COMMUNITY HOME-BASED CARE IN RESOURCE-LIMITED SETTINGS

Citation:
E.N. PN, Hirschfeld M, Lindsey E, Kimani V, Mwanthi M, Olenja J, Pigott W, Messervy P, Mudongo K, Ncube E, Rantona K, Bale S, Limtragool P, Nunthachaipun P. COMMUNITY HOME-BASED CARE IN RESOURCE-LIMITED SETTINGS. Geneva: THE CROSS CLUSTER INITIATIVE ON HOME-BASED LONG-TERM CARE, NON-COMMUNICABLE DISEASES AND MENTAL HEALTH AND THE DEPARTMENT OF HIV/AIDS, FAMILY AND COMMUNITY HEALTH, WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION; 2002.

Abstract:

COMMUNITY HOME-BASED CARE IN RESOURCE-LIMITED SETIINGS
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
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his document provides a systematic framework for establishing and maintaining community home-based care (CRBC) in resource-limited
settings for people with RIV / AIDS and those with other chronic or disabling conditions. Most CRBC services so far have been established through unsystematic, needs-based efforts. As the RIV / AIDS epidemic continues to grow, many organizations and communities are now considering expanding in a more programmatic approach, and countries are looking for scaled-up responses and national strategies for CRBe. This document therefore provides an important framework to guide governments, national and international donor agencies and community-based organizations (including nongovernmental organizations, faith-based organizations and community groups) in developing or expanding CRBC programmes. The need for such a document has been clearly identified.
CRBC is defined as any form of care given to ill people in their homes. Such care includes physical, psychosocial, palliative and spiritual activities. The goal of CRBC is to provide hope through high-quality and appropriate care that helps ill people and families to maintain their independence and achieve the best possible quality of life.
This document targets three important audiences: policy-makers and senior administrators, middle managers and those who develop and run CRBC programmes. Although the roles and responsibilities of these target audiences differ somewhat, developing effective partnerships among the three is essential. Policy-makers and senior administrators must be involved in developing and monitoring CRBC programmes, and the people who manage and run the programmes must share information and feedback with senior administrators. In this sense, policy and action are interrelated as each partner learns from and guides the other. To this end, this document is divided into four interrelated sections: a policy framework for CRBC; the roles and responsibilities for CRBC at the national, district and local levels of administration; the essential elements of CRBC; and the strategies for action in establishing and maintaining CRBC in resource-limited settings.

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