Publications

Found 182 results

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2019
Gitau PW, Kunyanga CN, Abong’ GO, Ojiem JO, Muthomi JW. "Assessing Sensory Characteristics and Consumer Preference of Legume-Cereal-Root Based Porridges in Nandi County." Journal of Food Quality. 2019;https://doi.org/10.1155/2019/3035418.
Maluk MD, Kahiu N, Olubayo F, Eric M, Muthomi J, Nzuve F, Ochanda N. "Combining ability for earliness and yield among south sudanese F1 sorghum genotypes." Journal of Agriculture. 2019;6(3):1-13.
Mutundi AN, Muthomi JW, Olubayo FM, Leley PK, Nzuve FM. "Effect of Farm Saved Maize (Zea mays L.) Seed on Intensity of Foliage Diseases." Journal of Agricultural Science. 2019;11(8):45-57.
Okumu OO, Muthomi JW, Ojiem J, Narla R, Nderitu JH. "Effect of Legume Extracts on Germination, Seedling Health of Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) and Soil Microorganisms." International Journal of Plant & Soil Science. 2019;28(1):1-13.
Njeru NK, Midega CAO, Muthomi JW, WAGACHA JOHNMAINA, Khan ZR, Khan ZR. "Influence of socio‐economic and agronomic factors on aflatoxin and fumonisin contamination of maize in western Kenya." Food Science and Nutrition. 2019;00:1-11.
Kinyungu TN, Muthomi JW, Subramanian S, Miano DW, Olubayo FM’mogi, Maobe MA. "Role of maize residues in transmission of maize chlorotic mottle virus and effect on yield." International Journal of Biosciences. 2019;14(4):338-349.
2018
Muthomi J. "Technologies and innovations in Phytosanitary Systems.". In: The 2nd Phytosanitary Conference. KEPHIS Headquarter, Nairobi, Kenya; 2018.
Lengai G, Muthomi J. "Biopesticides and Their Role in Sustainable Agricultural Production." Journal of Biosciences and Medicines. 2018;6:7-41.
Yuga ME, Kimani, P.M; Kimani JM, Kimani PM, Olubayo MF, Muthomi JW, Nzuve FM. "Combining Ability and Heterosis for Agronomic and Yield Traits in Indica and Japonica Rice Crosses." Journal of Agricultural Science . 2018;10(12):92-103.
Rono S, Nzuve F, Muthomi J, Kimani J. "Combining Ability of Agronomic and Yield Traits in Rice Genotypes." Journal of Plant Physiology & Pathology. 2018;6:2.
Kataliko RK, Kimani PM, Muthomi JW, Wanderi SW, Olubayo FM, Nzuve FM. "Combining ability of resistance to pod shattering and selected agronomic traits of soybean." International Journal of Agricultural Policy and Research. 2018;6(10):176-188.
Kambura C, Tanga CM, Kilalo D, Muthomi J, Salifu D, Rwomushana I, Mohamed SA, Ekesi S. "Composition, Host Range and Host Suitability of Vegetable-Infesting Tephritids on Cucurbits Cultivated in Kenya." African Entomology. 2018;26(2):379-397.
Pierre HJM, Kinama JM, Olubayo FM, Wanderi SW, Muthomi JW, Nzuve FM. "Effect of Intercropping Maize and Promiscuous Soybean on Growth and Yield. ." Journal of Experimental Agriculture International. 2018;12(2):1-21.
Pierre HJM, Kinama JM, Olubayo FM, Olubayo FM. "Effect of Intercropping Maize-Soybean on Grain Quality Traits in Kenya." Journal of Agricultural Science. 2018;10(2):341-351.
Okumu OO, Muthomi J, Ojiem J, Narla R, Nderitu J. "Effect of lablab green manure on population of soil microorganisms and establishment of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)." American Journal of Agricultural Science. 2018;5(3):44-54.
Buyela SN, Muthomi JW, Mwang’ombe AW, Njau P, Olubayo F. "Effect of Seed Treatment on Wheat Seed Viability and Vigour." American Journal of Agricultural Science. 2018;5(1):1-9.
Mdenye BB, Kinama JM, Olubayo FM'mogi, Kivuva BM, Muthomi JW. "Effect of storage methods of cassava planting materials on establishment and early growth vigour." International Journal of Agronomy and Agricultural Research (IJAAR) . 2018;12(1):1-10.
Okumu O, Muthomi J, Ojiem J, Narla R, Nderitu J. "Effect of time after incorporation of lablab green manure on root rot pathogens and establishment of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)." World Journal of Agricultural Research. 2018;6(4):113-121.
Kinyungu TN, Muthomi JW, Subramanian S, Miano DW, Olubayo FM, Wagura J. "Efficiency of aphid and thrips vectors in transmission of viruses causing maize lethal necrosis disease." World Journal of Agricultural Research . 2018;6(4):144-152.
Musungayi EM, Ngugi K, Ngugi K, Muthomi JW, Were VW, Olubayo FM, Nzuve FM. "Evaluation of resistance of cassava half-sib progenies to cassava mosaic disease and their agronomic performances in Western Kenya." Journal of Agricultural Science. 2018;10(12):78-91.
Mbusa HK, Ngugi K, Olubayo FM, Kivuva BM, Muthomi JW, Nzuve FM. "The Inheritance of Yield Components and Beta Carotene Content in Sweet Potato." Journal of Agricultural Science. 2018;10(2):71-81.
Muthomi JW, Wafula GO, Nderitu JH, Chemining’wa GN. "Integration of Seed Dressing, Bio-pesticides and Intercropping to Reduce Pesticide Use in Snap Bean Production." International Journal of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources. 2018;5(1):12-20.
Mutundi AN, Muthomi JW, Olubayo FM, Leley PK, Nzuve FM. "Quality of farm saved maize (zea mays l.) Seeds and its effect on field establishment." International Journal of Research in Agricultural Sciences. 2018;5(6):2348-3997.
M.E Y, Kimani PM, Kimani, P.M; Kimani JM, Muthomi JW. "Screening Upland Rice Genotypes for Grain Yield and Grain Quality in Kenya." Research journali’s Journal of Agriculture. 2018;5(7):1-15.
Birithia R, Subramanian S, Muthomi JW, Narla RD. "Seasonal dynamics and alternate hosts of thrips transmitted Iris yellow spot virus in Kenya." African Crop Science Journal . 2018;26(3):365-376.
Mumia BI, Muthomi JW, Narla RD, Nyongesa MW, Olubayo FM. "Seed Potato Production Practices and Quality of Farm Saved Seed Potato in Kiambu and Nyandarua Counties in Kenya." World Journal of Agricultural Research. 2018;6(1):20-30.
2017
Jimmy ML, Nzuve F, Flourence O, Manyasa E, Muthomi J. ". Genetic variability, heritability, genetic advance and trait correlations in selected sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L. Moench) varieties." International Journal of Agronomy and Agricultural Research. 2017;11(5):47-56.
Maina AW, Wagacha JM, Wagacha JM, Mwaura FB, Muthomi JW, Woloshuk CP. "Assessment of Farmers Maize Production Practices and Effect of Triple-Layer Hermetic Storage on the Population of Fusarium Spp. and Fumonisin Contamination." World Journal of Agricultural Research. 2017;5(1):21-30.
Malemba GM, Nzuve FM, Kimani, P.M; Kimani JM, Olubayo MF, Muthomi JW. "Combining Ability for Drought Tolerance in Upland Rice Varieties at Reproductive Stage." Journal of Agricultural Science. 2017;9(3):138-150.
Mumia BI, Muthomi JW, Narla RD, Nyongesa M, Olubayo FM. "Effect of Seed Potato Tuber Storage Methods on Occurrence of Potato Diseases." International Journal of Research in Agricultural Sciences . 2017;4(4):23-48.
Morris MM, Muthomi JW, Wagacha JM. "Effect of Soil Fertility and Intercropping on the Incidence and Severity of Root Rot Diseases of Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). ." World Journal of Agricultural Research. 2017;5(4):189-199.
Lengai GMW, Muthomi JW, Narla RD, Wagacha M. "Efficacy of Plant Extracts and Antagonistic Fungi in Managing Tomato Pests and Diseases under Field Conditions." Journal of Agriculture and Life Sciences. 2017;4(2):20-27.
Wafula GO, Muthomi JW, Nderitu JH, Chemining’wa GN. "Efficacy of Potassium Salts of Fatty Acids in the Management of Thrips and Whitefly on Snap Beans." Sustainable Agriculture Research. 2017;6:45-54.
Achieng BO, Nzuve FM, Muthomi JW, Olubayo FM. "Evaluation of maize (Zea mays L.) genotypes for resistance to Aspergillus flavus infection." International Journal of Agronomy and Agricultural Research. 2017;10(6):85-94.
Akello MO, Nzuve F, Olubayo F, Macharia G, Muthomi J. "Identification of Resistance Sources to Wheat Stem Rust from Introduced Genotypes in Kenya." Journal of Agricultural Science. 2017;9(2):73-87.
Muthomi JW, Lengai GMW, Wagacha MJ, Narla RD. "In vitro activity of plant extracts against some important plant pathogenic fungi of tomato." Australian Journal of Crop Science. 2017;11(6):83-689.
Muthomi JW, Fulano AM, Wagacha JM, Mwang’ombe AW. "Management of Snap Bean Insect Pests and Diseases by Use of Antagonistic Fungi and Plant Extracts." Sustainable Agriculture Research. 2017;6(3):52-63.
Lorroki P, Muthomi J, Ininda J, Gichuru L, Githiri S, Wagacha. M. "Mode of Gene Action to Maize Streak Virus in Mid Altitude Inbred Lines CML202 and Osu23i." International Journal of Applied Science and Technology. 2017;7(3):9-18.
Stasiewicz MJ, Falade TDO, Mutuma M, Mutiga SK, Harvey JJW, Fox G, Pearson TC, Muthomi JW, Nelson RJ. "Multi-spectral kernel sorting to reduce aflatoxins and fumonisins in Kenyan maize." Food Control. 2017;(78):203-214.
Sitta J, Nzuve F, Olubayo FM, Mutinda C, Muiru WM, Miano DW, Muthomi JW, Leley PK. "Response of Assorted Maize Germplasm to the Maize Lethal Necrosis Disease in Kenya." Journal of Plant Studies. 2017;6(2):65-76.
Mutinda YA, Muthomi JW, Kimani JM, Cheminigw’wa GN, Olubayo FM. "Viability and Dormancy of Rice Seeds after Storage and Pre-treatment with Dry Heat and Chemical Agents." Journal of Agricultural Science. 2017;9(7):175-185.
2016
Muthomi JW, Mwang’ombe AW, Olubayo FM. "Improving access to postgraduate training in Crop Protection for agricultural practitioners through distance learning at the University of Nairobi, Kenya.". In: 8th Pan Commonwealth Forum on Open Learning (PCF8). Open University of Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; 2016.
Muthomi JW, Lengai GMW, Fulano AM, Wagacha JM, Narla RD, Mwang’ombe AW. "Biopesticide-based IPM systems to reduce synthetic pesticide residues in vegetables for niche market access by small holder growers.". In: 5th Biennial RUFORUM Conference. Cape Town, South Africa; 2016.
Fulano AM, Muthomi JW, Wagacha JM, Mwang’ombe AW. "Efficacy of Antagonistic Fungal Isolates in Management of Diseases in Snap Beans.". In: 5th Biennial RUFORUM Conference. Cape Town, South Africa; 2016.
Lengai GMW, Muthomi JW, Wagacha JM, Narla RD. "Plant extracts and antagonistic fungi as alternatives to synthetic pesticides in management of fungal diseases of tomato.". In: 5th Biennial RUFORUM Conference. Cape Town, South Africa; 2016.
Muthomi J. "Pest diagnostics in phytosanitary systems.". In: International Phytosanitary Conference. KEPHIS Headquarters, Karen, Nairobi, Kenya; 2016.
Mutuma M, Muthomi JW, Stasiewicz M. "Low-cost Optical Sorting to Remove Mycotoxins from Maize in Local Kenyan Mills.". In: Nairobi Innovation Week 2016. University of Nairobi, Kenya; 2016.
Fulano AM, Muthomi JW, Wagacha JM, Mwang’ombe AW. "Antifungal Activity of Local Microbial Isolates against Snap Bean Pathogens." International Journal of Current Microbiology and Applied Sciences. 2016;5(12):112-122.
Mugambi I, Williams F, Muthomi J, Chege F, Oronje ML. "Diagnostic support to plantwise plant doctors in Kenya. ." Journal of Agricultural Extension and Rural Development. 2016;8(11):232-239.
Njeru NK, Muthomi JW, Mutegi CK, Wagacha JM. "Effect of cropping systems on accumulation of Fusarium head blight of wheat inocula in crop residues and soils." Journal of Plant Sciences . 2016;11:12-21.
Mdenye BB, Kinama JM, Olubayo FM, Kivuva BM, Muthomi. JW. "Effect of Storage Methods on Carbohydrate and Moisture of Cassava Planting Materials." Journal of Agricultural Science . 2016;8(12):100-111.
Langa FP, Muiru WM, Mbuge D, Ragwa LRM, Olubayo FM, Muthomi JW. "Influence of Endosperm Types, Seed Moisture Content and Threshing Methods on Germination and Seedling Vigour of Sorghum." World Journal of Agricultural Sciences . 2016;12(5):378-383.
Leitich RK, Arinaitwe W, Mukoye B, Omayio DO, Osogo AK, Were HK, Muthomi JW, Otsyula RM, Abang MM. "Mapping of Angular Leaf Spot Disease Hotspot Areas in Western Kenya Towards Its Management." American Journal of Applied Scientific Research. 2016;2(6):75-81.
WAGACHA JOHNMAINA, Njeru NK, Okumu OO, Muthomi JW, Mutegi CK. "Occurrence of Fusarium Head Blight of Wheat and Associated Mycotoxins in Narok and Nakuru Counties, Kenya." World Journal of Agricultural Research. 2016;4(4):119-127.
Okumu OO, Muthomi JW, Mutegi CK, Wagacha JM. "Resistance of Kenyan wheat germplasm to Fusarium head blight and deoxynivalenol contamination." International Journal of Agronomy and Agricultural Research . 2016;9(2):22-35.
2015
Sserumaga JP, Makumbi D, Simyung L, Njoroge K, Muthomi JW, Chemining’wa GN, Asea G, Waswa M, Bomet DK. "Incidence and severity of potentially toxigenic Aspergillus flavus in maize (Zea mays L.) from different major maize growing regions of Uganda." African Journal of Agricultural Research. 2015;10(11):1244-1250.
2014
Muthomi JW, Mugambi IK, Ojiem J, Chemining’wa GN, Nderitu JH. "Effect of incorporating lablab biomass in soils on root rot disease complex and yield of beans intercropped with maize." International Journal of AgriScience . 2014;4(12):515-524.
Muriungi SJ, Mutitu EW, JW M. "Efficacy of cultural methods in the control of Rhizoctonia solani strains causing tomato damping off in Kenya." African Journal of Food, Agriculture, Nutrition and Development (AJFAND) . 2014;14(2):8776-8790.
Ouma B, Muthomi J, Nderitu J, Toroitich F. "Management of thrips in French bean by integrating biological and synthetic pesticides in conventional spray regimes." Journal of Renewable Agriculture. 2014;2(2):27-37.
Sserumaga JP, Makumbi D, Ji H, Njoroge K, Muthomi JW, Chemining’wa GN, Si-myung L, Asea G, Kim H. "Molecular characterization of tropical maize inbred lines using microsatellite DNA markers." Maydica . 2014;59:267-274.
Njogu M, Muindi E, Muthomi J, Nyankanga R, Muchiri P. "Phytophthora infestans responses to stinging nettle nextract, phosphoric acid and fungicides combination, in Kenya." Direct Research Journal of Agriculture and Food Science (DRJAFS) . 2014;2(9):128-134.
Birithia RK, Subramanian S, Muthomi JW, Narla RD. "Resistance to Iris yellow spot virus and onion thrips among onion varieties grown in Kenya." International Journal of Tropical Insect Science . 2014;34(2):73-79.
Jerome K, James M, Vigheri N, Johnson K, Rockefeller E, Ivan R, Wilberforce T, Fina O. "Strategies for rehabilitation of banana fields infested with Xanthomonas campestris pv. musacrearum." Journal of Crop Protection. 2014;3(1):21-29.
Njogu M, Muindi E, Muthomi J, Nyankanga R, Muchiri P. "Studies on the effects of stinging nettle extract, phosphoric acid and conventional fungicide combinations on the management of potato late blight and tuber yield in the Highlands of Kenya." Direct Research Journal of Agriculture and Food Science (DRJAFS) . 2014;2(8):119-127.
2013
R.Birithia, S.Subramanian, H.R.Pappu, Muthomi J, R.D.NARLA. "Analysis of Iris yellow spot virus (IYSV, genus Tospovirus) replication in vector and non-vector thrips species." Plant Pathology . 2013;(12057).
Muthomi JW;, Otieno PE;, Chemining’wa GN;, Nderitu JH. Effect Of Root Rot Pathogens And Fungicide Seed Treatment On Nodulation In Food Grain Legumes.; 2013. Abstract

Greenhouse experiments were conducted over 2 cropping cycles to investigate the effect of fungicide seed treatment and fungal root rot pathogens on nodulation and dry matter accumulation of selected food legumes. The legumes were common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.var GLP 2), green gram (Vigna radiata L., variety M66) and lablab (Lablab purpureus L.). Treatments included, inoculation of legumes with pathogen alone (Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. phaseoli or Macrophomina phaseolina or Sclerotinia sclerotiorum or Rhizoctonia solani), or with appropriate rhizobia alone or application of fungicide (copper oxychloride) or their combinations. Results of the study indicated that fungicide seed treatment reduced disease incidence on Sclerotinia and Rhizoctonia inoculated plants. However, fungicide treatment significantly (p=0.05) depressed nodulation of the legumes but its effect on nodulation was significantly suppressed when applied together with rhizobia on infected seeds. Fungicide application significantly reduced seedlings mortality (pre-emergence damping off) and number of nodules per plant but had no effect on dry matter accumulation. Combination of fungicide and rhizobia inoculation improved nodulation as well as reducing disease incidence. It is therefore concluded that this combination yields better results if the aim is to reduce root rot incidence while improving nodulation concurrently.

Muriithi BK, Muthomi JW, Chemining'wa GN, Mutitu EW. "Identification of predisposing factors to aflatoxin contamination of maize value chain in eastern Kenya." East African Agricultural and Forestry Journal. 2013;78(4):217-226.
Muthomi JW;, Nderitu JH;, Olubayo FM;, Kabira JN;, Cheminin’wa GN;, Kiretai SM;, Aura JA;, Muindi EM. "Management Of Potato Viruses In Seed Potato Production Using Border Crops."; 2013. Abstract

Field experiments were conducted over two croppi ng seasons to investigate the effectiveness of border crops in managing potato aphids and the associated viruses in seed potato production. Potato plots were surrounded with maize, sorghum and wheat borde rs. Aphid population was monitored on leaves and on yellow sticky traps. Other data collected included virus disease incidence and tuber yield. The border crops reduced aphid popula tion on leaves compared to non-bordered potato plots. More alate aphids we re caught on yellow sticky traps placed inside potato plots than on traps placed inside the border crops. In addition, virus disease incidence was reduced in all plots surrounded by the border cr ops. However, plots surrounded by border crops had reduced tuber yield, although the yield of s eed grade was increased. The results indicated that use of border crops would be beneficial in the management of virus diseases in small-holder seed potato production.

Kitonyo OM, Chemining'wa GN, Muthomi JW. "Productivity of farmer-preferred maize varieties intercropped with beans in semi-arid Kenya." International Journal of Agronomy and Agricultural Research (IJAAR). 2013;3(1):6-16.kitonyo_ijaar-v3no1-p6-16.pdf
WAHOME SW, Kimani PM, Muthomi JW, Narla RD. "Quality and yield of snap bean lines locally developed in Kenya." International Journal of Agronomy and Agricultural Research (IJAAR). 2013;3(7):1-10.analysis_of_iris_yellow_spot_virus_replication_in_vector_and_non.pdf
Bigirimana J, Njoroge K, Muthomi JW, Walyaro DJ, Phiri NA, Gichuru EK, Gahakwa D. "Resistance of Arabica coffee genotypes (Coffea arabica L.) to coffee berry disease and coffee leaf rust in Rwanda." International Journal of Farming and Allied Sciences (IJFAS). 2013;Accepted.
Muthomi JW, Weru RW, Chemining'wa GN, Mutitu EW. "Resistance of maize varieties to infection by Aspergillus flavus and aflatoxin accumulation." East African Agricultural and Forestry Journal. 2013;Accepted.
Karanja LW, Wachira PM, Muthomi JW, Phiri NA, Mutegi CK, Nzioki HS, Gikaru AK, Kanampiu F, J.M W. "Use of geographical information system to determine incidence of Aspergillus section flavi in different soils in Kaiti, Kenya." East African Agricultural and Forestry Journal. 2013;Accepted.
2012
Kwach JK, Onyango MA, Muthomi JW, Nderitu JH. "Baseline survey for status of Banana Xanthomonas Wilt in Kenya.". In: 13th KARI Biennial Scientific Conference. KARI Headquarters; 2012.
Tom FK, Muthomi JW, Olubayo FM, Chemining'wa GN. "Susceptibility of locally grown maize varieties to infestation by maize weevil (Sitophilus zeamais Motsch.).". In: 13th KARI Biennial Scientific Conference. KARI Headquarters; 2012.
Subramanian S, Pappu HR, Birithia R, Muthomi JW, Sseruwagi P, Narla RD. "Diversity and distribution of Iris yellow spot virus infecting onion in Eastern Africa.". In: 4th Conference of the International Working Group on Legume and Vegetable Viruses (IWGLVV). Antequera, Málaga, Spain; 2012.
Birithia R, Subramanian S, Villinger J, Muthomi J, Narla RD, Pappu HR. "2012. First report of tomato yellow ring virus (Tospovirus, Bunyaviridae) Infecting tomatoes in Kenya." Plant Disease. 2012;96:1384.Website
Chemining’wa N, Ngeno J, Muthomi JW, Shibairo SI. "Effectiveness of indigenous pea rhizobia (Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae) in cultivated soils of central Kenya." Journal of Applied Biosciences. 2012;57:4177-4185.effectiveness_of_indigenous_pea_rhizobia.pdf
Gachu SM, Muthomi JW, Narla RD, Nderitu JH, Olubayo FM, Wagacha JM. "Management of thrips (Thrips tabaci) in bulb onion by use of vegetable intercrops." International Journal of AgriScience . 2012;2(5):393-402.
Gachu SM, Muthomi JW, Narla RD, Nderitu JH, Olubayo FM, Wagacha JM. "Management of thrips (Thrips tabaci) in bulb onion by use of vegetable intercrops. International Journal of AgriScience 2(5): 393-402." International Journal of AgriScience. 2012; 2(5):393-402.gachu_thrips_paper.pdfWebsite
Muthomi JW, Musyimi SL, Wagacha JM, Narla RD. "Occurrence of Fusarium species and associated T2-toxin in Kenyan wheat." Agricultural Sciences. 2012;3(1): 24-34.(1):24-34. Abstractfusarium_t-2_toxin_paper_agricultural_sciences.pdfWebsite

Malaria is a serious cause of mortality globally. The disease is of regional concern in Africa and of national interest in Kenya due to its high morbidity and mortality as a result of development of resistant strains of Plasmodium falciparum to many existing drugs such as chloroquine. Alternative medicine using herbal remedies are commonly used to treat malaria in Kenya. However, plants used in some rural areas in Kenya are not documented. Many antimalarial drugs have been derived from plants. This study was conducted to document medicinal plants that are traditionally used by the Msambweni community of Kenyan South Coast to treat malaria, where the disease is endemic. Herbalists were interviewed by administration of semistructured questionnaires in order to obtain information on medicinal plants traditionally used for the treatment of malaria. Focused group discussions held with the herbalists supplemented the interview and questionnaire survey. Twenty-seven species of plants in 24 genera distributed in 20 families were reported to be used in this region for the treatment of malaria. Labiatae, Rutaceae and Liliaceae families had each eleven percent of the plant species reported and represented th species that are most commonly used. Thirteen plant species, namely; Aloe deserti Berger (Liliaceae), Launea cornuta (Oliv and Hiern) C. Jeffrey (Compositae), Ocimum bacilicum L. (Labiatae), Teclea simplicifolia (Eng) Verdoon (Rutaceae), Gerranthus lobatus(Cogn.) Jeffrey (Cucurbitaceae), Grewia hexaminta Burret.(Tiliaceae), Canthium glaucum Hiern. (Rubiaceae), Amaranthus hybridus L.(Amaranthaceae), Combretum padoides Engl and Diels. (Combretaceae), Seneciosyringitolius O.Hoffman. (Compositae), OcimumsuaveWilld(Labiatae), Aloe macrosiphon Bak. (Liliaceae) and Laudolphia buchananii (Hall.f) Stapf. (Apocynaceae) are documented from this region forthefirst time for the treatment of malaria. These results become a basis for selection of plants for further pharmacological, toxicological and phytochemical studies in developing new plant based antimalarial drugs.

Muthomi JW, Musyimi SL, Wagacha JM, Narla RD. "Occurrence of Fusarium species and associated T2-toxin in Kenyan wheat." Agricultural Sciences. 2012;3(1):24-34.
W DRMUTHOMIJAMES. "Muthomi J. W., Mureithi B. K., Chemining.". In: International Journal of AgriScience. International Academic Journals; 2012.
2011
Nderitu JH, Muthomi JW. Curricula for Agricultural Value Chain Development for Universities and Colleges. Nairobi, Kenya: Gesellschaft Fuer Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) and Promotion of Private Sector Development in Agriculture (PSDA); 2011.
Muthomi JW, Gachu SM, Narla RD, Nderitu JH. "Management of thrips in bulb onions using vegetable intercrops.". In: aGRO 2011 Inaugural Biennial Conference. Faculty of Agriculture, University of Nairobi, Nairobi, Kenya; 2011.management_of_thrips_thrips_tabaci_in_bulb_onion_by_use_of_vegetable_intercrops.pdf
Kimani E, Kigamwa J, Chege F, Muthomi J. "Bridging phytosanitary capacity through the Centre of Phytosanitary Excellence (COPE).". In: aGRO 2011 Inaugural Biennial Conference, Faculty of Agriculture. Faculty of Agriculture, University of Nairobi, Kenya; 2011.
Muthomi JW, Muindi EM, Nderitu JH, Olubayo FM, Kabira JN, Chemining'wa GN. "Integrated management of aphid-transmitted viruses in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.).". In: aGRO 2011 Inaugural Biennial Conference, Faculty of Agriculture. Faculty of Agriculture, University of Nairobi, Kenya; 2011.
Mureithi BK, Muthomi JW, Chemining'wa GN, undefined. "Predisposing factors to aflatoxin contamination of maize in Estern Kenya.". In: aGRO 2011 Inaugural Biennial Conference, Faculty of Agriculture. Faculty of Agriculture, University of Nairobi, Kenya; 2011.identification_of_predisposing_factors_to_aflatoxin_contamination_of_maize_value_chain_in_eastern_kenya.2.pdf
Chemining'wa GN, Wahome PK, Muthomi JW. "Soil fertility status and nodulation of selected legumes in farmer’ fields in south-eastern Kenya.". In: aGRO 2011 Inaugural Biennial Conference, Faculty of Agriculture. Faculty of Agriculture, University of Nairobi; 2011.
Wagacha JM, Steiner U, Dehne H-W, Muthomi JW, Oerke E-C. "Variation in susceptibility of wheat parts to major Fusarium head blight pathogens.". In: aGRO 2011 Inaugural Biennial Conference, Faculty of Agriculture. Faculty of Agriculture, University of Nairobi, Kenya; 2011.variation_in_susceptibility_of_wheat_parts_to_major_fusarium_head_blight_pathogens.pdf
Kwach JK;, Onyango MA;, Muthomi JW;, Nderitu JH. "Baseline survey for status of Banana Xanthomonas Wilt in Kenya."; 2011.
Birithia R;, Subramanian S;, Pappu HR;, Sseruwagi P;, Muthomi JW;, Narla RD. "First Report of Iris yellow spot virus Infecting Onion in Kenya and Uganda."; 2011. Abstract

Onion (Allium cepa L.) is one of the key vegetables produced by small-holder farmers for the domestic markets in Sub-Saharan Africa. Biotic factors, including infestation by thrips pests such as Thrips tabaci Lindeman, can inflict as much as 60% yield loss. Iris yellow spot virus (IYSV; family Bunyaviridae, genus Tospovirus) transmitted by T. tabaci is an economically important viral pathogen of bulb and seed onion crops in many onion-growing areas of the world (2,4). In Africa, IYSV has been reported in Reunion (1) and South Africa (3). In September 2009, symptoms suspected to be caused by IYSV were observed on onions and leeks cultivated in Nairobi, Kenya. Symptoms consisted of spindle-shaped, straw-colored, irregular chlorotic lesions with occasional green islands on the leaves. The presence of the virus was confirmed with IYSV-specific Agdia Flash kits (Agdia Inc., Elkart, IN). Subsequently, surveys were undertaken in small-holder farms in onion production areas of Makueni (January 2010) and Mwea (August 2010) in Kenya and Kasese (January 2010) and Rwimi (January 2010) in Uganda. The incidence of disease in these locations ranged between 27 and 72%. Onion leaves showing symptoms of IYSV infection collected from both locations tested positive for the virus by double-antibody sandwich-ELISA with IYSV-specific antiserum (Agdia Inc). IYSV infection was confirmed by reverse transcription-PCR with primers IYSV-465c: 5′-AGCAAAGTGAGAGGACCACC-3′ and IYSV-239f: 5′-TGAGCCCCAATCAAGACG3′ (3) as forward and reverse primers, respectively. Amplicons of approximately 240 bp were obtained from all symptomatic test samples but not from healthy and water controls. The amplicons were cloned and sequenced from each of the sampled regions. Consensus sequence for each isolate was derived from at least three clones. The IYSV-Kenya isolate (GenBank Accession No. HQ711616) had the highest nucleotide sequence identity of 97% with the corresponding region of IYSV isolates from Sri Lanka (GenBank Accession No. GU901211), followed by the isolates from India (GenBank Accession Nos. EU310287 and EU310290). The IYSV-Uganda isolate (GenBank Accession No. HQ711615) showed the highest nucleotide sequence identity of 95% with the corresponding region of IYSV isolates from Sri Lanka (GenBank Accession No. GU901211) and India (95% with GenBank Accession Nos. EU310274 and EU310297). To our knowledge, this is the first report of IYSV infecting onion in Kenya and Uganda. Further surveys and monitoring of IYSV incidence and distribution in the region, along with its impact on the yield, are under investigation.

Muthomi JW, Kinyungu TN, Nderitu JH, Olubayo FM, Kabira JN. "Spatial Arrangement Of Maize As Border Crop To Manage Aphids And Aphid-Transmitted Viruses In Potato.". 2011. Abstract

Field experiments were conducted over two growing seasons to determine the effect of spatial arrangement of maize as border crop to manage aphid infestation and aphid-transmitted virus diseases in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.). Maize was planted at a distance of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5 and 3.0 m from the potato crop. Aphid infestation and incidence of virus infection was monitored over the growth period of potato. Aphids were recorded on potato leaves and in water pan traps while virus infection was determined by visual symptoms on the potato plant. At harvest, potato tubers were graded into ware, seed, and chatts and weighed. The results show that placement of maize border up to 0.5 m and 1.0 m reduced aphid population and virus disease incidence by up to 48%. The maize borders had no effect on the yield of seed potato grade but only on the ware. Placing maize border at 0.5m had the greatest reduction of ware potato yield by 48%. Maize borders placed up to 1m from the potato crop would be effective in the management of potato aphids and aphid-transmitted virus diseases. This study shows that the technology would be ideal for propagation plots in small scale seed potato production.

W DRMUTHOMIJAMES. "Birithia, R. L., Subramanian, S., Muthomi, J., and Narla, R. D. 2010. Distribution of the tospovirus Iris Yellow Spot Virus infecting onions in Kenya. 10th Horticultural Association of Kenya (HAK) Workshop on Sustainable Horticultural Production in the Tr.". In: 10th Horticultural Association of Kenya (HAK) Workshop on Sustainable Horticultural Production in the Tropics: Analysis of Production Chains of Ornamentals for the Local Market and For Export. 8th - 11th December 2010, Jomo Kenyatta University of Agricult. Horticultural Association of Kenya (HAK); 2011.
W DRMUTHOMIJAMES. "Chemining.". In: African Journal of Horticultural Science 5: 92-97. Horticultural Association of Kenya; 2011.
W DRMUTHOMIJAMES. "Subramanian, S., H.R. Pappu, R. Birithia, O. Shem, J. Muthomi, P. Sseruwagi, R.D. Narla. 2011. Diversity and distribution of Iris yellow spot virus infecting onion in Eastern Africa. 4th Conference of the International Working Group on Legume and Vegetabl.". In: 4th Conference of the International Working Group on Legume and Vegetable Viruses (IWGLVV), May 17-20, 2011 - Antequera, M. International Working Group on Legume and Vegetable Viruses (IWGLVV); 2011.
2010
Chege F, Day R, T R, A S, Muthomi J, W O, E K, R N, J.G M’E, J J, F O, Mohamed R. "A new partnership in phytosanitary capacity development for protecting agriculture and supporting trade in Africa: The Centre of Phytosanitary Excellence (COPE).". In: 12th KARI Biennial Scientific Conference. KARI Headquarters, Nairobi, Kenya; 2010.
Birithia R, Subramanian S, Muthomi JW, Narla RD. "Distribution of the tospovirus Iris Yellow Spot Virus infecting onions in Kenya.". In: Tenth Horticultural Association of Kenya (HAK) Workshop on Sustainable Horticultural Production in the Tropics: Analysis of Production Chains of Ornamentals for the Local Market and For Export. Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology (JKUAT), Juja, Kenya; 2010.
Birithia RL;, Subramanian S;, Muthomi J;, Narla RD. "Distribution Of The Tospovirus Iris Yellow Spot Virus Infecting Onions In Kenya.".; 2010.
Maina J, Steiner U, H.DEHNE, Zuehlke S, M.SPITELLER, Muthomi J, OERKE E. "Diversity in mycotoxins and fungal spp infecting wheat in Nakuru." INSTITUTE OF SCINCE AND RESOURCE CONSERVATION. 2010;158(1439):527-537.diversity_in_mycotoxins_and_fungal_spp_infecting_wheat_in_nakuru.pdf
W DRMUTHOMIJAMES. "Muthomi, J. W., Mureithi, B. K., Chemining.". In: 12th KARI Biennial Conference, 8th-12th November 2010, Nairobi, Kenya. 12th KARI Biennial Conference Proceedings; 2010.
2009
Chemining'wa GN, Nderitu, John H, Olubayo FM, Kabira JN, Kiretai SM, Kabira JN. "Use of cereal border crops in management of aphid-transmitted viral diseases during seed potato (Solanum tuberosum) production.". 2009.Website
W DRMUTHOMIJAMES. "Muindi, E. M., Muthomi, J. W., Nderitu, J. H., Olubayo, F. M., Kabira, J. N., Chemining.". In: African Journal of Horticultural Science. Horticultural Association of Kenya; 2009. Abstract
Field experiments were conducted to investigate the response of grain legumes to rhizobia inoculation, farmyard manure and inorganic fertilizer nitrogen. The grain legumes were common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.var GLP 2), lima bean (Phaseolus lunatus L.), green gram (Vigna radiate L.) and lablab (Lablab purpureus L.). The experimental design was a randomized complete block design with split plot arrangement and replicated thrice. Parameters determined were the number of nodules and nodule dry weight per plant, seed yield and yield components. Nitrogen fertilizer application significantly reduced the number of nodules in most of the legume species. In contrast, rhizobia inoculation increased number of nodules and nodule dry matter in most species but this was not translated into increase in plant growth or grain yield. Application of manure improved nodulation and grain yield only in the short rains. However, fertilizer application significantly increased dry matter in both seasons and total grain yield during short rains. The study indicated that the effect of rhizobia inoculation, farmyard manure and nitrogen fertilizer on grain legumes is variable depending on species, parameter being measured and other environmental factors. Keywords: Dry matter, grain legumes, grain yield, nitrogen source, nodulation.
W DRMUTHOMIJAMES. "Muthomi, J. W., L. N. Njenga, J. K. Gathumbi and G. N. Chemining.". In: Plant Pathology Journal. Asian Network for Scientific Information; 2009. Abstract
Field experiments were conducted to investigate the response of grain legumes to rhizobia inoculation, farmyard manure and inorganic fertilizer nitrogen. The grain legumes were common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.var GLP 2), lima bean (Phaseolus lunatus L.), green gram (Vigna radiate L.) and lablab (Lablab purpureus L.). The experimental design was a randomized complete block design with split plot arrangement and replicated thrice. Parameters determined were the number of nodules and nodule dry weight per plant, seed yield and yield components. Nitrogen fertilizer application significantly reduced the number of nodules in most of the legume species. In contrast, rhizobia inoculation increased number of nodules and nodule dry matter in most species but this was not translated into increase in plant growth or grain yield. Application of manure improved nodulation and grain yield only in the short rains. However, fertilizer application significantly increased dry matter in both seasons and total grain yield during short rains. The study indicated that the effect of rhizobia inoculation, farmyard manure and nitrogen fertilizer on grain legumes is variable depending on species, parameter being measured and other environmental factors. Keywords: Dry matter, grain legumes, grain yield, nitrogen source, nodulation.
W DRMUTHOMIJAMES. "Muthomi, J. W., Nyaga, J. N., Olubayo, F. M., Nderitu, J. H., Kabira, J. N., Kiretai, S. M., Aura, J. A. and Wakahiu, M. 2009. Incidence of aphid-transmitted viruses in farmer-based seed potato production in Kenya. Asian Journal of Plant Sciences 8(2): 16.". In: Asian Journal of Plant Sciences 8(2): 166-171. 12th KARI Biennial Conference Proceedings; 2009. Abstract
Field studies were carried out in farmer-based seed potato production to determine the incidence of potato aphids and potato aphid-transmitted viruses in two potato-producing areas of Kenya. Parameters determined included aphid population, virus disease incidence and tuber yield. Aphid population was monitored on leaves and in water-pan traps. Virus infection was determined based on symptoms and the viruses were identified in tubers sprouts by DAS-ELISA. Tuber yield was determined for plants showing virus symptoms and healthy-looking plants. Five aphid species were identified, with the most abundant being M. euphorbiae and A. gossypii on leaves and M. persicae and A. gossypii in water traps. The average aphid population was between 1.4 and 4.2 aphids per three leaves and 4.68 and 9.64 aphids per water. Farms with higher population of M. persicae had higher virus disease incidence. The most prevalent viruses were PVS, PLRV and PVM. Healthy looking plants had a latent infection rate 57.2% compared to 76.6% for symptomatic plants. Virus infection reduced the number and weight of tubers by 74% and 62.7%, respectively. However, virus infection increased the number and weight of the chats grade. The results indicated that aphid infestation and virus disease incidence were higher than the recommended for seed potato production. Therefore, there is need to create awareness among the farmers on aphid and virus symptom recognition and use of clean certified seed potato.
W DRMUTHOMIJAMES. "Otieno, P. E., Muthomi, J. W., Chemining.". In: Journal of Biological Sciences 9 (4): 326-332. 12th KARI Biennial Conference Proceedings; 2009. Abstract
Field experiments were conducted to investigate the response of grain legumes to rhizobia inoculation, farmyard manure and inorganic fertilizer nitrogen. The grain legumes were common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.var GLP 2), lima bean (Phaseolus lunatus L.), green gram (Vigna radiate L.) and lablab (Lablab purpureus L.). The experimental design was a randomized complete block design with split plot arrangement and replicated thrice. Parameters determined were the number of nodules and nodule dry weight per plant, seed yield and yield components. Nitrogen fertilizer application significantly reduced the number of nodules in most of the legume species. In contrast, rhizobia inoculation increased number of nodules and nodule dry matter in most species but this was not translated into increase in plant growth or grain yield. Application of manure improved nodulation and grain yield only in the short rains. However, fertilizer application significantly increased dry matter in both seasons and total grain yield during short rains. The study indicated that the effect of rhizobia inoculation, farmyard manure and nitrogen fertilizer on grain legumes is variable depending on species, parameter being measured and other environmental factors. Keywords: Dry matter, grain legumes, grain yield, nitrogen source, nodulation.
2008
Muthomi JW, Ndung'u JK, Gathumbi JK, Mutitu EW, Wagacha JM. "The occurrence of Fusarium species and mycotoxins in Kenyan wheat.". 2008. Abstract

presence of head blight-causing Fusarium species. Fungal contaminationwas determined by isolation on agar media, while mycotoxin analysis was by direct competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The wheat grain samples were highly contaminated with fungi, especially Epicoccum, Alternaria and Fusarium species. The mean Fusarium infection rate varied from 13% to 18%, with the major head blight-causing species being Fusarium poae, Fusarium graminearum, Fusarium equiseti and Fusarium avenaceum. F. graminearum isolates were found to be highly virulent (79% disease severity) and significantly reduced kernel weight. Most grain samples were contaminated with mycotoxins, with a mean incidence rate of up to 75% for deoxynivalenol (DON) and 86% for T-2 toxin. Other mycotoxins detected were zearalenone and aflatoxin B1. Co-occurrence of DON, T-2 toxin and zearalenone was found in up to 35% of the samples. The results suggested the presence of Fusarium head blight and associated mycotoxins in Kenya. The presence of several mycotoxins, even at such low levels, could pose chronic adverse health effects to human and livestock fed on the contaminated wheat products.

W DRMUTHOMIJAMES. "Muindi, E. M., Muthomi, J. W., Nderitu, J. H., Olubayo, F. M., Kabira, J. N., Cheminin.". In: 11th KARI Biennial Scientific Conference, 10. Horticultural Association of Kenya; 2008.
W DRMUTHOMIJAMES. "Muthomi J. W., P. E. Otieno, G. N. Chemining.". In: Journal of Entomology, 5(3): 156-163. Academic Journals; 2008. Abstract
Effectiveness of dimethoate 40 EC and copper oxychloride in the management of legume pests and diseases was tested in field experiments during 2005 growing seasons. Grain legumes used were common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. var GLP 2), lima bean (Phaseolus lunatus L.), green gram (Vigna radiate L.), lablab (Lablab purpureus L.) and chickpea (Cicer arietinum). The experimental design was a randomized complete block design in a split plot replicated thrice. The parameters observed were insect pest incidence, number of pods per plant, percent seed damage and total grain yield. Pesticides spray significantly reduced the incidence of insect pests like flower thrips, African bollworm and legume pod borer. Pod and seed damage were significantly reduced in lablab, chickpea and green gram. Only lablab, chickpea and green gram showed significant increase in number of pods per plant and total seed yield resulting from pesticide spray. In addition, the quality of yield increased through reduction of shrivelled and discoloured seed due to diseases. The study showed that the use of dimethoate and copper oxychloride is beneficial for the management of the common insect pests and diseases in legumes. However, studies on the optimum number of sprays, time of application and use of other control measures that are ecologically viable for the management of the pests ought to be done.
W DRMUTHOMIJAMES. "Muthomi J. W., P. E. Otieno, G. N. Chemining.". In: Journal of Entomology, 5(3): 156-163. Asian Network for Scientific Information; 2008.
W DRMUTHOMIJAMES. "Muthomi, J. W., G. M. Riungu, J. K. Ndung.". In: Journal of Plant Sciences 3 (1): 52-60. Academic Journals; 2008.
W DRMUTHOMIJAMES. "Muthomi, J. W., G. M. Riungu, J. K. Ndung.". In: Journal of Plant Sciences 3 (1): 52-60. Asian Network for Scientific Information; 2008.
W DRMUTHOMIJAMES. "Muthomi, J. W., G. M. Riungu, J. K. Ndung.". In: 10th International Fusarium Workshop and the Fusarium Genomics Workshop, 30th August-2nd September 2008, Alghero (Sardinia), Italy. Asian Network for Scientific Information; 2008.
W DRMUTHOMIJAMES. "Muthomi, J. W., Nderitu, J. H., Olubayo, F. M., Muindi, E. M, Kabira, J. N., Kiretai, S. M. and Aura, J. A. 2008. Management of aphid-transmitted virus diseases in seed potato production by use of border crops and insecticides. 8th Horticultural Associati.". In: 8th Horticultural Association of Kenya (HAK) workshop, Masinde Muliro University of Science and Technology, 8th-11th December 2008, Kakamega, Kenya. Horticultural Association of Kenya; 2008.
W DRMUTHOMIJAMES. "Muthomi, J. W., Ndung.". In: Crop Protection 27(8): 1215-1219. Asian Network for Scientific Information; 2008.
W DRMUTHOMIJAMES. "Muthomi, J. W., Ndung.". In: Crop Protection 27(8): 1215-1219. Asian Network for Scientific Information; 2008.
W DRMUTHOMIJAMES. "Muthomi, J. W., Njenga, L. N., Gathumbi, J. K. and Chemining.". In: 11th KARI Biennial Scientific Conference, 10. Kenya Agricultural Research Institute; 2008.
W DRMUTHOMIJAMES. "Wagacha J. M. and J. W. Muthomi. 2008. Mycotoxin problem in Africa: Current status, implications to food safety and health and possible management strategies. International Journal of Food Microbiology 124: 1-12.". In: International Journal of Food Microbiology 124: 1-12. Academic Journals; 2008. Abstract
Mycotoxins are toxic secondary metabolites of fungal origin and contaminate agricultural commodities before or under post-harvest conditions. They are mainly produced by fungi in the Aspergillus, Penicillium and Fusarium genera. When ingested, inhaled or absorbed through the skin, mycotoxins cause lowered performance, sickness or death on humans and animals. Factors that contribute to mycotoxin contamination of food and feed in Africa include environmental, socio-economic and food production. Environmental conditions especially high humidity and temperatures favour fungal proliferation resulting in contamination of food and feed. The socio-economic status of majority of inhabitants of Sub-Saharan Africa pre-dispose them to consumption of mycotoxin contaminated products either directly or at various points in the food chain. The resulting implications include immuno-suppression, impaired growth, various cancers and death depending on the type, period and amount of exposure. A synergistic effect between mycotoxin exposure and some important diseases in the continent such as malaria, kwashiorkor and HIV/AIDS have been suggested. Mycotoxin concerns have grown during the last few decades because of their implications to human and animal health, productivity, economics of their management and trade. This has led to development of maximum tolerated limits for mycotoxins in various countries. Even with the standards in place, the greatest recorded fatal mycotoxin-poisoning outbreak caused by contamination of maize with aflatoxins occurred in Africa in 2004. Pre-harvest practices; time of harvesting; handling of produce during harvesting; moisture levels at harvesting, transportation, marketing and processing; insect damage all contribute to mycotoxin contamination. Possible intervention strategies include good agricultural practices such as early harvesting, proper drying, sanitation, proper storage and insect management among others. Other possible interventions include biological control, chemical control, decontamination, breeding for resistance as well as surveillance and awareness creation. There is need for efficient, cost-effective sampling and analytical methods that can be used for detection analysis of mycotoxins in developing countries.
2007
Muthomi JW;, Otieno PE;, Chemining'wa GN;, Nderitu JH. "Effect of chemical pesticide spray on insect pests and yield of food grain legumes."; 2007.
Muthomi JW;, Riungu GM;, Ndung'u JK;, Narla RD. "Occurrence of wheat head blight and fusarium species infecting wheat."; 2007.
Nyaga JN;, Muthomi JW;, Olubayo FM;, Nderitu JH. "Seed potato production and occurrence of Transmitted viruses in Nyandarua District."; 2007.
W DRMUTHOMIJAMES. "Chemining.". In: Asian Journal of Plant Sciences, 6(7):1113-1118. Kenya Agricultural Research Institute; 2007.
W DRMUTHOMIJAMES. "Chemining.". In: Botswana Journal of Agriculture and Applied Sciences 3 (2): 164-169. Asian network for Scientific Information; 2007.
W DRMUTHOMIJAMES. "Muthomi, J. W., G. N. Riungu and J. M. Wagacha. 2007. Management of Fusarium head blight of wheat using antagonistic microorganisms. Tropentag 2007, October 9-11, Witzenhausen, Germany; Book of abstracts pp516. http://www.tropentag.de/2007/abstracts/full/.". In: Tropentag 2007, October 9-11, Witzenhausen, Germany; Book of abstracts pp516. African Crop Science Society; 2007. Abstract
Fusarium culmorum is an important pathogen of wheat causing seedling blight, foot rot, and head blight (FHB) or scab. The pathogen is dominant in cooler areas like north, central and western Europe. The fungus reproduces asexually by means of conidia, which form the main mode of dispersal. Head blight is by far the most serious concern of Fusarium infection on pre-harvest wheat and other small grain cereals. The significance of F. culmorum in wheat production is attributed to both head blight and mycotoxin contamination of the grain harvested from infected ears. Ear infection mainly occurs during anthesis and is favoured by wet weather or high humidity and warm temperatures. The major mycotoxins produced by F. culmorum are deoxynivalenol, nivalenol and zearalenone, which are a potential health hazard for both humans and animals. The mycotoxins, especially deoxynivalenol, are believed to play a role in disease development. Available options of managing Fusarium head blight include use of fungicides, cultural practices, resistant varieties and biological agents. However, no wheat variety is completely resistant to Fusarium head blight while fungicides are at most 70% effective against natural infection. This review seeks to document and infer information on F. culmorum, with special emphasis on wheat head blight infection process, mechanisms of mycotoxin production, the role the mycotoxins play in pathogenesis, and the possible management options.
W DRMUTHOMIJAMES. "Muthomi, J. W., Hindorf, H., Ndung.". In: Journal of Plant Diseases and Protection, 114:39. Kenya Agricultural Research Institute; 2007. Abstract
A survey was carried out during 2004 harvesting season in five agroecological zones in Nakuru and 4 agroecological zones in Nyandarua district. Fusarium species were isolated from wheat kernels and were identified based on cultural and morphological characteristics. Mycotoxin content in the wheat grains was determined by direct competitive Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay.The major fungal genera isolated from wheat grain samples were Epicoccum, Alternaria, Fusarium, Aspergillus and Penicillium. Fusarium species isolated were F. poae, F. chlamydosporum, F. oxysporum, F. graminearum, F. equiseti, F. moniliforme, F. avenaceum, F. semitectum, F. crookwellense, F. lateratium, F. sporotrichioides, F. scirpi, F. sambucinum and F. solani.Most of the wheat grain samples were contaminated with mycotoxins deoxynivalenol, T-2 toxin and zearalenone. The incidence and levels of the mycotoxins varied in samples from different agro-ecological zones.The study showed that Fusarium head blight pathogens are highly prevalent in the wheat-growing district of Nakuru and Nyandarua.
W DRMUTHOMIJAMES. "Muthomi, J. W., Ndung.". In: Asian Journal of Plant Sciences 6 (4): 585-591. Asian network for Scientific Information; 2007.
W DRMUTHOMIJAMES. "Muthomi, J. W., Otieno, P. E., Chemining.". In: African Crop Science Conference Proceedings 8: 981-986. African Crop Science Society; 2007. Abstract
Fusarium culmorum is an important pathogen of wheat causing seedling blight, foot rot, and head blight (FHB) or scab. The pathogen is dominant in cooler areas like north, central and western Europe. The fungus reproduces asexually by means of conidia, which form the main mode of dispersal. Head blight is by far the most serious concern of Fusarium infection on pre-harvest wheat and other small grain cereals. The significance of F. culmorum in wheat production is attributed to both head blight and mycotoxin contamination of the grain harvested from infected ears. Ear infection mainly occurs during anthesis and is favoured by wet weather or high humidity and warm temperatures. The major mycotoxins produced by F. culmorum are deoxynivalenol, nivalenol and zearalenone, which are a potential health hazard for both humans and animals. The mycotoxins, especially deoxynivalenol, are believed to play a role in disease development. Available options of managing Fusarium head blight include use of fungicides, cultural practices, resistant varieties and biological agents. However, no wheat variety is completely resistant to Fusarium head blight while fungicides are at most 70% effective against natural infection. This review seeks to document and infer information on F. culmorum, with special emphasis on wheat head blight infection process, mechanisms of mycotoxin production, the role the mycotoxins play in pathogenesis, and the possible management options.
W DRMUTHOMIJAMES. "Muthomi, J. W., P. E. Otieno, G. N. Chemining.". In: Journal of Biological Sciences 7: 1163-1170. Asian network for Scientific Information; 2007. Abstract
Greenhouse experiments were conducted over two cropping cycles to investigate the effect of fungicide seed treatment and fungal root rot pathogens on nodulation and dry matter accumulation of selected food legumes. The legumes were common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. variety GLP 2), green gram (Vigna radiata L. variety M66) and lablab (Lablab purpureus L.). Treatments included, inoculation of legumes with pathogen alone (Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. phaseoli or Macrophomina phaseolina or Sclerotinia sclerotiorum or Rhizoctonia solani), or with appropriate rhizobia alone or application of fungicide (copper oxychloride) or their combinations. Results of the study indicated that fungicide seed treatment reduced disease incidence on Sclerotinia and Rhizoctonia inoculated plants. However, fungicide treatment significantly (p=0.05) depressed nodulation of the legumes but its effect on nodulation was significantly suppressed when applied together with rhizobia on treated seeds. Fungicide application significantly reduced seedlings mortality (pre-emergence damping off) and number of nodules per plant but had no effect on dry matter accumulation. Combination of fungicide and rhizobia inoculation improved nodulation and reduced disease incidence. It is therefore concluded that this combination yields better results if the aim is to reduce root rot incidence while improving nodulation concurrently.
W DRMUTHOMIJAMES. "Muthomi, J. W., Riungu, G. M., Ndung.". In: African Crop Science Conference Proceedings 8: 863-867. African Crop Science Society; 2007. Abstract
Fusarium culmorum is an important pathogen of wheat causing seedling blight, foot rot, and head blight (FHB) or scab. The pathogen is dominant in cooler areas like north, central and western Europe. The fungus reproduces asexually by means of conidia, which form the main mode of dispersal. Head blight is by far the most serious concern of Fusarium infection on pre-harvest wheat and other small grain cereals. The significance of F. culmorum in wheat production is attributed to both head blight and mycotoxin contamination of the grain harvested from infected ears. Ear infection mainly occurs during anthesis and is favoured by wet weather or high humidity and warm temperatures. The major mycotoxins produced by F. culmorum are deoxynivalenol, nivalenol and zearalenone, which are a potential health hazard for both humans and animals. The mycotoxins, especially deoxynivalenol, are believed to play a role in disease development. Available options of managing Fusarium head blight include use of fungicides, cultural practices, resistant varieties and biological agents. However, no wheat variety is completely resistant to Fusarium head blight while fungicides are at most 70% effective against natural infection. This review seeks to document and infer information on F. culmorum, with special emphasis on wheat head blight infection process, mechanisms of mycotoxin production, the role the mycotoxins play in pathogenesis, and the possible management options.
W DRMUTHOMIJAMES. "Otieno, P. E., Muthomi, J. W., Chemining.". In: African Crop Science Conference Proceedings 8: 305-312. African Crop Science Society; 2007. Abstract
Fusarium culmorum is an important pathogen of wheat causing seedling blight, foot rot, and head blight (FHB) or scab. The pathogen is dominant in cooler areas like north, central and western Europe. The fungus reproduces asexually by means of conidia, which form the main mode of dispersal. Head blight is by far the most serious concern of Fusarium infection on pre-harvest wheat and other small grain cereals. The significance of F. culmorum in wheat production is attributed to both head blight and mycotoxin contamination of the grain harvested from infected ears. Ear infection mainly occurs during anthesis and is favoured by wet weather or high humidity and warm temperatures. The major mycotoxins produced by F. culmorum are deoxynivalenol, nivalenol and zearalenone, which are a potential health hazard for both humans and animals. The mycotoxins, especially deoxynivalenol, are believed to play a role in disease development. Available options of managing Fusarium head blight include use of fungicides, cultural practices, resistant varieties and biological agents. However, no wheat variety is completely resistant to Fusarium head blight while fungicides are at most 70% effective against natural infection. This review seeks to document and infer information on F. culmorum, with special emphasis on wheat head blight infection process, mechanisms of mycotoxin production, the role the mycotoxins play in pathogenesis, and the possible management options.
W DRMUTHOMIJAMES. "Riungu, G. M., Muthomi, J. W. and Narla, R. D. 2007. Effect of antagonistic microorganisms on severity of Fusarium head blight of wheat and grain yield. African Crop Science Conference Proceedings 8: 827-832.". In: African Crop Science Conference Proceedings 8: 827-832. African Crop Science Society; 2007. Abstract
Fusarium culmorum is an important pathogen of wheat causing seedling blight, foot rot, and head blight (FHB) or scab. The pathogen is dominant in cooler areas like north, central and western Europe. The fungus reproduces asexually by means of conidia, which form the main mode of dispersal. Head blight is by far the most serious concern of Fusarium infection on pre-harvest wheat and other small grain cereals. The significance of F. culmorum in wheat production is attributed to both head blight and mycotoxin contamination of the grain harvested from infected ears. Ear infection mainly occurs during anthesis and is favoured by wet weather or high humidity and warm temperatures. The major mycotoxins produced by F. culmorum are deoxynivalenol, nivalenol and zearalenone, which are a potential health hazard for both humans and animals. The mycotoxins, especially deoxynivalenol, are believed to play a role in disease development. Available options of managing Fusarium head blight include use of fungicides, cultural practices, resistant varieties and biological agents. However, no wheat variety is completely resistant to Fusarium head blight while fungicides are at most 70% effective against natural infection. This review seeks to document and infer information on F. culmorum, with special emphasis on wheat head blight infection process, mechanisms of mycotoxin production, the role the mycotoxins play in pathogenesis, and the possible management options.
W DRMUTHOMIJAMES. "Wagacha, J. M, and Muthomi, J. W. 2007. Fusarium culmorum: Infection process, mechanisms of mycotoxin production and their role in pathogenesis in wheat. Crop Protection 26: 877-885.". In: Crop Protection 26: 877-885. Elsevier Ltd, UK; 2007. Abstract
Fusarium culmorum is an important pathogen of wheat causing seedling blight, foot rot, and head blight (FHB) or scab. The pathogen is dominant in cooler areas like north, central and western Europe. The fungus reproduces asexually by means of conidia, which form the main mode of dispersal. Head blight is by far the most serious concern of Fusarium infection on pre-harvest wheat and other small grain cereals. The significance of F. culmorum in wheat production is attributed to both head blight and mycotoxin contamination of the grain harvested from infected ears. Ear infection mainly occurs during anthesis and is favoured by wet weather or high humidity and warm temperatures. The major mycotoxins produced by F. culmorum are deoxynivalenol, nivalenol and zearalenone, which are a potential health hazard for both humans and animals. The mycotoxins, especially deoxynivalenol, are believed to play a role in disease development. Available options of managing Fusarium head blight include use of fungicides, cultural practices, resistant varieties and biological agents. However, no wheat variety is completely resistant to Fusarium head blight while fungicides are at most 70% effective against natural infection. This review seeks to document and infer information on F. culmorum, with special emphasis on wheat head blight infection process, mechanisms of mycotoxin production, the role the mycotoxins play in pathogenesis, and the possible management options.
W DRMUTHOMIJAMES. "Wagacha, J. M., J. W. Muthomi and E. W. Mutitu. 2001. Control of bean rust using antibiotics produced by Bacillus and Streptomyces species - Translocation and persistence in snap bean. Journal of Applied Science and Environmental Management 11(2):165-168.". In: Journal of Applied Science and Environmental Management. Journal of Applied Science and Environmental Management; 2007. Abstract
Fusarium culmorum is an important pathogen of wheat causing seedling blight, foot rot, and head blight (FHB) or scab. The pathogen is dominant in cooler areas like north, central and western Europe. The fungus reproduces asexually by means of conidia, which form the main mode of dispersal. Head blight is by far the most serious concern of Fusarium infection on pre-harvest wheat and other small grain cereals. The significance of F. culmorum in wheat production is attributed to both head blight and mycotoxin contamination of the grain harvested from infected ears. Ear infection mainly occurs during anthesis and is favoured by wet weather or high humidity and warm temperatures. The major mycotoxins produced by F. culmorum are deoxynivalenol, nivalenol and zearalenone, which are a potential health hazard for both humans and animals. The mycotoxins, especially deoxynivalenol, are believed to play a role in disease development. Available options of managing Fusarium head blight include use of fungicides, cultural practices, resistant varieties and biological agents. However, no wheat variety is completely resistant to Fusarium head blight while fungicides are at most 70% effective against natural infection. This review seeks to document and infer information on F. culmorum, with special emphasis on wheat head blight infection process, mechanisms of mycotoxin production, the role the mycotoxins play in pathogenesis, and the possible management options.
2006
W DRMUTHOMIJAMES. "Chemining.". In: 10th KARI Biennial Scientific Conference, 113-17 November 2006, Nairobi, Kenya. Kenya Agricultural Research Institute; 2006. Abstract
Fusarium culmorum is an important pathogen of wheat causing seedling blight, foot rot, and head blight (FHB) or scab. The pathogen is dominant in cooler areas like north, central and western Europe. The fungus reproduces asexually by means of conidia, which form the main mode of dispersal. Head blight is by far the most serious concern of Fusarium infection on pre-harvest wheat and other small grain cereals. The significance of F. culmorum in wheat production is attributed to both head blight and mycotoxin contamination of the grain harvested from infected ears. Ear infection mainly occurs during anthesis and is favoured by wet weather or high humidity and warm temperatures. The major mycotoxins produced by F. culmorum are deoxynivalenol, nivalenol and zearalenone, which are a potential health hazard for both humans and animals. The mycotoxins, especially deoxynivalenol, are believed to play a role in disease development. Available options of managing Fusarium head blight include use of fungicides, cultural practices, resistant varieties and biological agents. However, no wheat variety is completely resistant to Fusarium head blight while fungicides are at most 70% effective against natural infection. This review seeks to document and infer information on F. culmorum, with special emphasis on wheat head blight infection process, mechanisms of mycotoxin production, the role the mycotoxins play in pathogenesis, and the possible management options.
W DRMUTHOMIJAMES. "Muthomi, J. and H. Hindorf. 2006. Occurrence of Fusarium head blight-causing pathogens and mycotoxins in Kenyan wheat. 9th European Fusarium Seminar, 19 .". In: 9th European Fusarium Seminar, 19 . Kenya Agricultural Research Institute; 2006. Abstract
Fusarium culmorum is an important pathogen of wheat causing seedling blight, foot rot, and head blight (FHB) or scab. The pathogen is dominant in cooler areas like north, central and western Europe. The fungus reproduces asexually by means of conidia, which form the main mode of dispersal. Head blight is by far the most serious concern of Fusarium infection on pre-harvest wheat and other small grain cereals. The significance of F. culmorum in wheat production is attributed to both head blight and mycotoxin contamination of the grain harvested from infected ears. Ear infection mainly occurs during anthesis and is favoured by wet weather or high humidity and warm temperatures. The major mycotoxins produced by F. culmorum are deoxynivalenol, nivalenol and zearalenone, which are a potential health hazard for both humans and animals. The mycotoxins, especially deoxynivalenol, are believed to play a role in disease development. Available options of managing Fusarium head blight include use of fungicides, cultural practices, resistant varieties and biological agents. However, no wheat variety is completely resistant to Fusarium head blight while fungicides are at most 70% effective against natural infection. This review seeks to document and infer information on F. culmorum, with special emphasis on wheat head blight infection process, mechanisms of mycotoxin production, the role the mycotoxins play in pathogenesis, and the possible management options.
W DRMUTHOMIJAMES. "Muthomi, J. W., J. K. Ndung.". In: 10th KARI Biennial Scientific Conference, 13-17 November 2006, Nairobi, Kenya. Kenya Agricultural Research Institute; 2006. Abstract
Fusarium culmorum is an important pathogen of wheat causing seedling blight, foot rot, and head blight (FHB) or scab. The pathogen is dominant in cooler areas like north, central and western Europe. The fungus reproduces asexually by means of conidia, which form the main mode of dispersal. Head blight is by far the most serious concern of Fusarium infection on pre-harvest wheat and other small grain cereals. The significance of F. culmorum in wheat production is attributed to both head blight and mycotoxin contamination of the grain harvested from infected ears. Ear infection mainly occurs during anthesis and is favoured by wet weather or high humidity and warm temperatures. The major mycotoxins produced by F. culmorum are deoxynivalenol, nivalenol and zearalenone, which are a potential health hazard for both humans and animals. The mycotoxins, especially deoxynivalenol, are believed to play a role in disease development. Available options of managing Fusarium head blight include use of fungicides, cultural practices, resistant varieties and biological agents. However, no wheat variety is completely resistant to Fusarium head blight while fungicides are at most 70% effective against natural infection. This review seeks to document and infer information on F. culmorum, with special emphasis on wheat head blight infection process, mechanisms of mycotoxin production, the role the mycotoxins play in pathogenesis, and the possible management options.
W DRMUTHOMIJAMES. "Muthomi, J. W., P. E. Otieno and G. N. Chemining.". In: 10th KARI Biennial Scientific Conference, 113-17 November 2006, Nairobi, Kenya. Kenya Agricultural Research Institute; 2006. Abstract
Fusarium culmorum is an important pathogen of wheat causing seedling blight, foot rot, and head blight (FHB) or scab. The pathogen is dominant in cooler areas like north, central and western Europe. The fungus reproduces asexually by means of conidia, which form the main mode of dispersal. Head blight is by far the most serious concern of Fusarium infection on pre-harvest wheat and other small grain cereals. The significance of F. culmorum in wheat production is attributed to both head blight and mycotoxin contamination of the grain harvested from infected ears. Ear infection mainly occurs during anthesis and is favoured by wet weather or high humidity and warm temperatures. The major mycotoxins produced by F. culmorum are deoxynivalenol, nivalenol and zearalenone, which are a potential health hazard for both humans and animals. The mycotoxins, especially deoxynivalenol, are believed to play a role in disease development. Available options of managing Fusarium head blight include use of fungicides, cultural practices, resistant varieties and biological agents. However, no wheat variety is completely resistant to Fusarium head blight while fungicides are at most 70% effective against natural infection. This review seeks to document and infer information on F. culmorum, with special emphasis on wheat head blight infection process, mechanisms of mycotoxin production, the role the mycotoxins play in pathogenesis, and the possible management options.
W DRMUTHOMIJAMES. "Ndung.". In: 10th KARI Biennial Scientific Conference, 113-17 November 2006, Nairobi, Kenya. Kenya Agricultural Research Institute; 2006. Abstract
Fusarium culmorum is an important pathogen of wheat causing seedling blight, foot rot, and head blight (FHB) or scab. The pathogen is dominant in cooler areas like north, central and western Europe. The fungus reproduces asexually by means of conidia, which form the main mode of dispersal. Head blight is by far the most serious concern of Fusarium infection on pre-harvest wheat and other small grain cereals. The significance of F. culmorum in wheat production is attributed to both head blight and mycotoxin contamination of the grain harvested from infected ears. Ear infection mainly occurs during anthesis and is favoured by wet weather or high humidity and warm temperatures. The major mycotoxins produced by F. culmorum are deoxynivalenol, nivalenol and zearalenone, which are a potential health hazard for both humans and animals. The mycotoxins, especially deoxynivalenol, are believed to play a role in disease development. Available options of managing Fusarium head blight include use of fungicides, cultural practices, resistant varieties and biological agents. However, no wheat variety is completely resistant to Fusarium head blight while fungicides are at most 70% effective against natural infection. This review seeks to document and infer information on F. culmorum, with special emphasis on wheat head blight infection process, mechanisms of mycotoxin production, the role the mycotoxins play in pathogenesis, and the possible management options.
W DRMUTHOMIJAMES. "Theuri, S. W. M., G. N. Chemining.". In: 10th KARI Biennial Scientific Conference, 13-17 November 2006, Nairobi, Kenya. Kenya Agricultural Research Institute; 2006. Abstract
Fusarium culmorum is an important pathogen of wheat causing seedling blight, foot rot, and head blight (FHB) or scab. The pathogen is dominant in cooler areas like north, central and western Europe. The fungus reproduces asexually by means of conidia, which form the main mode of dispersal. Head blight is by far the most serious concern of Fusarium infection on pre-harvest wheat and other small grain cereals. The significance of F. culmorum in wheat production is attributed to both head blight and mycotoxin contamination of the grain harvested from infected ears. Ear infection mainly occurs during anthesis and is favoured by wet weather or high humidity and warm temperatures. The major mycotoxins produced by F. culmorum are deoxynivalenol, nivalenol and zearalenone, which are a potential health hazard for both humans and animals. The mycotoxins, especially deoxynivalenol, are believed to play a role in disease development. Available options of managing Fusarium head blight include use of fungicides, cultural practices, resistant varieties and biological agents. However, no wheat variety is completely resistant to Fusarium head blight while fungicides are at most 70% effective against natural infection. This review seeks to document and infer information on F. culmorum, with special emphasis on wheat head blight infection process, mechanisms of mycotoxin production, the role the mycotoxins play in pathogenesis, and the possible management options.
2005
W DRMUTHOMIJAMES, N DRCHEMININGWAGEORGE. "Chemining.". In: 7th Biennial Conference of the African Crop Science Society, 5th . African Crop Science Society; 2005. Abstract
Fusarium culmorum is an important pathogen of wheat causing seedling blight, foot rot, and head blight (FHB) or scab. The pathogen is dominant in cooler areas like north, central and western Europe. The fungus reproduces asexually by means of conidia, which form the main mode of dispersal. Head blight is by far the most serious concern of Fusarium infection on pre-harvest wheat and other small grain cereals. The significance of F. culmorum in wheat production is attributed to both head blight and mycotoxin contamination of the grain harvested from infected ears. Ear infection mainly occurs during anthesis and is favoured by wet weather or high humidity and warm temperatures. The major mycotoxins produced by F. culmorum are deoxynivalenol, nivalenol and zearalenone, which are a potential health hazard for both humans and animals. The mycotoxins, especially deoxynivalenol, are believed to play a role in disease development. Available options of managing Fusarium head blight include use of fungicides, cultural practices, resistant varieties and biological agents. However, no wheat variety is completely resistant to Fusarium head blight while fungicides are at most 70% effective against natural infection. This review seeks to document and infer information on F. culmorum, with special emphasis on wheat head blight infection process, mechanisms of mycotoxin production, the role the mycotoxins play in pathogenesis, and the possible management options.
W DRMUTHOMIJAMES, N DRCHEMININGWAGEORGE. "Muthomi, J. W., J. K. Ndung.". In: African Crop Science Conference proceedings,7: 355-358. African Crop Science Society; 2005. Abstract
Fusarium culmorum is an important pathogen of wheat causing seedling blight, foot rot, and head blight (FHB) or scab. The pathogen is dominant in cooler areas like north, central and western Europe. The fungus reproduces asexually by means of conidia, which form the main mode of dispersal. Head blight is by far the most serious concern of Fusarium infection on pre-harvest wheat and other small grain cereals. The significance of F. culmorum in wheat production is attributed to both head blight and mycotoxin contamination of the grain harvested from infected ears. Ear infection mainly occurs during anthesis and is favoured by wet weather or high humidity and warm temperatures. The major mycotoxins produced by F. culmorum are deoxynivalenol, nivalenol and zearalenone, which are a potential health hazard for both humans and animals. The mycotoxins, especially deoxynivalenol, are believed to play a role in disease development. Available options of managing Fusarium head blight include use of fungicides, cultural practices, resistant varieties and biological agents. However, no wheat variety is completely resistant to Fusarium head blight while fungicides are at most 70% effective against natural infection. This review seeks to document and infer information on F. culmorum, with special emphasis on wheat head blight infection process, mechanisms of mycotoxin production, the role the mycotoxins play in pathogenesis, and the possible management options.
2003
Muthomi JW;, Mutitu EW. "Occurrence of mycotoxin producing Fusarium species and other fungi on wheat kernels harvest in selected districts of Kenya."; 2003. Abstract

Wheat samples collected from 5 wheat growing districts of Kenya were investigated for contamination by different fungi. Kernels were plated on agar media and the fungi that grew were identified by cultural and morphological characteristics to genus level. Fusarium isolates were identified to species level and isolates of F. graminearum were tested for mycotoxin production in culture. The major genera of fungi isolated according to decreasing frequency were Epicoccum (52.8%), Alternaria (34%), Fusarium (6%), Aspergillus (2.3%) and Penicillium (1.8%). The frequently isolated Epicoccum species was identified as E. purpurascenes. Cladosporium and Rhizopus spp. were also isolated at very low frequencies. The most frequently isolated Fusarium species were F. poae (43%), F. graminearum (39%), and F. avenaceum (8%). Other Fusarium species isolated were F. equiseti, F. oxysporum, F. camptoceras and F. chlamydosporium. Most isolates of F. graminearum produced mycotoxin deoxynivalenol and zearalenone. The isolated Fusarium species are known to cause head blight in wheat resulting in mycotoxin contamination of the grains. The results therefore indicated that head blight is widely distributed at low levels in the wheat growing areas investigated. This inoculum is potentially capable of producing severe infections under optimum weather conditions.

W DRMUTHOMIJAMES. "Muimui, K. K., P. M. Kimani, J. W. Muthomi and Chirwa, R. 2003. Breeding for resistance to angular leaf spot, common bacterial blight and rust in yellow, brown and tan bean types in southern, eastern and central Africa. 6th Biennial Conference of the Afri.". In: African Crop Science Conference proceedings,6: 81-84. African Crop Science Society; 2003. Abstract
Fusarium culmorum is an important pathogen of wheat causing seedling blight, foot rot, and head blight (FHB) or scab. The pathogen is dominant in cooler areas like north, central and western Europe. The fungus reproduces asexually by means of conidia, which form the main mode of dispersal. Head blight is by far the most serious concern of Fusarium infection on pre-harvest wheat and other small grain cereals. The significance of F. culmorum in wheat production is attributed to both head blight and mycotoxin contamination of the grain harvested from infected ears. Ear infection mainly occurs during anthesis and is favoured by wet weather or high humidity and warm temperatures. The major mycotoxins produced by F. culmorum are deoxynivalenol, nivalenol and zearalenone, which are a potential health hazard for both humans and animals. The mycotoxins, especially deoxynivalenol, are believed to play a role in disease development. Available options of managing Fusarium head blight include use of fungicides, cultural practices, resistant varieties and biological agents. However, no wheat variety is completely resistant to Fusarium head blight while fungicides are at most 70% effective against natural infection. This review seeks to document and infer information on F. culmorum, with special emphasis on wheat head blight infection process, mechanisms of mycotoxin production, the role the mycotoxins play in pathogenesis, and the possible management options.
W DRMUTHOMIJAMES. "Muthomi, J. W. and E. W. Mutitu. 2003. Occurrence of mycotoxin producing Fusarium species and other fungi on wheat kernels harvested in selected districts of Kenya. African Crop Science Conference proceedings,6: 335-339.". In: African Crop Science Conference proceedings,6: 335-339. African Crop Science Society; 2003. Abstract
Fusarium culmorum is an important pathogen of wheat causing seedling blight, foot rot, and head blight (FHB) or scab. The pathogen is dominant in cooler areas like north, central and western Europe. The fungus reproduces asexually by means of conidia, which form the main mode of dispersal. Head blight is by far the most serious concern of Fusarium infection on pre-harvest wheat and other small grain cereals. The significance of F. culmorum in wheat production is attributed to both head blight and mycotoxin contamination of the grain harvested from infected ears. Ear infection mainly occurs during anthesis and is favoured by wet weather or high humidity and warm temperatures. The major mycotoxins produced by F. culmorum are deoxynivalenol, nivalenol and zearalenone, which are a potential health hazard for both humans and animals. The mycotoxins, especially deoxynivalenol, are believed to play a role in disease development. Available options of managing Fusarium head blight include use of fungicides, cultural practices, resistant varieties and biological agents. However, no wheat variety is completely resistant to Fusarium head blight while fungicides are at most 70% effective against natural infection. This review seeks to document and infer information on F. culmorum, with special emphasis on wheat head blight infection process, mechanisms of mycotoxin production, the role the mycotoxins play in pathogenesis, and the possible management options.
W DRMUTHOMIJAMES. "Wagacha, J. M., E. W. Mutitu, J. W. Muthomi and F. B. Mwaura. 2003. Translocation and persistence of antibiotics produced by Bacillus and Streptomyces spp. African Crop Science Conference proceedings,6: 81-84.". In: African Crop Science Conference proceedings,6: 81-84. African Crop Science Society; 2003. Abstract
Fusarium culmorum is an important pathogen of wheat causing seedling blight, foot rot, and head blight (FHB) or scab. The pathogen is dominant in cooler areas like north, central and western Europe. The fungus reproduces asexually by means of conidia, which form the main mode of dispersal. Head blight is by far the most serious concern of Fusarium infection on pre-harvest wheat and other small grain cereals. The significance of F. culmorum in wheat production is attributed to both head blight and mycotoxin contamination of the grain harvested from infected ears. Ear infection mainly occurs during anthesis and is favoured by wet weather or high humidity and warm temperatures. The major mycotoxins produced by F. culmorum are deoxynivalenol, nivalenol and zearalenone, which are a potential health hazard for both humans and animals. The mycotoxins, especially deoxynivalenol, are believed to play a role in disease development. Available options of managing Fusarium head blight include use of fungicides, cultural practices, resistant varieties and biological agents. However, no wheat variety is completely resistant to Fusarium head blight while fungicides are at most 70% effective against natural infection. This review seeks to document and infer information on F. culmorum, with special emphasis on wheat head blight infection process, mechanisms of mycotoxin production, the role the mycotoxins play in pathogenesis, and the possible management options.
2002
W DRMUTHOMIJAMES. "Muthomi, J. W., E.-C. Oerke, E. W. Mutitu, A. Schade-Sch.". In: Journal of Plant Disease and Protection, 109 (5): 462 - 477. Landwirtschaftliche Fakult; 2002. Abstract
Fusarium culmorum is an important pathogen of wheat causing seedling blight, foot rot, and head blight (FHB) or scab. The pathogen is dominant in cooler areas like north, central and western Europe. The fungus reproduces asexually by means of conidia, which form the main mode of dispersal. Head blight is by far the most serious concern of Fusarium infection on pre-harvest wheat and other small grain cereals. The significance of F. culmorum in wheat production is attributed to both head blight and mycotoxin contamination of the grain harvested from infected ears. Ear infection mainly occurs during anthesis and is favoured by wet weather or high humidity and warm temperatures. The major mycotoxins produced by F. culmorum are deoxynivalenol, nivalenol and zearalenone, which are a potential health hazard for both humans and animals. The mycotoxins, especially deoxynivalenol, are believed to play a role in disease development. Available options of managing Fusarium head blight include use of fungicides, cultural practices, resistant varieties and biological agents. However, no wheat variety is completely resistant to Fusarium head blight while fungicides are at most 70% effective against natural infection. This review seeks to document and infer information on F. culmorum, with special emphasis on wheat head blight infection process, mechanisms of mycotoxin production, the role the mycotoxins play in pathogenesis, and the possible management options.
W DRMUTHOMIJAMES. "Muthomi, J. W., E.-C. Oerke, H.-W. Dehne and E. W. Mutitu. 2002. Susceptibility of Kenyan wheat varieties to head blight, fungal invasion and deoxynivalenol accumulation inoculated with Fusarium graminearum. Journal of Phytopathology 150: 30 .". In: Journal of Phytopathology 150: 30 . Landwirtschaftliche Fakult; 2002. Abstract
Fusarium culmorum is an important pathogen of wheat causing seedling blight, foot rot, and head blight (FHB) or scab. The pathogen is dominant in cooler areas like north, central and western Europe. The fungus reproduces asexually by means of conidia, which form the main mode of dispersal. Head blight is by far the most serious concern of Fusarium infection on pre-harvest wheat and other small grain cereals. The significance of F. culmorum in wheat production is attributed to both head blight and mycotoxin contamination of the grain harvested from infected ears. Ear infection mainly occurs during anthesis and is favoured by wet weather or high humidity and warm temperatures. The major mycotoxins produced by F. culmorum are deoxynivalenol, nivalenol and zearalenone, which are a potential health hazard for both humans and animals. The mycotoxins, especially deoxynivalenol, are believed to play a role in disease development. Available options of managing Fusarium head blight include use of fungicides, cultural practices, resistant varieties and biological agents. However, no wheat variety is completely resistant to Fusarium head blight while fungicides are at most 70% effective against natural infection. This review seeks to document and infer information on F. culmorum, with special emphasis on wheat head blight infection process, mechanisms of mycotoxin production, the role the mycotoxins play in pathogenesis, and the possible management options.
W DRMUTHOMIJAMES. "Oerke, E. C, Meier, A., Lienemann, G., and Muthomi, J. 2002. Incidence and control of Fusarium species causing head blight in the Rhineland, Germany. Pages 32-44 in: Wissenschaftlichen Fachtagung: Fusarium-befall and Mykotoxinbelastung von Getreide Schadv.". In: Wissenschaftlichen Fachtagung, Landwirtschaftliche Fakult. Landwirtschaftliche Fakult; 2002. Abstract
Fusarium culmorum is an important pathogen of wheat causing seedling blight, foot rot, and head blight (FHB) or scab. The pathogen is dominant in cooler areas like north, central and western Europe. The fungus reproduces asexually by means of conidia, which form the main mode of dispersal. Head blight is by far the most serious concern of Fusarium infection on pre-harvest wheat and other small grain cereals. The significance of F. culmorum in wheat production is attributed to both head blight and mycotoxin contamination of the grain harvested from infected ears. Ear infection mainly occurs during anthesis and is favoured by wet weather or high humidity and warm temperatures. The major mycotoxins produced by F. culmorum are deoxynivalenol, nivalenol and zearalenone, which are a potential health hazard for both humans and animals. The mycotoxins, especially deoxynivalenol, are believed to play a role in disease development. Available options of managing Fusarium head blight include use of fungicides, cultural practices, resistant varieties and biological agents. However, no wheat variety is completely resistant to Fusarium head blight while fungicides are at most 70% effective against natural infection. This review seeks to document and infer information on F. culmorum, with special emphasis on wheat head blight infection process, mechanisms of mycotoxin production, the role the mycotoxins play in pathogenesis, and the possible management options.
2001
2000
W DRMUTHOMIJAMES. "Muthomi, J. W., Anja Sch.". In: Journal of Plant Disease and Protection, 107 (2): 113 - 123. Landwirtschaftliche Fakult; 2000. Abstract
Fusarium culmorum is an important pathogen of wheat causing seedling blight, foot rot, and head blight (FHB) or scab. The pathogen is dominant in cooler areas like north, central and western Europe. The fungus reproduces asexually by means of conidia, which form the main mode of dispersal. Head blight is by far the most serious concern of Fusarium infection on pre-harvest wheat and other small grain cereals. The significance of F. culmorum in wheat production is attributed to both head blight and mycotoxin contamination of the grain harvested from infected ears. Ear infection mainly occurs during anthesis and is favoured by wet weather or high humidity and warm temperatures. The major mycotoxins produced by F. culmorum are deoxynivalenol, nivalenol and zearalenone, which are a potential health hazard for both humans and animals. The mycotoxins, especially deoxynivalenol, are believed to play a role in disease development. Available options of managing Fusarium head blight include use of fungicides, cultural practices, resistant varieties and biological agents. However, no wheat variety is completely resistant to Fusarium head blight while fungicides are at most 70% effective against natural infection. This review seeks to document and infer information on F. culmorum, with special emphasis on wheat head blight infection process, mechanisms of mycotoxin production, the role the mycotoxins play in pathogenesis, and the possible management options.
W DRMUTHOMIJAMES. "Schade-Sch.". In: Mycotoxin Research,16A (1): 30 - 37. Landwirtschaftliche Fakult; 2000. Abstract
Fusarium culmorum is an important pathogen of wheat causing seedling blight, foot rot, and head blight (FHB) or scab. The pathogen is dominant in cooler areas like north, central and western Europe. The fungus reproduces asexually by means of conidia, which form the main mode of dispersal. Head blight is by far the most serious concern of Fusarium infection on pre-harvest wheat and other small grain cereals. The significance of F. culmorum in wheat production is attributed to both head blight and mycotoxin contamination of the grain harvested from infected ears. Ear infection mainly occurs during anthesis and is favoured by wet weather or high humidity and warm temperatures. The major mycotoxins produced by F. culmorum are deoxynivalenol, nivalenol and zearalenone, which are a potential health hazard for both humans and animals. The mycotoxins, especially deoxynivalenol, are believed to play a role in disease development. Available options of managing Fusarium head blight include use of fungicides, cultural practices, resistant varieties and biological agents. However, no wheat variety is completely resistant to Fusarium head blight while fungicides are at most 70% effective against natural infection. This review seeks to document and infer information on F. culmorum, with special emphasis on wheat head blight infection process, mechanisms of mycotoxin production, the role the mycotoxins play in pathogenesis, and the possible management options.
1994
W DRMUTHOMIJAMES. "Mutitu, E. W. and J. W. Muthomi. 1994. Control of carnation Fusarium wilt using antibiotic culture filtrates from Streptomyces spp. African Crop Science Journal, 2 (1): 111-116.". In: African Crop Science Journal, 2 (1): 111-116. African Crop Science Society; 1994. Abstract
Fusarium culmorum is an important pathogen of wheat causing seedling blight, foot rot, and head blight (FHB) or scab. The pathogen is dominant in cooler areas like north, central and western Europe. The fungus reproduces asexually by means of conidia, which form the main mode of dispersal. Head blight is by far the most serious concern of Fusarium infection on pre-harvest wheat and other small grain cereals. The significance of F. culmorum in wheat production is attributed to both head blight and mycotoxin contamination of the grain harvested from infected ears. Ear infection mainly occurs during anthesis and is favoured by wet weather or high humidity and warm temperatures. The major mycotoxins produced by F. culmorum are deoxynivalenol, nivalenol and zearalenone, which are a potential health hazard for both humans and animals. The mycotoxins, especially deoxynivalenol, are believed to play a role in disease development. Available options of managing Fusarium head blight include use of fungicides, cultural practices, resistant varieties and biological agents. However, no wheat variety is completely resistant to Fusarium head blight while fungicides are at most 70% effective against natural infection. This review seeks to document and infer information on F. culmorum, with special emphasis on wheat head blight infection process, mechanisms of mycotoxin production, the role the mycotoxins play in pathogenesis, and the possible management options.
1993

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