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Book
Gitao CG, Njihia LW, Lamuka P. 'Prevalence and risk of milk-borne microbes from camels" Potential microbes from camel milk in Isiolo county, Kenya. Nairobi: lAP Lambert Academic Publishing; 2021.
HM M, OL O, LC A. Guide to Clinical and Practical Laboratory Procedures in Theriogenology. Ibadan: Scholarship Books; 2019.
Ngotho-Esilaba RN, Onono JO, Ombui JN, Lindahl JF, Wesonga HO. Perceptions of challenges facing pastoral small ruminant production in a changing climate in Kenya; Handbook of climate change resilience. Switzerland AG: @Springer Nature ; 2018.
N M, M G, Gichuhi S, G K, N N, L M, M B. Guidelines For Screening And Management of Diabetic Retinopathy. Nairobi: Ministry of Health Kenya; 2017.
Ferrier S, Ninan KN, Leadley P, Alkemade R, Acosta LA, Akcakaya HR, Brotons L, Cheung WWL, Christensen V, Harhash KA, KABUBO-MARIARA J, Lundquist C, Obersteiner M, Pereira HM, Peterson G, Pichs-Madruga R, Ravindranath N, Rondinini C, Wintle BA. The methodological assessment report on scenarios and models of biodiversity and ecosystem services. Bonn, Germany: IPBES; 2016.2016.methodological_assessment_report_scenarios_models.pdf
Waris A, Leaman J. The International Political Economy of Taxation 1945-Present. Berlin: Bregnan; 2013.
Onyango C, Unbehend G, Mewa EA, Mutahi AW, Lindhauer MG, Okoth MW. Strategies for the production of gluten-free bread from sorghum cassava flour blend. Dresden: TUDpress; 2013.trend_and_opportunities.pdf
Linet LK, K’Obonyo PO. A survey of strategic human resource and practices and performance of commercial banks in Nairobi, Kenya. London: LA MBERT Academic Publishing; 2013.
Okello JJ;, Ofwona-Adera, Edith; Mbatia, L.E; O, Okello RM. Using ICT to Integrate Smallholder Farmers into Agricultural Value Chain: The Case of DrumNet Project in Kenya.; 2013. AbstractWebsite

This article examines an ICT-based intervention (known as the DrumNet project) that has succeeded in integrating smallholder-resource and poor farmers into a higher value agricultural chain. The article assesses the design of the project, and how it resolves the smallholder farmers’ idiosyncratic market failures and examines member-farmers’ marketing margins. The article finds that the design of the DrumNet project resolves smallholder farmers’ credit, insurance and information market failures and enables them to overcome organizational failure. The article concludes that successful ICT-based interventions for integrating farmers into higher value agricultural value chains require an integrated approach to tackling smallholder farmers’ constraints. The findings have implications for the design of future ICT-based interventions in agriculture.

Okello JJ;, Ofwona-Adera, Edith; Mbatia, L.E; O, Okello RM. Using ICT to Integrate Smallholder Farmers into Agricultural Value Chain: The Case of DrumNet Project in Kenya.; 2013. AbstractWebsite

This article examines an ICT-based intervention (known as the DrumNet project) that has succeeded in integrating smallholder-resource and poor farmers into a higher value agricultural chain. The article assesses the design of the project, and how it resolves the smallholder farmers’ idiosyncratic market failures and examines member-farmers’ marketing margins. The article finds that the design of the DrumNet project resolves smallholder farmers’ credit, insurance and information market failures and enables them to overcome organizational failure. The article concludes that successful ICT-based interventions for integrating farmers into higher value agricultural value chains require an integrated approach to tackling smallholder farmers’ constraints. The findings have implications for the design of future ICT-based interventions in agriculture.

Longo D, Fauci A, Kasper D, Hauser S, Jameson J, Loscalzo J. Harrison's {Principles} of {Internal} {Medicine} 18E {Vol} 2 {EB}. McGraw Hill Professional; 2012. Abstract
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Melmed S, Polonsky KS, Larsen RP, Kronenberg HM. Williams {Textbook} of {Endocrinology}. Elsevier Health Sciences; 2011. Abstract

The latest edition of Williams Textbook of Endocrinology edited by Drs. Shlomo Melmed, Kenneth S. Polonsky, P. Reed Larsen, and Henry M. Kronenberg, helps you diagnose and treat your patients effectively with up-to-the minute, practical know-how on all endocrine system disorders. Comprehensive yet accessible, this extensively revised 12th Edition updates you on diabetes, metabolic syndrome, obesity, thyroid disease, testicular disorders, and much more so you can provide your patients with the most successful treatments. Find scientific insight and clinical data interwoven in every chapter, reflecting advances in both areas of this constantly changing discipline, and presented in a truly accessible format. You’ll also access valuable contributions from a dynamic list of expert authors and nearly 2.000 full-color images to help you with every diagnosis. This title has everything you need to manage any and all the clinical endocrinopathies you may encounter. Rely on the one reference that integrates rapidly evolving basic and clinical science in a cohesive, user-friendly format, definitively addresses every topic in the field, and has remained a standard for more than half a century.Update your know-how and skills to diagnose and treat your patients most effectively with exhaustively revised content on diabetes, metabolic disease, thyroid cancer, fertility problems, testicular problems, weight issues, and much more. Apply reliable guidance on endocrine conditions of growing interest like hypothyroidism and testicular disorders, with dedicated new chapters that expound on the latest research findings. Overcome any clinical challenge with comprehensive and easy-to-use coverage of everything from hormone activity, diagnostic techniques, imaging modalities, and molecular genetics, to total care of the patient. Apply the latest practices with guidance from expert authors who contribute fresh perspectives on every topic.

Lund JF(ed). Measuring Livelihoods and Environmental Dependence: Methods for Research and Fieldwork..; 2011. AbstractWebsite

Thousands of surveys on rural livelihoods in developing countries are being done every year. Unfortunately, many suffer from weaknesses in methods and problems in implementation. Quantifying households' dependence on multiple environmental resources (forests, bush, grasslands and rivers) is particularly difficult and often simply ignored in the surveys. The results therefore do not reflect rural realities. In particular, 'the hidden harvest' from natural resources is generally too important to livelihoods for development research, policies and practice to ignore. Fieldwork using state-of-the-art methods, and in particular well-designed household questionnaires, thus becomes an imperative to adequately capture key dimensions of rural welfare. This book describes how to do a better job when designing and implementing household and village surveys for quantitative assessment of rural livelihoods in developing countries. It covers the entire research process from planning to sharing research results. It draws on the experiences from a large global-comparative project, the Poverty Environment Network (PEN), to develop more robust and validated methods, enriched by numerous practical examples from the field. The book will provide an invaluable guide to methods and a practical handbook for students and professionals.

C.M K, I.W M, L.M N, P.W K. TFD 301: Sociology of Education. Nairobi: University of Nairobi-ODEL; 2011.
Langdon J, Patel M, Brennan P. Operative {Oral} and {Maxillofacial} {Surgery} {Second} edition. 2nd ed. CRC Press; 2010. Abstract

Operative Maxillofacial Surgery was first published in 1998, and within a very short period it became the standard text for trainees in oral and maxillofacial surgery preparing for their exit examinations.For this second edition, the contents have been extensively revised not only to include all aspects of oral surgery but also to reflect the changes in maxillofacial practice that have occurred since 1998. In particular, the role of osseointegrated implants, the management of craniofacial trauma and facial aesthetic surgery including 'cosmetic' surgery and bone distraction have all moved on since the first edition was written. The editors have made a careful selection of contributors representing current practice from throughout the world including continental Europe, the United States, Asia and Australia. Operative Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery represents international best practice in the specialty. Each chapter has been written by an internationally recognised expert and represents a 'how I do it' master class. It is illustrated with clear line diagrams supplemented where appropriate with clinical photographs showing the essential steps in all the surgical procedures in current clinical practice. Authors have kept to a standard template, ensuring a minimum of discussion and an emphasis on surgical technique.The definitive surgical manual in the field, Operative Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery will appeal to trainees, young specialists and established experts not only in oral and maxillofacial surgery but also the related specialties of otorhinolaryngology and plastic surgery.

Gichuru EK;, Combes MC;, Mutitu EW;, Ngugi ECK;, Omondi CO;, Bertrand B;, Lashermes P. Towards the development of sequence based markers for resistance to coffee berry disease (Colletotrichum kahawae).; 2009. AbstractWebsite

Coffee Berry Disease which affects green Arabica coffee (Coffea arabica) berries is caused by the fungus Colletotrichum kahawae and is a major problem in Arabica coffee production in African countries. Breeding for resistance to this disease is therefore to a major priority in these countries avoid intensive chemical usage for its control. Recently, microsatellite and Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphisms (AFLP) markers for a gene conferring resistance to the disease were identified and mapped onto the chromosomal region carrying the gene. To improve the repeatability of the AFLP markers, four of the marker bands were selected for cloning and sequencing to facilitate specific primers to be designed. Three of the resultant primers did not amplify products that exhibited polymorphism characteristic of the parent AFLP bands; but one primer pair amplified a product that dominantly identified the presence of the parent AFLP marker at an optimum temperature of 62°C followed by electrophoresis in agarose. The reliability of the designed primers was confirmed by analysis in 95 plants from a F2 population previously used to map the chromosomal fragment carrying the resistance. The importance of the results in enhancing the utility of the parent AFLP marker in relation to analytical costs and position on the chromosomal fragment is discussed.

Boon TRE;, Lund DH;, Buttoud G;, Kouplevatskaya I. Analysis along procedural elements.; 2008.Website
Atoh F, L. K. Introduction to Morphology. Nairobi: University of Nairobi; 2008.
Oboko RO, Wagacha PW, Masinde EM, Omwenga E, Libotton A. Value Difference Metric for Student Knowledge Level initialization in a Learner Model-based Adaptive e-Learning System.; 2008. AbstractValue Difference Metric for Student Knowledge Level initialization in a Learner Model-based Adaptive e-Learning System

Web-based learning systems give students the freedom to determine what to study based on each individual learner’s learning goals. These systems support learners in constructing their own knowledge for solving problems at hand. However, in the absence of instructors, learners often need to be supported as they learn in ways that are tailored to suit a specific learner. Adaptive web-based learning systems fit in such situations. In order for an adaptive learning system to be able to provide learning support, it needs to build a model of each individual learner and then to use the attribute values for each learner as stored in the model to determining the kind of learning support that is suitable for each learner. Examples of such attributes are learner knowledge level, learning styles and learner errors committed by learners during learning. There are two important issues about the use of learner models. Firstly, how to initialize the attributes in the learner models and secondly, how to update the attribute values of the learner model as learners interact with the learning system. With regard to initialization of learner models, one of the approaches used is to input into a machine learning algorithm attribute values of learners who are already using the system and who are similar (hence called neighbors) to the learner whose model is being initialized. The algorithm will use these values to predict initial values for the attributes of a new learner. Similarity among learners is often expressed as the distance from one learner to another. This distance is often determined using a heterogeneous function of Euclidean and Overlap measures (HOEM). This paper reports the results of an investigation on how HOEM compares to two different variations of Value Difference Metric (VDM) combined with the Euclidean measure (HVDM) using different numbers of neighbors. An adaptive web-based learning system teaching object oriented programming was used. HOEM was found to be more accurate than the two variations of HVDM

Wanyande P, Omosa M, Ludeki C. Governance Issues in Kenya: An Overview.; 2007.Website
Ludeki C, Wanyande P, Omosa M. Governance Issues in Kenya: An Overview.; 2007.Website
Søren M, Lars S;. Guidelines for distribution of tree seed in small bags: small quantities and high quality.; 2007. AbstractWebsite

It has been assessed that the majority of trees planted in developing countries are planted by farmers. On-farm tree planting is likely to gain importance in the future as access to natural forests and trees is getting more and more difficult. On-farm tree planting, however, often suffers from lack of access to a diversity of high quality tree planting material. Quality tree seed are normally sold from major seed producers (national tree seed organisations) in a centralised manner, with only 1-3 outlets within the country, and often only in large quantities. Small holders cannot afford to travel long distances and need only small amounts of seed. Therefore the seed will have to be brought to the farmer

Søren M;, Lars S;. Guidelines for distribution of tree seed in small bags: small quantities and high quality.; 2007. AbstractWebsite

It has been assessed that the majority of trees planted in developing countries are planted by farmers. On-farm tree planting is likely to gain importance in the future as access to natural forests and trees is getting more and more difficult. On-farm tree planting, however, often suffers from lack of access to a diversity of high quality tree planting material. Quality tree seed are normally sold from major seed producers (national tree seed organisations) in a centralised manner, with only 1-3 outlets within the country, and often only in large quantities. Small holders cannot afford to travel long distances and need only small amounts of seed. Therefore the seed will have to be brought to the farmers

Oyugi, Lutiali, Saka, Musumba. Au Sommet 3: Une approche Intégrée et communicative . Nairobi: Kenya Literature Bureau; 2005.
Kristensen K;, Larsen B;J, Madsen P. Forest rehabilitation in Denmark using nature-based forestry .; 2005.Website
Kioko UM, Guthrie T, Lara G, Sumbana H, Phororo H, Kerapeletswe C, Fairstein C, Valdes A, Sotomayor J, Darce D. Funding the fight: Budgeting for HIV/AIDS in Developing Countries. ISBN 1-919798-71-4, . Idasa, Cape Town; 2004.
L. M, Njoroge K, Bett C, Mwangi W, Verkuijl H, Groote DH. The Seed Industry for Dryland Crops in Eastern Kenya.; 2003.
E.N. PN, Hirschfeld M, Lindsey E, Kimani V, Mwanthi M, Olenja J, Pigott W, Messervy P, Mudongo K, Ncube E, Rantona K, Bale S, Limtragool P, Nunthachaipun P. COMMUNITY HOME-BASED CARE IN RESOURCE-LIMITED SETTINGS. Geneva: THE CROSS CLUSTER INITIATIVE ON HOME-BASED LONG-TERM CARE, NON-COMMUNICABLE DISEASES AND MENTAL HEALTH AND THE DEPARTMENT OF HIV/AIDS, FAMILY AND COMMUNITY HEALTH, WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION; 2002. AbstractWebsite

COMMUNITY HOME-BASED CARE IN RESOURCE-LIMITED SETIINGS
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
6
his document provides a systematic framework for establishing and maintaining community home-based care (CRBC) in resource-limited
settings for people with RIV / AIDS and those with other chronic or disabling conditions. Most CRBC services so far have been established through unsystematic, needs-based efforts. As the RIV / AIDS epidemic continues to grow, many organizations and communities are now considering expanding in a more programmatic approach, and countries are looking for scaled-up responses and national strategies for CRBe. This document therefore provides an important framework to guide governments, national and international donor agencies and community-based organizations (including nongovernmental organizations, faith-based organizations and community groups) in developing or expanding CRBC programmes. The need for such a document has been clearly identified.
CRBC is defined as any form of care given to ill people in their homes. Such care includes physical, psychosocial, palliative and spiritual activities. The goal of CRBC is to provide hope through high-quality and appropriate care that helps ill people and families to maintain their independence and achieve the best possible quality of life.
This document targets three important audiences: policy-makers and senior administrators, middle managers and those who develop and run CRBC programmes. Although the roles and responsibilities of these target audiences differ somewhat, developing effective partnerships among the three is essential. Policy-makers and senior administrators must be involved in developing and monitoring CRBC programmes, and the people who manage and run the programmes must share information and feedback with senior administrators. In this sense, policy and action are interrelated as each partner learns from and guides the other. To this end, this document is divided into four interrelated sections: a policy framework for CRBC; the roles and responsibilities for CRBC at the national, district and local levels of administration; the essential elements of CRBC; and the strategies for action in establishing and maintaining CRBC in resource-limited settings.

Yoon DH, Ochieng JW, Lee HK, Oh SJ, Cho BW, Cheong IC, Hanotte O. Genetic diversity and relationships of three Eastern Asian cattle breeds.; 2002. AbstractBook

Ten cattle populations, 3 Asian (Hanwoo, Yanbian, Wagyu), 2 African, and 2 European Bos taurus as well as 2 Asian B. indicus and one Bali cattle, B. banteng, were characterized with 13 microsatellite markers. A total of 364 animals from the different cattle populations were used in the study. Allele frequencies were used to estimate expected heterozygosities (He), genetic distances (Ds), and to perform principal component analysis. 165 alleles were observed across all loci. The data supported a common origin for the Hanwoo and Yanbian cattle (Ds=0.013). No evidence for a major West European taurine introgression into the Wagyu was observed. The Eastern Asian cattle were found to be genetically distinct from the European and African taurine and from the Asian zebu. It is recommended that the genetic uniqueness of these cattle breeds be maintained in conservation and improvement programmes

L. Owiti, W. Musyoni JB. Rise Up and Act: A Resource Material on iolence Against Women. Nairobi: All Africa Conference of Churches; 2002.
Likimani T. Chemistry and its applications.; 2001. Abstract

PREFACE To reap the full benefit of any product available in the market, consumers should know the types of raw materials in the products, the way in which the products perform their job, and the precautions that need to be taken when using the products. With some basic knowledge of chemistry, the small print on the label becomes important to the consumer and may lead to a better selection and use of the product purchased. The first chapter of this book deals primarily with the chemical nature of both living and non-living things. Chapter Two places emphasis on the innate curiosity of man and his use of experimentation in the evolution of important chemical transformation processes that bring about changes in matter. These reaction processes are employed in the chemical industries discussed in the subsequent chapters; their inclusion therefore seeks to bring the study of chemistry into focus in the student's life. The rest of the text material, which can be built on a very thoughtful analysis of chemical theory or a simple notion of atoms, molecules and a few molecular geometries and interactions, enlightens the student on the many ways in which chemical knowledge has been applied to solve practical problems. An innovative approach to the problem of teaching students something about the chemical processes which touch upon their daily lives is discussed under various chemical aspects including: isolation of metals from their ores and salts and their uses, nuclear processes and their applications, the manufacture of soaps and detergents, synthetic fibres and surface-coating products, beauty aids, perfumes and flavouring agents, foods, agrochemical and animal health products, fermentation reaction products and medicines, environmental chemical pollution, chemical poisons and their basis of toxicity, the role of chemistry in industrial and economic development (with a discussion on some critical industries) and, finally, safety precautions against chemical hazards. Although some of the exercises provided at the end of each chapter are meant to test the reader's understanding of concepts, a few open-ended questions have been added to stimulate the bright student and to involve him or her in some of the inevitable controversies of chemical science. A few references have been provided to encourage the enthusiastic student to develop a taste for studying in depth a particular point of interest.

Boon TRE;, Nathan I;, Buttoud G;, Kouplevatskaya I, Lund DH;. Analysis along procedural elements.; 1998.Website
Cheatle RJ, Muraya P, Young A, Thomas DB, Biamah EK, Kilewe AM, Lundgren L. Modelling soil changes under agroforestry.; 1989. AbstractWebsite

In the older approach to soil conservation, the emphasis was on controlling the rate of soil loss, expressed as tonnes per hectare or millimeters of soil depth. Conservation measures were directed at reducing erosion to a presumed acceptable rate, called soil-loss tolerance. Earlier attempts to assess economic terms were made on the basis of reduction in soil erosion control should come first, as a prerequisite to other agricultural improvements. Recent research has changed this emphasis in several ways. It has been recognized that the effects of erosion are by no means limited to reduction in soil depth. Equally important are loss of nutrients, organic matter, and through the latter, deterioration in soil physical properties. This is leading towards integration between tow aspects of soil conservation: erosion control and maintenance of fertility. Both are necessary to achieve land use which is sustainable as well as productive.

LITONDO KO. "Recurrent Cost of Public Investment and Rationalisation in Kenya",. Vaccine 26:2788- 2795; 1988. AbstractWebsite

Computers were first developed to process business transactions; the trend has been to have computers also support management in decision making. This led to the evolution of Management Information Systems (MIS). The concept of MIS can be traced from four major areas, namely, managerial accounting, management science or operations research, management theory and computer science. MIS is supported by a comprehensive set of data for business operations referred to as a database. There are several databases in any given organization. Organizations have realized that valuable information is hidden in separate databases which might sometimes contain overlapping and contradictory information, and are coming up with data warehouses. A data warehouse provides a platform for advanced, complex and efficient data analysis using On-Line Analytical Processing (OLAP) for data mining or Knowledge Data Discovery (KDD) to extract previously unknown strategic business information or business intelligence (BI). There are a lot of similarities between data warehousing and operations research (OR), they both require analytical processing to support executive decision making, yet OR, MIS and IT exist as separate communities, right from the education level to the organizations. There are many challenges facing data warehousing, with organizations viewing it as a purely IT project. The objective of the paper was to establish how some of the challenges of data warehousing could be addressed so as to reduce the failure rate of BI projects. It was concluded that data warehousing would be more successful if its development was a joint effort of both the OR & MIS community and the IT community. It is recommended that OR and MIS be taught as one discipline whose graduates will work very closely with IT specialists.

Book Chapter
Okaru AO, Rehm J, Sommerfeld K, Kuballa T, Walch SG, Lachenmeier DW. "The threat to quality of alcoholic beverages by unrecorded consumption.". In: Alcoholic beverages. Woodhead Publishing; 2019:. Abstract
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Owakah F, Liyai H, Nyarwath O. "Henry Odera Oruka: A Bio-Bibliography.". In: Odera Oruka in the 21st Century. Washington: Council for Research in Values and Philosophy (CRVP); 2018.
Mwesigwa JB, Ouma GO, Ouma JO, Lutta IM, Mwangi SG, Ogallo LA. "Tools and Procedures for Seasonal Downscaling of Climate Forecasts for Use by Farmers Over the Greater Horn of Africa: A Case Study for Western Kenya.". In: Climate Change Adaptation in Africa. Springer, Cham; 2017. Abstract

Seasonal climate outlooks have become a necessary input to agricultural planning and execution of all farming activities as a form of adaptation to climate change and variability. Extended climate forecasts of 3–4 months pose a challenge to farmers as it is difficult for them to pinpoint exactly what might happen on daily, weekly or decadal time scales. In addition, such forecasts are presented in form of probability maps and in very coarse resolution, making them difficult for farmers to comprehend. Community-specific downscaled forecasts offer an opportunity for farmers to decide on what, where and when to plant, allocation of resources and on other investment options. This study evaluated various downscaling tools and procedures for seasonal forecast interpretation over the Greater Horn of Africa (GHA) region. The tools evaluated were: analogue year approach, Fact-Fit tool, Water Requirement Satisfaction Index (WRSI) and GeoCLIM tool. Analogue year approach turned out to be good but highly dependent on accuracy of the selected year; Fact-Fit tool was able to convert the seasonal probability forecasts into amounts but unable to disaggregate rainfall amounts at daily, weekly or dekadal time scales; the WRSI tool used was limited to a number of crops, seasons and regions but was necessary for monitoring seasonal progress and predicting crop performance. The current GeoCLIM software used was unable to disaggregate rainfall amounts to daily, weekly or dekadal scales but was good for suitability analysis and producing spatial distribution rainfall maps. An integrated approach is therefore desirable for producing more reliable and dependable location-specific seasonal forecasts for direct application by farmers and other agricultural practitioners. This is so important in the Horn of Africa region, where climate change is already affecting populations, and adaptation is seen as a major approach to cope with the impacts of climate change.

Ong’amo G, Khadioli N, LeRu B, Mujica N, Carhuapoma P. "African Pink stemborer, Sesamia calamistis (Hampson 1910).". In: Pest distribution and risk atlas for Africa. Potential global and regional distribution and abundance of agricultural and horticultural pests and associated biocontrol agents under current and future climates. Lima (Peru).: International Potato Center (CIP).; 2016.
Ong’amo G, Khadioli N, LeRu B, Mujica N, Carhuapoma P. "Maize stalk borer, Busseola fusca (Fuller 1901).". In: Pest distribution and risk atlas for Africa. Potential global and Regional distribution and abundance of agricultural and horticultural pests and associated biocontrol agents under current and future climates. Lima (Peru): International Potato Center (CIP).; 2016.
Ong’amo G, Khadioli N, LeRu B, Mujica N, Carhuapoma P. "Spotted stemborer, Chilo partellus (Swinhoe 1885).". In: Pest distribution and risk atlas for Africa. Potential global and regional distribution and abundance of agricultural and horticultural pests and associated biocontrol agents under current and future climates. Lima (Peru). : International Potato Center (CIP). ; 2016.
mungai lnw. "diabetes ketoacidosis.". In: paediatric diabetes . ISPAD; 2014.
Ngowi HA, Mukaratirwa S, Lekule FP, Maingi N, Waiswa C, Sikasunge C, Afonso S, Sumbu J, Ramiandrasoa S, penrith ML, Willingham AL. "Agricultural Impact of Porcine Cysticercosis in Africa: A Review.". In: Novel Aspects on Cysticercosis and Neurocysticercosis. Jeneza Tirdine Rijeka, Croatia: INTECH; 2013.
Grainger A, Wong G, KABUBO-MARIARA J, Mbuvi D, Low PK, Low PS. "Economic and Social Impacts Assessment of DLDD. Chapter 2 .". In: Economic and social impacts of desertification, land degradation and drought. White Paper I. UNCCD 2nd Scientific Conference, prepared with the contributions of an international group of scientists; 2013.unccd_white_paper_1.pdfunccd_key_findings_policy_implications_and_recommendations_of_wp_i.pdf
KABUBO-MARIARA J, Linderhof V, Kruseman G, Atieno R. "Tenure Security and Ecosystem service provisioning in Kenya.". In: Nature’s Wealth. The Economics of Ecosystem Services and Poverty. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press ; 2013.
Ayuke F.A, Karanja N.K, J.J O, Wachira P.M, Mutua G.K, Lelei D. K, Gachene K.K. "Agrobiodiversity and potential use for enhancing soil health .". In: Tropical Soils of Africa. London: Soils and Food Security; 2012.
Ayuke FO, Karanja NK, Okello J, Wachira P, Mutua GK, Lelei, D., Gachene CKK. "Agrobiodiversity and potential use for enhancing soil health in tropical soils of Africa.". In: In Hester, R.E., Harrison, R.M. (Eds)Soils and Food Security: Issues in Environmental Science and Technology, No 35, 5: 94-133 . London, United Kingdom: The Royal Society of Chemistry; 2012. Abstract

Land degradation and soil fertility decline is often cited as a major constraint to crop production in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). As mineral and organic fertilisers are often limited in quantity and quality, soil
fertility research has focused on developing integrated management strategies to address soil fertility decline. Soil biotas are an essential component of soil health and constitute a major fraction of global
terrestrial biodiversity. Within the context of Integrated Soil Fertility Management (ISFM), soil biota are responsible for the key ecosystem functions of decomposition and nutrient cycling, soil organic matter
synthesis and mineralisation, soil structural modification and aggregate stabilisation, nitrogen fixation, nutrient acquisition, regulation of atmospheric composition, the production of plant growth substances
and the biological control of soil-borne pests and diseases. Soil biological processes are not as well understood as are soil physical and chemical properties, creating opportunities for breakthroughs in
biotic function to provide better services to agriculture. These services accrue through two basic approaches: indirectly, as a result of promoting beneficial soil biological processes and ecosystem services through land management, or directly, through the introduction of beneficial organisms to the soil. Because of their sensitivity to disturbance and their importance in redistributing and transforming organic inputs, some of the soil biota groups, such as earthworms and termites, represent an important indicator of soil quality. In this chapter we have highlighted the importance of soil biodiversity, especially its potential use for enhancing soil health in tropical soils of SSA.

of Kenya NC, of Learning C, of Nairobi U, AMREF. "MEDICAL SURGICAL NURSING 1.". In: UON-NCK-AMREF Distance Learning Modules . Nairobi: UON- NCK-AMREF; 2012.uon-nck-amref_distance_learning_modules_unit_19_medical_surgical_nursing_i.doc
L.W. N, M.M. M. "Curriculum Development for Non formal Education.". In: A Distance Learning Module for Master of Education Programme. Nairobi: University of Nairobi; 2011.kimani_3.pdf
Kimani G.N., L.W. N, M.M. M. "Curriculum Development for Non formal Education. .". In: A Distance Learning Module for Master of Education Programme. Nairobi: University of Nairobi; 2011.kimani_1.pdf
Kanyinga K, Long J, Ndii D. "Was it Rigged? A Forensic Analysis of Vote Returns in Kenya's 2007 Elections.". In: Tensions and Reversals in Democratic Transitions: The Kenya 2007 General Elections. Nairobi: Society for International Development and Institute for Development Studies (IDS), University of Nairobi; 2010.
Muthoni M, Levine T, and Asaah AH. "Who’s Afraid of Female Sexuality.". In: Empathy and Rage: Female genital Mutilation in African Literature. Ayebia Clark. UK; 2009.
Onwonga RN, Freyer B, Lelei JJ. "Traditional soil fertility management strategies: Do they conform to recommendations in organic farming? A case study of the smallholder farmers of the Central Rift Valley Province of Kenya."; 2008. Abstract

The low input nature of organic farming (OF) is often likened to the traditional soil fertility management practices (TSFMP) of smallholder farming systems in developing countries. There are however no concrete studies to support this assertion. The present study aims at comparing the TSFM practices with recommendations in OF specifically recycling of organic wastes of crop and animal origin and maintenance of long-term fertility of the soil. These were monitored through resource flow mapping and calculation of nitrogen balances, at crop production level, using NUTMON toolbox. The study was conducted in Gilgil, Lare and Molo divisions of the Rift Valley Province of Kenya. Crop residues and manure were the principal organic resources recycled within the smallholder farming systems. The calculated N balances were negative; -70.9, -80.2 and -99.8 kg/ha/year for Gilgil, Lare and Molo, respectively. The organic resources recycled within the farm were therefore insufficient to sustain soil fertility. This is contrary to recommendations in OF, in which the long-term soil fertility should be maintained and/or enhanced. There were however opportunities; composting, biomass transfer and improved use of external and internal farm boundaries, enhanced livestock manure handling and integration of agroforestry trees, for improving the TSFMP to expectations of OF

Brauch HG, Grin J, Mesjasz C, Behera NC, Chourou B, Spring UO, Liotta PH, Kameri-Mbote P. "‘Water and food security in the River Nile Basin: The perspectives of governments and NGOS of upstream countries.". In: Facing Global Environmental Change: Environmental, Human, Energy, Food, Health and Water Security Concept. Berlin – Heidelberg – New York – Hong Kong – London – Milan – Paris – Tokyo: Springer-Verlag; 2008.
Mwega F, Muga KL, Oyejide A, Lyakurwa W, Njinkeu D. "Africa and the World Trading System: The Case of Kenya." New Jersey: Third World Press; 2007.
Ininda J, Njuguna JGM, Gichuru L, Lorroki P. "Performance of Three-Way Cross Hybrids for Agronomic Traits and Resistance to Maize Streak Virus Disease in Kenya."; 2007. Abstract

Maize Streak virus (MSV) disease is a major disease in many parts of Africa, and is the most important viral pathogen of maize in Kenya. A study was conducted in 2004 to evaluate the agronomic performance and maize streak virus (MSV) resistance of maize ( Zea mays check for this species in other resources L.) three-way crosses developed in Kenya. Twenty hybrids and one check were grown under normal conditions in a randomized complete block design, in two replications at Embu, 1540 masl; and Muguga, 2093 masl). In a parallel trial in Muguga, hybrids were also evaluated in two replications under artificial inoculation with MSV. The analyses of variance combined across environments showed significant differences (P<0.05) among genotypes for grain yield, days to 50% pollen shed, days to mid-silk and ear height. Genotype x environment interaction was significant (P<0.01) for grain yield and days to mid-silk, indicating some hybrids were more adapted in some environments. Grain yield for MU03-025 (10.04 t ha-1) was significantly better (P<0.05) than the check, H513 (7.53t ha-1). In the disease inoculated experiment, the best hybrids for disease resistance were MU03-012 and MU03-006 (score of 1.75), while H513 had a mean score of >3.0. The highest yielding hybrid under disease inoculation, MU03-026 showed yield gain of 5.2 t ha-1 above that of H513. The results indicate adoption of disease resistant hybrids would result in a higher maize yields in the mid-altitude areas of Kenya.

Ndetei DM, Lule G, Mohit A, Mburu J, Atwoli L, Mucheru M. "Psychiatric and Mental Health Training."; 2006.
J. G, M. M, J. M, L. M, J. M, P. O. "Ethnoveterinary Practices in Eastern Africa, ISBN-9966-907-15-7." Community-based Livestock Initiatives Program; 2004.
Njeri KM, Ligulu, Peter, McCormick, Dorothy. "Policy and Footwear in Kenya in McCormick.". In: Clothing and Footwear in Africa industrialization. Johannesburg: Africa Institute of South Africa; 2004.
Baliraine FN, Bonizzoni M, Guglielmino CR, Osir EO, Lux SA, Mulaa FJ, Gomulski LM, Zheng L, Quilici S, Gasperi G, Malacrida AR. "Population genetics of the potentially invasive African fruit fly species, Ceratitis rosa and Ceratitis fasciventris (Diptera: T."; 2004.
Ayiemba EHO, Lugalla, J.L.P. and Kibassa(eds)CG. "Katoloni Street Children Rehabilitation School: A Case Study of an Integrated Model for Community Development.". In: Poverty, AIDS and Street Children in East Africa. New York, U.S.A: Edwin Mellon Press; 2002.
Hassan R, Njoroge K, Ngure M, Otsyula R, Laboso A. "Adoption patterns and performance of improved maize in Kenya. In: R.M. Hassan, (Ed).". In: Maize Technology Development and Transfer: A GIS application for research planning in Kenya (Chapter 7). CAB International, Oxford and New York; 1998.
LITONDO KO. ""Data Processing and Computers - Introduction to Business: A Kenyan Perspective" edited by Prof. F.N. Kibera.". In: Kenya Literature Bureau,. Vaccine 26:2788- 2795; 1996. Abstract

Computers were first developed to process business transactions; the trend has been to have computers also support management in decision making. This led to the evolution of Management Information Systems (MIS). The concept of MIS can be traced from four major areas, namely, managerial accounting, management science or operations research, management theory and computer science. MIS is supported by a comprehensive set of data for business operations referred to as a database. There are several databases in any given organization. Organizations have realized that valuable information is hidden in separate databases which might sometimes contain overlapping and contradictory information, and are coming up with data warehouses. A data warehouse provides a platform for advanced, complex and efficient data analysis using On-Line Analytical Processing (OLAP) for data mining or Knowledge Data Discovery (KDD) to extract previously unknown strategic business information or business intelligence (BI). There are a lot of similarities between data warehousing and operations research (OR), they both require analytical processing to support executive decision making, yet OR, MIS and IT exist as separate communities, right from the education level to the organizations. There are many challenges facing data warehousing, with organizations viewing it as a purely IT project. The objective of the paper was to establish how some of the challenges of data warehousing could be addressed so as to reduce the failure rate of BI projects. It was concluded that data warehousing would be more successful if its development was a joint effort of both the OR & MIS community and the IT community. It is recommended that OR and MIS be taught as one discipline whose graduates will work very closely with IT specialists.

Ikamari LDE, Lucas TJ, Nalwamba C. "’Provincial view of fertility and mortality change in Kenya, Zambia, and Zimbabwe’.". In: Africa Today: Proceedings of the international Seminar. Sydney: University of New South Wales; 1995.
Case
Conference Paper
L MRNDOGONIKINYANJUI. "Preparation (with others) of an Urban Development Plan for Ruiru Town.". In: Winrock International, Morrilton, U.S.A. EAMJ; Submitted. Abstract
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(eds) Harle J, Lamptey RB, Mwangi A, Nzegwu F, Okere O. "Creating digital content and delivering digital learning in African universities."; 2021. Abstract

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Mwihia EW, Lyche JL, Mbuthia PG, Gathumbi JK, Maina J, Ivanova L, Uhlig S, Mulei IR, Eriksen GS. "Co-occurrence of multiple mycotoxins in fish feed in Kenya.". In: ASM 2018 Scientific Programme. Leisure Lodge Resort, Mombasa, Kenya; 2018.
Lolgisoi LB, Kimani EK, Ayah R, Jama HH. "Improving the Prototyping Manufacturing Processes: The Development of an Assembly Manual for Suction Machine.". In: 1 st Annual Architecture and Engineering Conference 2018. Nairobi, Kenya; 2018.
Malusi B, L.O O. "Effect of Handedness on Completion Rate of Chemistry Timed Tasks by LeftHanded Learners .". In: The IAFOR International Conference on Education. Dubai; 2018.iicedubai2018_39167.pdf
Kariuki J, Stuart-Shor E, Leveille S, Gona P, Cromwell J, Hayman L. "Tapping Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Dataset to Assess Transportability of the Non-Laboratory Based Framingham Cardiovascular Risk Assessment Tool.". In: NURSING RESEARCH. Vol. 67. LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS TWO COMMERCE SQ, 2001 MARKET ST, PHILADELPHIA …; 2018:. Abstract
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Odhiambo JA, Lukhoba CW, Dossaji SF. "Corms as an additional feature to identify Gladiolus spp.". In: XXI AETFAT congress.; 2017. Abstractuse_of_corms_as__additional_features_to_identify.ppt

Gladiolus is a genus that consists of underground corms and strikingly showy flowers. The corms are mostly rounded and symmetrical enveloped with fibrous tunics. Presently the main and sure way to identify these plants is by their use of showy flowers; however, this becomes a challenge in during the dry seasons when the plants don’t flower. This study investigated the use of corms as additional feature for identification of Gladiolus species found in Kenya; Gladiolus watsonoides, G. goetzenii, G. ukambanensis and G. newii. Physical and histological features of the corms were evaluated according to Rolls, 2011, to investigate any differences across the different species. Although the analysis of the cells of corms did not reveal any obvious differences, their outward morphologies including the colour, shape and texture of the tunics were different across the species investigated. Therefore, corms form an additional feature of taxonomic value for identification and collection of these plants in the absence of flowers.
Key words: Gladiolus, Corms, Identification

Musila FM, Lukhoba CW, Dossaji SF, Nguta JM. "Molecular Phylogeny of ten Kenyan Plectranthus species in the Coleus clade.". In: XXI AETFAT congress. Catholic University of Eastern Africa, Nairobi, Kenya; 2017. Abstractaetfat_2017-fredrick_m.ppt

Plectranthus is one important genus of flowering plants whose member species have a variety of uses in the horticultural and in the medical field. Plectranthus species are difficult to distinguish morphologically and many species have been given different names by different authors. Use of morphological characters is not sufficiently enough to delimit the genus successfully. Molecular, anatomical and biochemical markers are better in studying interspecific variation compared to gross morphological markers. So far no study on molecular phylogeny of the Kenyan Plectranthus species has been conducted. By comparing the same gene sequence across species within a genus, a phylogenetic tree can be constructed which can support or give new insights into the existing classification and rule out the confusion brought by synonymy. As a result, the current study used molecular characters to classify ten Plectranthus species in the Coleus clade within the Plectranthus genus. The molecular characters used in the study were DNA sequences of two chloroplast genes: MatK and Rbcl genes considered as universal molecular markers. Genomic DNA from the ten species was obtained followed by amplification and sequencing of the two genes in each species. From the results, a phylogenetic tree reconstructed using MatK genes groups P. caninus, P. otostegioides, P. barbatus and P. lanuginosus together and all the four species form a monophyletic group. These four species together with P.aegyptiacus form a larger monophyletic group. The same pattern can be observed in the phylogenetic tree created using the Rbcl genes. Again based on the MatK genes; P. pseudomarruboides, P. ornatus, P. montanous and P. amboinicus have been showed to be closely related and are monophyletic. Again these four species together with P.edulis form a larger monophyletc group. This close relationship of these species can also be observed in phylogenetic tree produced using the Rbcl genes. The present study has grouped the ten study Plectranthus species using molecular characters into phylogenies which are supported by previous studies and proved that molecular characters can aid in plant identification and phylogenetic studies.
Key words; Plectranthus, Molecular phylogeny, MatK gene, Rbcl gene.

Lydia W. Njenga, Rachael E.N. Njogu, Kariuki DK, Yusuf AO, Wendt OF. "Tris-Cyclometalated Iridium (III) Complexes as Photoredox Catalysts in Organic Synthesis.". In: Oorgandagarna - Inorganic Days,. Nynäshamn, Sweden; 2017.
Luciani R, Laneve G, Jahjah M, Collins M. "Crop species classification: A phenology based approach.". In: 2017 IEEE International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium (IGARSS). IEEE; 2017:. Abstract
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Luciani R, Laneve G, Jahjah M, Collins M. "Crop species classification: A phenology based approach.". In: 2017 IEEE International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium (IGARSS). IEEE; 2017:. Abstract
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Liu Y, Xie J, Luo M, Peng B, Deng L. "Synthesis and characterization of magnetic Al/NiO composite pigments with low infrared emissivity.". In: Materials Science Forum. Vol. 898. Trans Tech Publ; 2017:. Abstract
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Liu F, Gu F, Ball AD, Zhao Y, Peng B. "The validation of an ACS-SSI based online condition monitoring for railway vehicle suspension systems using a SIMPACK model.". In: 2017 23rd International Conference on Automation and Computing (ICAC). IEEE; 2017:. Abstract
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Liu Y, Gureya D, Al-Shishtawy A, Vlassov V. "OnlineElastMan: Self-Trained Proactive Elasticity Manager for Cloud-Based Storage Services.". In: 2016 International Conference on Cloud and Autonomic Computing (ICCAC). Augsburg, Germany; 2016:. Abstract

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Olago D, Joordens J, Beck C, Sier M, der Lubbe JV, et al. "Climate-driven lacustrine dynamics from the Early Pleistocene Lorenyang Lake, Turkana Basin, Kenya.". In: EGU General Assembly 2016. Vienna Austria; 2016. Abstract

Two stratigraphic records from Kaitio in West Turkana, Kenya, span 1.87 - 1.34 Ma, and document environmental character and variability through a critical interval for human evolution and cultural development. The WTK13 core collected by the Hominin Sites and Paleolakes Drilling Project (HSPDP) recovered 216 m of sediment at 95% recovery. A parallel outcrop record of 180 m was investigated in exposures along the Kaitio laga close to the drill site. Six tephrostratigraphic markers, the Chari, Lokapetamoi, 22Q-3, Etirr, Ebei and KBS Tuffs are present in the outcrop and/or core. These were characterized by single-shard geochemical analysis, and provide links to the well-established tephrochronology of the Turkana Basin. Magnetic polarity stratigraphy of the two records documents the top of the Olduvai Subchron (C2N) at 1.78 Ma. The lithostratigraphic record, bolstered by magnetic susceptibility and sedimentary facies characterization, demonstrates a first-order transition from a deeper lacustrine system to a dynamic lake margin setting, followed by delta progradation. Facies analysis reveals repeated fluctuations of lake level at Milankovitch and sub-Milankovitch scales. Core-outcrop correlation allows detailed comparisons between diagenetically-prone outcrop samples and more pristine samples from the deep core. The excellent preservation of the core sediments makes it possible to obtain critical climate records of organic biomarkers, pollen, phytoliths and other proxies. This detailed archive of environmental variability is closely linked to the rich paleontological and archaeological discoveries from nearby sites and around the Turkana Basin.

Muthomi JW, Lengai GMW, Fulano AM, Wagacha JM, Narla RD, Mwang’ombe AW. "Biopesticide-based IPM systems to reduce synthetic pesticide residues in vegetables for niche market access by small holder growers.". In: 5th Biennial RUFORUM Conference. Cape Town, South Africa; 2016.
Lengai GMW, Muthomi JW, Wagacha JM, Narla RD. "Plant extracts and antagonistic fungi as alternatives to synthetic pesticides in management of fungal diseases of tomato.". In: 5th Biennial RUFORUM Conference. Cape Town, South Africa; 2016.
Kianji G, Roberts R, Lund B, Shomali H, Barongo J, Mathu E. "Preliminary seismic catalogue for Kenya and adjoining areas, 1900-2014; Challenges and constraints."; 2016.
Ferrier S, Ninan KN, Leadley P, Alkemade R, Acosta-Michlik L, Akçakaya HR, KABUBO-MARIARA J. "Summary for policymakers of the assessment report of the methodological assessment of scenarios and models of biodiversity and ecosystem services.". In: Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services, IPBES Secretariat. Bonn, Germany; 2016.
Luciani R, Laneve G, Mito C, Jahjah M. "Developing a satellite based automatic system for crop monitoring: Kenya's Great Rift valley a case study.". In: ESA SP 740, LPS16, Proceedings of the conference held 9–13 May 2016. L. Ouwehand. Vol. 740.; 2016:. Abstract
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at the of Library ZMLUN-, at University EYLAN–, at University MWLAN–. "Corporate Social Responsibility legal framework, policies and practices in Kenya: a strategic approach to enhancing the image of libraries.". In: Kenya Library Association Conference. Nairobi Safari Club; 2015.
Khan S, Kanyiginya V, Kiema JBK, Lengoiboni M, Tumusherure W, Ngabo V, Hassan RM, Sisi JD. "Influence of Urban Land Policies on land Markets and People’s Livelihoods in Urban Rwanda.". In: World Bank Conference on Land and Poverty. Washington D.C.; 2015.
Chalo C, Lukhoba CW, Dossaji SF, Nguta JM. "Evaluation of Antimicrobial activity, Toxicity and Phytochemical composition of selected medicinal plants of Losho, Narok county, Kenya.". In: Nairobi Innovation week. university of nairobi; 2015. Abstract

In Kenya, microbial infections remain a threat to millions of lives of those individuals

Antibiotic effectiveness is threatened by increasing resistance of pathogenic microbes against most available drugs as new pathogens continue to emerge.

•Plants are a possible source of antimicrobial agents and could lead to the isolation of new and potentially effective antimicrobial compounds.

However for majority of herbal drugs, information on the efficacy, dosage safety and active principles is not well documented.

Antimicrobial activity, toxicity and phytochemical analysis of 4 most commonly used medicinal plants for treatment of ear, nose and throat infections (ENT), gastrointestinal disorders and skin ailments namely, Schrebera alata (Bark), Omorcarpum kirkii (Aerial part) ,Cussonia holstii (Bark)& Helichrysum forskahlii (Whole plant) was carried out .

Lydia W. Njenga, Lydia W. Njenga, Kariuki DK, Yusuf AO, Wendt OF. "“Synthesis and Characterization of Tris-Cyclometalated Iridium (III) 2-(1-naphthyl)-pyridine Complexes for Photoredox Catalysis.". In: 3rd Nordic Meeting on Organometallic Chemistry. Lund, Sweden; 2015.
Kiama TN, Sirma AJ, Senerwa DM, Ochungo P, Waithanji EM, Lindahl J, EK K'ethe, D. G. "Dietary exposure to mycotoxins within the Kenya dairy value chain and the role of gender.".; 2015.
Mecha J, Gitahi-Kamau N, Ilovi S, L. Njagi, Njuguna E, Mutai K, Katei I, Inwani I. "Optimising adolescent HIV care in a large Kenyan care and treatment centre.". In: IAS Conference on Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention, Vancouver, . Canada; 2015.
Olago D, van der Lubbe HJL, Sier MJ, Feibel CS, Beck C, Dupont-Nivet G, Vonhof H, Joordens JJ, Cohen A, Prins M. "Sr isotope stratigraphy and lithogenic grain-size distributions of the Pleistocene Turkana Basin, Kenya."; 2015.
Muirhead J, Lee H, Fischer T, Kattenhorn SA, Ebinger C, Kianji G, Maqway M, Thomas N, Onguso B. "Fault-controlled fluid migration during early-stage continental rifting in the Magadi Basin, Kenya.". In: American Geophysical Union Annual Meeting, Volume: Eos, Trans. AGU 95, Fall Meet. San Francisco, CA,; 2014.
Lee H, Muirhead JD, Fischer T, Kattenhorn SA, Ebinger C, Thomas N, Kianji G, Ongu B. "Fault-related soil efflux of mantle-derived CO2 in the Magadi and Natron Basins, East African Rift.". In: American Geophysical Union Annual Meeting, Volume: Eos, Trans. AGU 95, Fall Meet. San Francisco, CA,; 2014.
Bendick R, Fisseha S, Lewi E, Reilinger R, King R, Kianji G. "GPS Constraints on the Spatial Distribution of Extension in the Ethiopian Highlands and Main Ethiopian Rift.". In: American Geophysical Union Annual Meeting, Volume: Eos, Trans. AGU 95, Fall Meet. San Francisco, CA,; 2014.
Lambert, C, Murhead, J., Ebinger, C. J, Tiberi, C., Roecker SW, Ferdnard WR, Kianji, G., Mulibo, G.D. "The importance of magmatic fluids in continental rifting in East Africa.". In: American Geophysical Union. San Francisco; 2014.
Nganga CJ, Korir DK, Lolokote SS, Liaulo J. "Varroa destructor, a cause of decreased honey production in Samburu North District, Samburu County Kenya.". In: 9th Biennial Scientific Conference and Exhibition of Faculty of Veterinary Medicine. Nairobi, Kenya; 2014.
M M, PB G, LM M, J.M M, D K. "The Impact of Knowledge, Attitudes and the Practices of Indigenous Chicken farmers in Makueni that may Risk Drug, Aflatoxin, and Barbaloin Residues in the Meat.Presented at Held at .". In: 9th Biennial scientific conference and Exhibition. University of Nairobi Kenya ; 2014.
JC W, Matu NK, Stephen L and Laloo R., TK M, LW G. "Occurrence of red-complex aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans among patients with periodontal disease at the university of Nairobi dental hospital.". In: 32rd KDA Conference and exhibition. Sarova Panafric hotel Nairobi; 2014.
D.W. Gakuya, T.O.Abuom, C.Onyango, L.K.Cheruiyot. "Use of sodium hypochlorite (jik) in the management of dermatophytosis (ringworm) in a dairy cattle farm in Kiambu County.". In: 9th Faculty of Veterinary Medicine Biennial Scientific conference and Exhibition. PHPT Auditorium,CAVS,University of Nairobi; 2014.
L N. "Retinoblastoma: Promoting early diagnosis.". In: 5th Kenya Ophthalmic Nurses Conference. Jumuia Hotel,Nakuru, Kenya; 2014.njambi_l.retinoblastoma_promoting_early_diagnosis.pdf
Khawaja S, L.W G, T.J O. "Correlation of hand traced lateral cephalograms with digitally computerized lateral cephalograms.". In: . IADR general session and exbition. Capetown; 2014.
Lucy OP, Odero AN. "Solution to Economic Load Dispatch Problem using Particle Swarm Optimization.". In: KSEEE. Mombasa, Kenya; 2014. Abstractpso18sept2014.pdf

This paper proposes to determine the feasible optimal solution of the economic load dispatch power systems problem using Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) considering various generator constraints. The objective of the proposed method is to determine the steady-state operating point which minimizes the fuel cost, while maintaining an acceptable system performance in terms of limits on generator power, line flow,
prohibited operating zone and non linear cost function. Three diff erent inertia weights; a constant inertia weight CIW, a timevarying inertia weight TVIW, and global-local best inertia weight GLbestIW, are considered with the (PSO) algorithm to analyze the impact of inertia weight on the performance of PSO algorithm. The PSO algorithm is simulated for each of the method individually. It is observed that the PSO algorithm with
the proposed inertia weight (GLbestIW) yields better results, both in terms of optimal solution and faster convergence.

Thakral M, Leveille S, Stuart-Shor E. "A Critical Analysis of Multidimensional Pain Instruments.". In: NURSING RESEARCH. Vol. 63. LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS 530 WALNUT ST, PHILADELPHIA, PA 19106-3621 USA; 2014:. Abstract
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Wen X, Li G, Zhang J, Zhang Q, Peng B, Wong LM, Wang S, Xiong Q. "Flexible and tunable metamaterials and their applications in sensing.". In: APS March Meeting Abstracts. Vol. 2014.; 2014:. Abstract
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Katternhorn SA, Muirhead JD, W. DE, Fischer TP, Lee H, Ebinger CJ. "Contribution of transverse structures, magma, and crustal fluids to continental rift evolution: the East African rift in southern Kenya.". In: AGU FALL 2013. San Francisco, California; 2013. Abstract

The Magadi rift in southern Kenya formed at ~7 Ma within Proterozoic rocks of the Mozambique orogenic belt, parallel to its contact with the Archean Tanzania craton. The rift is bounded to the west by the ~1600-m-high Nguruman border fault. The rift center is intensely dissected by normal faults, most of which offset ~1.4-0.8 Ma lavas. Current E-W extensional velocities are ~2-4 mm/yr. Published crustal tomography models from the rift center show narrow high velocity zones in the upper crust, interpreted as cooled magma intrusions. Local, surface-wave, and SKS-splitting measurements show a rift-parallel anisotropy interpreted to be the result of aligned melt zones in the lithosphere. Our field observations suggest that recent fault activity is concentrated at the rift center, consistent with the location of the 1998 seismic swarm that was associated with an inferred diking event. Fault zones are pervasively mineralized by calcite, likely from CO2-rich fluids. A system of fault-fed springs provides the sole fluid input for Lake Magadi in the deepest part of the basin. Many of these springs emanate from the Kordjya fault, a 50-km-long, NW-SE striking, transverse structure connecting a portion of the border fault system (the NW-oriented Lengitoto fault) to the current locus of strain and magmatism at the rift center. Sampled springs are warm (44.4°C) and alkaline (pH=10). Dissolved gas data (mainly N2-Ar-He) suggests two-component mixing (mantle and air), possibly indicating that fluids are delivered into the fault zone from deep sources, consistent with a dominant role of magmatism to the focusing of strain at the rift center. The Kordjya fault has developed prominent fault scarps (~150 m high) despite being oblique to the dominant ~N-S fault fabric, and has utilized an en echelon alignment of N-S faults to accommodate its motion. These N-S faults show evidence of sinistral-oblique motion and imply a bookshelf style of faulting to accommodate dextral-oblique motion along the Kordjya fault. Fault relationships imply that the NW-SE transverse structures represent recent activity in the rift, and have locally tilted Late Pleistocene sediments. Given the abundance of N-S striking faults in the rift, the tendency for fault activity along transverse features suggests a change in the rifting driving forces that are likely the result of an interplay between strain localization at the rift center, inherited crustal fabric (NW structures in the Mozambique belt), a possible counterclockwise rotation of stress related to interacting rift segments in southern Kenya, and an active hydrothermal fluid regime that facilitates faulting. By connecting the Lengitoto fault to the rift center, the Kordjya fault has effectively caused the Magadi rift to bypass the Nguruman border fault, which has been rendered inactive and thus no longer a contributor to the rifting process

L N, K K, Gallie B, Chan H, Dimaras H. "Kenya National Retinoblastoma Strategy: A model for developing countries.". In: Canadian Cancer and Research Conference. sheraton Hotel, Toronto, Canada; 2013.njambi_et_al_kenya_retinoblastoma_strategy-_a_model_for_developing_countries.pdf
Kitonde CK, Dossaji SF, Lukhoba CW, Jumba MM. "Phytochemistry and Utilization of Vernonia glabra (Steetz) Oliv. & Hiern. in the Management of Food Spoilage and Poisoning Pathogens, in Kenya.". In: 1st International Conference Pesticidal Plants. Vol. 10.; 2013:.
Lally R, Moreira AS, Germaine K, Galbally P, Culhain J, Otieno N, Brazil D, Ryan D, Dowling D. "Development of endophytic bacterial inoculants possessing plant growth promotion traits for practical application in bio-energy plant species.". In: Association of Applied Biologists (AAB) Conference 2013 - Positive plant microbial interactions: their role in maintaining sustainable agricultural and natural ecosystems. Forest Pines Hotel, Brigg, North Linconshire, U.K; 2013. Abstract

Endophytes are bacteria present in plants that form a symbiotic relationship with
their hosts and may promote plant growth and health (Ryan et al., 2008). We extracted
Pseudomonas endophytes from Miscanthus × giganteus; a series of strains were selected
for application to two oilseed rape (OSR) trials. Endophytes colonise plants (including
the root-surface) and allow the plant to utilise nutrients present in the rhizosphere. This
potentially provides a yield boost for colonised plants, allowing for efficient fertiliser
strategies and improved yield performance (Redondo-Nieto et al., 2013). This study has
provided evidence that the application of specialised live microbial biofertilisers can
enhance aspects of crop development when applied in the field. The results show that
there was a significant increase in crop stem and leaf of “Compass” a variety of Oilseed
rape. The results did not indicate that there was a significant increase within the overall
yield of the crop.

Kiama TN, Sirma AJ, Senerwa DM, Ochungo P, Waithanji EM, Lindahl J, EK K'ethe, D. G. "How qualitative studies and gender analysis can add value to the assessment of dietary exposure to aflatoxins in Kenya.".; 2013.
McLigeyo AA, Lule G, FREDRICK OTIENOCF, Kayima JK;, Omonge E;. "Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) associated lipodystrophy: The prevalence, severity and phenotypes in patients on highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) in Kenya.". In: Journal of AIDS and HIV Research. Vol. 5.; 2013:. Abstract

Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) is widely accessible to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals in Kenya. Their long term use is associated with chronic complications such as lipodystrophy which may lead to stigmatization, reduced self esteem and poor adherence to HAART. This cross-sectional study described the prevalence of lipodystrophy, the phenotypes and severity among adult HIV infected patients on chronic HAART at a HIV clinic in Kenya. Data were collected using an investigator administered questionnaire and anthropometric measurements done using a protocol based on the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. The prevalence of lipodystrophy was 51.3% (confidence interval (CI) 45.6 to 57.6). Lipoatrophy occurred in 44%, lipohypertrophy in 15% and mixed syndrome in 41% of patients with lipodystrophy. Facial atrophy occurred in 75.7% of patients with lipodystrophy, upper limb atrophy in 48.5%, and lower limb atrophy in 36.8%. Abdominal obesity occurred in 40.4% of patients with lipodystrophy, breast enlargement in 30.9% and dorsocervical fat accumulation in 5.1%. Most patients had severe lipoatrophy, whereas lipohypertrophy was described as mild to moderate using the HIV out-patient study (HOPS) scale. HIV associated lipodystrophy was common in HIV-infected patients on chronic HAART. The main phenotype was lipoatrophy which majority of the patients described as severe.

Karanja F, Lohmann P. "Using Developable Land Units as an Indicator of Rate of Growth of an Urban Area."; 2013. Abstract

Developable Land Units (DLU) have been used in combination with remotely sensed data as an indicator for tracking the rate of urban growth. The variables used to model this indicator(DLU) are namely available vacant land, high land value, moderate elevation and compatibility with already existing land uses. Dar-esalaam, Tanzania, is used as the case study, specifically existing land use information (1992) is used to provide data pertaining to available vacant land and neighbourhood (i.e. compatibility), elevation data used was derived from ERS (1/2) data, whereas land value is obtained from mapped landform characteristics. The modelled developable land units is combined with new developed areas from 1998 SPOT multispectral data to estimate the amount of development occurring within this period i.e. between 1992 to 1998. The advantage of remotely sensed data in providing information continuously has been exploited in this regard, thus enabling a growth rate index to be estimated based on developable land units. The results obtained show that developable land units can be used successfully for monitoring growth and not only for predominantly allocating new developments as has been the case in the past.

Peng B, Lei F, Ozdemir SK, Long GL, Yang L. "Engineering the spectral properties of photonic molecules.". In: CLEO: QELS\_Fundamental Science. Optical Society of America; 2013:. Abstract
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Edwards P, Janisch C, Peng B, Ozdemir SK, Yang L, Liu Z. "Raman spectroscopic sensing using whispering gallery microresonators.". In: Ultrafast Imaging and Spectroscopy. Vol. 8845. International Society for Optics and Photonics; 2013:. Abstract
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Chege, H.W., D.C.Kemboi, L.C. Bebora, N. Maingi, P.G. Mbuthia, P.N. Nyaga, Njagi LW, Githinji JM. "Prevalence of ecto and endo parasites in free-range chickens in Mbeere District, Eastern Province, Kenya.". In: 3rd RUFORUM Conferencenar. Entebbe, Uganda; 2012.
Kemboi, D.C., H.W. Chege, L.C. Bebora, N. Maingi, P.N. Nyaga, P.G. Mbuthia, Njagi LW, Githinji JM. "Seasonal Newcastle disease antibody titres in village chicken of Mbeere District, Eastern Province, Kenya.". In: 3rd RUFORUM Conferenceting. Entebbe, Uganda; 2012.2012-_seasonal_new_castle_disease_antibody_titre_levels_in_village_chickens_of_mbeere_distrct_kenya.pdf
Lenga F, J.M.Bahemuka. "Higher Education in Africa and knowledge Economy.". In: Going Global Forum. London; 2012.
Lubembe DM, Githigia SM, Chogo P, Athumani HM, Kitaa JM. "Management of bovine papillomatosis using an Autogenous Vaccine: A case study in Bukura Agricultural College, Western Kenya.". In: Joint Faculty of Veterinary Medicine 8th Biennial and 46th Annual Scientific Conference of the Kenya Veterinary Association. Safaripark Hotel, Nairobi Kenya; 2012.
Kiemo K, Leseni B. "Mobile Money Services and Entrepreneurial Development in Rural Communities: The Case of the Agricultural Kikuyu and Pastoral Maasai Communities in Kenya.". In: IMTFI Annual Conference 2011 . Institute for Mooney, Technology and Financial Inclusion, University of California, Irvine, USA; 2012.
L.C. B, T.N M, P.K G, Ngatia T.A., Muchemi G. "Historical perspectives of lesser flamingo mortalities in Kenya.". In: Bennial Scientific Conference and 46th Kenya Veterinary Association Annual Scientific Conference. Faculty of Veterinary Medicine ; 2012.2012_-_historical_perspectives_of_lesser_flamingo_mortalities_in_kenya.pdf
L.D.E. I. "Analysis of Census Data taking into consideration Gender Dimensions’.". In: Kenya National Seminar on Census Data Analysis,. Panafric Hotel, Nairobi, Kenya; 2012.
Mwololo JK, Muturi PW, Mburu MWK, Njeru RW, Kiarie N, Munyua JK, Ateka EM, Muinga RW, Kapinga RE, Lemaga B. "Integration of farmers in technology developments as a basis for enhancing sweet-potato productivity in Kenya. .". In: Published online at knowledge.cta.int/en/content/view/full/15294.; 2012.
Mavuti SK;, Mbuthia PG;, Waruiru, R.M., L.W.jagi;, Mutune. MN;, Otieno RO;, Msoffe PLM. "Prevalence Of Haemoparasites In Free-range Local Duck."; 2012. Abstract

A study was conducted between November 2008 and March 2009 to determine the prevalence of haemoparasites in different age and sex groups of free-range local ducks in Nairobi and its environs. The ducks were categorized into ducklings (<2 months), growers (2 to 6 months) and adult ducks (>6 months). A total of 47 adults, 50 growers and 48 ducklings comprising 77 females and 68 males were sampled. Two thin blood smears were prepared from each bird, processed and examined for haemoparasites. Data obtained was analyzed as number of ducks of different age and sex groups infected with a particular haemoparasite. Haemoparasites were observed in 70/145 (48.28 %) of the ducks. Four haemoparasites identified were Aegyptinella pullorum 59/145 (40.69 %), Leucocytozoon caulleryi 10/145 (6.90 %), Haemoproteus species 1/145 (0.69 %) and Eperythrozoon species 5/145 (3.45 %). Their prevalence was 38.57 % (27/70), 24.29 % (17/70), 20.0 % (14/70) and 17.14 % (12/70) (p>0.05) for Embakasi, Westlands, Kasarani and Thika districts, respectively. Grower ducks had a prevalence of 35.71 % (25/70), adults, 34.29 % (24/70) and ducklings, 30.0 % (21/70) (p>0.05). Male and female ducks had an equal prevalence of 50.0 % (35/70). This study has demonstrated the occurrence of haemoparasites in different sexes and age groups of apparently healthy appearing ducks for the first time in Kenya. Their impact on duck productivity need further investigation and control strategies initiated to improve the industry

Mavuti SK;, Mbuthia PG;, Waruiru, R.M., L.W N.jagi;, Mutune. MN;, Otieno RO;, Msoffe PLM. "Prevalence Of Haemoparasites In Free-range Local Duck."; 2012. Abstract

A study was conducted between November 2008 and March 2009 to determine the prevalence of haemoparasites in different age and sex groups of free-range local ducks in Nairobi and its environs. The ducks were categorized into ducklings (<2 months), growers (2 to 6 months) and adult ducks (>6 months). A total of 47 adults, 50 growers and 48 ducklings comprising 77 females and 68 males were sampled. Two thin blood smears were prepared from each bird, processed and examined for haemoparasites. Data obtained was analyzed as number of ducks of different age and sex groups infected with a particular haemoparasite. Haemoparasites were observed in 70/145 (48.28 %) of the ducks. Four haemoparasites identified were Aegyptinella pullorum 59/145 (40.69 %), Leucocytozoon caulleryi 10/145 (6.90 %), Haemoproteus species 1/145 (0.69 %) and Eperythrozoon species 5/145 (3.45 %). Their prevalence was 38.57 % (27/70), 24.29 % (17/70), 20.0 % (14/70) and 17.14 % (12/70) (p>0.05) for Embakasi, Westlands, Kasarani and Thika districts, respectively. Grower ducks had a prevalence of 35.71 % (25/70), adults, 34.29 % (24/70) and ducklings, 30.0 % (21/70) (p>0.05). Male and female ducks had an equal prevalence of 50.0 % (35/70). This study has demonstrated the occurrence of haemoparasites in different sexes and age groups of apparently healthy appearing ducks for the first time in Kenya. Their impact on duck productivity need further investigation and control strategies initiated to improve the industry

Okello JJ;, Lagervisk CJ;, Ngigi M;, Karanja N. "Role of Farmers’ Personal Values in Soil Fertility Management Decisions: Evidence from Means-End Chain Analysis of Peri-urban Leafy Vegetable Production in Kenya."; 2012. Abstract

Peri-urban areas play a major role in the supply of vegetables consumed in urban areas. In order to meet high demand for aesthetic quality characteristics, peri-urban farmers use intensive production practices characterized by use external inputs. This paper uses Means-End Chain analysis approach to examine the role farmers’ personal values play in the decision to use soil fertility improvement inputs namely, animal manures (organic fertilizer) and inorganic fertilizers. It found that use of animal manures and inorganic fertilizers was driven by the need to earn higher profit margins thus making more money in order to meet family needs. This in turn met farmers’ personal values relating to, among others, happiness, leading a comfortable life, independence and healthy life. The major implication of these findings was that farmers’ private goals could, with the urging of the market that demands unique aesthetic quality characteristics, promote intensive applications of both the organic and inorganic inputs with potential negative environmental consequences.

Okello JJ;, Lagervisk CJ;, Ngigi M;, Karanja N. "Role of Farmers’ Personal Values in Soil Fertility Management Decisions: Evidence from Means-End Chain Analysis of Peri-urban Leafy Vegetable Production in Kenya."; 2012. Abstract

Peri-urban areas play a major role in the supply of vegetables consumed in urban areas. In order to meet high demand for aesthetic quality characteristics, peri-urban farmers use intensive production practices characterized by use external inputs. This paper uses Means-End Chain analysis approach to examine the role farmers’ personal values play in the decision to use soil fertility improvement inputs namely, animal manures (organic fertilizer) and inorganic fertilizers. It found that use of animal manures and inorganic fertilizers was driven by the need to earn higher profit margins thus making more money in order to meet family needs. This in turn met farmers’ personal values relating to, among others, happiness, leading a comfortable life, independence and healthy life. The major implication of these findings was that farmers’ private goals could, with the urging of the market that demands unique aesthetic quality characteristics, promote intensive applications of both the organic and inorganic inputs with potential negative environmental consequences.

Letting, Aosa E, Machuki VN. "Board Diversity and Performance of Companies Listed in Nairobi Stock Exchange." International Journal of Humanities and Social Science, Vol. 2(11) pp. 172-182; 2012. Abstract
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Lyakurwa W, Owiti E. "Sustainable Financing and Governance of Regional Initiative s in Higher Education in Africa.". In: Region al Workshop on Sustainable Financing and Governance of Higher Education in Africa . uagadougou, Burkina Faso; 2011.
Khasakhala" "A, Agwanda" "A, Odwe" "G, Lyaga" "Z, Imbwaga" "A. "Reassessing Mortality decline in Kenya.". In: 6th African Population Conference. Ougadougou, Burkina Faso ; 2011.
JP E, S E, J K, LW I, B T. "Inter and intraspecific olfactory behaviour of the coconut bug, Pseudtheraptus wayi: do males search of the food then invite females?". In: Book of abstracts, Semio 11 workshop. ICIPE, NAIROBI - KENYA; 2011.
Bebora L.C, E K, M N, N K, E K’ethe, C.J L, P.G M, L. N, J.J O. "Bacterial contamination of kale (Brassica oleracea acephala) along the value chain in Nairobi and its environs.". In: 10th African Crop Science Society Conference. Maputo, Mozambique; 2011.2011_-_bacterial_contamination_of_kale_from_farm_and_market.pdf
Kiitonde C, Lukhoba CW, Dossaji SF. "Antimicrobial and Phytochemical Study of Vernonia glabra (Steetz) Oliv. & Hiern. in Kenya.". In: Botany 2011 . Healing the Planet Symposium in St. Louis, Missouri, USA.: C. Kiitonde, C.W. Lukhoba & S.F. Dossaji; 2011. Abstract

Infectious diseases are prevalent and life threatening. In Kenya, a majority of the sick are seeking herbal remedies in such for effective, safe, and affordable cure. This project aims to investigate the antimicrobial activity and phytochemical compounds present in different parts of Vernonia glabra, a plant used by herbalists in various regions of Kenya claimed to treat different microbial infections. The plant was collected in January, 2010 in Machakos, and the different plant parts ground into powder and extracted in Dichloromethane:Methanol (1:1) and water. These were tested against bacterial and fungal organisms using disc diffusion technique. It was observed that the organic crude extracts of the flower, leaf, stem, root and/or entire plant, showed activity against at least one of the four test micro-organisms and at concentrations lower than the water crude extracts. The organic crude extract of the leaf showed the highest activity against Staphylococcus aureus (Mean inhibition, 1.83) and Aspergillus niger (mean inhibition, 1.43), and also recorded higher activity those of the standard ds. Organic crude extract of flower showed significant activity against one only organism- Staphylococcus aureus. Thin Layer Chromatography-Bioautography Agar Overlay, showed that saponins were eliciting over 60% of all the antimicrobial activity. These results suggest that Vernonia glabra may contain phytochemicals of medicinal properties and also justifies the use of Vernonia glabra in herbal medicine for the treatment of microbial diseases. In particular, the V. glabra leaf may contain broad spectrum antibacterial and antifungal agents that could be useful in the development of competent antimicrobial drugs. Further investigation to isolate, determine the pure and safe antimicrobial compounds is recommended for scientific verification and validation of the drugs from Vernonia glabra.

Luambano N;, Kimenju JW;, Narla R;, Waceke JW. "Colonisation of the Rhizosphere of plants which are poor host to root-knot nematodes by the biological agent Pochonia chlamydosporia."; 2011. Abstract

Management of root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.,) using fungi that parasitize eggs of root-knot and cyst nematodes has been gaining popularity. Application of this fungus to plants that are poor host to root-knot nematodes has shown good results. This study was conducted to screen plants that support growth of Pochonia chlamydosporia on its rhizosphere. Seedlings of cabbage, sunhemp, maize, velvet bean, African marigold and tomato were planted in pots containing sterilized soil which had Pochonia chlamydosporia. Thirty days after planting, the fungal propagules in the soil and roots increased significantly (P<0.05) in all plants with the exception of velvet beans. Ninety days after planting, the counts of the fungal propagules taken from the soil were significant higher (P<0.05) in the rhizosphere where maize was planted than in other plants. This study concluded that maize is a promising rotational in system where P. chlamydosporia is used as a biocontrol agent.

Luambano N;, Kimenju JW;, Narla R;, Waceke JW. "Colonisation of the Rhizosphere of plants which are poor host to root-knot nematodes by the biological agent Pochonia chlamydosporia."; 2011. Abstract

Management of root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.,) using fungi that parasitize eggs of root-knot and cyst nematodes has been gaining popularity. Application of this fungus to plants that are poor host to root-knot nematodes has shown good results. This study was conducted to screen plants that support growth of Pochonia chlamydosporia on its rhizosphere. Seedlings of cabbage, sunhemp, maize, velvet bean, African marigold and tomato were planted in pots containing sterilized soil which had Pochonia chlamydosporia. Thirty days after planting, the fungal propagules in the soil and roots increased significantly (P<0.05) in all plants with the exception of velvet beans. Ninety days after planting, the counts of the fungal propagules taken from the soil were significant higher (P<0.05) in the rhizosphere where maize was planted than in other plants. This study concluded that maize is a promising rotational in system where P. chlamydosporia is used as a biocontrol agent.

Lagerkvist, Carl Johan; Hess, Hess, Sebastian; Ngigi MOJJW;, Ngigi MW;, Okello JJ. "Consumers' Willingness to Pay for Food Safety in Nairobi: The Case of Fresh Vegetables."; 2011. Abstract

Large urban areas in developing countries represent currently the most dynamically growing markets for food products. This study investigates the willingness to pay of consumers in Nairobi for safer leafy vegetables. We survey individuals’ perceived food safety across four major market categories, while also considering the explanatory role of trust and behavioral, psychological, and socio-demographic covariates. Results show that willingness to pay is market-specific and multi-faceted, with trust and perceived risks as important drivers, while income plays only a subordinate role. We conclude that policy makers should aim to reduce asymmetric information within the value chain without raising food prices such that safer vegetables would become unaffordable for the poor.

Odhiambo JA, Dossaji SF, Lukhoba CK. "Ethnomedicinal knowledge in the traditional management of human ailments in Lake Victoria Basin, Kenya.". In: Botany 2011 . J.A. Odhiambo, W. Lukhoba & S.F. Dossaji; 2011. Abstract

Though the majority of inhabitants in the Kenya rely on ethnomedicinal plant species to manage a wide range of human ailments, much the indigenous knowledge largely remains undocumented. An ethnomedicinal study was conducted to document the plant species used medicinally in the Lake Victoria Basin. Data was collected by interviewing the herbalists from the region. A total of thirty four plant species distributed in twenty one botanical families were identified. The plant family with highest number of plants used for medicine was Compositae, followed by Leguminosae then Labiatae. The herbals were prepared mainly as concoctions and decoctions and were majorly administered orally and dermally to treat ailments such as typhoid, malaria, and chest and skin related complications. A rich knowledge of medicinal plants was recognized and phytochemical and bioactivity analyses of these herbal plants are recommended to determine their safety and efficacy.

Magutu PO, LISHENGA JL, Barasa JL. "Profitability Of Momentum Strategies In Emerging Markets: Evidence From Nairobi Stock Exchange.". In: Journal of Financial Studies & Research. IBIMA Publishing; 2011. Abstract

This paper tests the profitability of momentum strategies in Kenya, an emerging market for the period 1995 to 2007. Both relative strength strategies (RSS) and (weighted relative strength strategies (WRSS) are employed to implement momentum-based trading strategies. Analysis revealed that Nairobi Stock Exchange (NSE) exhibit medium term return continuation over the entire sample period and the sub-periods. We used RSS results to evaluate the influence of transaction costs, calendar effects, risk factors and other reported momentum characteristics on momentum profitability. We employ WRSS results to discriminate between the two diametrically opposed causes for the profitability of momentum strategies: behavioral factors (time-series continuation in the firm-specific component of returns), and risk factors (cross-sectional variation in expected returns and systematic risks of individual securities). Our results show that, consistent with the evidence elsewhere, momentum is an anomaly; the evidence is consistent with momentum being driven by continuation in the idiosyncratic component of individual-security, rather than by cross-sectional differences in expected return and risks.
Keywords: Profitability, Momentum Strategies Emerging Markets, Nairobi Stock Exchange

Lelan JK, Ndurumo MM. "Technology in education of physically impaired children in inclusive settings.". The Management Digest: ISSN 2074-4730; 2011. Abstract
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Lelan JK, Ndurumo MM. "Technology in education of physically impaired children in inclusive settings.". The Management Digest: ISSN 2074-4730; 2011. Abstract
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Odhiambo JA, Lukhoba CW, Dossaji SF. "Ethnomedicial knowledge in traditional management of human ailments in Lake Victoria Basin,.". In: 51st annual Meeting of the Society for Economic Botany, Veracruz, Mexico. Vera Cruz, Mexico: J.A. Odhiambo, .W. Lukhoba*, S.F. Dossaji; 2010. Abstract

Though the majority of inhabitants in the Kenya rely on ethnomedicinal plant species to manage a wide range of human ailments, much the indigenous knowledge largely remains undocumented. An ethnomedicinal study was conducted to document the plant species used medicinally in the Lake Victoria Basin. Data was collected by interviewing the herbalists from the region. A total of thirty four plant species distributed in twenty one botanical families were identified. The plant family with highest number of plants used for medicine was Compositae, followed by Leguminosae then Labiatae. The herbals were prepared mainly as concoctions and decoctions and were majorly administered orally and dermally to treat ailments such as typhoid, malaria, and chest and skin related complications. A rich knowledge of medicinal plants was recognized and phytochemical and bioactivity analyses of these herbal plants are recommended to determine their safety and efficacy.

Bebora L.C, Maingi N, P.N N, P.G M, C.O G, L.W N, J.M G. "Enhancing village chicken productivity through parasite management for effective Newcastle disease vaccination in Kenya.". In: 2nd RUFORUM Biennial Capacity Building Conference. Entebbe, Uganda; 2010.2010_-_effect_of_worm_burden_on_nd_vaccination_response.pdf
Ngigi MW;, Okello JJ;, Lagarkvist C;, Karanja N, Mburu J. "Assessment of developing-country urban consumers’ willingness to pay for quality of leafy vegetables: The case of middle and high income consumers in Nairobi, Kenya."; 2010. Abstract

The improvement in income in developing countries has led to emergence of middle and high income consumers in urban centers. Improvement in income usually causes the shift to consumption of non-staples including leafy vegetables. Thus in major developing country urban centers there has been rapid expansion of the grocery sections featuring leafy vegetables in leading retail stores. Specialty stores have also emerged featuring broad range vegetables. Many middle and high income consumers shop these stores. This study examines the willing of the middle and high income consumers who shop specialized stores to pay for quality of leafy vegetables and drivers of willingness to pay for quality. The study uses contingent valuation and the payment card method in eliciting consumers’ WTP. It considers a broad range of quality attributes including safety, nutrition, environmental friendliness, hygiene in handling. The study finds that mean willingness to pay for quality is higher among high income consumers (>60%). It also finds that income, age of children the consumer has, access to information of food safety are among the significant drivers of kale consumers’ willingness to pay for quality of kales. The study concludes that there is demand for quality of leafy vegetables and discusses policy implications.

Ngigi MW;, Okello JJ;, Lagarkvist C;, Karanja N;, Mburu J. "Assessment of developing-country urban consumers’ willingness to pay for quality of leafy vegetables: The case of middle and high income consumers in Nairobi, Kenya."; 2010. Abstract

The improvement in income in developing countries has led to emergence of middle and high income consumers in urban centers. Improvement in income usually causes the shift to consumption of non-staples including leafy vegetables. Thus in major developing country urban centers there has been rapid expansion of the grocery sections featuring leafy vegetables in leading retail stores. Specialty stores have also emerged featuring broad range vegetables. Many middle and high income consumers shop these stores. This study examines the willing of the middle and high income consumers who shop specialized stores to pay for quality of leafy vegetables and drivers of willingness to pay for quality. The study uses contingent valuation and the payment card method in eliciting consumers’ WTP. It considers a broad range of quality attributes including safety, nutrition, environmental friendliness, hygiene in handling. The study finds that mean willingness to pay for quality is higher among high income consumers (>60%). It also finds that income, age of children the consumer has, access to information of food safety are among the significant drivers of kale consumers’ willingness to pay for quality of kales. The study concludes that there is demand for quality of leafy vegetables and discusses policy implications.

Scholtz MM;, McManus C;, Mwai O;A, Seixas L;, Louvandini H. "Challenges and opportunities for beef production in developing countries of the southern hemisphere.".; 2010. Abstract

Livestock production faces specific challenges due to a rise in population numbers, urbanization and economic development in the developing world. A substantial increase in demand for meat in these countries will offer larger market opportunities for livestock producers. Developing countries from the southern hemisphere are characterized by a highly dualistic beef cattle sector with communal, subsistence or small scale farmers and large commercial farmers co-existing. Whereas the off-take from the commercial sector is high, the off-take from the other sectors is still low in certain regions. Global warming is expected to have a negative effect on the beef production environments of these countries. By describing production environments it will be possible to identify genotypes that are adapted to the environment. Tools are needed to overlay geo-referenced data sets onto the different environments in order to quantify them. Gene or marker assisted selection may play an important role in selection for disease and parasite resistance or tolerance, since it is difficult to measure these traits directly. Strategies that utilize EBVs derived from genomic analyses (genomic EBVs), together with conventional mixed model methodology, may speed up the process of breeding animals with higher and more efficient production. Research into methane production will also have to be stimulated. Up to 27 more results found for "MWAI O"

Lund JF;, Bhandari NS;, Baral K;, Kharel KK;, KK; Puri L;, Chhetri BBK;, Nielsen, Ø.J; Upadhyaya CP, Upadhyaya CP. "Community forestry common funds in Nepal."; 2010.
Lund JF;, Bhandari NS;, Baral K;, Kharel KK;, Puri L;, Chhetri BBK;, Nielsen, Ø.J; Upadhyaya CP, Nielsen, Ø.J; Upadhyaya CP. "Community forestry common funds in Nepal."; 2010.
Njage PMK;, Jans C;, Wangoh J;, Farah Z;, Lacroix C;, Meile L. "iodiversity And Genotyping Of Staphylococci Isolated In Raw And Fermented Camel Milk In East Africa.".; 2010.
Njage PMK;, Jans C;, Wangoh J;, Farah Z;, Lacroix C;, Meile L. "iodiversity And Genotyping Of Staphylococci Isolated In Raw And Fermented Camel Milk In East Africa.".; 2010.
Njage PMK;, Jans C;, Wangoh J;, Farah Z;, Lacroix C;, Meile. L. "Microbial biodiversity of camel milk and fermented camel milk products: technology, hygiene and safet."; 2010.
Chhetri BBK;, Lund JF;, Nielsen ØN. "Rural development potential of Community Forestry in Nepal."; 2010.
Chhetri BBK;, Lund JF;, Nielsen ØN. "Rural development potential of Community Forestry in Nepal."; 2010.
Cheryl R;L, Shirley W;, Flatt MS;, La Jolla CA;, Karanja N;, Cynthia T;, Nancy SE. "Two-Year Results From a Multi-Site Randomized Trial of a Commercial Weight Loss Program."; 2010. Abstract

Commercial weight loss programs may contribute to efforts to reduce the prevalence of obesity, although evidence of efficacy and effects on metabolic and cardiovascular risk factors is critical in evaluating the likelihood of sustained benefits. The Jenny Craig (JC) program involves individualized diet and exercise counseling (provided either in-person at community-based sites or by telephone), prepackaged foods and a low-energy density diet. The aims of this study are (1) To test, in a multi-site randomized controlled trial, whether the JC Centre-based and/or JC Direct (telephone-based) interventions promote greater weight loss and maintenance of that loss in overweight or obese women over a 24-month period compared to usual care (UC) conditions; and (2) To describe the effect of the program (vs. UC conditions) on selected biochemical factors, cardiopulmonary fitness, quality of life (QOL) and eating attitudes and behaviors. At randomization, participants (n=442) were 44(10) (mean[SD]) yrs, with BMI 33.8(3.4) kg/m2, weight 92.1(10.7) kg, and waist circumference 108.6(9.6) cm. Two-year data are available for 91% of study participants (n=406), and weight loss is - 8.1(8.6), -6.7(9.3), and -2.2(7.4) kg for the JC Centre- based, JC Direct, and UC groups, an average weight reduction of -8.7%, -7.3%, and -2.4% of initial weight, respectively. The proportion of women at highest risk (CRP>3 mg/L) in the JC arms decreased significantly from 53% at enrollment to 33% at two years, but was unchanged in the UC arm. Interim analysis also shows the JC intervention to promote favorable changes in lipid, leptin and carotenoid levels, and improved cardiopulmonary fitness

LITONDO KATEOYIELA. "E-commerce: A Review of Indicators and Theories." A paper presented to 11th International Conference (ICAESB) on Business Environment and SMEs; 2010. Abstract
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LITONDO KATEOYIELA. "Mobile Phones and E-commerce among Micro and Small Enterprises in the Informal Sector:." An Empirical Investigation of Entrepreneurship in Nairobi ; 2010. Abstract
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LITONDO KATEOYIELA. "Mobile Phones and Employment,." A Paper presented to African international Business and Management (AIBUMA) Conference; 2010. Abstract
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KAAYA G.P., KANDILA-MUANDINGI, P.N., LOTFY EL-SAYED, H.R, MSHIGENI K. "Determination of optimum ratios of seaweed in mushroom cultivation substrates and ability of mushrooms to absorb iodine.". In: Proc. AGRISSON Congress. Oshakati Country Hotel; 2009.

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