Isolation of E.coli O157:H7 from milk and cattle feaces from urban dairy farming and non dairy farming neighbour households in Dagoretti division, Nairobi, Kenya: prevalence and risk factors

Citation:
ORUNGO DRONONOJOSHUA. "Isolation of E.coli O157:H7 from milk and cattle feaces from urban dairy farming and non dairy farming neighbour households in Dagoretti division, Nairobi, Kenya: prevalence and risk factors.". In: East African Medical Journal. The Kenya Medical Association; 2007.

Abstract:

East African Medical Journal Vol. 84 No. 11 (supplement) November 2007

Authors: E.K. Kangethe, J.O. Onono, B. McDermott and M. Arimi
 
Objective: To estimate the prevalence of E.coli O157:H7 in milk and cattle feacal samples from dairy ad non dairy neighbouring households and to relate this prevalence to risk to human health.
Design: Cross sectional study design
Setting: Urban and peri urban households of Dagoretti division,
Subjects: Dairy farming households and non dairy farming neighbouring households.
Results: E.coli O157:H7 was isolated from milk samples at three of 136 non dairy neighbour households (2.2% C.I 0.5%, 6.3%) but was not found in any of the milk samples from the 260 milk samples from dairy households (0%, C.I 0.0%, 1.4%). E.coli O157:H7 was also found in fifteen of 285 pooled household cattle feacal samples (5.2%, C.I 3.1%, 8.7%). One of the feacal isolates was found to have the marker for the production of VT1. Discussion with focus groups revealed that the participants had limited knowledge about E.coli O157:H7.Focus group discussions and household questionnaire revealed practices increasing risk of E.coli infections to humans associated with milking hygiene, drinking water sources and treatment, and manure handling.
Conclusions: E.coli O157:H7 exist in urban setting and continuous surveillance is needed in case conditions and practices change favouring an increase in its prevalence and transmission to people.

Notes:

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