Publications

Found 42 results

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2018
and Mochoge GKBNO. "Nitrogen Mineralization Potential (No) in Three Kenyan Soils, Nitisols, Ferralsols and Luvisols ." Journal of Agricultural Science. 2018;10(4).
and Mochoge GKBNO. "Nitrogen Mineralization Potential (No) in Three Kenyan Soils, Nitisols, Ferralsols and Luvisols ." Journal of Agricultural Science. 2018;10(4).
2016
1. Koech OK, RN K, GN K, SM M, R W. "Field curing methods and storage duration affect the quality of hay from six rangeland grass species in Kenya." Ecological processes. 2016; 5(3):1-6.
2015
Chichongue OJ, Karuku GN, Mwala AK, Onyango CM, Magalhaes AM. "Farmers’ risk perceptions and adaptation to climate change in Lichinga and Sussundenga, Mozambique." African Journal of Agricultural Research . 2015;10(17):1938-1942.
Kipchirchir 1. KO, Ngugi 2.KR, Mwangi 3.MS, Njomo 4.KG, Raphael 5.W. "Water Stress Tolerance of Six Rangeland Grasses in the Kenyan Semi-arid Rangelands." Agriculture and Forestry. 2015; 3(5):222-229.
Koech OK, Kinuthia RN, Karuku GN, Mureithi SM, Wanjogu R. "Water use efficiency of six rangeland grasses under varied soil moisture content levels in the arid Tana River County, Kenya." African Journal of Environmental Science and Technology. 2015;9(7):632-640.
2014
and Chichongue, O.J; Karuku MOMGN; AK;. " Effect of organic and low inorganic fertilizers in maize-legume intercrop." International Journal of Advanced Biological Research (IJABR). Accepted for Publication in the next Issue after payments).. 2014.
Thuo AK, Kimenju JW, Kariuki GM, Karuku GN, Wendot PK, Melakeberhan H. Analysis of nematode assemblage in Kenyan Vertisol, Cambisol and Arenosol soil groups: II- Diversity, abundance and seasonal variations-a. Cape Town- South Africa on May 2014 ; 2014.
and N. L. Namoi R. N. Onwonga1*, C. M. Onyango2 K1 K1GNVM. "Assessment of Soil Nutrient Balances in Organic Based Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) and Sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench) Cropping Systems of Yatta Subcounty, Kenya." American Journal of Experimental Agriculture . 2014;4(12 ):1557-1578.
Liavoga B. A., V. M. Kathumo OKORNGN. "Assessment of Trends in Land Cover and Crop Type Change Over Two Decades in Yatta Sub County, Kenya." International Journal of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries. 2014;Vol. 2, ( No. 3):46-52.
Karuku GN, Gachene CKK, Karanja N, Cornelis W, Verplacke H. "Effect of different cover crop residue management practices on soil moisture content under a tomato crop (Lycopersicon esculentum). ." Tropical and Subtropical Agroecosystems. 2014;17:509-523.
and Koech O. K., Kinuthia R. N. MKWSMGNR. "Effect of Different Soil Water Content and Seed Storage on Quality of Six Range Grasses in the Semi-Arid Ecosystems of Kenya." Environment and Ecology Research . 2014;2(2):261-271.
and 1. Chepkemoi J, R. N. Onwonga KKGNVM. "Efficiency and interactive effects of Tillage Practices, Cropping Systems and Organic Inputs on Soil Moisture Retention in Semi-Arid Yatta Sub-County, Kenya." Journal of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences . 2014;3(2):145-156.
and Nambafu N. Karuku, G.N.; Onwonga ARS. "Knowledge, Attitude And Practices Used in the Control of Striga in Maize by Smallholder Farmers of Western Kenya." Agricultural Science and Technology B 4 (2014) 237-248: Earlier title: Journal of Agricultural Science and Technology, ISSN 1939-1250.. 2014.
Karuku GN, Gachene CKK, Karanja N, Cornelis W, Verplancke H. "Use of CROPWAT Model to Predict Water Use in Irrigated Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) Production at Kabete, Kenya." E. Afr. agric. For. J.. 2014;80(3):175-183.
2013
and Chichongue, O.J; Karuku MOGN; AK. Farmers’ risk perceptions and adaptation to climate change in Lichinga and Sussundenga, Mozambique. Cathy Hotel, Nakuru-Kenya; 2013.
and Karuku, G. N. CVWH. "Farmers’ Perspectives on Factors Limiting Tomato Production and Yields in Kabete, Kiambu County, Kenya." Available Online: http://standresjournals.org/journal/SRJS/index. html.. 2013.
and O.J. Chichoque, G.N. Karuku. MOMAKCMC. Fertilization of maize-legume Intercrop in Mozambique. LAP LAMBERT Academic Publishing; 2013.
2012
and Karuku, G. N. GKCVKCKKN. " Soil hydraulic properties of a Nitisol in Kabete, Ken." Soil hydraulic properties of a Nitisol in Kabete, Kenya International Journal of Tropical and Subtropical Agroecosystems, 15 (2012): 595-609. 2012.
2006
and P.M. KWGN. " Curriculum for Masters degree Studies’ in Environmental Sciences.". In: Towards a Shared Vision for Higher Education. Cross Cultural Insights and Projects. Kassel: Institute of Socio-Cultural Studies (ISOS) Unistaff 2005. University of Kassel, State of Hessen, Germany; 2006.
and Karuku G.N. GMCKKP. " Soil water extraction by different cover crops and soil water behavior under different cover crop residue management practices. Chapter 8. Pp 171.". In: Enhancing Agricultural Productivity in East Africa: Development and Up-scaling of Green Manure Legume Technologies in Kenya. Edited by Joseph G. Mureithi, Charles K.K. Gachene, Jane W. Wamuongo and Marjatatta Eilitta. ISBN 9966-879-71-4. Nairobi: Kenya Agricultural Research Institute (KARI). November 2006. ; 2006.
2000
Kinyalil SM;, Karuku GN;, Tirop SK. "Impact of siltation problems on production of fish in lake Baringo, Kenya."; 2000. Abstract

Influence of soil type, vegetation, landuse and environmental problems on infiltration rate into the two soils on the semi-arid Sibilo/Loruk watersheds (water catchment) in Baringo District was investigated. Infiltration was assessed during the dry and wet seasons by a double cylinder, infil¬trometer. Infiltration rates significantly dif¬fered among soils and site conditions (treatment) in both areas after 10 minutes and 180 minutes. Among site conditions in both seasons, intake rates were highest under Tree/Bush (TB), followed by culti¬ vated soils, intermediate on Open Grass (OG) and lowest on Bare Ground (BG). Cultivation temporarily increased infiltra¬tion rates. Bulk density (Pb), saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ksat) and organic carbon (Oe) sign.ificantly influenced infil¬tration in both areas during the dry and wet seasons in 1991/92. It was observed that water soil-erosion rates was higher in Loruk than Sibilo and this could be the rea¬son for high siltation of Lake Baringo and significant drop in the recorded fish output in the lake. This has not only resulted in less nutritional food for the people of the district but has meant loss of re~enue to the local fishermen. The siltation creates envi¬ronmental problems in the lake for produc¬tion of fish for child survival and develop-. ment in future. Fish is another cheap source of protein which could be more fully exploited. In Baringo area, water and sanitation are a big problem. The Baringo community in particular, has identified the need for water as its top priority. Water and sanitation is an important component for child survival and development in both areas

1998
Karuku GN. "Preparation And Planning Of Excursion And Study Tours For Science Students.". In: Nairobi Province Secondary Schools Science Congress. Aga Khan High School, Nairobi; 1998.
NJOMO MRKARUKUGEORGE. "Karuku, G.N., J.J. Odhiambo and B.O. Mochoge (1998). Nitrogen Mineralization potential ((No), mineralization rate constant (K) and time taken for half of the mineralizable nitrogen to be mineralized in four Kenya soils (Luvisols, Andosols, Ferralsols and.". In: East African Agricultural and Forestry Journal. EAMJ; 1998. Abstract

This study uses CROPWAT model to predict water use in rainfed agriculture and simulate irrigation requirement for tomato production in Kabete Field Station. The model predicted increased irrigation requirement for tomato crop of 33.1, 28.1 and 36.6 mm water, in the 1st, 2nd and 3rd 10-day periods of development stage, respectively. The crop evapotranspiration (ETc) requirements by tomato crop were predicted at 456.5 mm for the short rainy season while actual evapotranspiration (ETa) was 232.1 mm for the short rains giving a yield response factor of 0.49. The model suggested an addition of 253.7 mm of irrigation water in order to realize optimal tomato yields as the crop experienced an irrigation deficiency of 48.8%. The moisture deficit at harvest was 63.6 mm of water which resulted in total yield reduction of 51.3%. In relation to actual yields calculated, the mean potential optimal tomato yields in the study area were 23.3 Mg/ha with proper soil management and adequate water supply. The suggested supply system was at 10 days irrigation interval/stage where the soils were irrigated just below or above field capacity. Rainfall losses and irrigation requirements would be reduced to 41.9 and 267.7 mm, with minimum water deficit at harvest of 15.5 mm and an irrigation efficiency of 100%. At this point, ETa would equal ETm and optimal tomato yield would be obtained with yield losses predicted at 0.1%. Yield gap analysis revealed that radiation, sunshine and temperature are favourable for crop production, but the heavy dependence on rainfall makes the area very vulnerable to drought.

Karuku GN. "Preparation and planning of excursion and study tours for science students.". In: Nairobi Province Teachers's Science Congress Committee, Aga Khan High School, 1998.; 1998.
1996
NJOMO MRKARUKUGEORGE, N. PROFKARANJANANCYK. "Kinyali, S.M., G.N. Karuku and S.K. Tirop, (1996). Impact of siltation problems on fish production in Lake Baringo, Baringo District, Kenya. EAAFRO Journal.". In: East African Agricultural and Forestry Journal. EAMJ; 1996. Abstract
This study uses CROPWAT model to predict water use in rainfed agriculture and simulate irrigation requirement for tomato production in Kabete Field Station. The model predicted increased irrigation requirement for tomato crop of 33.1, 28.1 and 36.6 mm water, in the 1st, 2nd and 3rd 10-day periods of development stage, respectively. The crop evapotranspiration (ETc) requirements by tomato crop were predicted at 456.5 mm for the short rainy season while actual evapotranspiration (ETa) was 232.1 mm for the short rains giving a yield response factor of 0.49. The model suggested an addition of 253.7 mm of irrigation water in order to realize optimal tomato yields as the crop experienced an irrigation deficiency of 48.8%. The moisture deficit at harvest was 63.6 mm of water which resulted in total yield reduction of 51.3%. In relation to actual yields calculated, the mean potential optimal tomato yields in the study area were 23.3 Mg/ha with proper soil management and adequate water supply. The suggested supply system was at 10 days irrigation interval/stage where the soils were irrigated just below or above field capacity. Rainfall losses and irrigation requirements would be reduced to 41.9 and 267.7 mm, with minimum water deficit at harvest of 15.5 mm and an irrigation efficiency of 100%. At this point, ETa would equal ETm and optimal tomato yield would be obtained with yield losses predicted at 0.1%. Yield gap analysis revealed that radiation, sunshine and temperature are favourable for crop production, but the heavy dependence on rainfall makes the area very vulnerable to drought.
NJOMO MRKARUKUGEORGE, N. PROFKARANJANANCYK. "Kinyali, S.M., G.N. Karuku, P.M. Mainga and S.K. Tirop, (1996). Rainwater harvesting by run off inducement for irrigation for maize production in a semi-arid climate, Baringo District, Kenya. EAAFRO Journal.". In: East African Agricultural and Forestry Journal. EAMJ; 1996. Abstract
This study uses CROPWAT model to predict water use in rainfed agriculture and simulate irrigation requirement for tomato production in Kabete Field Station. The model predicted increased irrigation requirement for tomato crop of 33.1, 28.1 and 36.6 mm water, in the 1st, 2nd and 3rd 10-day periods of development stage, respectively. The crop evapotranspiration (ETc) requirements by tomato crop were predicted at 456.5 mm for the short rainy season while actual evapotranspiration (ETa) was 232.1 mm for the short rains giving a yield response factor of 0.49. The model suggested an addition of 253.7 mm of irrigation water in order to realize optimal tomato yields as the crop experienced an irrigation deficiency of 48.8%. The moisture deficit at harvest was 63.6 mm of water which resulted in total yield reduction of 51.3%. In relation to actual yields calculated, the mean potential optimal tomato yields in the study area were 23.3 Mg/ha with proper soil management and adequate water supply. The suggested supply system was at 10 days irrigation interval/stage where the soils were irrigated just below or above field capacity. Rainfall losses and irrigation requirements would be reduced to 41.9 and 267.7 mm, with minimum water deficit at harvest of 15.5 mm and an irrigation efficiency of 100%. At this point, ETa would equal ETm and optimal tomato yield would be obtained with yield losses predicted at 0.1%. Yield gap analysis revealed that radiation, sunshine and temperature are favourable for crop production, but the heavy dependence on rainfall makes the area very vulnerable to drought.
1994
NJOMO MRKARUKUGEORGE, N. PROFKARANJANANCYK. "Karuku, G.N. (1994). Effects of mycorrhiza inoculation on growth response, mineral nutrition and nodulation of some legumes. Paper presented at the Institute of Soil and Water, Volcani Centre, Bet Dagan, Israel, 23rd Nov 1994. Agricultural Resource Organi.". In: East African Agricultural and Forestry Journal. EAMJ; 1994. Abstract
This study uses CROPWAT model to predict water use in rainfed agriculture and simulate irrigation requirement for tomato production in Kabete Field Station. The model predicted increased irrigation requirement for tomato crop of 33.1, 28.1 and 36.6 mm water, in the 1st, 2nd and 3rd 10-day periods of development stage, respectively. The crop evapotranspiration (ETc) requirements by tomato crop were predicted at 456.5 mm for the short rainy season while actual evapotranspiration (ETa) was 232.1 mm for the short rains giving a yield response factor of 0.49. The model suggested an addition of 253.7 mm of irrigation water in order to realize optimal tomato yields as the crop experienced an irrigation deficiency of 48.8%. The moisture deficit at harvest was 63.6 mm of water which resulted in total yield reduction of 51.3%. In relation to actual yields calculated, the mean potential optimal tomato yields in the study area were 23.3 Mg/ha with proper soil management and adequate water supply. The suggested supply system was at 10 days irrigation interval/stage where the soils were irrigated just below or above field capacity. Rainfall losses and irrigation requirements would be reduced to 41.9 and 267.7 mm, with minimum water deficit at harvest of 15.5 mm and an irrigation efficiency of 100%. At this point, ETa would equal ETm and optimal tomato yield would be obtained with yield losses predicted at 0.1%. Yield gap analysis revealed that radiation, sunshine and temperature are favourable for crop production, but the heavy dependence on rainfall makes the area very vulnerable to drought.
1992
and Karuku CGNJA. Growing Onions booklet. . Edited by Mary Ngechu, The University of Nairobi; 1992.
NJOMO MRKARUKUGEORGE. "Karuku, G.N. and Knyali, S.M. (1992). Effects of soil, vegetation and land use on infiltration in two semi-arid sub-locations (Sibilo and Loruk) in Baringo District. National Capacity Building for Child Survival and Development Workshop (funded by UNICEF).". In: East African Agricultural and Forestry Journal. EAMJ; 1992. Abstract

This study uses CROPWAT model to predict water use in rainfed agriculture and simulate irrigation requirement for tomato production in Kabete Field Station. The model predicted increased irrigation requirement for tomato crop of 33.1, 28.1 and 36.6 mm water, in the 1st, 2nd and 3rd 10-day periods of development stage, respectively. The crop evapotranspiration (ETc) requirements by tomato crop were predicted at 456.5 mm for the short rainy season while actual evapotranspiration (ETa) was 232.1 mm for the short rains giving a yield response factor of 0.49. The model suggested an addition of 253.7 mm of irrigation water in order to realize optimal tomato yields as the crop experienced an irrigation deficiency of 48.8%. The moisture deficit at harvest was 63.6 mm of water which resulted in total yield reduction of 51.3%. In relation to actual yields calculated, the mean potential optimal tomato yields in the study area were 23.3 Mg/ha with proper soil management and adequate water supply. The suggested supply system was at 10 days irrigation interval/stage where the soils were irrigated just below or above field capacity. Rainfall losses and irrigation requirements would be reduced to 41.9 and 267.7 mm, with minimum water deficit at harvest of 15.5 mm and an irrigation efficiency of 100%. At this point, ETa would equal ETm and optimal tomato yield would be obtained with yield losses predicted at 0.1%. Yield gap analysis revealed that radiation, sunshine and temperature are favourable for crop production, but the heavy dependence on rainfall makes the area very vulnerable to drought.

G.N K. Strategies of Improving Soil Fertility and Productivity booklet. Edited by Mary Ngechu, The University of Nairobi; 1992.
1991
NJOMO MRKARUKUGEORGE, N. PROFKARANJANANCYK. "Karuku, G.N. and B.O. Mochoge (1991). Comparison of treatment effects (lime, nitrogen and phosphorus salts) on nitrogen mineralization in three Kenya soils (Luvisols, Andosols and Ferralsols). Paper presented at the 11th AGM of the SSSEA, Kampala, Uganda,.". In: East African Agricultural and Forestry Journal. EAMJ; 1991. Abstract
This study uses CROPWAT model to predict water use in rainfed agriculture and simulate irrigation requirement for tomato production in Kabete Field Station. The model predicted increased irrigation requirement for tomato crop of 33.1, 28.1 and 36.6 mm water, in the 1st, 2nd and 3rd 10-day periods of development stage, respectively. The crop evapotranspiration (ETc) requirements by tomato crop were predicted at 456.5 mm for the short rainy season while actual evapotranspiration (ETa) was 232.1 mm for the short rains giving a yield response factor of 0.49. The model suggested an addition of 253.7 mm of irrigation water in order to realize optimal tomato yields as the crop experienced an irrigation deficiency of 48.8%. The moisture deficit at harvest was 63.6 mm of water which resulted in total yield reduction of 51.3%. In relation to actual yields calculated, the mean potential optimal tomato yields in the study area were 23.3 Mg/ha with proper soil management and adequate water supply. The suggested supply system was at 10 days irrigation interval/stage where the soils were irrigated just below or above field capacity. Rainfall losses and irrigation requirements would be reduced to 41.9 and 267.7 mm, with minimum water deficit at harvest of 15.5 mm and an irrigation efficiency of 100%. At this point, ETa would equal ETm and optimal tomato yield would be obtained with yield losses predicted at 0.1%. Yield gap analysis revealed that radiation, sunshine and temperature are favourable for crop production, but the heavy dependence on rainfall makes the area very vulnerable to drought.
1990
NJOMO MRKARUKUGEORGE, N. PROFKARANJANANCYK. "Karuku, G.N. and B.O. Mochoge (1990). Organic nitrogen fractions in three Kenya soils (Andosols, Luvisols and Ferralsols). Paper presented at the 10th AM of SSEA, Arusha, Tanzania, Dec., 1990.". In: East African Agricultural and Forestry Journal. EAMJ; 1990. Abstract
This study uses CROPWAT model to predict water use in rainfed agriculture and simulate irrigation requirement for tomato production in Kabete Field Station. The model predicted increased irrigation requirement for tomato crop of 33.1, 28.1 and 36.6 mm water, in the 1st, 2nd and 3rd 10-day periods of development stage, respectively. The crop evapotranspiration (ETc) requirements by tomato crop were predicted at 456.5 mm for the short rainy season while actual evapotranspiration (ETa) was 232.1 mm for the short rains giving a yield response factor of 0.49. The model suggested an addition of 253.7 mm of irrigation water in order to realize optimal tomato yields as the crop experienced an irrigation deficiency of 48.8%. The moisture deficit at harvest was 63.6 mm of water which resulted in total yield reduction of 51.3%. In relation to actual yields calculated, the mean potential optimal tomato yields in the study area were 23.3 Mg/ha with proper soil management and adequate water supply. The suggested supply system was at 10 days irrigation interval/stage where the soils were irrigated just below or above field capacity. Rainfall losses and irrigation requirements would be reduced to 41.9 and 267.7 mm, with minimum water deficit at harvest of 15.5 mm and an irrigation efficiency of 100%. At this point, ETa would equal ETm and optimal tomato yield would be obtained with yield losses predicted at 0.1%. Yield gap analysis revealed that radiation, sunshine and temperature are favourable for crop production, but the heavy dependence on rainfall makes the area very vulnerable to drought.
1989

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