Bio

Dr.Jonathan Nzuma

Dr. Nzuma holds a PhD in Agricultural Economics and Business from the University of Guelph Canada. He is a Senior Lecturer at the Department of Agricultural Economics, University of Nairobi, where he specializes in Agricultural Policy, International Trade, Microeconomics, Production Economics, Commodity Markets, International Development, Feasibility Assessments, Project Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation and Research Methods. He has extensive experience in teaching both at the undergraduate and graduate levels. In addition he has supervised over 5 PhD and over 25 Masters students. Dr.

Senior Lecturer

Publications


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2022

Misango, G.V, Nzuma, M.J., Irungu, L.W., Kassie, M..  2022.  Intensity of adoption of integrated pest management practices in Rwanda: A fractional logit approach.. Heliyon. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.heliyon.2022.e08735

2021

Mwololo, M.H., Nzuma MJ, Ritho, N.C..  2021.  Farmer Empowerment in Agriculture and its Association with Smallholder Farm Incomes in Kenya. African Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics. 16(4):355-369.
Nyangau. P.N, Nzuma, M.J., Irungu, L.W., Kassie, M..  2021.  Evaluating livestock farmers knowledge, beliefs, and management of arboviral diseases in Kenya: A multivariate fractional probit approach. PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases . 15(9):e0009786.
Okello, J.J., Nzuma, M.J., Otieno DJ, Kidoido, M., Tanga, C.M..  2021.  Farmers’ Perceptions of Commercial Insect-Based Feed for Sustainable Livestock Production in Kenya. Sustainability. 13:53-59.
Nzuma, MJ, Kirui P.  2021.  Transmission of Global Wheat Prices to Domestic Markets in Kenya: A Cointegration Approach. African Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics. 16(1):80-93.

2020

Mbugua, M., Nzuma, M.J..  2020.  Effect of Social Networks on Household Dietary Diversity: Evidence from Smallholder Farmers in Kisii and Nyamira Counties, Kenya.. African Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics. 15(3):230-243.
Muthini, D., Nzuma, M.J., Qaim, M..  2020.  Subsistence Production, Markets, and Dietary Diversity in the Kenyan Small Farm Sector. Food Policy. DOI: 10.1016/j.foodpol.2020.101956
Sala, M.S., Otieno JD, Nzuma, M.J., Mureithi, S.M..  2020.  Determinants of Pastoralists’ Participation in Commercial Fodder Markets for Livelihood Resilience in Drylands of Northern Kenya: Case of Isiolo. Pastoralism: Research, Policy and Practice . 10(1):DOI:10.1186/s13570-020-00166-1.
Muthini, D, Nzuma J, Nyikal R.  2020.  Farm production diversity and its association with dietary diversity in Kenya. Food Security. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12571-020-01030-1
Nyang'au, P, Muriithi B, Nzuma J, Irungu P, Gichungi H, Diiro G.  2020.  Impact of Integrated Fruit Fly Management Strategy on Food Security among Smallholder Mango Farmers in Kenya.. African Journal of Food, Agriculture, Nutrition and Development. 20(2):15431–15454.
Mbugua, M, Nzuma JM, Muange E, Kunyanga C.  2020.  Social Networks and Household Food Consumption Smoothing in the Presence of Idiosyncratic Shocks: Insights from Rural Kenya. Development in Practice. DOI: 10.1080/09614524.2020.1715344

2019

Muthini, DN, Nzuma JN, Nyikal AR.  2019.  Variety Awareness, Nutrition Knowledge and Adoption of Nutritionally Enhanced Crop Varieties: Evidence from Kenya. African Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics. 14(4):225-237.
Lumumba, B., O, Nzuma MJ.  2019.  Spatial Integration and Price Relationships in Kenyan Sorghum Markets. Journal of Agricultural Economics, Extension and Rural Development. 7(7):944-949.
Mwololo, M.H., Nzuma, M.J., Ritho, N.C., Ogutu, S.O., Kabunga, N..  2019.  Determinants of actual and potential adoption of improved indigenous chicken under asymmetrical exposure conditions in rural Kenya. African Journal of Science, Technology, Innovation and Development. DOI: 10.1080/20421338.2019.1636489
Mwololo, M.H., Nzuma, M.J., Ritho, N.C..  2019.  Do farmers’ socio-economic characteristics influence their preference for agricultural extension methods?, Development in Practice. DOI: 10.1080/09614524.2019.1638344
Mwololo, M.H., Nzuma, M.J., Ritho, N.C., Aseta, A..  2019.  Is the type of agricultural extension services a determinant of farm diversity? Evidence from Kenya Development Studies Research. 6(1):40-46.
Mbugua, M., Nzuma, M.J., Muange, J..  2019.  Social networks and Ex-post risk management among smallholder farmers in Kenya. Development Studies Research. 6(1):30-39.
Mutuku, J., Nzuma, M.J., Irungu P.  2019.  Impact of World Food Programmer’s (WFP) Purchase for Progress (P4P) Pilot Project on Farm Incomes in Kenya. Case of Uasin Gishu and Narok Counties. Journal of Agricultural Economics, Extension and Rural Development. 7(1):797–808.

2017

Demmler K. M, Klasen S, Nzuma, M.J., Qaim, M..  2017.  Supermarket purchase contributes to nutrition-related non-communicable diseases in urban Kenya. PLoS ONE. 12(9):1-18.
Gichure, N.G., Wahome, R.G., Njage, P.K., Karuri, H. W., Nzuma, M.J., Karantininis, K..  2017.  Factors influencing extent of traceability along organic fresh produce value chains: case of kale in Nairobi, Kenya. Organic Agriculture. 7(3):293–302.

2016

Moni, N.A., Nzuma, M.J., Munei, K..  2016.  Assessment of Demand for Meat in Rural and Peri-urban Areas of Central Kenya. African Journal of Agricultural Economics and Rural Development. 4(10):480-488.
Matere, J.S, Mbatia, O.L.E., Nzuma, M.J., Nyamwaro, S.O..  2016.  Financial Benefit-Cost Analysis of Terraces in Maize-Pigeon Pea Intercrop in Semi-arid Areas of Kenya. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. 5(1):140–148.
Matere, J.S, Mbatia, O.L.E., Nzuma, M.J., Nyamwaro, S.O..  2016.  Impact of Terraces in Maize and Pigeon pea Intercrop on Wellbeing of Smallholder Farmers in Semi-arid Lands in Kenya. Journal of Agricultural Economics, Extension and Rural Development. 4(4):435–439.

2015

Nzuma, M.J..  2015.  The Political Economy of Food Price Policy in Kenya. Food Price Policy in an Era of Market Instability. , New York: Oxford University Press

2014

Wainaina, W. P., Okello, J.J., Nzuma, M.J..  2014.  Contract Farming, Smallholder Poultry Production and Household Welfare in Kenya. Quarterly Journal of International Agriculture. 53(4):319-340.
Okello, J.J., Kirui, K.O., Gitonga, M Z, Njiriani, G., Nzuma, M.J..  2014.  Determinants of Awareness and Use ICT-based Market Information Services in Developing-Country Agriculture: The Case of Smallholder Farmers in Kenya. Quarterly Journal of International Agriculture. 53(3):263–282.
Mwangi, J.W., Mbatia, O.L.E., Nzuma, M.J..  2014.  Effects of Exchange Rate Volatility on French Beans Exports in Kenya. Journal of Agricultural Economics, Extension and Rural Development. 1(1):1-12.
Mwangi, J.W., Mbatia, O.L.E., Nzuma, M.J..  2014.  The Effects of Exchange Rate Liberalization in Kenya on French Beans Exports. International Journal of Business, Economics and Management. 1(4):39-56.

2013

Ng’ang’a, J.C., Ritho, N C, Nzuma, M.J., Moyo, S., Herrero, M..  2013.  An Assessment of the Factors Influencing Household Willingness to Pay for Non-marketed Benefit of Cattle in the Agro-pastoral Systems of Mozambique. African Journal of Agricultural Research. 8(18):1949–1957.
Nzuma, JM.  2013.  The Political Economy Of Food Price Policy: The Case Of Kenya. Abstract

This paper evaluates Kenyas food price crisis over 2002.11 using a political economy approach. Kenya.s food prices have been high and volatile relative to world food prices. Moreover, domestic food markets are highly integrated while about 30 per cent of...........

Mwangi, SC, Mbatia OLE, Nzuma JM.  2013.  Effects of Market Reforms on Irish Potato Price Volatility in Nyandarua District, Kenya. Abstract

This paper evaluates the effects of market reform policies on the volatility of Irish potato prices in Kenya through an analysis of a 20 year monthly time series data set from Nyandarua district using an autoregressive econometric approach. The empirical results show that there has been a rise in Irish potato prices and lowering of price volatility after the implementation of market reform policies. The real prices exhibit seasonal variations around an upward trend with the prices being depressed during the harvesting period. The price risk premia is found to be negative revealing that the cost of carrying out Irish potato business declined, and farmers were better off with the implementation of the reforms. The collection and distribution of price information, storage of Irish potatoes during periods of glut, improvement in productivity and use of commodity exchange markets can help to reduce price volatility.

2012

Karugia, J;, Wanjiku J;, Nzuma J;, Gbegbelegbe S;, Macharia E;, Massawe S;, Freeman A;, Waithaka M;, Kaitibie S.  2012.  The Impact Of Non - Tariff Barriers On Maize And Beef Trade In East Africa.
Mogaka, VM;, Mbatia OLE;, Nzuma J.  2012.   → College of Agriculture and Veterinary Sciences (CAVS) → View Item Feasibility of Biofuel Production in Kenya: The Case of Jatropha. Abstract

This paper evaluates the potential of Jatropha curcas Linnaeus (Jatropha) as an alternative source of energy for rural households. The plant is said to have potential to diversify rural incomes, reclaim unproductive lands, reduce importation of fossil fuels, and consequently accumulation of green house gases in the atmosphere. A cost benefit analysis was employed to evaluate the feasibility of producing Jatropha as a biodiesel feedstock in relation to other crops in Kwale district. An IRR of 11 percent, BCR of 0.62 and a NPV of (28267.56) showed that production of Jatropha is not feasible at the moment. However we conclude that the plant has a potential to achieve its intended purpose if there is coordination in research and development along the Jatropha value chain and if technical and financial support is accorded to actors at the production level of the chain.

2011

Nzuma, JM.  2011.  Producer funding of agricultural research the case of Kenya’s tea industry. Abstract

This study provides an assessment of the performance of producer financing in Kenya’s tea industry. It is based on a comprehensive literature review, in combination with analysis of data derived from the Tea Board of Kenya (TBK) and the Tea Research Foundation of Kenya (TRFK). The secondary data analysis is complemented by expert opinions from representative of the Kenya Tea Development Agency (KTDA), the Kenya Tea Growers Association (KTGA), TBK, TRFK, and the Ministry of Agriculture (MOA), particularly the State Corporations Department. Currently, the tea industry operates under the Tea Act (CAP 343) and Agricultural Act (CAP 318) of the laws of Kenya. While the Tea Act is vested with regulatory services, the Agricultural Act focuses on oversight of the whole production process, as a technical arm. In addition, the Tea Act mandates that TBK undertake tea research through its technical arm, TRFK, per the State Corporations Act (CAP 446), which is also incorporated as a company limited by guarantee under the Companies Act (CAP 486) of the laws of Kenya. TBK is both a producer body that promotes and represents the tea industry, and a parastatal body appointed by government to regulate the industry. TBK is charged with facilitating research into all aspects of tea growing, manufacturing, and pest and disease control. To finance its (regulatory, promotional, and research), activities and programs the Board levies a manufacturing cess based on processed tea deliveries by all registered tea factories. The cess is statutory, and is currently the main source of revenue for the Board. The Tea Act provides a review by the Minister for Agriculture after consultation with the Board. Currently, the rate of the cess is at KSh. 46 cents per kg of processed tea. Today, the manufactured tea cess revenue collected is shared between TBK and TRFK on a 50/50 basis and used to finance both institutions. In addition, TBK is mandated to collect an Agricultural Produce Cess on green leaf production for the local authorities where tea is produced, disbursing it to the District Tea Road Committees for road infrastructure maintenance. The major challenges facing TRFK are increasing the adoption of improved technologies to close the gap between research and actual farm yields. The Foundation’s efforts to enhance branding, product diversification and value addition are limited by the following challenges: lack of an adaptive tea research factory and other relevant equipment; qualified and experienced personnel in the fields of food science, biochemistry and process engineering; and inadequate exchange of market information. Inadequate processing capacities in Kenyan factories and lack of operational policies and guidelines for intellectual property rights are still a challenge.

2010

Nzuma. M.J., Sarker., R..  2010.  An Error Corrected Almost Ideal Demand System for Major Cereals In Kenya. Agricultural Economics . 4(2010):43–50.
Mogaka, VM;, Iiyama M;, Mbatia OLE;, Jonathan N.  2010.  Reality or romantism? Potential of Jatropha to solve energy crisis and improve livelihoods Abstract

This paper evaluates the potential of Jatropha curcas Linnaeus (Jatropha) as an alternative source of energy for rural households. The plant is said to have potential to diversify rural incomes, reclaim unproductive lands, reduce importation of fossil fuels, and consequently accumulation of green house gases in the atmosphere. A cost benefit analysis was employed to evaluate the feasibility of producing Jatropha as a biodiesel feedstock in relation to other crops in Kwale district. An IRR of 11 percent, BCR of 0.62 and a NPV of (28267.56) showed that production of Jatropha is not feasible at the moment. However we conclude that the plant has a potential to achieve its intended purpose if there is coordination in research and development along the Jatropha value chain and if technical and financial support is accorded to actors at the production level of the chain.

Nzuma, Jonathan M; Sarker, R.  2010.  Who Are The Real Gainers Of Trade Liberalization In Kenya’s Maize Sector? Abstract

In Kenya, trade policy reforms in the cereals sector were initiated as a key component of the economy-wide structural adjustment programmes (SAPs) during the mid 1980s. The SAPs were later strengthened and made irreversible by Kenya’s commitments at the multilateral trade negotiations. However, the welfare effects of these trade policy reforms remain controversial. This paper to quantifies the market and welfare impacts of trade liberalization in Kenya’s maize sector using a partial equilibrium model with market interrelationships at the farm, wholesale and retail levels. The model is calibrated to simulate a 24 percent reduction in maize import tariffs and a complete abolition of tariffs. The simulations results suggest that tariff reductions yield price decreases across the three market levels. The declining prices increase maize consumption but reduce domestic production. Consequently, consumer surplus increases while producer surplus decreases. However, the gain in consumer surplus is not sufficient to compensate the loss in producer surplus. Thus, the implementation of the multilateral agricultural trade agreement is likely to leave Kenya’s maize sector worse off and cannot be considered as a viable policy based on the compensation principle.

2008

Nzuma, MJ.  2008.  An Economic Evaluation of the Impacts of Trade Liberalization on Kenya’s Maize Secto. , Düsseldorf, Germany: VDM Verlag Publishers

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