Sexual behaviour in Kenya implications for sexually transmitted disease transmission and control

Citation:
E.N. PN. "Sexual behaviour in Kenya implications for sexually transmitted disease transmission and control.". 1994.

Abstract:

Sexually transmitted diseases have long been recognized as a major public health problem in Kenya. They are among the most common presenting complaints W ,Z!iji of adults at outpatient health facilities, ,Xid: representing 5% to 10% of the caseload at many clinics.' Gonorrhea, syphilis, chancroid, chlamydial infection, genital herpes infection, and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection are the t, ;; most important sexually transmitted diseases in Kenya. The overall prevalence of these infections in the general population is unknown, but in antenatal populations in Nairobi, the prevalence of sexually transmitted diseases has recently been ..a shown to be in excess of 20%, with prevalence rates for gonorrhea, syphilis, and HIV-1 infection among pregnant women on the order of 5%, 8%, and 15%, respectively.2Sexually transmitted infections and their sequelae contribute significantly to morbidity and mortality. Syphilis in pregnancy is a major cause of spontaneous abortion, stillbirths, and neonatal morbidity and mortality. Gonorrhea and chlamydial infections in women are responsible for acute and chronic pelvic inflammatory disease, infertility, adverse p!!; pregnancy outcomes, and ophthalmia neonatorum.Perhaps even more important, treatable bacterial diseases, particularly those such as chancroid that cause genital ulceration, have been found to facilitate HIV-1 transmission.

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