Impact of gold mining associated with mercury contamination in soil, biota sediments and tailings in Kenya

Citation:
Kalambuka Angeyo H, Odumo BO’, Carbonell G, Patel JP, Torrijos M, Martín JAR. "Impact of gold mining associated with mercury contamination in soil, biota sediments and tailings in Kenya." Environmental Science and Pollution Research. 2016.

Abstract:

This work considered the environmental impact of artisanal mining gold activity in the Migori–Transmara area (Kenya). From artisanal gold mining, mercury is released to the environment, thus contributing to degradation of soil and water bodies. High mercury contents have been quantified in soil (140 μg kg−1), sediment (430 μg kg−1) and tailings (8,900 μg kg−1), as expected. The results reveal that the mechanism for transporting mercury to the terrestrial ecosystem is associated with wet and dry depositions. Lichens and mosses, used as bioindicators of pollution, are related to the proximity to mining areas. The further the distance from mining areas, the lower the mercury levels. This study also provides risk maps to evaluate potential negative repercussions. We conclude that the Migori–Transmara region can be considered a strongly polluted area with high mercury contents. The technology used to extract gold throughout amalgamation processes causes a high degree of mercury pollution around this gold mining area. Thus, alternative gold extraction methods should be considered to reduce mercury levels that can be released to the environment.

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