Bio

PROF. KAIMENYI JACOB T.

Personal Information

Short Profile

An individual with passion for promotion  of  learning and teaching, recognized track record of scholarship at local and international levels.  Possesses excellent skills in administration, communication and team approach to management.  Capacity to motivate and influence others  to achieve set goals.  A committed Catholic used to working under pressure and to meeting strict deadlines.

Publications


2004

T., PROFKAIMENYIJACOB.  2004.  Kaimenyi, JT. (2004) Oral Health in Kenya. International Dental Journal 54: 378-382.. International Dental Journal 54: 378-382.. : African Meteorological Society Abstract
This paper gives general information on the location of Kenya, its demography, economy, organisation of health services, general health policy, health financing, oral health infrastructure, problems that hamper health financing and proposals on how to solve these problems. Further, a summary of health status of the Kenyan people is given based on the results of studies. The mean DMFT for the rural and urban populations is low and there is no evidence of an increase or decrease. Similarly, the prevalence of periodontitis is low (1-10%), with no increase. Ulcerative lesions are rare (0.12%). The most common birth defects are cleft lip and palate. Oral cancer is very low, accounting for 2% of all malignancies. Comparative studies have not demonstrated any dramatic change in the frequency of oral cancer for the last 25 years. Oral candidiasis is the most prevalent oral lesion amongst HIV/AIDS patients. In June 2003, Kenya formulated a National Oral Health Policy, which gives direction on how to improve the oral health status of the citizens.

2001

T., PROFKAIMENYIJACOB.  2001.  Acute Necrotizing Ulcerative Gingivitis. In Textbook of Periodontology Pg 94. 2nd Edition. T.R. Gururaja Rao. All India Publishers and DistributorsCHENNAI (MADRAS) 2001.. Book Chapter. : African Meteorological Society Abstract
This paper gives general information on the location of Kenya, its demography, economy, organisation of health services, general health policy, health financing, oral health infrastructure, problems that hamper health financing and proposals on how to solve these problems. Further, a summary of health status of the Kenyan people is given based on the results of studies. The mean DMFT for the rural and urban populations is low and there is no evidence of an increase or decrease. Similarly, the prevalence of periodontitis is low (1-10%), with no increase. Ulcerative lesions are rare (0.12%). The most common birth defects are cleft lip and palate. Oral cancer is very low, accounting for 2% of all malignancies. Comparative studies have not demonstrated any dramatic change in the frequency of oral cancer for the last 25 years. Oral candidiasis is the most prevalent oral lesion amongst HIV/AIDS patients. In June 2003, Kenya formulated a National Oral Health Policy, which gives direction on how to improve the oral health status of the citizens.

2000

T., PROFKAIMENYIJACOB.  2000.  Kaimenyi, J.T. (2000). Prevalence and clinical features of acute necrotizing gingivitis in Nairobi, Kenya. African Journal of Oral Health Sciences. 1:19-23.. African Journal of Oral Health Sciences. 1:19-23.. : African Meteorological Society Abstract
This paper gives general information on the location of Kenya, its demography, economy, organisation of health services, general health policy, health financing, oral health infrastructure, problems that hamper health financing and proposals on how to solve these problems. Further, a summary of health status of the Kenyan people is given based on the results of studies. The mean DMFT for the rural and urban populations is low and there is no evidence of an increase or decrease. Similarly, the prevalence of periodontitis is low (1-10%), with no increase. Ulcerative lesions are rare (0.12%). The most common birth defects are cleft lip and palate. Oral cancer is very low, accounting for 2% of all malignancies. Comparative studies have not demonstrated any dramatic change in the frequency of oral cancer for the last 25 years. Oral candidiasis is the most prevalent oral lesion amongst HIV/AIDS patients. In June 2003, Kenya formulated a National Oral Health Policy, which gives direction on how to improve the oral health status of the citizens.

1999

T., PROFKAIMENYIJACOB.  1999.  Kaimenyi JT.Demography and seasonal variation of acute necrotising gingivitis in Nairobi, Kenya. Int Dent J. 1999 Dec;49(6):347-51.. Int Dent J. 1999 Dec;49(6):347-51.. : African Meteorological Society Abstract
The objectives of this study were to determine the frequency of Acute Necrotising Gingivitis (ANG), its sex and age distribution, ethnicity and seasonal variation amongst patients at the Dental Unit of Kenyatta National Hospital (KNH) in Nairobi, Kenya. Cards of patients who were seen in the Dental Unit of KNH in 1992/1993, were scrutinised for positive diagnosis of ANG, age, sex, presenting signs and symptoms and treatment that was given. Of the 53,572 patients who were treated, (0.15 per cent) had ANG. Their age range was 1.5-46 years (Mean = 14.5 years), with 58.5 per cent being below 11 years and 32.9 per cent being between 21 and 40 years. The most affected ethnic groups were the Luos and Kikuyus, while 72 per cent of the patients were seen in March and April, and between September and December. It is concluded that the frequency of ANG was low, ANG affected children and adults, and that ANG varied seasonally. PMID: 10907433 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
T., PROFKAIMENYIJACOB.  1999.  Kaimenyi, J.T. (1988). Occurrence of midline diastema and frenum attachments amongst school children in Nairobi, Kenya. Indian Journal of Dental Research 9:67-71. Indian Journal of Dental Research 9:67-71. : African Meteorological Society Abstract
The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of midline diastema, tongue tie and frenum attachments amongst school children in Nairobi. A total of 1802 children aged between 4 and 16 years were selected randomly using multistage sampling technique. To avoid oversampling in either sex, a proportionate sampling procedure was used. Thereafter, a thorough intra-oral examination was carried out using a mouth mirror under artificial or natural light with the children lying on a supine position. Presence or absence of midline interdental spaces unusually bigger than other interdental spaces were noted and recorded on a prepared dateacollection form. Accurate location of the origin of the frenum was done using Placek et al Morphological-functional classification of the labial frenum attachments. Data was analyzed manually by tally method. Results showed that 35% had upper and lower midline diastema. 55% were females and 45% were males. Their mean age was 7.6 years. 0.2% had a high lingual frenum. The commonest location of frenum attachment amongst children with lower midline diastema was the mucogingival junction (86%) whereas amongst those with upper midline diastema it was attached gingiva (50%). None of the children had frenum attachment on the interdental papilla. It was concluded that the maxilla had a higher prevalence of midline diastema than the mandible and that papillary penetrating frenum attachments amongst these patients were higher in the maxilla than the mandible.

1998

T., PROFKAIMENYIJACOB.  1998.  Kaimenyi, J.T. (1998). Oral Manifestations in HIV infection. Afya 31:9-11.. Afya 31:9-11. : African Meteorological Society Abstract
The objectives of this study were to determine the frequency of Acute Necrotising Gingivitis (ANG), its sex and age distribution, ethnicity and seasonal variation amongst patients at the Dental Unit of Kenyatta National Hospital (KNH) in Nairobi, Kenya. Cards of patients who were seen in the Dental Unit of KNH in 1992/1993, were scrutinised for positive diagnosis of ANG, age, sex, presenting signs and symptoms and treatment that was given. Of the 53,572 patients who were treated, (0.15 per cent) had ANG. Their age range was 1.5-46 years (Mean = 14.5 years), with 58.5 per cent being below 11 years and 32.9 per cent being between 21 and 40 years. The most affected ethnic groups were the Luos and Kikuyus, while 72 per cent of the patients were seen in March and April, and between September and December. It is concluded that the frequency of ANG was low, ANG affected children and adults, and that ANG varied seasonally. PMID: 10907433 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

1997

T., PROFKAIMENYIJACOB.  1997.  Ngakinya N.M., Ngotho, B.N., Kariuki, H.N., and Kaimenyi, J.T. (1997). Periodontal health status of patients attending diabetic clinic at Kenyatta National Hospital, Nairobi, Kenya. Indian Journal of Dental Research 8:105-114.. Indian Journal of Dental Research 8:105-114.. : African Meteorological Society Abstract
The periodontal health status of diabetic patients and the association between periodontal disease and treatment mode, age and duration of diabetes were investigated in 86 dentulous men and women aged between 20 years and 69 years. 43 were diabetics regularly controlled at Kenyatta National Hospital Diabetic Clinic and 43 were non-diabetics attending medical outpatient clinic at the same hospital for minor ailments. Diabetic patients were found to have significant severer levels of periodontal disease than the non-diabetics. The difference persisted with increasing age. No correlation was found between treatment mode and duration of diabetes on one hand and the severity of periodontal disease on the other.

1996

Kaimenyi, JT.  1996.  Cause of tooth mortality at the dental unit at Kenyatta National Hospital Nairobi, Kenya. AbstractWebsite

The purpose of Dentistry is to make the mouth healthy and preserve teeth in good function for what they are worth, namely a beautiful smile, better phonetics, a youthful look and ease of chewing all sorts of food without having to make uncalled for choices.(3) In the past, most people didn't value teeth at all. Loss of teeth was considered as an inevitable consequence 01 old age. The contemporary society however values teeth in a big way. Many people today will go along way to preserve their teeth notwithstanding the high expense to be incurred and the many man hours spent in attending dental clinic. Demand to preserve teeth by a patient whatever the cost doesn't necessarily have to be met by the dental surgeon. The decision to preserve teeth or not must be considered in the light of the pathology of dental disease in question regarding its onset, course, termination and the like hood of its response to treatment. Any attempt to preserve teeth with very poor prognosis is not only heroic but eventuates into frustrating the patient and the dental surgeon when the desired results are not met.

T., PROFKAIMENYIJACOB.  1996.  Kaimenyi, J.T. (1996). Prevention of cross-infection in dental surgeries in East Africa and a review of literature. West Indian Dental Journal 3:46-48.. West Indian Dental Journal 3:46-48.. : African Meteorological Society Abstract
A survey of 272 University of Nairobi undergraduate students was undertaken to assess their dental chairside experience and what reasons they gave for failing to seek dental treatment. Most respondents considered dental treatment uncomfortable and painful. The cost of treatment and fear arising from information given by other dental patients were important reasons that kept the respondents from visiting a dental clinic. This paper reveals the need for the dental profession to play a greater role in reducing costs of treatment and odontophobia.
T., PROFKAIMENYIJACOB.  1996.  Kaimenyi, J.T. (1996). Acute necrotizing gingivitis: Literature review on clinical features, aetiology and treatment. Afya 30:15-17. Afya 30:15-17. : African Meteorological Society Abstract
A survey of 272 University of Nairobi undergraduate students was undertaken to assess their dental chairside experience and what reasons they gave for failing to seek dental treatment. Most respondents considered dental treatment uncomfortable and painful. The cost of treatment and fear arising from information given by other dental patients were important reasons that kept the respondents from visiting a dental clinic. This paper reveals the need for the dental profession to play a greater role in reducing costs of treatment and odontophobia.
T., PROFKAIMENYIJACOB.  1996.  Kaimenyi, J.T. (1996). Use of antibiotics in the management of periodontal disease. Afya 30:2-4. Afya 30:2-4. : African Meteorological Society Abstract
A survey of 272 University of Nairobi undergraduate students was undertaken to assess their dental chairside experience and what reasons they gave for failing to seek dental treatment. Most respondents considered dental treatment uncomfortable and painful. The cost of treatment and fear arising from information given by other dental patients were important reasons that kept the respondents from visiting a dental clinic. This paper reveals the need for the dental profession to play a greater role in reducing costs of treatment and odontophobia.
T., PROFKAIMENYIJACOB.  1996.  Kaimenyi, J.T. (1996). The need for a thorough intra-oral examination of all patients. Afya 30:9-11. Afya 30:9-11. : African Meteorological Society Abstract
A survey of 272 University of Nairobi undergraduate students was undertaken to assess their dental chairside experience and what reasons they gave for failing to seek dental treatment. Most respondents considered dental treatment uncomfortable and painful. The cost of treatment and fear arising from information given by other dental patients were important reasons that kept the respondents from visiting a dental clinic. This paper reveals the need for the dental profession to play a greater role in reducing costs of treatment and odontophobia.
T., PROFKAIMENYIJACOB.  1996.  Kaimenyi, J.T. and Guthua, S.W (1996). Cancrum oris. Surgery 14:244-247. Surgery 14:244-247. : African Meteorological Society Abstract
A survey of 272 University of Nairobi undergraduate students was undertaken to assess their dental chairside experience and what reasons they gave for failing to seek dental treatment. Most respondents considered dental treatment uncomfortable and painful. The cost of treatment and fear arising from information given by other dental patients were important reasons that kept the respondents from visiting a dental clinic. This paper reveals the need for the dental profession to play a greater role in reducing costs of treatment and odontophobia.
T., PROFKAIMENYIJACOB.  1996.  Wakiaga, J.M., Kaimenyi, J.T. and Kisumbi, B.K (1996). Reasons underlying failure to seek dental treatment among Nairobi University students.East African Medical Journal 73:320-322.. East African Medical Journal 73:320-322.. : African Meteorological Society Abstract
A survey of 272 University of Nairobi undergraduate students was undertaken to assess their dental chairside experience and what reasons they gave for failing to seek dental treatment. Most respondents considered dental treatment uncomfortable and painful. The cost of treatment and fear arising from information given by other dental patients were important reasons that kept the respondents from visiting a dental clinic. This paper reveals the need for the dental profession to play a greater role in reducing costs of treatment and odontophobia.

1995

T., PROFKAIMENYIJACOB.  1995.  Kaimenyi, J.T. (1995). Prerequisites for formulating an oral health policy. Medicus 14:10-15.. Medicus 14:10-15.. : African Meteorological Society Abstract
The objective of this study was to determine the knowledge and attitude of Nairobi University students towards dental health care in Kenya. A self administered questionnaire given to 400 students in person who responded and handed them over immediately. The students had a mean age of 22.4 years, 45.3% were males and 54.5% were females. Extractions, restorations and replacement of teeth were known to majority of the students. However, almost half of the students preferred extraction to restoration and 49.2% considered restoration of deciduous teeth unnecessary. 79% indicated that they would undergo scaling. It is therefore recommended that an effective mode of transmitting positive information about various dental treatment modalities be established.
T., PROFKAIMENYIJACOB.  1995.  Kaimenyi, J.T. (1995). The need for auxiliaries in oral health care.Medicus 14:3-8.. Medicus 14:3-8.. : African Meteorological Society Abstract
The objective of this study was to determine the knowledge and attitude of Nairobi University students towards dental health care in Kenya. A self administered questionnaire given to 400 students in person who responded and handed them over immediately. The students had a mean age of 22.4 years, 45.3% were males and 54.5% were females. Extractions, restorations and replacement of teeth were known to majority of the students. However, almost half of the students preferred extraction to restoration and 49.2% considered restoration of deciduous teeth unnecessary. 79% indicated that they would undergo scaling. It is therefore recommended that an effective mode of transmitting positive information about various dental treatment modalities be established.
T., PROFKAIMENYIJACOB.  1995.  Kaimenyi, J.T. and Guthua, S.W (1995). Dental students compliance with University Examinations Instructions. Medicus 14:26-30.. Medicus 14:26-30.. : African Meteorological Society Abstract
The objective of this study was to determine the knowledge and attitude of Nairobi University students towards dental health care in Kenya. A self administered questionnaire given to 400 students in person who responded and handed them over immediately. The students had a mean age of 22.4 years, 45.3% were males and 54.5% were females. Extractions, restorations and replacement of teeth were known to majority of the students. However, almost half of the students preferred extraction to restoration and 49.2% considered restoration of deciduous teeth unnecessary. 79% indicated that they would undergo scaling. It is therefore recommended that an effective mode of transmitting positive information about various dental treatment modalities be established.
T., PROFKAIMENYIJACOB.  1995.  Kisumbi, B.K., Kaimenyi, J.T. and Wakiaga, J.M. (1995). Knowledge on treatment modalities and attitude of Nairobi University Students towards dental care. Indian Journal of Dental Research 6:133-136.. Indian Journal of Dental Research 6:133-136.. : African Meteorological Society Abstract
The objective of this study was to determine the knowledge and attitude of Nairobi University students towards dental health care in Kenya. A self administered questionnaire given to 400 students in person who responded and handed them over immediately. The students had a mean age of 22.4 years, 45.3% were males and 54.5% were females. Extractions, restorations and replacement of teeth were known to majority of the students. However, almost half of the students preferred extraction to restoration and 49.2% considered restoration of deciduous teeth unnecessary. 79% indicated that they would undergo scaling. It is therefore recommended that an effective mode of transmitting positive information about various dental treatment modalities be established.

1994

T., PROFKAIMENYIJACOB.  1994.  Kaimenyi JT, Guthua SW.Residual facial deformity resulting from cancrum oris: a case report.East Afr Med J. 1994 Jul;71(7):476-8. Review.. East Afr Med J. 1994 Jul;71(7):476-8. Review.. : African Meteorological Society Abstract
Cancrum oris cases are occasionally treated in various hospitals in Kenya. Despite this, only one case has been reported in literature. Besides, no epidemiological or treatment studies of cancrum oris has been carried out in Kenya. We report an unusual case of a 17 year old Kenyan female with oral cutaneous fistula and tissue atrophy on the left cheek following cancrum oris infection in childhood. Since most cancrum oris cases are a sequela of acute necrotizing gingivitis (ANG), prevention of cancrum oris can be achieved by early and prompt remedial measures once a diagnosis of ANG is established. Failure to do this might lead to cancrum oris with its attendant disfiguring complications some of which might be impossible to treat in developing countries where the requisite personnel is lacking or inadequate.
T., PROFKAIMENYIJACOB.  1994.  Kaimenyi JT, Ndungu FL.Knowledge, attitudes and practices towards HIV positive and AIDS patients among public service dentists in Nairobi.Afr J Health Sci. 1994 Aug;1(3):116-121.. Afr J Health Sci. 1994 Aug;1(3):116-121.. : African Meteorological Society Abstract

The purpose of this study was to assess the knowledge, practices and attitudes towards HIV Positive/AIDS patients among 112 dentists from public institutions in Nairobi using a self-administered questionnaire. 94(83.9%) responded. Over 74% had managed HIV positive/AIDS patients. In general, respondents' knowledge and preventive measures against HIV infection were satisfactory. 8.5% did not find use of protective eye wear absolutely necessary. 33% used protective covers routinely. 52.1% advocated for the screening of all suspected cases of AIDS before treatment. 27.7% felt that HIV positive health workers and those with AIDS should not be allowed to treat patients. 53.2% felt that they should be given the right to decide on treating HIV Positive/AIDS patients. 10.6% supported the idea that AIDS patients be isolated from uninfected individuals. It is concluded that a substantial number of dentists were wanting in their attitudes towards HIV positive/AIDS patients.

T., PROFKAIMENYIJACOB.  1994.  Kaimenyi JT, Guthua SW, Wakiaga J, Kisumbi B.Utilization of dental auxiliaries in private dental surgeries in Kenya. East Afr Med J. 1994 Dec;71(12):811-5.. East Afr Med J. 1994 Dec;71(12):811-5.. : African Meteorological Society Abstract
This study was done to determine the nature of utilization of dental auxiliaries and medical emergencies in private dental surgeries in Kenya. A self administering questionnaire with pre-paid postage was mailed to 138 dentists. 27.5% responded. 81.6% used dental auxiliaries and the main reason was to improve efficiency in managing patients. 93.5% of the auxiliaries were on job trained secondary school graduates. 63.2% of the respondents delegated duties which were mainly non-clinical. 26.3% did not delegate any duties. In a descending order, the reasons for non delegation were: that it would be risky to patients, not allowed by law, they did not find it necessary and that auxiliaries were not held responsible if something went wrong. The main duties delegated to the auxiliaries were cleaning of instruments and sterilization, mixing of restorative materials and preparing amalgam. Delegation was done primarily based on auxiliaries capability to perform the procedure and meet the set standards. 57.9% indicated that they rarely encountered medical emergencies. Syncope was the commonest emergency encountered. 72.7% indicated that auxiliaries could not handle medical emergencies because they were not trained. It is concluded that most dentists did not delegate clinical duties to dental auxiliaries and medical emergencies were rare.
T., PROFKAIMENYIJACOB.  1994.  Kaimenyi, J.T. and Guthua, S.W. (1994). Residual facial deformity resulting from cancrum oris-a case report.East African Medical Journal 71:476:478.. East Afr Med J. 1994 Jul;71(7):476-8.. : African Meteorological Society Abstract
Dental School, College of Health Sciences, Nairobi. Cancrum oris cases are occasionally treated in various hospitals in Kenya. Despite this, only one case has been reported in literature. Besides, no epidemiological or treatment studies of cancrum oris has been carried out in Kenya. We report an unusual case of a 17 year old Kenyan female with oral cutaneous fistula and tissue atrophy on the left cheek following cancrum oris infection in childhood. Since most cancrum oris cases are a sequela of acute necrotizing gingivitis (ANG), prevention of cancrum oris can be achieved by early and prompt remedial measures once a diagnosis of ANG is established. Failure to do this might lead to cancrum oris with its attendant disfiguring complications some of which might be impossible to treat in developing countries where the requisite personnel is lacking or inadequate.
T., PROFKAIMENYIJACOB.  1994.  Kaimenyi, J.T. and Guthua, S.W. (1994). Occurrence of ulcerative oral lesions at Kenyatta National Hospital, Nairobi, Kenya. African Journal of Health Sciences 1:179-181.. African Journal of Health Sciences 1:179-181.. : African Meteorological Society Abstract
Department of Dental Surgery, College of Health Sciences, University of Nairobi. This study was done as part of a WHO international survey of orofacial mutilations and NOMA cases referred to out-patient clinic and care centers in 1992. Files of 16,000 patients who were treated at the Dental Unit of Kenyatta National Hospital (KNH) were scrutinized for the occurrence of NOMA and other ulcerative oral lesions. Of these, 30% had acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis with a male to female ratio of 5:1. 25% had aphthous ulcers with a male to female ratio of 3:2. Equal numbers of patients (10%) had angular cheilitis, aspirin burn and oral candidiasis. Similarly, equal numbers of patients (5%) had NOMA, atypical ulceration and radiotherapy induced ulceration. It was concluded that NOMA and other ulcerative oral lesions were rare among the patients who were treated at the Dental Unit of KNH.
T., PROFKAIMENYIJACOB.  1994.  Kaimenyi, J.T., Guthua, S.W, Wakiaga, J. and Kisumbi, B. (1994). Utilization of dental auxiliaries in private and dental surgeries in Kenya. East African Medical Journal 71:811-815.. East African Medical Journal 71:811-815.. : African Meteorological Society Abstract
Department of Dental Surgery College of Health Sciences, University of Nairobi, Kenya. This study was done to determine the nature of utilization of dental auxiliaries and medical emergencies in private dental surgeries in Kenya. A self administering questionnaire with pre-paid postage was mailed to 138 dentists. 27.5% responded. 81.6% used dental auxiliaries and the main reason was to improve efficiency in managing patients. 93.5% of the auxiliaries were on job trained secondary school graduates. 63.2% of the respondents delegated duties which were mainly non-clinical. 26.3% did not delegate any duties. In a descending order, the reasons for non delegation were: that it would be risky to patients, not allowed by law, they did not find it necessary and that auxiliaries were not held responsible if something went wrong. The main duties delegated to the auxiliaries were cleaning of instruments and sterilization, mixing of restorative materials and preparing amalgam. Delegation was done primarily based on auxiliaries capability to perform the procedure and meet the set standards. 57.9% indicated that they rarely encountered medical emergencies. Syncope was the commonest emergency encountered. 72.7% indicated that auxiliaries could not handle medical emergencies because they were not trained. It is concluded that most dentists did not delegate clinical duties to dental auxiliaries and medical emergencies were rare.
T., PROFKAIMENYIJACOB.  1994.  Kaimenyi, J.T. and Ndung. African Journal of Health Sciences. 1:116-121.. : African Meteorological Society Abstract

Department of Dental Surgery, College of Health Sciences, University of Nairobi. The purpose of this study was to assess knowledge, practices and attitudes towards HIV positive and AIDS patients amongst 71 dental auxiliaries using on a self administered questionnaire. 65 (91.5%) returned the questionnaire. In general, respondents' knowledge was fair. 87.7% felt that dentistry as practised in Kenya today carries a high risk of transmission of HIV primarily because of improper sterilization of instruments. 72.3% had changed their sex habits since they became aware of the dangers posed by indiscriminate sex. Over 67% used gloves and masks routinely when assisting in the management of AIDS patients. Over 33% did not use protective eye wear and protective covers on operatories routinely because they were not provided by the employer. 27.7% felt that AIDS and HIV positive health workers should stop treating patients. 64.6% advocated that the cost of buying materials and equipment to prevent cross infection be met by the patient and the employer or dentist. 23.1% supported the idea that HIV positive and AIDS patients be isolated from uninfected individuals. In conclusion, a substantial number of dental auxiliaries were wanting in their knowledge, practices and attitudes towards HIV positive/AIDS patients.

T., PROFKAIMENYIJACOB.  1994.  Kaimenyi, J.T. and Ndung. East African Medical Journal 71:304-310.. : African Meteorological Society Abstract

Department of Dental Surgery, College of Health Sciences, University of Nairobi. The purpose of this study was to assess knowledge, practices and attitudes towards HIV positive and AIDS patients amongst 71 dental auxiliaries using on a self administered questionnaire. 65 (91.5%) returned the questionnaire. In general, respondents' knowledge was fair. 87.7% felt that dentistry as practised in Kenya today carries a high risk of transmission of HIV primarily because of improper sterilization of instruments. 72.3% had changed their sex habits since they became aware of the dangers posed by indiscriminate sex. Over 67% used gloves and masks routinely when assisting in the management of AIDS patients. Over 33% did not use protective eye wear and protective covers on operatories routinely because they were not provided by the employer. 27.7% felt that AIDS and HIV positive health workers should stop treating patients. 64.6% advocated that the cost of buying materials and equipment to prevent cross infection be met by the patient and the employer or dentist. 23.1% supported the idea that HIV positive and AIDS patients be isolated from uninfected individuals. In conclusion, a substantial number of dental auxiliaries were wanting in their knowledge, practices and attitudes towards HIV positive/AIDS patients.

1993

T., PROFKAIMENYIJACOB.  1993.  Kaimenyi JT, Ndungu FL, Maina SW, Chindia M.Oral hygiene habits and dental health awareness of Kenyan children aged 9-15 years in a peri-urban and urban school.East Afr Med J. 1993 Feb;70(2):67-70.. East Afr Med J. 1993 Feb;70(2):67-70.. : African Meteorological Society Abstract
The oral hygiene habits and dental health awareness of 541 Kenyan children from a peri-urban and urban school and aged 9-15 years, were investigated. 80.2% of the urban children and 43.1% of the peri-urban children had visited a dentist before. 12.4% of the urban children and 9.2% of the peri-urban children knew that bacteria cause dental caries. Over 87% of the children from either school knew that dental caries and periodontitis can be prevented. The main reason for visiting a dentist was to have tooth extraction. Failure to brush teeth was believed to be the cause of gingival bleeding by 38.9% of the peri-urban children and 37.6% of the urban children. 67.2% of the peri-urban children and 39.5% of the urban children brushed their teeth thrice daily. 21.1% of the peri-urban children and 2% of the urban children used a chewing stick to brush their teeth. More urban children (96.5%) used a toothbrush than peri-urban children (64.8%). None of the children from either school admitted using traditional cleaning aids such as the finger and charcoal. It is concluded that there were no consistent differences in oral hygiene habits and dental health awareness between peri-urban and urban children.
T., PROFKAIMENYIJACOB.  1993.  Kaimenyi JT.Inappropriateness of the term "periodontal disease". Indian J Dent Res. 1993 Jul-Dec;4(3-4):81-9.. Indian J Dent Res. 1993 Jul-Dec;4(3-4):81-9.. : African Meteorological Society Abstract
Traditionally, diseases that affect the periodontium have over the years been referred to as periodontal disease. This implies that these diseases are a single disease entity or only one disease, "periodontal disease," affects the periodontium. To date, dental literature is replete with several diseases that affect the periodontium. Most of these diseases exhibit unique bacteriological, immunological, biochemical and clinical features. It is these characteristics that qualify them to be regarded as individual or different disease entities. Biased by these recent reports on distinct diseases that affect the periodontium, several dental authors have written articles where they have preferred the term "periodontal diseases" to "periodontal disease," when discussing and reporting on the diseases that affect the periodontium. This paper suggests and discusses the reasons why scientists have continued to use the term periodontal disease and presents arguments why this terminology is inappropriate. It is suggested that the term "periodontal disease" be replaced by the term "periodontal diseases".
T., PROFKAIMENYIJACOB.  1993.  Kaimenyi, J.T. (1993) Dental Scaling: Patients fears. Africa Health July issue PP.21-23.. Africa Health July issue PP.21-23.. : African Meteorological Society Abstract
Department of Dental Surgery, College of Health Sciences, Nairobi, Kenya. Traditionally, diseases that affect the periodontium have over the years been referred to as periodontal disease. This implies that these diseases are a single disease entity or only one disease, "periodontal disease," affects the periodontium. To date, dental literature is replete with several diseases that affect the periodontium. Most of these diseases exhibit unique bacteriological, immunological, biochemical and clinical features. It is these characteristics that qualify them to be regarded as individual or different disease entities. Biased by these recent reports on distinct diseases that affect the periodontium, several dental authors have written articles where they have preferred the term "periodontal diseases" to "periodontal disease," when discussing and reporting on the diseases that affect the periodontium. This paper suggests and discusses the reasons why scientists have continued to use the term periodontal disease and presents arguments why this terminology is inappropriate. It is suggested that the term "periodontal disease" be replaced by the term "periodontal diseases".
T., PROFKAIMENYIJACOB.  1993.  Kaimenyi, J.T. (1993) The need for dental auxiliaries. Proceedings for the 3rd continuing education course for all categories of oral health personnel. Pages 147-163. 19th . Proceedings for the 3rd continuing education course for all categories of oral health personnel. Pages 147-163. 19th . : African Meteorological Society Abstract
Department of Dental Surgery, College of Health Sciences, Nairobi, Kenya. Traditionally, diseases that affect the periodontium have over the years been referred to as periodontal disease. This implies that these diseases are a single disease entity or only one disease, "periodontal disease," affects the periodontium. To date, dental literature is replete with several diseases that affect the periodontium. Most of these diseases exhibit unique bacteriological, immunological, biochemical and clinical features. It is these characteristics that qualify them to be regarded as individual or different disease entities. Biased by these recent reports on distinct diseases that affect the periodontium, several dental authors have written articles where they have preferred the term "periodontal diseases" to "periodontal disease," when discussing and reporting on the diseases that affect the periodontium. This paper suggests and discusses the reasons why scientists have continued to use the term periodontal disease and presents arguments why this terminology is inappropriate. It is suggested that the term "periodontal disease" be replaced by the term "periodontal diseases".
T., PROFKAIMENYIJACOB.  1993.  Kaimenyi, J.T. (1993). Oral Hygiene and dental health. East African Medical Journal 70:65.. East Afr Med J. 1993 Feb;70(2):65-6.. : African Meteorological Society Abstract
Department of Dental Surgery, College of Health Sciences, Nairobi, Kenya. Traditionally, diseases that affect the periodontium have over the years been referred to as periodontal disease. This implies that these diseases are a single disease entity or only one disease, "periodontal disease," affects the periodontium. To date, dental literature is replete with several diseases that affect the periodontium. Most of these diseases exhibit unique bacteriological, immunological, biochemical and clinical features. It is these characteristics that qualify them to be regarded as individual or different disease entities. Biased by these recent reports on distinct diseases that affect the periodontium, several dental authors have written articles where they have preferred the term "periodontal diseases" to "periodontal disease," when discussing and reporting on the diseases that affect the periodontium. This paper suggests and discusses the reasons why scientists have continued to use the term periodontal disease and presents arguments why this terminology is inappropriate. It is suggested that the term "periodontal disease" be replaced by the term "periodontal diseases".
T., PROFKAIMENYIJACOB.  1993.  Kaimenyi, J.T. (1993). Inappropriateness of the term . Indian Journal of Dental Research 4:81-89.. : African Meteorological Society Abstract
Department of Dental Surgery, College of Health Sciences, Nairobi, Kenya. Traditionally, diseases that affect the periodontium have over the years been referred to as periodontal disease. This implies that these diseases are a single disease entity or only one disease, "periodontal disease," affects the periodontium. To date, dental literature is replete with several diseases that affect the periodontium. Most of these diseases exhibit unique bacteriological, immunological, biochemical and clinical features. It is these characteristics that qualify them to be regarded as individual or different disease entities. Biased by these recent reports on distinct diseases that affect the periodontium, several dental authors have written articles where they have preferred the term "periodontal diseases" to "periodontal disease," when discussing and reporting on the diseases that affect the periodontium. This paper suggests and discusses the reasons why scientists have continued to use the term periodontal disease and presents arguments why this terminology is inappropriate. It is suggested that the term "periodontal disease" be replaced by the term "periodontal diseases".
T., PROFKAIMENYIJACOB.  1993.  Kaimenyi, J.T. (1993). Is periodontal disease on the increase in Kenya? A review. East African Medical Journal 70:519-522. East African Medical Journal 70:519-522.. : African Meteorological Society Abstract
Department of Dental Surgery, College of Health Sciences, University of Nairobi, Kenya. During a recent scientific meeting held in Botswana (16th-19th October 1991), it was reported that the oral health situation in developing countries was typified by an increase in the prevalence of dental diseases. Kenya was cited as one of the typical examples of this worrying trend. For there to be an increase in dental diseases, there must be a concomitant increase or an upward shift in the main aetiological factor(s) or factors associated with dental diseases. This paper looks at these factors in relation to periodontal disease and reviews some of the major prevalence studies of periodontal disease that have been carried out in Kenya. It also presents some arguments to show that there is no unequivocal evidence that periodontal disease is on the increase in Kenya.
T., PROFKAIMENYIJACOB.  1993.  Kaimenyi, J.T. (1993). Periodontal health status in Africa after decades of development. East African Medical Journal 70:369:371.. East African Medical Journal 70:369:371.. : African Meteorological Society Abstract
Department of Dental Surgery, Dental School, College of Health Sciences, Nairobi. Seven hundred and seventy five files of edentulous patients seen at the Department of Dental Surgery, University of Nairobi were scrutinized for the presence or absence of routine radiographs prior to treatment. 180 (23.2%) had radiographs. 26% of the radiographs had 51 positive radiological findings. 17.3% were roots, 3.9% were unerupted teeth, 6.7% were radiopacities and 0.6% were radiolucencies. 52.9% of the radiological findings were in the mandible and 47.1% were in the maxilla. In the mandible, 44.4% of the radiological findings were in the anterior region and 55.6% were found posteriorly. 66.7% of the maxillary radiological findings were in the anterior region and 33.3% were found posteriorly. Since some of the positive radiological findings such as the retained roots and unerupted teeth might lead to infection, cysts or poor dentures fit, it is recommended that whenever possible, all edentulous patients be examined radiographically prior to treatment.
T., PROFKAIMENYIJACOB.  1993.  Kaimenyi, J.T. Karongo, P. and Ocholla T.J. (1993). Radiological findings in edentulous Kenyan Patients. East African Medical Journal 70:179-181.. East African Medical Journal 70:179-181.. : African Meteorological Society Abstract
Department of Dental Surgery, Dental School, College of Health Sciences, Nairobi. Seven hundred and seventy five files of edentulous patients seen at the Department of Dental Surgery, University of Nairobi were scrutinized for the presence or absence of routine radiographs prior to treatment. 180 (23.2%) had radiographs. 26% of the radiographs had 51 positive radiological findings. 17.3% were roots, 3.9% were unerupted teeth, 6.7% were radiopacities and 0.6% were radiolucencies. 52.9% of the radiological findings were in the mandible and 47.1% were in the maxilla. In the mandible, 44.4% of the radiological findings were in the anterior region and 55.6% were found posteriorly. 66.7% of the maxillary radiological findings were in the anterior region and 33.3% were found posteriorly. Since some of the positive radiological findings such as the retained roots and unerupted teeth might lead to infection, cysts or poor dentures fit, it is recommended that whenever possible, all edentulous patients be examined radiographically prior to treatment.

1992

T., PROFKAIMENYIJACOB.  1992.  Kaimenyi, J.T. (1992). Accepting our own limitations. Africa Health 14:47.. Africa Health 14:47.. : African Meteorological Society Abstract
The oral hygiene habits and dental health awareness of 541 Kenyan children from a peri-urban and urban school and aged 9-15 years, were investigated. 80.2% of the urban children and 43.1% of the peri-urban children had visited a dentist before. 12.4% of the urban children and 9.2% of the peri-urban children knew that bacteria cause dental caries. Over 87% of the children from either school knew that dental caries and periodontitis can be prevented. The main reason for visiting a dentist was to have tooth extraction. Failure to brush teeth was believed to be the cause of gingival bleeding by 38.9% of the peri-urban children and 37.6% of the urban children. 67.2% of the peri-urban children and 39.5% of the urban children brushed their teeth thrice daily. 21.1% of the peri-urban children and 2% of the urban children used a chewing stick to brush their teeth. More urban children (96.5%) used a toothbrush than peri-urban children (64.8%). None of the children from either school admitted using traditional cleaning aids such as the finger and charcoal. It is concluded that there were no consistent differences in oral hygiene habits and dental health awareness between peri-urban and urban children.

1991

Kibwage, IO, Kaimenyi JT, Migosi D.  1991.  Quality performance of metronidazole tablet products on the Kenyan market. Abstract

The in vitro performance of metronidazole tablet product by different manufacturers avallable on the Kenyan market was evaluated. It was found that a number of generic metronidazole tablet products have quality performance equal to that of FlagylR-the Innovator product. All products confirmed to pharmacopoelal speciflcations, Three products with percent weight loss of 1.4, 11.08 and 14.93 fulled the crucial friability test, for multidose packs. Two products failed the dissolution test releasing 46.8% and 45.8% of drug In 40 minutes. Drug release from tablet was found to vary between batches for one product. Ageing appears to decrease amount of drug released from tablets but longer storage periods and more samples are required before def1nlte conclusions are drawn

T., PROFKAIMENYIJACOB.  1991.  Kaimenyi, J.T. and Gururaja Rao, T.R. (1991). A comparative study on the periodontal health status of adult populations of Kenya and India. Ind. J. Dent. Research 2:29-34.. Indian J Dent Res. 1991 Jul-Dec;2(3-4):29-34.. : African Meteorological Society Abstract

Dental School, College of Health Sciences, Nairobi, Kenya. The purpose of this study was to compare the oral hygiene and periodontal health status of 497 randomly selected Kenyan and Indian adult populations aged between 20 and 35 years. Oral hygiene and periodontal health status were assessed using Silness and Loe plaque Index and Russel's Periodontal Index respectively. Results revealed that the overall mean plaque and periodontal index scores of Kenyan participants were significantly lower than those of Indians. Increase of mean Periodontal index with age was found to be significant among Kenyan participants and insignificant among Indian participants Kenyan female participants were found to have significant lower mean plaque and periodontal index scores than males. However, the mean periodontal index score of Indian male participants was found to be lower than that of female participants. It is concluded that Kenyan participants had better periodontal and oral hygiene status than Indian participants and that Indian females unlike Kenyan females had poorer periodontal health status than male.

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