Bio

PROFESSOR. OYIEKE, FLORENCE AWINO

Personal Information

PROFESSOR OF ENTOMOLOGY/DEPUTY DIRECTOR STUDENTS WELFARE AUTHORITY

counselling youth on matters related to HIV?AIDS, social services at community and high school level, PTA , small scale gardening

Areas Of Specialization

Entomology / Applied Parasitology

Research Interests

Insect pests in relation to Bt Maize in Kenya, Tse-tse fly control, Mosquito control. jigger control

Publications


2013

Ngunjirir, J, Ochanda H, Oyieke FA, Keiyoro P.  2013.  Effect of soil pH on Tunga penetrans population.

2012

and Thairu, FAON.  2012.  Varsity develops jigger repellent, 31 May 2012. The Star Newspaper, Kenya. :17.
DR. OYIEKE, FLORENCEAWINO.  2012.  Electric nets and sticky materials for the study of gravid Anopheles mosquitoes. Malaria Journal. : Sissay Dugassa et al Abstract

Background & objectives: Bancroftian filariasis in Kenya is endemic in coastal districts with anestimated number of 2.5 million people at risk of infection. The main mosquito genera involved intransmission of Wuchereria bancrofti in these areas are Anopheles, Culex and Mansonia. Thestudy was envisaged to compare the infectivity rates of Bancroftian filariasis vectors between thehigh transmission (wet) and the low transmission (dry) seasons.Methods: Mosquitoes were sampled from houses and compounds from two study sites, Gazi andMadunguni, on the Kenyan coast. Day resting indoor collection (DRI), pyrethrum spray catch(PSC) and CDC light traps were used to collect mosquitoes. After identification, female mosquitoeswere dissected to search for W. bancrofti III stage larvae.Results: A total of 1832 female mosquitoes were dissected. Infectivity rates of vectors in Madunguniwere 1.49 and 0.21% in wet and dry seasons respectively, whereas in Gazi, these were 1.69 and0%, respectively. There was a significant difference in the infectivity rates between the two seasonsin both Madunguni and Gazi villages (p <0.05). Anopheles gambiae s.l. was the main vector inboth study sites followed by Culex quinquefasciatus and An. funestus.Conclusion: There was a difference in infectivity rates of Bancroftian filariasis vectors betweenthe wet and dry seasons. The abundance of An. gambiae s.s. during the transmission season couldbe responsible for the increased infectivity rates of vectors in this season.

2010

2009

S., K, F. O, C. W, C. M.  2009.  Seasonal changes of infectivity rates of Bancroftian filariasis vectors in Coast Province, Kenya. J. Vector Borne Dis. 46:219-224.

2008

and D.N.OBONYO1, 2*, SONGA2 OYIEKE1 NYAMASYO1 MUGO3JMFA.  2008.  Bt-transgenic maize does not deter oviposition by two. Journal of Applied Biosciences. 10:424-433..
PROF. OYIEKE, FLORENCE AWINO, KASILISICHANGIMBOGO.  2008.  Seasonal changes of infectivity rates of Bancroftian filariasis vectors in coast province, Kenya. journal. : Oyieke Florence AbstractWebsite

Background & objectives: Bancroftian filariasis in Kenya is endemic in coastal districts with anestimated number of 2.5 million people at risk of infection. The main mosquito genera involved intransmission of Wuchereria bancrofti in these areas are Anopheles, Culex and Mansonia. Thestudy was envisaged to compare the infectivity rates of Bancroftian filariasis vectors between thehigh transmission (wet) and the low transmission (dry) seasons.Methods: Mosquitoes were sampled from houses and compounds from two study sites, Gazi andMadunguni, on the Kenyan coast. Day resting indoor collection (DRI), pyrethrum spray catch(PSC) and CDC light traps were used to collect mosquitoes. After identification, female mosquitoeswere dissected to search for W. bancrofti III stage larvae.Results: A total of 1832 female mosquitoes were dissected. Infectivity rates of vectors in Madunguniwere 1.49 and 0.21% in wet and dry seasons respectively, whereas in Gazi, these were 1.69 and0%, respectively. There was a significant difference in the infectivity rates between the two seasonsin both Madunguni and Gazi villages (p <0.05). Anopheles gambiae s.l. was the main vector inboth study sites followed by Culex quinquefasciatus and An. funestus.Conclusion: There was a difference in infectivity rates of Bancroftian filariasis vectors betweenthe wet and dry seasons. The abundance of An. gambiae s.s. during the transmission season couldbe responsible for the increased infectivity rates of vectors in this season.

2007

2006

2003

A., OF.  2003.  Occurrene and transmission for camel trypanosomiasis in northern Kenya. Journal of Camel Research & Practice. 10(1):17-21.abstract_journal_of_camel_research.pdf
DR. OYIEKE, FLORENCEAWINO.  2003.  The Mechanical transmission of Trypanosoma evansi by Haematobia minuta (Diptera: Muscidae) and Hippobosca camelina (Diptera: Hippoboscidae) from an infected camel to a mouse and the survival of trypanosomes in fly mouthparts and gut.. journal. : Folio Veterinaria Abstractabstract_Folio_Veterinaria.pdfWebsite

Background & objectives: Bancroftian filariasis in Kenya is endemic in coastal districts with anestimated number of 2.5 million people at risk of infection. The main mosquito genera involved intransmission of Wuchereria bancrofti in these areas are Anopheles, Culex and Mansonia. Thestudy was envisaged to compare the infectivity rates of Bancroftian filariasis vectors between thehigh transmission (wet) and the low transmission (dry) seasons.Methods: Mosquitoes were sampled from houses and compounds from two study sites, Gazi andMadunguni, on the Kenyan coast. Day resting indoor collection (DRI), pyrethrum spray catch(PSC) and CDC light traps were used to collect mosquitoes. After identification, female mosquitoeswere dissected to search for W. bancrofti III stage larvae.Results: A total of 1832 female mosquitoes were dissected. Infectivity rates of vectors in Madunguniwere 1.49 and 0.21% in wet and dry seasons respectively, whereas in Gazi, these were 1.69 and0%, respectively. There was a significant difference in the infectivity rates between the two seasonsin both Madunguni and Gazi villages (p <0.05). Anopheles gambiae s.l. was the main vector inboth study sites followed by Culex quinquefasciatus and An. funestus.Conclusion: There was a difference in infectivity rates of Bancroftian filariasis vectors betweenthe wet and dry seasons. The abundance of An. gambiae s.s. during the transmission season couldbe responsible for the increased infectivity rates of vectors in this season.

2001

Ndegwa P, S. M, F.A. O.  2001.  Habitat preferences and activity patters of Glossina swynnertoni. Austen in Maasai Mara. Insect Science and its Application . 2(2):113-122.

1998

1989

F.A., O.  1989.  Studies on occurrence, Transmission of camel trypanosomiasis in Northern Kenya,. , Nairobi, Kenya: University of Nairobi

1987

Oyieke, FA.  1987.  Mechanical transmission of Trypanosoma evansi steele by heamatophagous flies. Paper presented at 8th Annual medical Scientific Conference of KEMRI/KETRI, . :46., Nairobi, Kenya

1983

A., OF.  1983.  Mechanical Transmission of Trypanosoma evansi steele, by Stomoxys calcitrans.. , Nairobi, Kenya: University of Nairobi

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