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NYAMBURA PROFKIMANIVIOLET, MUHENJE PROFOLENJAJOYCE. "ELIZABETH NGUGI, VIOLET KIMANI, MUTUKU MWANTHI & JOYCE OLENJA 2002: Community-Based Care in Resource Limited Settings: A Framework for Action WHO, Geneva, Book Publications.". In: Community-Based Care in Resource Limited Settings: A Framework for Action WHO, Geneva, Book Publications. University of Nairobi Press; 2002. Abstract
NTRODUCTION: Family Health International developed a simple checklist to help family planning providers apply the new medical eligibility criteria (MEC) of the World Health Organization (WHO) for the use of the intrauterine device (IUD) contraceptive method. METHODS: One hundred thirty-five providers in four countries participated in focus groups to field test the checklist. Before participating in a discussion about the checklist, each provider was given a copy of the checklist, its instructions and hypothetical client scenarios. Providers used the checklist to answer questions about the client scenarios in order to determine if they understood the checklist and if they would correctly determine IUD eligibility for women in updated categories of eligibility on the basis of the checklist. RESULTS: Providers found the checklist easy to use and thought that it would enhance identification of eligible IUD users. Nevertheless, many providers relied on prior knowledge of IUD eligibility rather than the checklist recommendations. Providers only correctly determined eligibility for new categories of IUD use 69% of the time. CONCLUSIONS: The IUD checklist is a useful job tool for providers, but training and effective dissemination of the WHO MEC should precede its introduction to ensure that it is correctly used.
MUHENJE PROFOLENJAJOYCE. "Emergency contraception in Nairobi, Kenya: knowledge, attitudes and practices among policymakers, family planning providers and clients, and university students. Muia E, Ellertson C, Lukhando M, Flul B, Clark S, Olenja J. Contraception. 1999 Oct;60(4):223.". In: Contraception. 1999 Oct;60(4):223-32. University of Nairobi Press; 1999. Abstract
To gauge knowledge, attitudes, and practices about emergency contraception in Nairobi, Kenya, we conducted a five-part study. We searched government and professional association policy documents, and clinic guidelines and service records for references to emergency contraception. We conducted in-depth interviews with five key policymakers, and with 93 family planning providers randomly selected to represent both the public and private sectors. We also surveyed 282 family planning clients attending 10 clinics, again representing both sectors. Finally, we conducted four focus groups with university students. Although one specially packaged emergency contraceptive (Postinor levonorgestrel tablets) is registered in Kenya, the method is scarcely known or used. No extant policy or service guidelines address the method specifically, although revisions to several documents were planned. Yet policymakers felt that expanding access to emergency contraception would require few overt policy changes, as much of the guidance for oral contraception is already broad enough to cover this alternative use of those same commodities. Participants in all parts of the study generally supported expanded access to emergency contraception in Kenya. They did, however, want additional, detailed information, particularly about health effects. They also differed over exactly who should have access to emergency contraception and how it should be provided. PIP: A five-part study was conducted to gauge knowledge, attitudes, and practices about emergency contraception (EC) among policymakers, family planning providers and clients, and university students in Nairobi, Kenya. Government and professional association policy documents, and clinic guidelines and service records were searched for references to EC. In-depth interviews were conducted with 5 key policymakers, and with 93 family planning providers randomly selected to represent both the public and private sectors. Furthermore, 282 family planning clients attending 10 clinics were also surveyed and four focus groups were conducted with university students. Although one specially packaged EC was registered in Kenya, the method was scarcely known or used. No extant policy or service guidelines address the method specifically, although revisions to several documents were planned. Yet policymakers felt that expanding access to EC would require few overt policy changes, as much of the guidance for oral contraception was already broad enough to cover this alternative use of those same commodities. Participants in all parts of the study generally supported expanded access to EC in Kenya. They did, however, want additional detailed information, particularly on the health effects of EC. They also differed on who should have access to EC and how it should be provided.
MUHENJE PROFOLENJAJOYCE. "Evaluation of an emergency contraception introduction project in Kenya. Muia E, Blanchard K, Lukhando M, Olenja J, Liambila W. Contraception. 2002 Oct;66(4):255-60.". In: Contraception. 2002 Oct;66(4):255-60. University of Nairobi Press; 2002. Abstract

The Consortium for Emergency Contraception introduced Postinor-2, a progestin-only EC product, into Kenya as part of its work to expand access to EC in developing countries. Introduction activities included registering Postinor-2, training providers, and developing provider and client materials. We surveyed family planning clients and providers to assess the impact of these activities. Knowledge of EC among clients and providers improved between the baseline and evaluation surveys. More women and providers had heard of EC and more providers were distributing it. Support for access to EC in Kenya also improved. The results indicate, though, that further information is needed. Only one-fifth of women at the evaluation had heard of EC and almost half of the women expressed concerns about EC at baseline and evaluation. More research and experience using novel ways of informing women about EC in Africa is needed, and information needs to address women's concerns.

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