Publications

Found 83 results

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2014
Tonya R. Thurman, Kidman R, Nice J, Ikamari L. "Family Functioning and child behavioural problems in HIV/AIDs affected households in Kenya." AIDS and Behaviour . 2014;D01 10.1007/S10461-014-0897-9.
2013
Ikamari LD;, Izugbara C;, Ochako R. "Prevalence and determinants of unintended pregnancy among women in Nairobi, Kenya.". 2013. AbstractWebsite

Background

The prevalence of unintended pregnancy in Kenya continues to be high. The 2003 Kenya Demographic and Health Survey (KDHS) showed that nearly 50% of unmarried women aged 15–19 and 45% of the married women reported their current pregnancies as mistimed or unwanted. The 2008–09 KDHS showed that 43% of married women in Kenya reported their current pregnancies were unintended. Unintended pregnancy is one of the most critical factors contributing to schoolgirl drop out in Kenya. Up to 13,000 Kenyan girls drop out of school every year as a result of unintended pregnancy. Unsafe pregnancy termination contributes immensely to maternal mortality which currently estimated at 488 deaths per 100 000 live births. In Kenya, the determinants of prevalence and determinants of unintended pregnancy among women in diverse social and economic situations, particularly in urban areas, are poorly understood due to lack of data. This paper addresses the prevalence and the determinants of unintended pregnancy among women in slum and non-slum settlements of Nairobi.
Methods

This study used the data that was collected among a random sample of 1262 slum and non-slum women aged 15–49 years in Nairobi. The data was analyzed using simple percentages and logistic regression.
Results

The study found that 24 percent of all the women had unintended pregnancy. The prevalence of unintended pregnancy was 21 per cent among women in slum settlements compared to 27 per cent among those in non-slum settlements. Marital status, employment status, ethnicity and type of settlement were significantly associated with unintended pregnancy. Logistic analysis results indicate that age, marital status and type of settlement had statistically significantly effects on unintended pregnancy. Young women aged 15–19 were significantly more likely than older women to experience unintended pregnancy. Similarly, unmarried women showed elevated risk for unintended pregnancy than ever-married women. Women in non-slum settlements were significantly more likely to experience unintended pregnancy than their counterparts in slum settlements.

The determinants of unintended pregnancy differed between women in each type of settlement. Among slum women, age, parity and marital status each had significant net effect on unintended pregnancy. But for non-slum women, it was marital status and ethnicity that had significant net effects.
Conclusion

The study found a high prevalence of unintended pregnancy among the study population and indicated that young and unmarried women, irrespective of their educational attainment and household wealth status, have a higher likelihood of experiencing unintended pregnancy. Except for the results on educational attainments and household wealth, these results compared well with the results reported in the literature.

The results indicate the need for effective programs and strategies to increase access to contraceptive services and related education, information and communication among the study population, particularly among the young and unmarried women. Increased access to family planning services is key to reducing unintended pregnancy among the study population. This calls for concerted efforts by all the stakeholders to improve access to family planning services among the study population. Increased access should be accompanied with improvement in the quality of care and availability of information about effective utilization of family planning methods.

Ikamari LDE. "Regional variation in neonatal and post-neonatal motality in Kenya." Journal of African Population Studies. 2013;Vol 27(1).
2012
Ikamari LDE. "‘African ontology and its implications for public health research’.". In: Second Cohort of Carta PhD Fellows Training Workshop. The Oak Place, Nairobi, Kenya; 2012.
L.D.E. I. "Analysis of Census Data taking into consideration Gender Dimensions’.". In: Kenya National Seminar on Census Data Analysis,. Panafric Hotel, Nairobi, Kenya; 2012.
W.Wafula S, Ikamari L, K’Oyugi B. "‘In search for an explanation to the upsurge in infant mortality in Kenya during the 1988-2003 period’." BMC Public Health . 2012;12(441).
2011
Ochako R, Saliku T, Ikamari L, Izugbara C. "‘Contraceptive Use among Women in Nairobi, Kenya’.". In: 2011 International Conference on Family Planning. Dakar, Senegal; 2011.
Ikamari LDE. "‘State of Maternal Health in Rural Kenya’.". In: Maternal Health Challenges in Kenya-What Evidence Shows Workshop. Serena Hotel, Nairobi, Kenya; 2011.
Ikamari LDE. "IUCD re-introduction in Kenya: A Case of Best Practice.". In: In PP Documentation of Best Practices in Family planning and Reproductive Health: Partners in Population and Development Secretariat. Dhaka Bangladesh; 2011.
Ochako R, Fotso J-C, Ikamari L, Khasakhala A. "Utilization of maternal health services among young women in Kenya: Insights from the Kenya Demographic and Health Survey, 2003." . BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth. 2011;Volume 11(1).
Ikamari LDE. "‘An Innovative and Integrated Initiative to Reposition Intrauterine Devices in the National Family Planning Programme-Kenya’.". In: Sharing Innovative Experiences: Experiences in Addressing Population and Reproductive Health Challenges. New York: UNDP; 2011.
2010
Ikamari LDE. ‘A Status report on the implementation of the KeFA Project’. Hanoi, Vietnam: National Institutes for Health (NIH) Partnership for HIV/AIDS Research Meeting; 2010.
Wafula SW, Ikamari L, K’Oyug B. "What accounts for the upturn in infant mortality in Kenya during the 1989-2003 period?". In: Quertelet Seminar on Stalls, Resistances and Reversals in Demographic Transitions, Research Centre in Population and Societies. Universite’, Catholic De Louvain,Belgium; 2010.
Ikamari LDE. "‘A status report on the integration of the PPD generic models in the PSRI training programmes’.". In: Partners Meeting on Networking among Partner Institutions: Progress and Challenges. Taicang, China; 2010.
Ikamari LDE, Odwe G. Analysis of Unintended Pregnancy and pregnancy termination among women in selected urban settlements in Nairobi. Nairobi: African Population and Health Centre; 2010.
Ikamari LDE, Odwe G. Socio-economic determinants of unwanted pregnancy among women in slum and non-slum settlements of Nairobi, Kenya. Nairobi: African Population and Health Centre; 2010.
Njiru B, Ikamari L, Gachigua J. "‘Climate Change, Resource Competition and Conflict Among Pastoral Communities in Kenya’.". In: Conference on’ Social Stress, and Violent Conflicts- State of the Art and Research Needs. University of Hamburg, Germany; 2010.
2009
2008
Ikamari LDE. "‘Our (PSRI) experiences on integrating the PPD Generic Models in the training programmes’.". In: The PPD Consultative Partners Meeting. Washington Hotel, Dhaka Bangladesh; 2008.
Ikamari LDE. "Regional variation in the timing of childbearing in Kenya." Journal of Population Studies. 2008;12:1-25.
2007
Nyangara F, Charterji M, Thurman T, Akikabi T, Katangwa Z, Ikamari L, Korani N, Buek K. "Evaluating Four Approahes to Community based programmes for Orphans and Vulnerable Children'.". In: 5th African Population Conference. Arusha International Conference Centre; 2007.
Ikamari LDE. "Re-positioning of the Intrauterine Contraceptive Device (IUCDs) initiative in Kenya, 2001-2007.". In: Consultative meeting on Documenting Best /Promising Practices in Population & Reproductive health. Dhaka Bangladesh; 2007.
Wafula S, Ikamari L. "‘Patterns, levels and trends in unmet need for contraception in Kenya’.". In: 5th African Population Conference. Arusha International Conference Centre; 2007.
Ikamari LDE, Towett R. "‘Sexual Initiation and Contraceptive Use Among Female Adolescents in Kenya’." African Journal of Health Sciences. 2007;Volume 14:1-13.
2006
Ikamari LDE. "Trends and Changes in Non-Use of Contraceptives in Kenya. In A closer look at KDHS 2003’: Further Analysis of Contraceptive Prevalence and Fertility Stalls.". In: Summaries of Selected NCAPD Working Papers. www.ncapd-ke.org/publications MEASURE Evaluation Publication.; 2006.
2005
Ikamari LDE. Constraints to Data Use in Kenya. USA: MEASURE Evaluation/Future Group Project; 2005.
Ikamari LDE. "The effect of education on timing of marriage in Kenya." Demographic Research Journal. 2005;12:1-20.Website
2004
Ikamari LDE. "Health Systems Research: A Training Manual.". In: A manual developed for African Medical and Research Foundation. Headquarters, Nairobi; 2004.
Ikamari LDE. "‘An upsurge in early childhood mortality in Kenya: A search of explanations’ ." African Journal of Health Sciences. 2004;11(1 & 2):9-20. AbstractWebsite

 Journal of African Health Sciences (11) 1&2: 9-20.

Ikamari LDE. "‘Maternal Care Utilisation in Teso District’." African Journal of Health Sciences. 2004;Volume 11(1 & 2):9-20. AbstractWebsite

This study seeks to document recent trends in early childhood mortality in the country and to offer some plausible explanations for the upsurge in the trends. Data and information from various sources are used in this paper to achieve this purpose. The results obtained show that infant, child and under-five mortality rates had declined in the 1960s and 1970s but were taking un upward trend since early 1990s. This situation is attributable to a combination of factors, including increased poverty, adverse effects of economic hardships and cost recovery programs associated with structural adjustment programs, increased childhood malnutrition, decreased use of certain maternity care services, decline in the coverage of child immunisations, inability of the public health system to provide services, and the HIV/ AIDS epidemic and the recent ethnic clashes that rocked some parts of the Rift Valley, Coast, Nyanza and Western province. In order to reverse the upward trend in mortality, there is an urgent need to intensify efforts to reduce poverty, to enable most people to have adequate food supply, improve the public health sector so that it can deliver health care to all people; to make greater efforts to raise the living standards of rural populations and improve the quality of housing, sanitary and sewerage conditions in urban slums. In addition, concerted efforts must continue to be made to contain the spread of HIV/AIDS, to assist AIDs orphans and to eliminate completely and to avoid recurrence of ethnic clashes and cattle rustling.

D.E. DRIKAMARILAWRENCE. "Covariates of age at first marriage and birth in Kenya: a hazard model analysis. A paper submitted to the Editor, Journal of Health and Population in Developing Countries. CB# 7411, 1107 McGavran-Greenberg, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Cha.". In: Gabbay R. &Siddique A., ed., Good Governance Issues and Sustainable Development: The Indian Ocean Region (New Delhi: Vedams Books). ISCTRC; 2004. Abstract
Journal of African Health Sciences (11) 1&2: 21-32
D.E. DRIKAMARILAWRENCE. "Maternal Health Care Utilization in Teso.". In: Gabbay R. &Siddique A., ed., Good Governance Issues and Sustainable Development: The Indian Ocean Region (New Delhi: Vedams Books). ISCTRC; 2004. Abstract
Journal of African Health Sciences (11) 1&2: 21-32
2003
Ikamari LDE. "‘Institutional Delivery Care: a tough choice among women in Teso District’." A Journal of Health . 2003;7(1):6-13. AbstractWebsite

This paper sets to establish the factors that underlie the choice of place of delivery among expectant women in Teso District. This paper uses the data and information collected in Teso District between the year 2000 and 2001. The results indicate that out of the 76 per cent of 1170 women in the reproductive age and who had a birth during the five years preceding the study delivered their last born babies at home. This was a result of lack of access to institutionalised care, the availability of cheap and more accessible alternative care providers (TBAs) and the poor quality of services offered at the local health facilities. The traditional birth attendants and nurse/midwives were the main providers of maternal health care. The constraints to utilisation of institutionalised delivery care were manifold. The major constraints were unavailability and inaccessibility of health facilities, competing priorities, poverty, exorbitant user charges and associated costs, and poor services offered at the local health facilities. Reducing or removing these constraints would result in increased utilisation of institutionalised delivery care in the study district.

D.E. DRIKAMARILAWRENCE. "Maternal Care Utilisation in Teso District African Journal of Health Sciences, 11(1&2):21-32.". In: African Journal of Health Sciences: 11(1&2): 9-20. ISCTRC; 2003. Abstract
This paper sets to establish the level of awareness of antenatal care, the timing of antenatal clinic visits, the level of utilisation of maternal health care, to identify the main service providers, and to identify some of the barriers to the utilisation of maternal health care in Teso District. This paper uses the data and information collected in Teso District between the year 2000 and the year 2001. Descriptive statistics are the main tools of data analysis. The results obtained indicate that most respondents in the study area are aware of the importance of antenatal care, the majority seek antenatal care but late in their pregnancy, and that most of the childbirths take place at home mainly because of lack of access to institutionalised care, lack of quick means of transport, inability to meet user charges and associated costs, the availability of cheap and more accessible alternative care providers (TBAs), and the poor quality of services offered at the local health facilities. The traditional birth attendants and nurse/midwives are the main providers of maternal health care. The barriers to utilisation of maternal health care are manifold. The major constraints are unavailability and inaccessibility of health facilities, competing priorities, poverty, exorbitant user charges and associated costs, and poor services offered at the local health facilities. Reducing or removing these barriers would result in increased utilisation of maternal health care in the study area.
D.E. DRIKAMARILAWRENCE. "An upsurge in early childhood mortality in Kenya: A search of explanations African Journal of Health Sciences: 11(1&2): 9-20.". In: African Journal of Health Sciences: 11(1&2): 9-20. ISCTRC; 2003. Abstract
This study seeks to document recent trends in early childhood mortality in the country and to offer some plausible explanations for the upsurge in the trends. Data and information from various sources are used in this paper to achieve this purpose. The results obtained show that infant, child and under-five mortality rates had declined in the 1960s and 1970s but were taking un upward trend since early 1990s. This situation is attributable to a combination of factors, including increased poverty, adverse effects of economic hardships and cost recovery programs associated with structural adjustment programs, increased childhood malnutrition, decreased use of certain maternity care services, decline in the coverage of child immunisations, inability of the public health system to provide services, and the HIV/ AIDS epidemic and the recent ethnic clashes that rocked some parts of the Rift Valley, Coast, Nyanza and Western province. In order to reverse the upward trend in mortality, there is an urgent need to intensify efforts to reduce poverty, to enable most people to have adequate food supply, improve the public health sector so that it can deliver health care to all people; to make greater efforts to raise the living standards of rural populations and improve the quality of housing, sanitary and sewerage conditions in urban slums. In addition, concerted efforts must continue to be made to contain the spread of HIV/AIDS, to assist AIDs orphans and to eliminate completely and to avoid recurrence of ethnic clashes and cattle rustling.
2002
Ikamari LDE, Lwanga CK. "‘Correlates of unmet need for contraception in Zambia’." African Journal of Health Sciences. 2002;7:11-23.Website
IKAMARI LAWRENCEDE. "‘Persistence of FGM in Nyambene District, Kenya’." Health line: A Journal of Health . 2002;6(3):39-50. AbstractWebsite

This paper sets to establish the factors that underlie the choice of place of delivery among expectant women in Teso District. This paper uses the data and information collected in Teso District between the year 2000 and 2001. The results indicate that out of the 76 per cent of 1170 women in the reproductive age and who had a birth during the five years preceding the study delivered their last born babies at home. This was a result of lack of access to institutionalised care, the availability of cheap and more accessible alternative care providers (TBAs) and the poor quality of services offered at the local health facilities. The traditional birth attendants and nurse/midwives were the main providers of maternal health care. The constraints to utilisation of institutionalised delivery care were manifold. The major constraints were unavailability and inaccessibility of health facilities, competing priorities, poverty, exorbitant user charges and associated costs, and poor services offered at the local health facilities. Reducing or removing these constraints would result in increased utilisation of institutionalised delivery care in the study district.

Ikamari LDE. "‘Situation Analysis of MCH facilities in Teso District, Kenya, Kenya’." Health line: A Journal of Health. 2002;6(4):64-71. AbstractWebsite

This paper sets to establish the factors that underlie the choice of place of delivery among expectant women in Teso District. This paper uses the data and information collected in Teso District between the year 2000 and 2001. The results indicate that out of the 76 per cent of 1170 women in the reproductive age and who had a birth during the five years preceding the study delivered their last born babies at home. This was a result of lack of access to institutionalised care, the availability of cheap and more accessible alternative care providers (TBAs) and the poor quality of services offered at the local health facilities. The traditional birth attendants and nurse/midwives were the main providers of maternal health care. The constraints to utilisation of institutionalised delivery care were manifold. The major constraints were unavailability and inaccessibility of health facilities, competing priorities, poverty, exorbitant user charges and associated costs, and poor services offered at the local health facilities. Reducing or removing these constraints would result in increased utilisation of institutionalised delivery care in the study district.

Ikamari LDE. "’Sibling mortality correlation in Kenya’." Journal of Biosocial Science. 2002;32:265-278. AbstractWebsite

This paper examines whether infant and child mortality risks among successive siblings are closely correlated, and if so, whether the survival status of the preceding child is an important factor affecting infant and child mortality in Kenya. The data used were drawn from the 1988/89 Kenya Demographic and Health Survey. The results indicate both infant and child mortality rates were significantly higher among subsequent children whose preceding siblings had died in infancy than for those whose preceding siblings had survived through infancy. The results provide empirical evidence that infant and child mortality risks among successive siblings are closely correlated in Kenyan families and that effect of the survival status of the preceding child is in important in determining infant mortality but not child mortality.

2001
Ikamari LDE, Ayiemba EHO. "Population and Sustainable Development.". In: African Training Course on Local and Regional Development Planning. The UNCRD Training Programme for Anglophone Africa. KCB Management Centre, Karen, Nairobi, Kenya; 2001.
Ikamari LDE, Ayiemba EHO. "The Implications of the Demographic and Epidemiologic Transitions for Planning with special emphasis on adolescent reproductive health.". In: Training Workshop on Adolescent Sexuality and Reproductive Health with special emphasis on STI/AIDS for Middle Level Managers from Anglophone Sub-Saharan Africa. Nairobi, Kenya; 2001.
Ikamari LDE. "Barriers to Utilisation of Maternal Health care in Teso District’.". In: Rockefeller Foundation.; 2001.
Ocholla-Ayayo ABC, Nyamongo I, Ikamari LDE, Ateng T. Population, Health and Development in Africa: Anthropological Perspectives. Population Studies and Research Institute; 2001.
Ikamari LDE. A situation Analysis of the Health Facilities in Teso District’. Rockefeller Foundation; 2001.
Ikamari LDE. "The Use of Quantitative and Qualitative Research Methods in Differential Mortality Analysis.". In: Population, Health and Development in Africa.; 2001.
D.E. DRIKAMARILAWRENCE. "Ikamari, L.D.E 2001,.". In: Anthropological Perspectives.pp 23-44. ISCTRC; 2001. Abstract
This paper discusses in the use of both qualitative and quantitative research methods in differential mortality. It uses both quantitative data and several case studies drawn from Western and Central provinces of Kenya to illustrate that both research approaches can be used simultaneously and in a complimentary way.
2000
IKAMARI L, Ocholla-Ayayo ABC, Nyamongo I, Otieno AAT. Maternal mortality situation in Kenya, Population, Health and Development.; 2000.Website
Ikamari LDE. "‘An upsurge in early childhood mortality in Kenya: a search for plausible explanations’ .". In: Population Association of Kenya’s Second Conference. Mbagathi, Nairobi; 2000.
D.E. DRIKAMARILAWRENCE. "Ikamari, L.D.E. 2000. Regional variation in infant mortality in Kenya: A search for explanations. Pp: 119-139.". In: Population and Development in Kenya. Editors: Oucho, J, Ocholla-Ayayo ABC, Ayiemba, E.H.O, and Omwanda, L. O. ISCTRC; 2000. Abstract
This paper seeks to identify some the factors that underlie regional variation in infant mortality in Kenya. The data drawn from the 1988/89 Kenya Demographic and Health Survey were used for this purpose. Logistic regression is used to analyse the data. On the basis of infant mortality estimates obtained, provinces were grouped into two groups: High (HMP) and low (LMP). The results obtained show that the values of explanatory variables in LMP region than in the high mortality region. However, their differences did not explain much of the variation in infant mortality between the two mortality regions. Decomposing the results revealed that the differences were largely due to the differences in the nature or structure of relationships, as represented by logit coefficients, between mortality and explanatory variables. The results indicate that the lower average level of maternal education, higher proportion of preceding child loss, higher proportion mothers belonging to low economic status households and a lower proportion of mothers belonging to households possessing livestock and lower use of modern contraception modestly contributed to high infant mortality in the high mortality region
D.E. DRIKAMARILAWRENCE. "Ikamari, L.D.E., 2000. .". In: Journal of Population Studies and Development, Volume 7(1 & 2): 187-200. ISCTRC; 2000. Abstract
This paper illustrates in details how to use decomposition procedures to account for areal and temporal differences in the level of mortality, using the case of infant mortality in Kenya. Logistic regression is used to decompose the effects of various factors on the risk of mortality. The major advantage of the methodology described here is that it can identify the factors that account for differences in mortality levels between two or more places, and, if used or temporal mortality changes in the same place. In essence, these methods if used correctly, disentangle differences in the values of explanatory variables of mortality between two regions, or between two different time periods in the same place that are due to the differences in the values of the explanatory variables , and those that are due to the structure of relations between mortality and the explanatory variables.
1998
Ikamari LDE. "Birth Intervals and Child Survival in Kenya." African Journal of Health Sciences . 1998;5(1):15-24. AbstractWebsite

This paper seeks to identify some the factors that underlie regional variation in infant mortality in Kenya. The data drawn from the 1988/89 Kenya Demographic and Health Survey were used for this purpose. Logistic regression is used to analyse the data. On the basis of infant mortality estimates obtained, provinces were grouped into two groups: High (HMP) and low (LMP). The results obtained show that the values of explanatory variables in LMP region than in the high mortality region. However, their differences did not explain much of the variation in infant mortality between the two mortality regions. Decomposing the results revealed that the differences were largely due to the differences in the nature or structure of relationships, as represented by logit coefficients, between mortality and explanatory variables. The results indicate that the lower average level of maternal education, higher proportion of preceding child loss, higher proportion mothers belonging to low economic status households and a lower proportion of mothers belonging to households possessing livestock and lower use of modern contraception modestly contributed to high infant mortality in the high mortality region

Ikamari LDE. "’Regional variation in infant and child mortality in Kenya’." Tanzanian Journal of Population Studies and Development . 1998;5(1 & 2):39-64. AbstractWebsite

This article seeks to identify some of the factors underlying regional variation in child mortality in Kenya. The data drawn from the 1988/89 Kenya Demographic and Health Survey are used for the purpose. Logistic regression is used to analyse the data. On the basis of child mortality estimates obtained, provinces were grouped into two mortality groups: High (HLM) and Low (LMP). The results show that the values of explanatory variables in LMP were significantly high than in the high mortality region. However, their differences did not explain much of the differences in the variation in child mortality between the two regions. Decomposing the results revealed that the differences were largely due to nature or structure of relations between mortality and explanatory variables.

D.E. DRIKAMARILAWRENCE. "Regional variation in infant and child mortality in Kenya.". In: Population and Development in Kenya. Editors: Oucho, J, Ocholla-Ayayo ABC, Ayiemba, E.H.O, and Omwanda, L. O. ISCTRC; 1998. Abstract
This paper seeks to identify some the factors that underlie regional variation in infant mortality in Kenya. The data drawn from the 1988/89 Kenya Demographic and Health Survey were used for this purpose. Logistic regression is used to analyse the data. On the basis of infant mortality estimates obtained, provinces were grouped into two groups: High (HMP) and low (LMP). The results obtained show that the values of explanatory variables in LMP region than in the high mortality region. However, their differences did not explain much of the variation in infant mortality between the two mortality regions. Decomposing the results revealed that the differences were largely due to the differences in the nature or structure of relationships, as represented by logit coefficients, between mortality and explanatory variables. The results indicate that the lower average level of maternal education, higher proportion of preceding child loss, higher proportion mothers belonging to low economic status households and a lower proportion of mothers belonging to households possessing livestock and lower use of modern contraception modestly contributed to high infant mortality in the high mortality region
1997
Ikamari LDE. ’Poverty Eradication in Kenya’. Office of the President as a Section of the National Poverty Eradication Plan, Republic of Kenya; 1997.
Ikamari LDE. "‘Development, Implementation and Funding of Population Policy and Programmes in Kenya’.". In: The University of Nairobi Silver Jubilee and PSRI 20th Anniversary Celebrations. PSRI, University of Nairobi ; 1997.
Ikamari LDE. "’The effect of birth intervals on infant and child mortality in Kenya." Tanzanian Journal of Population Studies and Development. 1997;4(2):1-20. AbstractWebsite

This article seeks to identify some of the factors underlying regional variation in child mortality in Kenya. The data drawn from the 1988/89 Kenya Demographic and Health Survey are used for the purpose. Logistic regression is used to analyse the data. On the basis of child mortality estimates obtained, provinces were grouped into two mortality groups: High (HLM) and Low (LMP). The results show that the values of explanatory variables in LMP were significantly high than in the high mortality region. However, their differences did not explain much of the differences in the variation in child mortality between the two regions. Decomposing the results revealed that the differences were largely due to nature or structure of relations between mortality and explanatory variables.

1996
Ikamari LDE. "’Assessment of the 1988/89 Kenya Demographic and Health Survey Maternity History Data’.". In: the Demography Department Seminar. The Research School of Social Sciences, The Australian National University, Canberra; 1996.
Ikamari LDE. "‘Population Policies and Programmes in Kenya’.". In: The 1995/96 M.Sc. Students Attending JVP Course. Reproductive Biology Unit, Chiromo Campus, University of Nairobi; 1996.
Ikamari LDE. 'Factors Affecting Child Survival in Kenya’. The Australian National University; 1996.
1995
Ikamari LDE. "’Explaining regional variation in infant and child mortality in Kenya’, Working Paper No. 57." Demography Department. The Research School of Social Sciences (RSS); 1995.
Ikamari LDE, Lucas TJ, Nalwamba C. "’Provincial view of fertility and mortality change in Kenya, Zambia, and Zimbabwe’.". In: Africa Today: Proceedings of the international Seminar. Sydney: University of New South Wales; 1995.
1993
Ikamari LDE. "Population Growth and Socio-economic development.". In: Maternal and Child Health and Family Planning Training Seminar for Registered Nurses and Clinical Officers of the Ministry of HealthOrganised by The Family Planning Private Sector (FPPS). Methodist Guest House, Nairobi, Kenya; 1993.
Ikamari LDE. "’Formal Training Programs at PSRI’.". In: Curriculum Development Workshop. Green Hills Hotel, Nyeri, Kenya; 1993.
1992
Ikamari LDE. "'Socio-economic Impact of AIDS at Malaba Border Township, Kenya’.". In: AIDS Workshop . Nairobi; 1992.
1985
Ikamari LDE. 'Determinants of Contraceptive Use in Kenya'. Population Studies and Research Institute, University of Nairobi; 1985.

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