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FJO

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Publications


2014

Opijah, FJ.  2014.  Green Energy Potential in East Africa.
Opijah, F, et al.  2014.  Application of the Ems-Wrf Model in Decadal Rainfall Prediction over the Gha Region. Africa Journal of Physical Sciences . 1-1f.opijah.pdf

2013

2012

FRANKLIN, DROPIJAH.  2012.  Are Weather and Climate Forecasts by National Meteorological Centres Reliable? Bulletin of the Kenya Meteorological Society. : Weather and Climate Bulletin of the Kenya Meteorological SocietyWebsite

2011

FRANKLIN, DROPIJAH.  2011.  Golden Sunbeams in Shadowy Storms. Experimewntal Mechanics. : WordAlive

2009

FRANKLIN, DROPIJAH.  2009.  Natural Hazards and the Art of Forecasting. Experimewntal Mechanics. : Kenya Meteorological Society

2008

FRANKLIN, DROPIJAH.  2008.  Cloud Cover Estimation Over Selected Locations in East Africa Using Satellite Derived Reflectivity Data. Experimewntal Mechanics. : J. Kenya Meteorological Soc
FRANKLIN, DROPIJAH.  2008.  Simulation of the Impact of Deforestation on Rainfall in the Lake Victoria Basin. Experimewntal Mechanics. : J. Kenya Meteorological Soc
FRANKLIN, DROPIJAH, R DRMUKABANAJOSEPH, K PROFNGANGAJOHN.  2008.  Response of the Moisture Budget to the Growth and Development of Nairobi City . Experimewntal Mechanics. : Africa J. of Sc. and Tech
FRANKLIN, DROPIJAH, R DRMUKABANAJOSEPH, K PROFNGANGAJOHN.  2008.  Contribution to the Heat Budget in Nairobi Metro-Area by the Anthropogenic Heat Component.. Experimewntal Mechanics. : J. Kenya Meteorological Soc Abstract
This study quantifies the ejected waste heat from artificial supplies comprising road transport and industrial, commercial, domestic and metabolic heating activities which may enhance the urban temperatures in Nairobi metro area, taking into account the energy intensity of a given activity and the level of the activity, considering expended fossil and biofuels, electrical energy consumption and human metabolism. Translation of linear source strengths to area averages from the road transport sector yields about 4% of the total anthropogenic energy over the city. The contribution from the road sector is likely to rise to 10.8 W m-2 in 2029 as the City expands. The industrial/commercial sector contributes up to 35.5 W m-2 or 57% of the total anthropogenic energy, and could increase to 284 W m-2 by 2029 due to industrialization and economic growth. Domestic utilities account for up to 13 W m-2, which is 21% of the total anthropogenic energy. Depending on the activity engaged in, human metabolism contributes up to 11.4 W m-2, which is about 18% of the total anthropogenic energy supplies. The sum total area-averaged anthropogenic energy consumption over the city centre is currently small, constituting about 11 to 18% of the global radiation for the warmer and colder seasons, respectively. Notably, only a part of this energy is released into the atmosphere as waste heat as most is used for the intended purposes. If the current trends of rising population, increased motor vehicle density and enhanced industrialization persist, the anthropogenic waste heat ejection would be large enough to alter the heat balance of the study area appreciably in future by 2030.

2007

FRANKLIN, DROPIJAH.  2007.  Relationship between ENSO parameters and trends and periodic fluctuations in East Africa rainfall. Experimewntal Mechanics. : J. Kenya Meteorological Soc
FRANKLIN, DROPIJAH.  2007.  Anthropogenic Energy Component and Climate Change in Nairobi Metro-area. Experimewntal Mechanics. : Kenya Meteorological Society
FRANKLIN, DROPIJAH.  2007.  Inter-comparison of Satellite, Dobson Spectrophotometer and Ozonsonde Ozone Data Observations over Nairobi. Experimewntal Mechanics. : Kenya Meteorological Society
R, DRMUKABANAJOSEPH, K PROFNGANGAJOHN, FRANKLIN DROPIJAH.  2007.  Rainfall Distribution over Nairobi Area. Experimewntal Mechanics. : J. Kenya Meteorological Soc

2005

FRANKLIN, DROPIJAH.  2005.  Introduction to GrADS. Experimewntal Mechanics. : IGAG Climate Prediction and Applications Centre
FRANKLIN, DROPIJAH.  2005.  Numerical Simulation of the Influence of Urbanisation on Convective Activities over Nairobi City. Experimewntal Mechanics. : International Human Dimensions Programme
FRANKLIN, DROPIJAH.  2005.  Tropical Meteorology I. Experimewntal Mechanics. : University of Nairobi
FRANKLIN, DROPIJAH.  2005.  Tropical Meteorology II. Experimewntal Mechanics. : University of Nairobi
FRANKLIN, DROPIJAH.  2005.  General Circulation and Climatology. Experimewntal Mechanics. : University of Nairobi

2004

Opijah, FJ, Mukabana JR.  2004.  On the influence of urbanization on the water budget in Nairobi city: A numerical study. AbstractOn the influence of urbanization on the water budget in Nairobi city: A numerical study

The impact of the growth and development of the City of Nairobi on the water budget is simulated using a high-resolution limited-area numerical model. The water substance fields are modelled with full physics in a control experiment. Five sensitivity experiments are then performed by altering the land-use/cover over the domain of study to assess the influence of the city, forests and terrain undulations on the water substance fields. Results showed that the highest evaporation occurred in areas of the study domain with open grasslands/scattered bush-land's vegetation types and the least at the city centre. Deforestation would lead to a substantial increase in the loss of water effected through evaporation despite a reduction in transpiration. The observed rainfall amount and frequency were highest in the high ground portions to the northwest of the study domain. Numerical analyses showed that the urban heat island had a destabilizing effect on the flow, which enhanced convection that resulted in increased rainfall downwind of the urban area. Further growth and expansion of the city of Nairobi would increase the area and amount of rainfall received. Deforestation would decrease rainfall amounts. Massive reforestation would increase the observed rainfall. There has been a decrease in soil moisture at the current location of the city centre; the decrease is bound to increase with the expansion of the city. The City of Nairobi has resulted in a large decrease in the soil moisture through converting the natural fabric to concrete/asphalt material. Deforestation would result in a marginal decrease in the soil moisture. Further growth and development of Nairobi City would modify the water substance budget appreciably.

FRANKLIN, DROPIJAH.  2004.  Advances of Numerical Weather Prediction over the GHA Region. Experimewntal Mechanics. : IGAD Climate Prediction and Applications Centre
FRANKLIN, DROPIJAH.  2004.  Introduction to Unix. Experimewntal Mechanics. : IGAG Climate Prediction and Applications Centre

2003

FRANKLIN, DROPIJAH.  2003.  Principles of Numerical Weather Prediction. Experimewntal Mechanics. : IGAD Climate Prediction and Applications Centre
FRANKLIN, DROPIJAH.  2003.  Introduction to Meteorology I. Experimewntal Mechanics. : University of Nairobi

2000

Opijah, FJ.  2000.  Numerical Simulation of the Impact of Urbanization on the Microclimate over Nairobi Area. (Ng'ang'a, J.K., Mukabana, J.R., Eds.)., Nairobi: Nairobiphd.doc
FRANKLIN, DROPIJAH.  2000.  Numerical Simulation of the Impact of Urbanization on the Microclimate over Nairobi Area. Experimewntal Mechanics. : University of Nairobi

1993

FRANKLIN, DROPIJAH.  1993.  Mathematical Modelling of the Development of the Convective Planetary Boundary Layer in Nairobi.. Experimewntal Mechanics. : J. African Meteor. Soc.

1992

FRANKLIN, DROPIJAH.  1992.  The Boundary-Layer Flow-Field Regime over Nairobi. Experimewntal Mechanics. : University of Nairobi

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