the other hand, designer* claim that "...people do not understand us". Yet, design can only thrive where the community or people, is more artistic. Because of technological developments, the world around, has become one big homestead, the global village. The development of these high technologies is attributed to and spearheaded by the more developed countries. The rate of development of these technologies has been so high such that many of the less developed countries (LDCs) are left breathless and beaten. The United Nations (UN) in its concern for sustainable global development has in recent years sought to re-examine ways of pulling the LDCs into the mainstream of global development. The World Commission on Culture and Development (WCCD) that was established in 1992 provided 1jie framework to extend the development paradigm beyond economic criteria. Among other things, the WCCD "...explores many dimensions of culture and development -as well as their interactions -in an increasingly complex and interconnected and rapidly changing world". In the case of Africa, this has led to the wider special initiative for Africa. This initiative is deeply rooted in the belief that Africa has something to contribute to global development. The initiative seeks to identify aspects of Africa, be they cultural, environmental, craft or anything else, develop and package or repackage them and avail them to the rest of the world. UNESCO, has set out to intervene, initially, in the areas of Industrial, Textile and Graphic Design, Photography and Music. Textile and Graphic Design workshop was therefore, the first of these high level interaction of African artists in Development.

1995

ADHIAMBO, MRSOSANJOL.  1995.  The Informal Sector in Migori; A Baseline Survey. Intermediate Technology Development Group (ITDG). : ISCTRC Abstract
The culture, values and standard of living of people is reflected in their art and design, and, for centuries art has been used to communicate and reflect the lives and times of people. Somewhere along the line, however, there has developed a belief that art and design parted ways with "people". On one hand, "people" have developed % belief that design is the preserve of a talented few, while, on the other hand, designer* claim that "...people do not understand us". Yet, design can only thrive where the community or people, is more artistic. Because of technological developments, the world around, has become one big homestead, the global village. The development of these high technologies is attributed to and spearheaded by the more developed countries. The rate of development of these technologies has been so high such that many of the less developed countries (LDCs) are left breathless and beaten. The United Nations (UN) in its concern for sustainable global development has in recent years sought to re-examine ways of pulling the LDCs into the mainstream of global development. The World Commission on Culture and Development (WCCD) that was established in 1992 provided 1jie framework to extend the development paradigm beyond economic criteria. Among other things, the WCCD "...explores many dimensions of culture and development -as well as their interactions -in an increasingly complex and interconnected and rapidly changing world". In the case of Africa, this has led to the wider special initiative for Africa. This initiative is deeply rooted in the belief that Africa has something to contribute to global development. The initiative seeks to identify aspects of Africa, be they cultural, environmental, craft or anything else, develop and package or repackage them and avail them to the rest of the world. UNESCO, has set out to intervene, initially, in the areas of Industrial, Textile and Graphic Design, Photography and Music. Textile and Graphic Design workshop was therefore, the first of these high level interaction of African artists in Development.

1994

Osanjo, LA.  1994.  The Entrepreneur And Entrepreneurship.
Osanjo, L.  1994.  participation of Commercial Banks in the Development of the Small Enterprise Sector in Kenya. , Nairobi: Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology
ADHIAMBO, MRSOSANJOL.  1994.  The Participation of Commercial Banks in the Development of Small Enterprise Sector in Kenya. Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology (JKUAT). : ISCTRC Abstract

This research examines the relationship between commercial banks (CBs) and the small enterprise sector (SES) and identifies constraints' which impede the flow of financial assistance from the commercial banks to the latter in Kenya. The variables that were examined included; requirements for successful loan application, lending levels, degree of risk attached to small enterprise lending, levels of economic impact and stages in business development at which banks become willing to support. For the small enterprises, the study sought to profile the business and its owner and, to examine its financing. The sampling units were drawn from CBs and SES within Nairobi. In data collection, questionnaires, interview and document review was employed. The study found that high interest rates and long processing procedures kept small businesses away from banks. The study established that, on the part of the banks, the entrepreneurs lacked business management skills and did not keep proper records. Moreover, the banks experienced general reproach from the small business owners, based upon conventional beliefs.

1993

ADHIAMBO, MRSOSANJOL.  1993.  The Entrepreneur and Entrepreneurship. Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology (JKUAT). : ISCTRC Abstract

This research examines the relationship between commercial banks (CBs) and the small enterprise sector (SES) and identifies constraints' which impede the flow of financial assistance from the commercial banks to the latter in Kenya. The variables that were examined included; requirements for successful loan application, lending levels, degree of risk attached to small enterprise lending, levels of economic impact and stages in business development at which banks become willing to support. For the small enterprises, the study sought to profile the business and its owner and, to examine its financing. The sampling units were drawn from CBs and SES within Nairobi. In data collection, questionnaires, interview and document review was employed. The study found that high interest rates and long processing procedures kept small businesses away from banks. The study established that, on the part of the banks, the entrepreneurs lacked business management skills and did not keep proper records. Moreover, the banks experienced general reproach from the small business owners, based upon conventional beliefs.

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