Bio

Dr. Owiti

Dr. Owiti a Kenyan psychiatrist working at the University of Nairobi department of psychiatry

Publications


2012

  2012.  Sexual Dysfunction among Patients with Diabetes Mellitus. Abstract

Sexual dysfunction can impact a person’s ability to form or sustain intimate relationships and co morbidity between sexual dysfunction and anxiety as well as depression has been reported. Yet epidemiological, etiological, and health association to sexual dysfunction has only begun to be explored in Kenya. To determine the prevalence, types of sexual dysfunction and their socio demographic correlate in diabetic patients. Descriptive cross- sectional study The study was conducted at the outpatient diabetic clinic of Kenyatta National Hospital. This is the main referral hospital in Kenya. A total of 350 participants were enrolled in the study. The Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) and the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) questionnaires were used to evaluate sexual dysfunctions in female and male patients respectively. The participants were composed of 164 females aged between 18-74 years and 186 males aged between 19- 100 years. In males, prevalence of sexual dysfunctions were: erectile dysfunction (68.8%); orgasmic dysfunction (48.4%); sexual desire (81.7%); intercourse satisfaction (86.6%) and overall satisfaction (68.4%).The female sexual dysfunction was 36.6% and was categorized as mild (17.1%); moderate (18.3%) and severe (1.2%). Diabetic patients have a high prevalence of sexual dysfunction

2008

Muasya, T, Lore W, Yano K, Yatsuhashi H, Owiti FR, Fukuda M, Tamada MY, Kulundu J, Tukei J, Okoth FA.  2008.  Prevalence of hepatitis C virus and its genotypes among a cohort of drug users in Kenya. Abstract

Prevalence of hepatitis C virus and that of its main genotypes varies between the worlds geographic regions. The risk factors for infection with HCV include blood transfusion, tattoing and injecting drug use. To examine the prevalence of HCV and determine its main genotypes among a cohort of drug users in Kenya. A laboratory based study. Hepatitis research laboratory in the Centre for Virus Research at the Kenya Medical Research Institute, Nairobi. Three hundred and fourteen male and 19 female intravenous and non-intravenous drug users aged between 15-55 years. Seventy four (22.2%) out of 333 samples tested positive for anti-HCV. Sixty nine out of the 74 serum samples were assayed for HCV RNA and 38 (55.5%) were positive. The RNA positive samples were further subjected to sequencing and 19 (73%) of the samples were classified as genotype 1a, while seven (27%) samples were classified as genotype 4. Genotypes 2, 3, 5 and 6 were not identified in this study. These results demonstrate a high HCV infection prevalence among this cohort of drug users (22.2%) as compared to that of the general population, which is estimated to be 0.2-0.9%. The study also confirms the presence of at least two major genotypes among Kenyan drug users (genotypes 1 and 4).

2006

R, DROWITIFREDRICK, M PROFNDETEIDAVID, JOSEPH DROTHIENOCALEB.  2006.  Ndetei D M, Othieno C J, Owiti F, Sebit M B, Kilonzo G. Organic disorders, In Eds. Ndetei et al., (2006). The African Textbook of Clinical Psychiatry and Mental Health. The African Medical and Research Foundation (AMREF), Nairobi, pp 329-347.. In Eds. Ndetei et al., (2006). The African Textbook of Clinical Psychiatry and Mental Health. The African Medical and Research Foundation (AMREF), Nairobi, pp 329-347.. : University of Nairobi

1999

R, DROWITIFREDRICK.  1999.  Owiti F.R. (1999). Drug Use and Abuse : Editorial East African Medical Journal, Vol. 76. East Afr Med J. 1999 Jun;76(6):301-6. Links. : University of Nairobi Abstract
United States International University-Africa, Nairobi, Kenya. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the prevalence and pattern of substance use among an undergraduate population in a Kenyan university. DESIGN: Cross-sectional survey, cluster sampling of classrooms, self-administered questionnaires. SETTING: Private international university in Nairobi province, Kenya. PARTICIPANTS: Five hundred fifty eight undergraduate students of both sexes, age range 16-50 and mean age (S.E) of 21.1 +/- 0.2. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Self-reported use of psychoactive substances. RESULTS: Percentages of lifetime prevalence rates of commonly used substances were tobacco, 54.7%; alcohol, 84.2%; cannabis, 19.7% and inhalants, 7.2%. The corresponding "past use" and "current use" rates were relatively lower but followed the same pattern. The percentage rates were significantly higher in males than females (p < 0.005). Rates for regular use (> 20 days/month) were higher for tobacco (24.7%) than alcohol (11.5%). The lifetime prevalence rates of other drugs (heroin, cocaine, mandrax, amphetamines and LSD) were low (< 5%), while modest rates were recorded for tranquilizers (10.8%), local brews (13.6%) and cough mixtures (35.1%). Less than 20% of respondents initiated substance use in lower primary school, while more than 50% started using in upper primary and secondary school and 11% to 25% started using substances at university. CONCLUSION: Substances most commonly used by respondents studied were of the licit variety (alcohol and tobacco). The rate of use of the two substances is rather high. The use of illicit drugs seems to be growing and may soon escalate to alarming levels. The findings suggest an urgent need to gather more data, which can be used to guide formulation of health promotion and prevention programmes.

1996

R, DROWITIFREDRICK.  1996.  Management of psychiatric disorders in Kenya (1963-1996)Owiti FR. East Afr Med J. 1996 Oct;73(10):629-30.. East Afr Med J. 1996 Oct;73(10):629-30.. : University of Nairobi Abstract
United States International University-Africa, Nairobi, Kenya. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the prevalence and pattern of substance use among an undergraduate population in a Kenyan university. DESIGN: Cross-sectional survey, cluster sampling of classrooms, self-administered questionnaires. SETTING: Private international university in Nairobi province, Kenya. PARTICIPANTS: Five hundred fifty eight undergraduate students of both sexes, age range 16-50 and mean age (S.E) of 21.1 +/- 0.2. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Self-reported use of psychoactive substances. RESULTS: Percentages of lifetime prevalence rates of commonly used substances were tobacco, 54.7%; alcohol, 84.2%; cannabis, 19.7% and inhalants, 7.2%. The corresponding "past use" and "current use" rates were relatively lower but followed the same pattern. The percentage rates were significantly higher in males than females (p < 0.005). Rates for regular use (> 20 days/month) were higher for tobacco (24.7%) than alcohol (11.5%). The lifetime prevalence rates of other drugs (heroin, cocaine, mandrax, amphetamines and LSD) were low (< 5%), while modest rates were recorded for tranquilizers (10.8%), local brews (13.6%) and cough mixtures (35.1%). Less than 20% of respondents initiated substance use in lower primary school, while more than 50% started using in upper primary and secondary school and 11% to 25% started using substances at university. CONCLUSION: Substances most commonly used by respondents studied were of the licit variety (alcohol and tobacco). The rate of use of the two substances is rather high. The use of illicit drugs seems to be growing and may soon escalate to alarming levels. The findings suggest an urgent need to gather more data, which can be used to guide formulation of health promotion and prevention programmes.
R, DROWITIFREDRICK.  1996.  Owiti F.R. Schizophrenia . East Afr Med J. 1996 Oct;73(10):629-30.. : University of Nairobi Abstract
United States International University-Africa, Nairobi, Kenya. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the prevalence and pattern of substance use among an undergraduate population in a Kenyan university. DESIGN: Cross-sectional survey, cluster sampling of classrooms, self-administered questionnaires. SETTING: Private international university in Nairobi province, Kenya. PARTICIPANTS: Five hundred fifty eight undergraduate students of both sexes, age range 16-50 and mean age (S.E) of 21.1 +/- 0.2. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Self-reported use of psychoactive substances. RESULTS: Percentages of lifetime prevalence rates of commonly used substances were tobacco, 54.7%; alcohol, 84.2%; cannabis, 19.7% and inhalants, 7.2%. The corresponding "past use" and "current use" rates were relatively lower but followed the same pattern. The percentage rates were significantly higher in males than females (p < 0.005). Rates for regular use (> 20 days/month) were higher for tobacco (24.7%) than alcohol (11.5%). The lifetime prevalence rates of other drugs (heroin, cocaine, mandrax, amphetamines and LSD) were low (< 5%), while modest rates were recorded for tranquilizers (10.8%), local brews (13.6%) and cough mixtures (35.1%). Less than 20% of respondents initiated substance use in lower primary school, while more than 50% started using in upper primary and secondary school and 11% to 25% started using substances at university. CONCLUSION: Substances most commonly used by respondents studied were of the licit variety (alcohol and tobacco). The rate of use of the two substances is rather high. The use of illicit drugs seems to be growing and may soon escalate to alarming levels. The findings suggest an urgent need to gather more data, which can be used to guide formulation of health promotion and prevention programmes.

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