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Artwork
Miano K. "Leroy Newman on Safari". Nanyuki & Maasai Mara): Book Chronicling Neiman's work in Kenya; 1997.
Audiovisual
Kilemi M. Life As A Nairobi University Student. Nairobi: Nairobi University; 2012.
Book
Mwangi W, Nyika D. Land Administration, Principles and Processes. Nairobi: Quinexx Publishers; 2018.
Maina. The Language of Design. Seattle: Amazon; 2017.
Kibugi R, Makathimo M, Mwathane I. Large Scale Land Acquisitions for Investments in Kenya: Is the Participation, and benefits for affected local communities meaningful, and equitable? A case study of the situation in Lamu, Isiolo and Siaya Counties . Nairobi: Land Development and Governance Institute ; 2016. Abstractlarge_scale_land_acquisitions_for_investment_in_kenya.pdfWebsite

Land acquisitions, either driven by foreign investments or domestic investment needs have continued to polarize opinions. When this research was proposed, it was premised on arguments by scholars Ruth Meinzen-Dick and Helen Markelova, who had analysed agricultural land deals, and argued that there were potentially two schools of thought about foreign acquisitions over agricultural land. Their school of thought regards them as “beneficial investments” whereby investors are viewed as bringing needed investment, possibly improved technology or farming knowledge, thereby generating employment and increasing food production. Meinzen-Dick and Markelova further argued that because these land acquisitions, foreign and domestic, are ongoing at a very fast rate, it is necessary for host countries to focus on what they can do to seize the opportunities and mitigate the risks associated with the deals.
During implementation of the research project in Kenya, it became clear that although prior illustrations of land deals included foreign acquisitions (e.g. Dominion farms), a government economic policy focusing on mega- infrastructure projects was driving (or expected to drive) a much higher pace of land acquisitions either for primary infrastructure, or for the economic activities that flowed from the primary infrastructure. This is in the context of the Lamu South Sudan Ethiopia Transportation Corridor (LAPSSET) project, which is a flagship means for realization of Vision 2030; Kenya’s current national development plan. Thus, a national conversation is necessary to debate the crucial question of how to provide safeguards to protect the interests of local communities directly affected by these investments, including compensation of land that is taken, and their place in the socio-economic and environmental continuum of investment projects from design to implementation.
The following findings and recommendations have resulted from this research, and it is anticipated they will be valuable in setting the agenda and tone of such a useful national conversation, as well as tangible actions:

A. Lessons, Conclusions and findings requiring policy level interventions

1. Regularization of landholding and tenure systems.
The absence or weakness of formal landholding, and land registration systems was evident in most of the research sites, in Isiolo and Lamu. This is despite Kenya having put in place new land laws in 2012 to give effect to constitutional provisions to protect land rights. This has resulted either in emergence of informal land administration and conveyance systems (Lamu), or the emergence of a complex system of formal land allocation that brings about multi-allocation of land through repeated issuance of allotment letters, (Isiolo), or non-adjudication and registration of community lands (Isiolo, Lamu). In either instance this results in undermining security of tenure, and enhances the vulnerability of concerned communities who will face difficulties securing their interests in the land ahead of any large scale land acquisitions, due to the entry of speculators, and persons interested in grabbing the land by being first to obtain formal registration. The Kenyan national government should consider partnering with the County government in Isiolo in order to identify the nature and extent of, and take steps to resolve the problem of multi-allocations of land there. In addition, putting in place a programme for regularization of tenure rights by addressing the challenges of those without title is important as it will enhance the security of tenure of people affected by compulsory acquisition.

2. Enhancing tenure of certain communities through implementation of the provisions of Community Land Act.
This conclusion is drawn from findings in research amongst the Aweer (Bargoni), and Turkana communities (Ngare Mara) where residents expressed apprehension over their tenure security in the face of land acquisition for LAPSSET infrastructure. This is because the land has not been (fully) adjudicated or registered in favour of the community notwithstanding existence of the Land (Group Representatives) Act that preceded the 2016 community land law. It is recommended that the government expedites the application of the provisions of the Community Land Act for the Lamu and Isiolo communities faced by these land acquisition projects as a first step to guaranteeing the beneficial interests of the community members, first by protecting tenure rights, and subsequently providing for equitable community land governance mechanisms.

3. Clarification on the practice and methodology of valuation of land and non-land assets for compensation.
The repeal of the Land Acquisition Act, and with that the Schedule that defined the methodology of valuation of land requires to be resolved. In any event, based on the analysis in the research, and findings, there is need to formally resolve the entitlement to compensation for persons without legal title. In addition, it is imperative for Kenya to state in law or regulations the methodology to be applied in valuation of non-land assets, including the loss of livelihoods. Application of the full replacement cost methodology, as discussed, provides a viable option because, in addition to anchoring on the market value of the land, the replacement cost approach extends compensation to non-land assets, using the real cost of full replacement, and not factoring in any depreciation of the non-land assets being replaced, and takes into account all the transaction costs of purchasing (conveyancing fees, etc), or logistical costs of replacement of non-land assets.

4. Internalization of resettlement safeguards principles and practice into Kenyan law of compulsory acquisition of land
A review of the current legal situation in Kenya concerning compulsory acquisition of land discloses the absence of safeguards governing interaction with host community, as well as involuntary resettlement safeguards in the event of displacement by land acquisition. This includes exploring the possible application of an FPIC process that emphasizes the quality and meaningfulness of affected community participation, including the impact that views obtained during consultations have on the final decision. Equally critical is the decision to vertically integrate the process by requiring the consultation of the affected public during project planning. In the sense of feasibility studies, and project designs, this suggests that community participation may add value to the process by being conducted much earlier on in the process, and contribute to analysis of project sites, and alternatives.

For practical purposes, Kenya could consider a legal requirement for a national Resettlement Policy Framework (RPF) that would govern internalization of resettlement safeguards, including participation of communities. Key to this is that if a Resettlement Action Plan (RAP) is required, in terms of EMCA, both the RAP and RPF would have undergo a Strategic Environmental Assessment thereby providing a means for risk assessment in advance of major implementation steps being underway.

5. Policy linkage of investment promotion rules with investments flowing from land acquisitions to secure community benefit through contracts and business models
At a policy level, it is important for Kenya to revisit, in a framework sense, how to use investment promotion rules and binding contracts to safeguard socio-economic, environmental benefits and livelihoods of local communities. This is mainly in context of the continuum of an investment, from land acquisition, and during its implementation. The Investment Promotion Act, while addressing the benefit to Kenya threshold, is not aggressively applied, and as evidenced by the Dominion contracts, critical socio-economic safeguards were not included. A clear policy evaluation of business models application, either contracts in the context of farming investments, or other types, should be undertaken and public disclosure of the proposed business model(s) should be undertaken early enough, to ensure affected project communities do not experience anxiety over their future.

This could be done in context of section 12 of the Land Act, which requires the National Land Commission to make regulations to govern how investments on public land will safeguard community benefits and livelihoods. The details of these considerations have been discussed at length earlier in this report.

6. Regulations to regulate methodology for assessment of just compensation
Kenya is currently engaged in a number of infrastructural projects that call for the compulsory acquisition and compensation of land. As noted in the study, Section 111 of the Land Act requires the National Land Commission to develop rules to regulate the assessment of just compensation where land is compulsorily acquired. As at the time of this report, these rules had not yet been developed. The rules will help to standardize the methodology for the anticipated assessment and make the process more predictable and, in an environment where the government is involved in the development of infrastructure calling for massive compensation of compulsorily acquired land, the development of these rules should have been accorded priority.

It is however noted that regulations to operate the entire Land Act have not yet been developed. Perhaps the development of these regulations, and the rules to govern assessment for just compensation, may have been delayed by the amendments recently effected to the Land Act. Now that the amendments were concluded, it is recommended that the development of the rules to govern the assessment of just compensation payable to landowners affected by large scale investments on land be expedited.

B. Lessons, conclusions and findings requiring direct actions at community level
In this category, the conclusions and findings are drawn to highlight matters that directly affect the voice and equitable benefit or participation of affected local communities, either in land acquisition process, or in the continuum of investments introduced in their midst.

1. A community dissemination manual for transfer of knowledge about land laws, policies and land administration processes
In focus group discussions held in the course of field work, the research team got similar feedback multiple times that the (potentially) affected “had heard” on radio, or through other fora that Kenya had new land laws in place, they did not really know the content of these laws. A similar sentiment was expressed with regard to knowledge of details about the components of the various LAPSSET projects. Communities indicated that they would want to have some form of civic education on this, especially regarding tenure rights, the land administration system (surveying, adjudication and registration), the implications and contents of the new community land law, and legal protection of community rights during land acquisition. One key finding was a preference by community members to have some of their own members trained in order to pass the knowledge to the communities, a sentiment that arose from a desire to receive information from a trustworthy source who was part of the community. Another finding was that community members did not have clear details on available grievance mechanisms on the land administration system, and while some had managed to access the National Land Commission, they lamented that it was based in Nairobi.

This finding suggests there is a need to develop a basic community dissemination manual, that includes a provision for empowerment of community based trainers (through a Training of Trainers concept). In such an approach, the dissemination manual can be published in simple language, including translation to Kiswahili or local languages where preferable.

2. Enhancement of meaningful public participation in the entire continuum through effective consultations and disclosure of relevant information

In order to enhance the voice of the community ahead of any process of land acquisition, it will be helpful to integrate a constructive and meaningful process of consultation with potentially affected communities, from early on during project planning, feasibility studies to onboarding of investments. This would particularly aid in providing value on local circumstances and risks that may not be obvious to technical teams. Occurrences such as in the Isiolo Kiwanjani settlement (displaced for the airport) where residents of Kiwanjani Zone G Squatter complained that maps generated during the acquisition process continued to record their land as being part of the airport complex despite there being a 75 feet road between the airport boundary, and the plots in question, would be avoided.

Enhanced community participation would further provide a valuable avenue through which the [potentially] affected local community can enhance its voice by having an opinion (which is taken into account) early on in the stages of the project design. However, this approach would also require protection from speculative behavior, that could result in an artificial increase in market value of land, due to market behavior triggered by anticipation of a project, and land acquisition. Access to information requires that this type of information is made available to the public, but in order to control speculative behaviour that drives up the cost of land compensation, government can apply the new 2016 Access to Information Act to sieve out aspects that are either confidential or considered deliberative and therefore not to be publicly disclosed. Another helpful approach would be to undertake the feasibility studies focusing on multiple alternative sites, without showing preference for any particular site.

Meaningful community participation requires a legal or policy definition of how to ensure consultations are effective. This could include possibility of requiring consulting (public) agencies to return to the host community and disclose how they considered the various opinions, and provide feedback. The community dissemination manual proposed above would provide a valuable tool through which to structure techniques that affected local communities can apply in order to have meaningful consultations. The manual could also include implications of the procedures set out in the new 2016 Access to Information Act.

3. Promotion of Networking by Project Affected communities in various parts of Kenya to build knowledge and exchange thoughts
There are multiple instances of compulsory acquisition of land in Kenya (e.g. For LAPSSET projects), or the allocation of land by government for private investments (Siaya – Dominion). The processes are at various stages, either at conceptual point, or having gone through various steps of acquisition and onboarding of investments. Equally, others are complete and the investment has been operational for a number of years. In all these cases, there multiple lessons to be learnt between the various affected local communities. In both Lamu and Isiolo for instance, the research engaged with multiple focus groups drawn from within the same project locality but in different geographical sections – and there was evidence that there was no integrated system to promote consultations and learning from each other. Further, even where acquisition and investments have been undertaken in separate parts of the country, people from Isiolo or Lamu could learn coping techniques from those in Siaya, or by learning the adverse impacts in Siaya, become more interested in enhancing their voices in the local context to avoid a similar outcome. Therefore, the idea of a network that brings together representatives of the various communities is useful to consider. Such a network would also include policy makers drawn from the national and county governments. Already in most of these local communities, the research observed that chiefs (who are national government administration officers) are an integral part of the community process. Learning forums could be organized, and a feedback process put in place such that when representatives return to their local communities, they can provide details to their neighbours. Such a network would however require that policy makers also commit to provide valuable information and feedback to any questions and problems raised by participating communities.

An alternative to utilization of physical meetings for such a network is application of internet-based technology. In this case, a network can be developed through low cost options, such as through the WhatsApp Platform. Although this requires internet access through a smartphone, the Land Development and Governance Institute has been piloting a WhatsApp based platform that creates a Network aptly named Community Land Matters. The experience with this platform is discussed at length in section 9.

4. Involvement of Women in Community Interventions
The study exposes some good lessons in the involvement of women in community interventions and leadership on communal land rights. It was instructive that for instance in the discussion with the Aweer group in Bargoni, Lamu, some women participants in the focus group discussions were very active and made crucial contributions. In addition, the women also made distinguished contributions too during discussions with the Turkana community at Ngare Mara, Isiolo County, where critical leadership positions in the community are held by women.

Yet, the two communities, like many others in Kenya, are largely patriarchal. This experience provides a good benchmarking lesson that, despite the cultural practices that have informed many communities in the past, given opportunity, women may play critical roles in helping communities protect and mitigate their communal land rights where circumstances so demand.

5. Compensation to “occupants in good faith” without title to land
As noted in the study, Article 40(4) of the Constitution of Kenya states that ‘provision may be made for compensation to be paid to occupants in good faith of land acquired under clause (3) who may not hold title to the land”. While the rules to govern how the discretion implied by this Article are yet to be developed, the study reveals that the State has exercised this discretion positively in the studied Port site in Lamu and the Airport site in Isiolo. Despite land owners not holding title to their land in the two places, cash-for-land and land-for-land compensation was made to the claimants in Lamu and Isiolo respectively.

These are good precedents for other parts of the country where formal processes to register communal land have not been applied or completed. Lessons learnt from these two Counties may be borrowed to inform and improve similar compensation exercises elsewhere.

6. Protection of interests of legitimate beneficiaries during compensation

Incidents were recounted of husbands and fathers pocketing the proceeds of compensation and departing home with the entire compensation sum. This leaves the wives and children vulnerably exposed and without alternative livelihoods. Such people become a problem for the community and State. To avoid such negligence, the government should consider regulating the release of compensation funds. The practice under the Land Control Act Chapter 302 of the Laws of Kenya which regulates transactions of agricultural land could be borrowed. Though not written into the law, Land Control Boards always require the proprietor’s spouse to be in attendance before approval to any application for approval of a transaction such as subdivision or sale of family property. And where they are in doubt about the facts to any application, they will usually refer to an area elder or the Assistant Chief for pertinent information in an effort to ensure that spouse and children are in agreement. Such a procedure could be enforced in the case of compensation following acquisition.

It is recommended that the Government, in liaison with the National Land Commission, puts in place modalities to explore how a similar social safeguard procedure could be instituted in the proceedings for compensation under the Land Act to protect legitimate beneficiaries in instances where acquisition of land for projects has to be done with requisite compensation to landowners.

7. Preservation of indigenous and local knowledge:
Project activities involving large scale land acquisition have the inevitable consequence, in some cases, of interfering or totally defacing available traditional/indigenous knowledge from the affected site. This is the case in some parts of Lamu and Isiolo where invaluable oral and cultural knowledge, including some cultural sites, have been preserved over the years. In any event, if enhanced community participation is adopted, and a threshold placed to examine if the participation is meaningful, the indigenous and local knowledge of the communities will also benefit the project at the point of local risk assessment. In this case, recording of such knowledge can be undertaken for posterity use.
It is therefore recommended that the implementation of such projects be preceded by a quick knowledge mapping to determine and document such knowledge before destruction or adulteration, together with enhanced community participation. Where possible, such knowledge can be proactively preserved in collaboration with the relevant state organs. Such a mapping can still be done for the LAPSSET Corridor and Isiolo Resort City before implementation takes off.

Nyasani PJ, Owuor MA. Latin Maxims, Expressions, Phrases and Idioms in Legal and Philosophical Use. Nairobi: BR Professional Education; 2013.
Gichuki N. Law of Financial Institutions in Kenya (2nd edition). Nairobi: LawAfrica; 2013.
HAMU PROFHABWEJOHN. Lulu ya Maisha. Jomo Kenyatta Foundation; 2013.
Kokwaro JO, Johns T. Luo-English Biological Dictionary. Nairobi: East African Educational Publishers Ltd; 2013.
Mandela P. Living the Mysteries of the Holy Rosary. London: Xlibris Publishing Corporation; 2012.
Gichuki N. Law of Financial Institutions in Kenya. Nairobi: LawAfrica; 2011.
Inyega HN, Inyega JO. Learning to read and reading to learn: A practical teacher's guide. Nairobi: Riverbrooks Communications Network. ISBN: 996-67336-3-9. Nairobi: Riverbrooks Communications Network; 2011. Abstract

The book focus on teaching methodology with special reference to reading

Inyega HN. Learning to read and reading to learn: A practical teachers' guide. Nairobi: Riverbrooks Publishers; 2011.
Oketch(ed.)E, Siele N. Life’s Prescription: A Journey of Inspiration through Poetry. Nairobi: BlueBay International; 2011.
Nzimbi BM. Linear Algebra II-ODL Programme. Nairobi: University of Nairobi; 2011.
Literary Translation in Kiswahili, . VDM Verlagsservicegesellschaft mbH, Germany: Lambart Academic Publishers; 2011.
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Musyoka W. Law of Succession.. Nairobi: LawAfrica Publishing (K) Limited.; 2006.
Musyoka W. Law of Succession.. Nairobi: LawAfrica Publishing (K) Limited.; 2006.
Ndegwa PN. Lecture Notes on Invertebrate Zoology. Nairobi: University of Nairobi; 2003.Website
Kamau MM. Law and Ethics of Media: English Adaptation. Nairobi: Pauline Publications; 2002.
Mungai DN;, Suguna DO, Gachene CKK;, Gichuki FN;. Land and water management for sustainable agricultural production..; 2000.Website
Gachene CKK;, Suguna DO, Mungai DN;, Gichuki FN;. Land and water management for sustainable agricultural production..; 2000.Website
Mungai, DN; Gachene CKK;, Suguna DO, Mungai DN;, Gichuki FN;. Land and water management for sustainable agricultural production..; 2000. AbstractWebsite

The constraints on land use and water resources for sustainable agricultural production in Kenya were assessed during May to September 1992 using questionnaires and personal interviews along with existing secondary data using districts representative of the country as a whole. It is concluded that land use planning in Kenya is disastrous. A large proportion of good land is under commercial crops that are less important than food crops, from social and political standpoints. Soil degradative processes, other than accelerated erosion, should be given due attention. Erosion control measures should be evaluated for technical feasibility, economic benefit, social acceptability and environmental suitability. Soil erosion classification is required. Drainage and irrigation potentials are under-exploited, whilst fertilizer use on food crops is minimal. Due to maldistribution and mismanagement of land and water resources, low crop production per unit of land is common. It is recommended that techniques be developed to ensure sustained high productivity of land to satisfy changing needs without unnecessary opening up of new land

Mungai DN;, Gichuki FN;, Gachene CKK. Land-use planning, development and policy for rural Kenya..; 2000. AbstractWebsite

This paper is concerned with policy and development issues relating to the planning of rural land use in Kenya. The central theme of the analysis is the critical and urgent need for sustainable land use. Based on a study of land considerations in past development policies and of current land use issues, the paper discusses current development strategies and issues. Pitfalls likely to be encountered in future land use planning in rural Kenya are discussed.

Odada EO, Johnson TC. The Limnology, Climatology and Paleoclimatology of the East African lakes. Amsterdam: Gordon and Breach Science Publishers,; 1996.
NZUVE SNM. Labour Relations, with a 60 minutes cassete. Nairobi: University of Nairobi press; 1990.
Book Chapter
Amadi H. "Local Government Functions in a Societal Perspective: Evolution of Government-Society Relations in Kenya".". In: Local Government: A Global Perspective.; Forthcoming.
Shagwira H, Mwema FM, MBUYA TO. "Lightweight Polymer–Nanoparticle-Based Composites.". In: Nanomaterials and Nanocomposites. Boca Raton: CRC Press; 2021. Abstract

The increasing demand for eco-friendly materials in various fields including the construction industry has led to increased efforts toward the development of more materials to suit such fields. In this work, a specific review of polymer–nanoparticle-based composites is presented with an emphasis on the nano-silica reinforcements. A background on applications, processing methods, and state-of-the-art review of the subject is presented. It is noted that there is limited literature focusing on the recycling of polymers using silica nanoparticle-based reinforcements for the construction industry. Gaps in the literature are identified, and the direction for future research focus is presented.

Kaimenyi C., Kidombo H, T. S. "Legal Framework and Implementation of Workforce Diversity Policies in Public Universities in Kenya.". In: Africa at Development Crossroads .; 2017.
M N. "Leadership and Statecraft in frican Foreign Policy and Diplomatic Engagements.". In: African Foreign Policy, Diplomacy and Leadership. Nairobi : Colourprint Ltd; 2016.
Ondicho, TG. "Letter: Study Trends of Lecturers at the Institute of Anthropology, Gender and African Studies, University of Nairobi.". In: S. Wakana, S. Siraishi & T. Ondicho (Eds) Re-finding African Local Assets and City Environments: Governance, Research and Reflexivity. Tokyo: ILCAA & JSPS Pp. 287-289; 2016.
Kibugi R. "Legal Options for Mainstreaming Climate Change Disaster Risk Reduction in Governance for Kenya.". In: Adaptation to Climate Change: ASEAN and Comparative Experiences.; 2016:. Abstract
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Musonye MM. "Literary Insurgency: Mchongoano and the Popular Art Scene in Nairobi.". In: Popular Culture in Africa: The Episteme of the Everyday. New York & London: Taylor & Francis Group; 2014.
Kameri-Mbote P, Odote C. "Liability for Climate Change in Kenya.". In: Climate Change Liability: Transnational Law and Practice. London: Cambridge University Press; 2012.
M PROFSYAGGAPAUL. "Land Tenure in Slum Upgrading Projects.". In: In Slum Upgrading Programmes in Nairobi: Challenges in Implementation. Nairobi: French Institute for Research in Africa (IFRA); 2011.
MARY MWIANDI. "Leadership and transformation of society.". In: Challenging the Rulers: a Leadership Model for Good Governance. Nairobi: East African Educational Publishers; 2011.
Karanja NK, Kimenju JM, Esilaba AO, Jefwa J, Ayuke F. "Legume Based Cropping and Soil Biodiversity Dynamics.". In: Springer Science+Business Media B.V.; 2011:. Abstract

The soil is home to an enormous diversity of organisms, many of which
are beneficial, while a small and equally diverse proportion contains harmful organisms.
Legume cropping and husbandry practices impact negatively or positively on
diversity. These changes in biodiversity may be quantitative and/or qualitative.
Sustainable management of diversity in soils involves an ecosystem approach which
encourages the establishment of equilibria between the organisms in the soil. It is
evident that the diversity of beneficial organisms in the soil can be harnessed to
improve and sustain crop productivity with minimal external inputs. Legumes will
continue to play a central role in the supply of plant nutrients and in the establishment
of a self-regulating ecosystem which is based on a diverse range of
organisms.

Karanja NK, Kimenju JM, Esilaba AO, Jefwa, J., Ayuke FO. "Legume based cropping and soil biodiversity dynamics.". In: In: Bationo, A., Waswa, B., Okeyo, J.M., Maina, F., Kihara, J., Mokwunye, U (Eds), Fighting Poverty in Sub-Saharan Africa: The Multiple Roles of Legumes in Integrated Soil Fertility Management, 4:67-83. Springer Publishers; 2011. Abstract

The soil is home to an enormous diversity of organisms, many of which are benefi cial, while a small and equally diverse proportion contains harmful organisms. Legume cropping and husbandry practices impact negatively or positively on diversity. These changes in biodiversity may be quantitative and/or qualitative.
Sustainable management of diversity in soils involves an ecosystem approach which encourages the establishment of equilibria between the organisms in the soil. It is evident that the diversity of benefi cial organisms in the soil can be harnessed to improve and sustain crop productivity with minimal external inputs. Legumes will continue to play a central role in the supply of plant nutrients and in the establishment of a self-regulating ecosystem which is based on a diverse range of organisms.

Nyang’au TN, Misati L. "The Link between Rural Poverty and HIV/AIDS.". In: Working With Rural Communities. Second Edition. Nairobi: University of Nairobi Press; 2011.
Odhiambo T. "Literary Maps of Nairobi’s Citiness.". In: Afropolis: Cairo, Lagos, Nairobi, Kinshasa, Johannesburg. Koln: Verlag der Buchhandlung Walther Konig; 2011.
WAMBUA MUSILI. "The legislative framework for adjudication of piracy cases in kenya; review of the jurisdictionaland procedural challenges and the institutional capacity.". In: sea piracy law-selected national legal frameworks and regional legislative approaches. Germany: Duncker and Humblot; 2010.
P.N W, E.T.O O, A.J R. "License Plate Recognition System: Localization for Kenya.". In: Strengthening the Role of ICT in Development. Nairobi; 2010.
Njeru G. "Local Level Politics: The 2007 Parliamentary Elections in Kenya.". In: Tensions and Reversals in Democratic Transitions: The Kenya 2007 General Elections. Nairobi: Society for International Development; 2010.
KABUBO-MARIARA J. "The Labour Market in Kenya: Structure, Reforms and the Role of Government. Chapter 7: (150-184).". In: M.S. Gupta (ed.) Labour and Rural Development. Serials Publications; 2009.
PATRICIA PROFKAMERI-MBOTE. "The Land Question in Kenya: Legal and Ethical Dimensions”, in Governance.". In: Institutions and the Human Condition. NAIROBI: Strathmore University and Law Africa; 2009.
Kanyinga K. "Land redistribution in Kenya.". In: Agriculture Land Redistribution: Towards Greater Consensus. Washington D.C: The World Bank; 2009.
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(eds.) OCO, et al. "Land Tenure and Sustainable Environmental Management in Kenya.". In: Environmental Governance in Kenya: Implementing the Framework Law. NAIROBI: East African Education Publishers; 2008.
Siriba DN, Farah HO. "Land Management Information Systems in the Knowledge Economy: What options are there for Kenya.". In: Discussion and Guiding Principles for Africa - land management Systems in the Knowledge Economy. Addis Ababa: Economic Commission for Africa; 2007.
Zarins CK, Xu C, Taylor CA, Glagov S. "Localization of {Atherosclerotic} {Lesions}." In: MD RWA, MD LHH, eds. Vascular {Surgery}. Blackwell Publishing; 2007:. Abstract

This chapter contains sections titled: * Arterial structure and function * Physiologic adaptation of the arterial wall * Human atherosclerotic plaque morphology * Mechanical determinants of plaque localization * Susceptible regions of the arterial vasculature * Conclusion

Wandiga SO, Madadi VO, Kiremire BT, Kishimba MA. "Lake Victoria: Will it support life tomorrow? A case for abatement of pollution and eutrophication of fresh waters.". In: Environment for Development: An Ecosystem Assessment of Lake Victoria Basin Environmental and Socio-Economic Status, Trends and Human Vulnerabilities. Nairobi: UNEP-PASS; 2006:.
Musisi S, editor Ndetei, D.M. "Liaison Psychiatry."; 2006.
Obondo A, editor Ndetei, D.M., Rono R, Ngare D. "Loss and Bereavement Therapies."; 2006.
Wanjala C. "Lewis Nkosi's Early Literary Criticism.". In: Still Beating the Drum. Amsterdam & New York: Rodopi; 2005.
K. DRMARIARAJANEWANJIKU. "Labour Market Outcomes, Poverty and the Role of Gender: The Case of Kenya. Chapter 10 in Mohammed Mwamadzingo and Ditiro Saleshando (Eds). ISBN no. 92-2-114143-8 2003.". In: "Trade Unions and Poverty Alleviation in Africa. Harare and Geneva;: ILO ; 2003.
Dr. OLOO ADAMS co-authored with Winnie Mitullah in Lawrence Mute and Smokin Wanjala(eds.). "The Legislature and Constitutionalism in Kenya.". In: the Constitution begins to Flower. NAIROBI: Claripress; 2002.
Broadcast
Mueni J. Live audience. Medeva; 2007.
Case
Conference Paper
Jayne M. "Languages and Society: A Gender Perspective.". In: Proceedings of Understanding Gender Inequalities. Egerton University; Forthcoming.
Oyugi CCA. "La mise en valeur du non-dit en classe du français langue étrangère.". In: L’enseignement du français dans le contexte multilingue estafricain et kenyan (Teaching of French in a multilingual context in East Africa and Kenya). Kenyatta University; Submitted.conference_presentation-_k.u..docxconference_presentation_2-_k.u..docxconcilier_formation_doc__ku.docx
N PROFNZOMODAUDI. "Leasing: "Four-year period for transitional new accounting practice." This article discusses the official position of the Accounting Profession on capitalization of leases.". In: Management: (Ibid), (pages 28-29). RIVERBRROKS COMMUNICATIONS; Submitted. Abstract
Journal of the Institute of Certified Public Accountants of Kenya. (pages 13-15)
N PROFNZOMODAUDI. "Leasing: "Four-year period for transitional new accounting practice." This article discusses the official position of the Accounting Profession on capitalization of leases.". In: Management: (Ibid), (pages 28-29).; Submitted. Abstract

Journal of the Institute of Certified Public Accountants of Kenya. (pages 13-15)

G. PROFSIMIYUVINCENT. "Les Classes Sociales en Afrique de Iquest Pre-Coloniale in He-CHI Revue dEtudes Francaises de Iuniversite de Nairobi.". In: P. 47-53 Editorship: African in Time Perspective. Weekly Radio Talks on African History, V.O.K.; Submitted. Abstract

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KICHAMU MRAKIVAGASYMONDS. "Local Authorities in Kenya (H.E.B.) . forthcoming.". In: East Afr. Medi. Journal. Elsevier; Submitted. Abstract
Analysis of 355 cases with fractures of the mandible indicated that 74.9% of the cases were due to interpersonal violence and 13.8% were caused by road traffic accidents. The men to women ratio was 8.4:1 and 75.5% of the fracture cases had single fractures while 24.5% had multiple fractures. In cases with a single fracture, the most commonly involved mandibular site was the body (42.2%). The angle of mandible was most frequently fractured (50.5%) in cases with multiple fractures.
O DROGARAWILLIAM. "Long-term performance of electronic identification devices and model traceability system for cattle under pastoral production systems of Kenya.". In: Journal. Livestock Research for Rural Development; Submitted. Abstract
G O Matete*, W Maritim**, G Muchemi**, N Maingi***, J M Gathuma* and W Ogara* * Department of Veterinary Public Health, Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Nairobi P.O Box 30197, Nairobi, Kenyageorge.matete@gmail.com** Ministry of Livestock Development P.O Kabete 00625 Kangemi, Nairobi, Kenya*** Department of Veterinary Pathology and Parasitology, University of Nairobi, P.O Box 30197, Nairobi, Kenya Abstract The readability of two different types of electronic identifiers (EID) were evaluated under pastoral production system in North-Eastern Kenya.  Physical verification and reading was done at day 0, and 1, 2, 4, 8 and 12 months respectively on a total of 1943 beef cattle of which 934 were tagged using ear button tags and 1009 with rumen boluses.  The retention rates were recorded and readability determined using a hand-held reader and subsequently compared using a non parametric survival analysis.   The results showed that, rumen boluses were more effective with retention and readability of 100% after the one-year period.  The retention rate for ear button tags deteriorated after day 120 to 94.6%.  This implied that rumen boluses are safe and tamper-proof and are thus recommended for use in pastoral production systems. When tested within the model Livestock Identification and Traceability System (LITS), the use of RFID identifiers were able to substantially contribute to better record keeping, and proof of credible livestock certification. However, due to cost considerations, undertaking a benefit-cost analysis and provisional analysis of the institutional and organisational infrastructure may be critical for successful implementation. Keywords: livestock identification, radio frequency identification devices, traceability system
O DROGARAWILLIAM. "Long-term performance of electronic identification devices and model traceability system for cattle under pastoral production systems of Kenya.". In: Journal. Livestock Research for Rural Development; Submitted. Abstract
G O Matete*, W Maritim**, G Muchemi**, N Maingi***, J M Gathuma* and W Ogara* * Department of Veterinary Public Health, Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Nairobi P.O Box 30197, Nairobi, Kenyageorge.matete@gmail.com** Ministry of Livestock Development P.O Kabete 00625 Kangemi, Nairobi, Kenya*** Department of Veterinary Pathology and Parasitology, University of Nairobi, P.O Box 30197, Nairobi, Kenya Abstract The readability of two different types of electronic identifiers (EID) were evaluated under pastoral production system in North-Eastern Kenya.  Physical verification and reading was done at day 0, and 1, 2, 4, 8 and 12 months respectively on a total of 1943 beef cattle of which 934 were tagged using ear button tags and 1009 with rumen boluses.  The retention rates were recorded and readability determined using a hand-held reader and subsequently compared using a non parametric survival analysis.   The results showed that, rumen boluses were more effective with retention and readability of 100% after the one-year period.  The retention rate for ear button tags deteriorated after day 120 to 94.6%.  This implied that rumen boluses are safe and tamper-proof and are thus recommended for use in pastoral production systems. When tested within the model Livestock Identification and Traceability System (LITS), the use of RFID identifiers were able to substantially contribute to better record keeping, and proof of credible livestock certification. However, due to cost considerations, undertaking a benefit-cost analysis and provisional analysis of the institutional and organisational infrastructure may be critical for successful implementation. Keywords: livestock identification, radio frequency identification devices, traceability system
Ondiba IM, Oyieke FA, Athinya DK, Nyamongo IK, Estambale BBA. "Larval species diversity, seasonal occurrence and larval habitat preference of mosquitoestransmitting Rift Valley fever and malariain Baringo County, Kenya.". In: C.B.P.S. Annual conference.; 2019.
Gichuyia LN. "LESSONS LEARNT FROM THERMAL DATA-LOGGING OF BUILDINGS IN NAIROBI OVER THE YEARS; HIGHLIGHT- ING THE DEMAND FUNCTIONS FOR DECI- SION-SUPPORT.". In: Annual Eastern Africa Architecture Workshop and Exhibition. ADD Building - University of Nairobi; 2019.
and Mwangi, I. K., Mugo FW, Ndegwa E. "Land Fragmentation and Its Potential Effects on Maize Production in Kenya. Paper Presented at Maize for Kenya Consultative Workshop.". In: Maize for Kenya Consultative Workshop. ICRAF, Nairobi; 2019.
Mumbi M. "limate Responsive Architecture: Learning from the History of the Origin, Spread and Development of Tropical Modern Architecture.". In: annual Eastern African Regional Workshop, Nairobi. ADD Building, University of Nairobi; 2018.
Dommain R, S Riedl ALD, deMenocal PB, Olaka LA, Strecker MR, Potts R. "Lake level history of Paleolake Siriata and hydrological sub-basin connectivity in the Southern Kenya Rift during the African Humid Period (AHP).". In: American Geophysical Union, Fall General Assembly 2016. San Fransisco; 2016. Abstract

The AHP is one of the most dramatic examples of late Quaternary hydroclimatic change in the tropics. During this wet period numerous large and deep lakes existed in the eastern arm of the East African Rift System (EARS) as testified by paleo-shorelines and lacustrine sediments. The tempo of onset and termination as well as the duration of the AHP is a matter of ongoing research and are still poorly established for the Southern Kenya Rift. Here we present new paleo-shoreline and sedimentary evidence for the existence of a freshwater lake during the AHP to the east of alkaline Lake Magadi. The AHP lake - Paleolake Siriata - was a critical link in the paleodrainage network that connected the central with the southern Kenya rift lakes and northern Tanzania. To establish the timing and spatial extent of Paleolake Siriata we mapped elevations of paleo-shorelines and associated shoreline facies and diatomaceous lacustrine sediments along the former basin margins. Morphometric and topographic details were mapped using a dGPS and an UAV to create a DEM with a resolution of 5 cm to define shoreline elevations and the characteristics of the former basin outlet. Reservoir age-corrected radiocarbon dates of gastropod and bivalve shells and 40Ar/39Ar ages of pumice from the lacustrine strata provide the chronological framework of the Lake Siriata highstand. In addition, oxygen-isotope measurements of gastropod shells indicate past variations in the former lake water-balance. Paleolake Siriata formed abruptly immediately after the dry Younger Dryas interval and reached a maximum depth of 55 m and a surface area of 30 km2; during highstand conditions the lake overflowed into adjacent Lake Magadi while it received inflow from Lake Naivasha via the Kedong Valley and the Olorgesailie Basin in the north. This hydrological connectivity provides important context for the interpretation of the sediment records from the recently collected Olorgesailie-Koora and Lake Magadi drill cores.

Waweru JN. "Leading versus managing libraries in Kenya.". In: Kenya Library Association international conference. Nairobi safari club; 2016.
Mutuma M, Muthomi JW, Stasiewicz M. "Low-cost Optical Sorting to Remove Mycotoxins from Maize in Local Kenyan Mills.". In: Nairobi Innovation Week 2016. University of Nairobi, Kenya; 2016.
Tan T, Chu TS, Peng B, Wang J. "Large-scale traffic grid signal control using decentralized fuzzy reinforcement learning.". In: Proceedings of SAI Intelligent Systems Conference. Springer; 2016:. Abstract
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Muigua K. "The Lawyer as a Negotiator, Mediator and Peacemaker in Kenya.". In: 2015 LSK Annual Conference. Leisure Lodge & Beach Resort, Diani Mombasa ; 2015.the_lawyer_as_a_negotiator_mediator_and_peacemaker_in_kenya-by_dr__muigua.pdf
Onjala J. "Local Economic Development and Regional Planning in Poverty Reduction at County Levels in Kenya.". In: Conference on Sustainable Development and Management, United Nations Human Settlements Programme and the African Institute for Capacity Development (AICAD). AICAD Nairobi; 2015.
KYALO DN, P.D. MATULA, MULWA SA. "LEARNING IN HIGHER EDUCATION: The Role of Active Learning in Redefining Education to detach it from Acquisition of Certificates’.". In: LEARNING IN HIGHER EDUCATION: The Role of Active Learning in Redefining Education to detach it from Acquisition of Certificates’. Kenya Education Management Institute, Nairobi; 2014.
Kithiia SK, Krhoda G, Wambua BN. "Land Alienation, Livelihood and Integrated Water resources Management Strategy in Tana River County.". In: Tana River County Sustainable Resource Utilization and Environmental Management. Proceedings of the National Scientific Conference on the Tana River county; Nema/Wetlands International/UoN. Mombasa, Kenya; 2014.
Kimeu M. "The LRC: Wholistic Green Building Design In Nairobi.". In: Green Building Training in Kampala organised by UN Habitat. Kampala; 2014.
Kimeu M. "The LRC: Wholistic Green Building Design In Nairobi.". In: Green Building Training in Nairobi. Apollo Centre in Westlands, Nairobi.; 2014.
Wambua BN. "Lakes Chala and Jipe and Umba river ecosystems transboundary integrated natural Resource management programme.". In: lakes challa and Jipe and umba river ecosystem transboundary management. Kilimanjaro crest Hotel- moshi Tanzania; 2013.
MBECHE F. "Leadership and Management Development for African Schooling in the 21stCentury.". In: DETA conference . University of Nairobi; 2013.
M.Kimeu. "The LRC: Holistic Green building design finally in Nairobi.". In: East African regional Workshop East African regional Workshop . ADD building, University of Nairobi; 2013.
Papah, et al. "Lake Magadi Ecosystem: Current Research Trends and Future Perspectives.". In: 1st International One Health Conference. Hilton Hotel, Addis Ababa Ethiopia; 2013.
Kimeu M. "The LRC at The Catholic University of Eastern Africa.". In: UN-Habitat Conference on Financing Green Building in Africa. Strathmore University; 2013.
Muriithi MK, Kamau G. "Livelihood strategy and food security in Turkana county of Kenya." Tanzania, Arusha; 2012.
Mukhono PM, Angeyo HK, Dehayem-Massop A, Kaduki KA. "Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroanalysis and Characterization of Environmental Matrices Utilizing Multivariate Chemometrics.". In: 7th Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy Conference. Luxor, Egypt; 2012.
Khasakhala" "AA. "Levels, Trends and Pattern in Overall, childhood and Maternal Mortality in Kenya.". In: 2. 4th Population Association of Kenya (PAK) Conference,. Nairobi, Kenya; 2012.
M DRININDAJOSEPH. "Linkages between global sea surface temperatures and decadal rainfall variability over Eastern africa region.". In: International Journal of Climatology. Royal Meteorological Society; 2012. Abstract
Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh, UK. 256p.
Alila PO. "Local Communicty Social Systems and Human Security." A. Kumssa et al (eds). Conflict and Human Security in Africa: Kenya in Perspective, Macmillan, 2011; 2012. Abstract
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ndeti ndati. "Leadership and Community Mobilization.". In: HIV/AIDS Base Group Regional Conference. YMCA Nairobi; 2011.
Mwenesi BM. "L’enseignement du français dans le contexte multilingue Est-Africain et kenyan .". In: L’enseignement du français dans le contexte multilingue Est-Africain. Kenyatta University; 2011.ku_paper.pdf
WINFRED DR MWANGI. "A Land Administrators View on the National Land Policy, the Constitution of Kenya (2010) and the National Land Commission Bill (2011).". In: KHRC Breakfast Forum on land reforms Agenda in Kenya. Nairobi; 2011.
Mbaria JM. "Lead Poisoning."; 2011. Abstract

Understanding of lead toxicity has advanced substantially over the past three decades, and focus has shifted from high-dose effects in clinically symptomatic individuals to the consequences of exposure at lower doses that cause no symptoms, particularly in children and fetuses. The availability of more sensitive analytic methods has made it possible to measure lead at much lower concentrations. This advance, along with more refined epidemiological techniques and better outcome measures, has lowered the least observable effect level until it approaches zero. As a consequence, the segment of the population who are diagnosed with exposure to toxic levels has expanded. At the same time, environmental efforts, most importantly the removal of lead from gasoline, have dramatically reduced the amount of lead in the biosphere. The remaining major source of lead is older housing stock. Although the cost of lead paint abatement is measured in billions of dollars, the monetized benefits of such a Herculean task have been shown to far outweigh the costs.

RAI MRVYASYASHWANT. ""Landlords, Tenants and the Law: There is Recourse to the Law".". In: Executive, Nairobi, 19-20.; 2011. Abstract
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GICHOHI DRMBUTHIAPAUL. "Lucy Wanjiru Njagi, Paul Gichohi Mbuthia , Phillip Njeru Nyaga, Lilly Caroline Bebora, Uswege M. Minga. 2011. Viral nucleoprotein localization and lesions of Newcastle disease in tissues of indigenous ducks.Trop Anim Health Prod DOI 10.1007/s11250-011-995.". In: Livestock research for Rural development. Kenya Veterinary association; 2011. Abstract
bstract Localization of Newcastle disease viral nucleoprotein and pathological lesions was evaluated in tissues of 55 indigenous ducks (45 experimentally infected and 10 sentinel ones). In addition, ten Newcastle disease infected chickens were used to ensure that the virus inoculum administered to the ducks produced the disease in chickens, the susceptible hosts. Ducks were killed on day 1, 4, 8 and 14 post-infection. Postmortem examination was done with six tissues (liver, spleen, lung, caecal tonsils, kidneys and brain) being collected from each bird. The tissues were preserved in 10% neutral formalin for 24 h. They were then transferred to 70% ethanol for histology and immunohistochemical staining. Airsacculitis, necrotic splenic foci, congested intestines, lymphoid depleted caecal tonsils and focal infiltrations by mononuclear cells were the main pathological lesions in infected ducks. Over 28.9% of the infected ducks had Newcastle disease viral nucleoprotein in macrophage-like large mononuclear cells in the caecal tonsils and kidney tubular epithelium. The viral antigens were located in the cytoplasm and nucleolus of the cells. The other organs had no detectable viral antigens. This study shows that the kidneys and caecal tonsils are the likely predilection sites for the virus in ducks. They thus need to be considered as diagnostic indicators for the viral carriage in ducks
Mogambi H. "Local language broadcasting in Kenya.". In: Global Media Research Centre. Southern Illinois University; 2010.
"Liberal Arts and the Achievement of vision 2030.". In: Synergy and Networking to Enhance Research and Development. 1st Alexander Van Humboldt Alumni Meridian Court Hotel, Nairobi.; 2010.
Wambui P, Rodrigues A, Opiyo E. "Licence Plate Recognition System: Localization for Kenya.". In: ICCIR. Kampala Uganda; 2010.
Ngugi CM. "Leadership, Ethics and Social Responsibility: Considerations for Women Leaders .". In: Women in Leadership Seminar. St. Benedictine Monastry, Limuru, Kenya; 2010.
WINFRED DR MWANGI. "Land Policy Development and Land Conflicts/Clashes in Kenya: Is there Light at the end of the Tunnel.". In: 10th AFRES Conference. Naivasha, Kenya; 2010.
Okeyo AM;, PERSLEY G;, Kemp SJ. "Livestock and Biodiversity: The Case of Cattle in Africa."; 2010. Abstract

Africa is home to diverse and genetically unique ruminant livestock and wildlife species. The continent, however, faces huge food security challenges, partly due to low productivity of the livestock. As a centre of cattle domestication, Africa hosts genetically unique cattle, being products of generations of co-evolution with diverse people, each selecting for different attributes under different production systems and environments. Over millennia, this diversity of purpose has led to rich and unparalleled blends of indigenous and exotic cattle. Different parasites and pathogens, whose vigour has been buoyed by variable but generally favourable tropical conditions, have coevolved and served as critical drivers, making African cattle some of the world’s most scientifically interesting and valuable populations. This diversity is being lost at an alarmingly rate, and insitu conservation will not significantly save it These cattle can potentially provide adequate food and income to their keepers. First their genetic and phenotypic diversity should be understood, and then carefully tailored to specific production systems to improve their productivity. To realistically conserve these cattle, for which no conservation plans currently exist, available modern bio- and information technologies are needed to assemble and analyse complex sets of information on them. As the climate and pathogens all change, by smartly conserving (ex-situ) those at risk the genetic attributes critical for the world’s future food security challenges would be saved. This paper discusses the diversity of the African cattle and the need for their system-wide characterisation in order to allow their keepers to cope with the changing system, and minimise the loss of these unique genotypes.

MBURU STEPHENNGANGA. "Longhorn ICT for Teacher Training Colleges (manuscript).". In: European Journal of Pharmaceutical sciences. Longhorn; 2010.
Ayub M. "Language Policy and Planning in Urban Kenya." VDM Publishers, Saarbrucken, Germany; 2010. Abstract
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Ndung'u I. "The Learning and Teaching of English Pronunciation in ESL Classroom." Manuscript submitted to World Language English Journal, Pergamon Institute of English; 2010. Abstract
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S. PROFAKUNDABWENILEVI. "Levi-Shadeya-M Akundabweni, G. Mulokozi and D M Maina. 2010. Characterization of African leafy Vegetables for Organo- and Mineral Micronutrient Densities based on X- ray Fluorescence and High Performance Liquid Chromatography. African Journal of Food and .". In: (AJFAND) 10: No. 11 (2010). Paraclete Publishers; 2010. Abstract
AbstractOn-farm experiment was carried out in southwest Kenya in the period 2002 to 2005. The objective was to determine the most profitable source of nitrogen for maize production, and assess various application quantities to identify the most profitable rate. Treatments investigated were: mucuna green manure applied at rates of 30, 60, 120, 240 and 480 kg N ha-1; inorganic fertilizer-urea ratesof 0, 30, 60 and 120 kg N ha-1. At tissue N concentration of 1.85 to 2 % for mucuna, the rates worked to 1.5, 3, 6, 12 and 24 t DM ha-1 equivalent of its green biomass, respectively. Randomized complete block design with four replications was used. Data was collected on maize grain yield and price, costof mucuna N and its application. Procedures applied in economic analysis were net benefits, dominance and marginal analyses. The beneficial rate of mucuna green manure was 6 t DM ha-1 to supply 120 kg N ha-1 with marginal rate of return (MRR) of 123%. In absence of capital to invest in mucuna N production, the inorganic fertilizer rate of 60 kg N ha-1 is profitable and can be used butwith expectation of comparatively lower MRR of 73%. In the absence of required capital to produce the target 120 kg N ha-1 equivalent of mucuna biomass, application of inorganic N at 30 kg ha-1 is the most beneficial practice in all seasons. Lower application rates might require supplementation withinorganic N to make up to the required amount.
S. PROFAKUNDABWENILEVI. "Levi-Shadeya-M Akundabweni, G. Mulokozi and D M Maina. 2010. Characterization of African leafy Vegetables for Organo- and Mineral Micronutrient Densities based on X- ray Fluorescence and High Performance Liquid Chromatography. African Journal of Food and .". In: (AJFAND) 10: No. 11 (2010). Paraclete Publishers; 2010. Abstract
AbstractOn-farm experiment was carried out in southwest Kenya in the period 2002 to 2005. The objective was to determine the most profitable source of nitrogen for maize production, and assess various application quantities to identify the most profitable rate. Treatments investigated were: mucuna green manure applied at rates of 30, 60, 120, 240 and 480 kg N ha-1; inorganic fertilizer-urea ratesof 0, 30, 60 and 120 kg N ha-1. At tissue N concentration of 1.85 to 2 % for mucuna, the rates worked to 1.5, 3, 6, 12 and 24 t DM ha-1 equivalent of its green biomass, respectively. Randomized complete block design with four replications was used. Data was collected on maize grain yield and price, costof mucuna N and its application. Procedures applied in economic analysis were net benefits, dominance and marginal analyses. The beneficial rate of mucuna green manure was 6 t DM ha-1 to supply 120 kg N ha-1 with marginal rate of return (MRR) of 123%. In absence of capital to invest in mucuna N production, the inorganic fertilizer rate of 60 kg N ha-1 is profitable and can be used butwith expectation of comparatively lower MRR of 73%. In the absence of required capital to produce the target 120 kg N ha-1 equivalent of mucuna biomass, application of inorganic N at 30 kg ha-1 is the most beneficial practice in all seasons. Lower application rates might require supplementation withinorganic N to make up to the required amount.
S. PROFAKUNDABWENILEVI. "Levi-Shadeya-M Akundabweni, R.W. Munene, D M Maina and J.M. Mangala. 2010. Mineral Micronutrient Density Characterization Using Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) Analysis in Four On-Farm Kenyan Wild African Fruit tree Germplasm. JAfrican Journal .". In: (AJFAND On Line) Volume 20 No 8. Paraclete Publishers; 2010. Abstract
AbstractOn-farm experiment was carried out in southwest Kenya in the period 2002 to 2005. The objective was to determine the most profitable source of nitrogen for maize production, and assess various application quantities to identify the most profitable rate. Treatments investigated were: mucuna green manure applied at rates of 30, 60, 120, 240 and 480 kg N ha-1; inorganic fertilizer-urea ratesof 0, 30, 60 and 120 kg N ha-1. At tissue N concentration of 1.85 to 2 % for mucuna, the rates worked to 1.5, 3, 6, 12 and 24 t DM ha-1 equivalent of its green biomass, respectively. Randomized complete block design with four replications was used. Data was collected on maize grain yield and price, costof mucuna N and its application. Procedures applied in economic analysis were net benefits, dominance and marginal analyses. The beneficial rate of mucuna green manure was 6 t DM ha-1 to supply 120 kg N ha-1 with marginal rate of return (MRR) of 123%. In absence of capital to invest in mucuna N production, the inorganic fertilizer rate of 60 kg N ha-1 is profitable and can be used butwith expectation of comparatively lower MRR of 73%. In the absence of required capital to produce the target 120 kg N ha-1 equivalent of mucuna biomass, application of inorganic N at 30 kg ha-1 is the most beneficial practice in all seasons. Lower application rates might require supplementation withinorganic N to make up to the required amount.
S. PROFAKUNDABWENILEVI. "Levi-Shadeya-M Akundabweni, R.W. Munene, D M Maina and S.K Bartilol. 2010. Mineral Micronutrient Density in Local Cereals Sample from Bungoma, Maseno and Kibwezi areas. (AJFAND) 10: 11 (2010).". In: (AJFAND) 10: 11 (2010). Paraclete Publishers; 2010. Abstract
AbstractOn-farm experiment was carried out in southwest Kenya in the period 2002 to 2005. The objective was to determine the most profitable source of nitrogen for maize production, and assess various application quantities to identify the most profitable rate. Treatments investigated were: mucuna green manure applied at rates of 30, 60, 120, 240 and 480 kg N ha-1; inorganic fertilizer-urea ratesof 0, 30, 60 and 120 kg N ha-1. At tissue N concentration of 1.85 to 2 % for mucuna, the rates worked to 1.5, 3, 6, 12 and 24 t DM ha-1 equivalent of its green biomass, respectively. Randomized complete block design with four replications was used. Data was collected on maize grain yield and price, costof mucuna N and its application. Procedures applied in economic analysis were net benefits, dominance and marginal analyses. The beneficial rate of mucuna green manure was 6 t DM ha-1 to supply 120 kg N ha-1 with marginal rate of return (MRR) of 123%. In absence of capital to invest in mucuna N production, the inorganic fertilizer rate of 60 kg N ha-1 is profitable and can be used butwith expectation of comparatively lower MRR of 73%. In the absence of required capital to produce the target 120 kg N ha-1 equivalent of mucuna biomass, application of inorganic N at 30 kg ha-1 is the most beneficial practice in all seasons. Lower application rates might require supplementation withinorganic N to make up to the required amount.
DR. WEBER TILO. "Lexikon und Grammatik in Interaktion .". In: Journal of Etnopharmacology. de Gruyter; 2010. Abstract
What are the elementary building blocks of language? Which categories can they be assigned to, based on which criteria? What function do parts of speech or lexical categories have for the speakers of a language? This study provides answers to these theoretical questions, showing on the example of German that lexical categorization is dependent on cognitive and functional conditions ― not as a static structure, but rather as a dynamic process. The empirical part of the study shows that this has consequences, especially for writers of German.
KAISHA DROTSIANYIWYCKLIFFE. "Locating the arcuate line of douglas: is it of surgical relevance?". In: Int. J. Morphol. Wiley; 2010.
HASSAN PROFSAIDI. "Locating the arcuate line of Douglas: Is it of surgical significance? Mwachaka P.M., Saidi H., Odula P.O., Awori K.O., Kaisha W.O. Clinical Anatomy 2010; 23: 84-86.". In: Clinical Anatomy. Surgical society of Kenya; 2010. Abstract
14.00 800x600 Normal 0 false false false EN-GB X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman";} Variant anatomy of the superior thyroid artery is important during surgical procedures, interpretation of angiograms, and interventional radiography in the neck. Pattern of the variations shows population differences but there is no data from the Kenyan population. This study therefore investigated the variations in origin of the superior thyroid artery in a Kenyan population. Forty six necks (36 males and 10 females) from 46 cadavers of black Kenyans in Department of Human Anatomy University of Nairobi, Kenya were bilaterally dissected to expose the origin of the superior thyroid artery. Pattern of origin of the vessel was determined on both sides in males and females. It originated from the external carotid artery common carotid artery and linguo-facial trunk in 80%, 13% and 6.5% of the cadavers respectively on the right side. All but one of the superior thyroid arteries were ventral branches. There was asymmetric origin in 6.5% of cases. Origin from the common carotid artery was associated with high carotid bifurcation. Nearly 20% of superior thyroid arteries showed variant origin. Of these, 6.5% arose from the linguo-facial trunk, much higher than in the Caucasian and Oriental populations. Origin from common carotid artery is substantially lower than prevailing figures from other populations. These findings support ethnic variations. Preoperative angiographic evaluation is recommended.
BUURI MRKABURIAMARTIN, BUURI MRKABURIAMARTIN. "Logistic regression modeling of poverty using Demographic and Health Survey data.". In: European Journal of Social Science. John Benjamins Publishing Company; 2010. Abstract
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O DRACHIATHOMASN. "Logistic regression modeling of poverty using Demographic and Health Survey data.". In: European Journal of Social Science. John Benjamins Publishing Company; 2010. Abstract
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WAMBUA MUSILI. "The legislative framework for adjudication of piracy cases in Kenya; review of the jurisdictional and procedural challenges and the institutional capacity.". In: review of the jurisdictional and procedural challenges and the institutional capacity. Max Planck Institute of Foreign and International Criminal Law, Freiburg, Germany; 2009.
Oroda A, Anyango SO, Branthome A, Situma C. "Land use land cover changes in the lake Victoria region .". In: East. African ecology, Conference. Kampala, Uganda ; 2009.
W. PROFJAOKOGODFREY. "Lester RT, Jaoko W, Plummer FA & Kaul R (2009) Sex, microbial translocation and the African HIV epidemic. Proceedings of National Academy of Science of the United States of America 106 (34) e89.". In: UoN research meeting. Proceedings of National Academy of Science of the United States of America 106 (34) e89; 2009. Abstract
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W. PROFJAOKOGODFREY. "Lester RT, Jaoko W, Plummer FA & Kaul R (2009) Sex, microbial translocation and the African HIV epidemic. Proceedings of National Academy of Science of the United States of America 106 (34) e89.". In: Beverage among the Abagusii of Western Kenya. Proceedings of National Academy of Science of the United States of America 106 (34) e89; 2009. Abstract
Ninety seven patients were examined for dental caries using two standard methods: (a) clinical examination based on WHO Basic Methods Oral Health surveys and (b) radiographic examination. Clinical examination method under records caries by upto 40%. Such under recording may give an impression of a decreasing caries prevalence in epidemiological studies.
W. PROFJAOKOGODFREY. "Lester RT, Yao XD, Ball TB, McKinnon LR, Omange WR, Kaul R, Wachihi C, Jaoko WG, Rosenthal KL & Plummer FA (2009). HIV-1 RNA dysregulates the natural TLR response to subclinical endotoxemia in Kenyan female sex-workers. PLoS ONE 4(5), e5644.". In: UoN research meeting. PLoS ONE 4(5), e5644; 2009. Abstract
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W. PROFJAOKOGODFREY. "Lester RT, Yao XD, Ball TB, McKinnon LR, Omange WR, Kaul R, Wachihi C, Jaoko WG, Rosenthal KL & Plummer FA (2009). HIV-1 RNA dysregulates the natural TLR response to subclinical endotoxemia in Kenyan female sex-workers. PLoS ONE 4(5), e5644.". In: Beverage among the Abagusii of Western Kenya. PLoS ONE 4(5), e5644; 2009. Abstract
Ninety seven patients were examined for dental caries using two standard methods: (a) clinical examination based on WHO Basic Methods Oral Health surveys and (b) radiographic examination. Clinical examination method under records caries by upto 40%. Such under recording may give an impression of a decreasing caries prevalence in epidemiological studies.
ABONG' MRGEORGEOOKO. "Levels of reducing sugars in eight Kenyan potato cultivars as influenced by stage of maturity and storage conditions.". In: Journal of Animal and Plant Sciences, Vol. 2 (2): 76 . 1. George O. Abong; 2009.
KAHAKI DRKIMANI, MARTIN DRKOLLMANNKH. "Listo BN, Kollmann KHM, Kimani K, Owino C.Ocular manifestations of HIV/AIDS at Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital (AMPATH Clinic). East Afr. j. ophthalmol. 2009 Jul; 15(1): 27-34.". In: East African Journal of Ophthalmology. I.E.K Internatioanl Conference l; 2009. Abstract
Objective: To determine the prevalence and pattern of ocular conditions in HIV/AIDS patients attending HIV/AIDS care clinic (AMPATH). Design: Hospital-based cross sectional study. Setting: Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital (AMPATH CLINIC) ,Eldoret, Kenya. Subjects: HIV/AIDS patients seen at AMPATH, clinic. Results: Two hundred patients with HIV/AIDS were examined. The overall prevalence of ocular findings was 154 patients (77%). One hundred and eighteen patients (59%) were on ARV therapy. The main findings were posterior segment lesions (53%), anterior segment disorders (26.5%). Posterior segment findings included; Retinal microvasculopathy (75 patients ,37.5%), chorioretinitis (9 patients, 4.5%), vitreous opacities (8 patients, 4%), macula edema (8 patients, 4%) and CMV retinitis (5 patients , 2.5%). Fibrous membrane attached to the iris mostly near the pupillary margin (37 patients, 18.5%) and iridocyclitis (11 patients, 5.5%) were the main anterior segment findings. Conjunctival growths (13 patients, 6,5%) and Kaposi (10 patients, 5%), conjunctival microvasculopathy (8 patients, 4%) and molluscum contagiosum (5 patients, 2.5%) were the main ocular adnexal findings. Tuberculosis was the main systemic findings (53%). This study found that ocular findings are directly related to the severity of clinical disease staging (e.g. WHO stages III and IV) and severity of immune suppression (CD4+ count). Conclusion: The results of this study suggest a high prevalence of ocular findings in adolescents and adults with HIV/AIDS. Retinal microvasculopathy was the commonest posterior segment finding observed. Further studies are needed to investigate the unusual findings of the fibrous membrane attached to the iris observed in this study.
KAHAKI DRKIMANI, MARTIN DRKOLLMANNKH. "Listo BN, Kollmann KHM, Kimani K, Owino C.Ocular manifestations of HIV/AIDS at Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital (AMPATH Clinic). East Afr. j. ophthalmol. 2009 Jul; 15(1): 27-34.". In: African Journal of Midwifery and Womens. Prof. Anna karani, Prof. Simon Kangethe & Johannes Njagi Njoka; 2009. Abstract
Objective: To determine the prevalence and pattern of ocular conditions in HIV/AIDS patients attending HIV/AIDS care clinic (AMPATH). Design: Hospital-based cross sectional study. Setting: Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital (AMPATH CLINIC) ,Eldoret, Kenya. Subjects: HIV/AIDS patients seen at AMPATH, clinic. Results: Two hundred patients with HIV/AIDS were examined. The overall prevalence of ocular findings was 154 patients (77%). One hundred and eighteen patients (59%) were on ARV therapy. The main findings were posterior segment lesions (53%), anterior segment disorders (26.5%). Posterior segment findings included; Retinal microvasculopathy (75 patients ,37.5%), chorioretinitis (9 patients, 4.5%), vitreous opacities (8 patients, 4%), macula edema (8 patients, 4%) and CMV retinitis (5 patients , 2.5%). Fibrous membrane attached to the iris mostly near the pupillary margin (37 patients, 18.5%) and iridocyclitis (11 patients, 5.5%) were the main anterior segment findings. Conjunctival growths (13 patients, 6,5%) and Kaposi (10 patients, 5%), conjunctival microvasculopathy (8 patients, 4%) and molluscum contagiosum (5 patients, 2.5%) were the main ocular adnexal findings. Tuberculosis was the main systemic findings (53%). This study found that ocular findings are directly related to the severity of clinical disease staging (e.g. WHO stages III and IV) and severity of immune suppression (CD4+ count). Conclusion: The results of this study suggest a high prevalence of ocular findings in adolescents and adults with HIV/AIDS. Retinal microvasculopathy was the commonest posterior segment finding observed. Further studies are needed to investigate the unusual findings of the fibrous membrane attached to the iris observed in this study.
KAHAKI DRKIMANI, MARTIN DRKOLLMANNKH. "Listo BN, Kollmann KHM, Kimani K, Owino C.Ocular manifestations of HIV/AIDS at Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital (AMPATH Clinic). East Afr. j. ophthalmol. 2009 Jul; 15(1): 27-34.". In: African Journal of Midwifery and Womens. Prof. Anna karani, Prof. Simon Kangethe & Johannes Njagi Njoka; 2009. Abstract

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Objective: To determine the prevalence and pattern of ocular conditions in HIV/AIDS patients attending HIV/AIDS care clinic (AMPATH).

Design: Hospital-based cross sectional study.

Setting: Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital (AMPATH CLINIC) ,Eldoret, Kenya.

Subjects: HIV/AIDS patients seen at AMPATH, clinic.

Results: Two hundred patients with HIV/AIDS were examined. The overall prevalence of ocular findings was 154 patients (77%). One hundred and eighteen patients (59%) were on ARV therapy. The main findings were posterior segment lesions (53%), anterior segment disorders (26.5%). Posterior segment findings included; Retinal microvasculopathy (75 patients ,37.5%), chorioretinitis (9 patients, 4.5%), vitreous opacities (8 patients, 4%), macula edema (8 patients, 4%) and CMV retinitis (5 patients , 2.5%). Fibrous membrane attached to the iris mostly near the pupillary margin (37 patients, 18.5%) and iridocyclitis (11 patients, 5.5%) were the main anterior segment findings. Conjunctival growths (13 patients, 6,5%) and Kaposi (10 patients, 5%), conjunctival microvasculopathy (8 patients, 4%) and molluscum contagiosum (5 patients, 2.5%) were the main ocular adnexal findings. Tuberculosis was the main systemic findings (53%). This study found that ocular findings are directly related to the severity of clinical disease staging (e.g. WHO stages III and IV) and severity of immune suppression (CD4+ count).

Conclusion: The results of this study suggest a high prevalence of ocular findings in adolescents and adults with HIV/AIDS. Retinal microvasculopathy was the commonest posterior segment finding observed. Further studies are needed to investigate the unusual findings of the fibrous membrane attached to the iris observed in this study.

OCHIENG&#39; DRODULAPAUL. "Locating the arcuate line of Douglas: Is it of surgical relevance?". In: Journal of Clinical Anatomy.23 (1): 84-86. Mwachaka, P, Saidi H.S, Odula P, Awori K and W. Kaisha; 2009.
MWANGI MRMUREITHISTEPHEN. "Logistic models with rainfall generated carrying capacities for wild herbivores. Kinyua, P.I.D. and Mureithi, S.M. Paper Presented at: The 19th East African Environmental Network Conference 22nd -23rd May 2009, AMREF International Training Centre, Nairobi.". In: The 19th East African Environmental Network Conference 22nd -23rd May 2009, AMREF International Training Centre, Nairobi Kenya. Conference theme: Energy, Gender and the Environment. EAEN; 2009. Abstract
Cities around the world are currently facing considerable pressure to cope with infrastructure provision amidst rapid urban development and economic growth. Kenya is also facing an increasing growth of informal settlements in her urban centres. As rapid urbanization takes its toll, so has the development and growth of slums. More than 34% of Kenya‟s total population lives in urban areas and of this, more than 71% is confined in informal settlements (UN-Habitat, 2009). This paper presents the result of study to assess the effects of the change in land use in two sub-catchments, in an urban area close to the Nairobi Central Business District (NCBD). The paper compares the change in land use of two regions in Nairobi, Kenya that are slowly changing due to the fast growing population and economy, on urban runoff.
R.S. O. "A Look at Climate Change and Human Mobility in Africa -,." paper presents at Cespi Workshop,Italian Ministry of Foreign Affairs; 2009. Abstract
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Njagi L W, Mbuthia P G, Nyaga P N, C BL. "Localization of Newcastle disease viral nucleoprotein in the tissues of carrier ducks.". In: Biennial FVM scientific conference. College of Agriculture and Vet. Sciences, University of Nairobi; 2008.2008-location_of_nd_viral_nucleoprotein_in_ducks.pdf
L.C. B, Nyaga P.N., Mbuthia P.G. "Localisation of Newcastle disease viral nucleoprotein in the tissues of carrier ducks.". In: Faculty of Veterinary Medicine Scientific Conference . Nairobi ; 2008.2008_-_localisation_of_nd_nucleoprotein_in_tissues_of_carrier_ducks.pdf
Mbaria JM, Kanja LW. "Local Experience on Conduct of Acute Toxicological Studies: Presented in Seminar on Procedure of Evaluation of Pesticides: toxicology Ecotoxicology and Efficacy. .". In: Workshop organized by Pest Control Products Board (PCPB) . information resource centre (AIRC), Nairobi, Kenya.; 2008.
Njagi LW;, Mbuthia PG;, Nyaga PN;, Bebora LC;, Michieka JN;, Minga UM. "Localisation Of Newcastle Disease Viral Nucleoprotein In The Tissues Of Carrier Ducks.".; 2008. Abstract

Localisation of Newcastle disease viral nucleo protein in the tissues of carrier ducks was evaluated in 45 experimentally infected and 10 sentinel ducks. Ten chickens were used as positive control bir ds. The ducks were sacrificed serially on days 1, 4, 8 and 14 – post - inoculation. Six tissues (liver, spleen, lung, cecal tonsils, kidneys and brain) were collected from each bird, preserved in 10% neutral formalin for 24 hours, and then transferred to 70% ethanol. Indirect alkaline phosphatase – antialkaline phosphatase immunoperoxidase staining was performed to detect viral nucleoprotein. The ducks (28.9 %) had Newcastle disease viral nucleoprotein in their tissues. The viral nucleoprotein s were found in l arge mononuclear cells of cecal tonsils and tubular epithelial cells in the kidneys of infected ducks. The viral antigens were located in the cytoplasm and nucleolus of the respective cells. Liver, lungs, spleen and brain of all infected ducks did not have detectable viral antigens. The number of ducks with viral antigen increased with duration of infection from 22.2%, 16.7%, 33.3% and 41.7% on days 1, 4, 8 and 14 post - inoculation , respectively (p<0.05).Viral antigen intensity in cecal tonsil tissue section s was 4, 5, and > 5 cells in 15.4%, 53.8% and 30.8%, respectively, of the infected ducks. In the kidneys, more than 5 positive cells were recorded. Thus, in Newcastle disease virus carrier ducks, the kidneys and cecal tonsils need to be sampled for virus i solation besides other tissues.

Njagi LW;, Mbuthia PG;, Nyaga PN;, Bebora LC;, Michieka JN;, Minga UM. "Localisation Of Newcastle Disease Viral Nucleoprotein In The Tissues Of Carrier Ducks.".; 2008. Abstract

Localisation of Newcastle disease viral nucleo protein in the tissues of carrier ducks was evaluated in 45 experimentally infected and 10 sentinel ducks. Ten chickens were used as positive control bir ds. The ducks were sacrificed serially on days 1, 4, 8 and 14 – post - inoculation. Six tissues (liver, spleen, lung, cecal tonsils, kidneys and brain) were collected from each bird, preserved in 10% neutral formalin for 24 hours, and then transferred to 70% ethanol. Indirect alkaline phosphatase – antialkaline phosphatase immunoperoxidase staining was performed to detect viral nucleoprotein. The ducks (28.9 %) had Newcastle disease viral nucleoprotein in their tissues. The viral nucleoprotein s were found in l arge mononuclear cells of cecal tonsils and tubular epithelial cells in the kidneys of infected ducks. The viral antigens were located in the cytoplasm and nucleolus of the respective cells. Liver, lungs, spleen and brain of all infected ducks did not have detectable viral antigens. The number of ducks with viral antigen increased with duration of infection from 22.2%, 16.7%, 33.3% and 41.7% on days 1, 4, 8 and 14 post - inoculation , respectively (p<0.05).Viral antigen intensity in cecal tonsil tissue section s was 4, 5, and > 5 cells in 15.4%, 53.8% and 30.8%, respectively, of the infected ducks. In the kidneys, more than 5 positive cells were recorded. Thus, in Newcastle disease virus carrier ducks, the kidneys and cecal tonsils need to be sampled for virus i solation besides other tissues

CAROLINE MUTAI. "L." KENYATTA UNIVERSITY; 2008. Abstract
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WANJIRU MRSKARIUKILUCY, KINYUA DRNGUUEDWARD, W. DRKINYANJUIPETER, BULIMO DRDIMBUSONWALLACE. "L.W. Kariuki, E.K. Nguu, R.M. Njogu, P. W. Kinyanjui, J.O.Midiwo, W.D. Bulimo, J.K.Kiaira. MAESANIN: A BENZOQUINONE FROM MAESA LANCEOLATA THAT COMPLETELY INHIBITS RESPIRATION IN BLOODSTREAM TRYPANOSOMA BRUCEI BRUCEI.". In: 5th International Congress of the African Association of Physiological Sciences (AAPS). Kisipan, M.L.; 2008.
WANJIRU MRSKARIUKILUCY, KINYUA DRNGUUEDWARD, W. DRKINYANJUIPETER, BULIMO DRDIMBUSONWALLACE. "L.W. Kariuki, E.K. Nguu, R.M. Njogu, P. W. Kinyanjui, J.O.Midiwo, W.D. Bulimo, J.K.Kiaira. MAESANIN: A BENZOQUINONE FROM MAESA LANCEOLATA THAT COMPLETELY INHIBITS RESPIRATION IN BLOODSTREAM TRYPANOSOMA BRUCEI BRUCEI.". In: 5th International Congress of the African Association of Physiological Sciences (AAPS). ELSAYED EL BANHAWY,1 L. IRUNGU1 & H. MUGO2; 2008.
WANJIRU MRSKARIUKILUCY, KINYUA DRNGUUEDWARD, W. DRKINYANJUIPETER, BULIMO DRDIMBUSONWALLACE. "L.W. Kariuki, E.K. Nguu, R.M. Njogu, P. W. Kinyanjui, J.O.Midiwo, W.D. Bulimo, J.K.Kiaira. MAESANIN: A BENZOQUINONE FROM MAESA LANCEOLATA THAT COMPLETELY INHIBITS RESPIRATION IN BLOODSTREAM TRYPANOSOMA BRUCEI BRUCEI.". In: 5th International Congress of the African Association of Physiological Sciences (AAPS). MBA; 2008.
WANJIRU MRSKARIUKILUCY, KINYUA DRNGUUEDWARD, W. DRKINYANJUIPETER, BULIMO DRDIMBUSONWALLACE. "L.W. Kariuki, E.K. Nguu, R.M. Njogu, P. W. Kinyanjui, J.O.Midiwo, W.D. Bulimo, J.K.Kiaira. MAESANIN: A BENZOQUINONE FROM MAESA LANCEOLATA THAT COMPLETELY INHIBITS RESPIRATION IN BLOODSTREAM TRYPANOSOMA BRUCEI BRUCEI.". In: 5th International Congress of the African Association of Physiological Sciences (AAPS). Heinrich Boll Foundation.; 2008.

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