Bio

Prof. Ariga's biography

Emmanuel Safary Ariga is an Agronomist/Weed Scientist and Food Security Consultant. He has PhD from International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA, Nigeria) and University of Nairobi, Kenya (1996).  MSc Agronomy/Weed Science, University of Nairobi, Kenya (1987). And BSc Agriculture, University of Nairobi, Kenya (1983). He has over 20 years experience in Agricultural Extension (Crops, Livestock, Irrigation, Soil and Water Conservation, Technology Transfer), Capacity Building, Research, Supervision and Consultancy.

Publications


2015

Mwangi, HW, Kihurani AW, Wesonga JM, Ariga ES, Kanampiu F.  2015.  Factors influencing adoption of cover crops for weed management in Machakos and Makueni of Kenya.. European Journal of Agronomy . 69 :1-9.
Kipkorir, CA, John W. Kimenju, Emmanuel S. Ariga, Kariuki GM, Omondi CO.  2015.  Reaction of Sugarcane Genotypes to Root-knot Nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.) in Kenya.. International Journal of Agricultural Policy and Research . 3 (5):213-221.
Mwangi, HW, Kihurani AW, Wesonga JM, Ariga ES, Kanampiu F.  2015.  Effect of Lablab purpureus L. cover crop and imidazolinone resistant (IR) maize on weeds in drought prone areas, Kenya.. Crop Protection . Vol 72:36-40..

2014

Ariga, ES, Narla R, Amuyunzu P.  2014.  Efficacy of herbicide (nicosulfuron) in the control of weeds in maize (Zea mays L).). E. Afr. agric. For. J.. 80(3):127-133.
Nambafu, GN, Onwonga RN, Karuku GN, Ariga ES, Vanlauwe B, R K.  2014.  Knowledge, Attitude and Practices Used in the Control of Striga in Maize by Smallholder Farmers of Western Kenya. . Journal of Agricultural Science and Technology.. 3:pp237-248.
Ogecha, J, Kisera JK, Ariga S.  2014.  Integrated Beanfly Management in East Africa: Beanfly Management on Common Beans in Kenya. , London: LAP LAMBERT Academic Publishing

2013

D.O, O, E.S A, R.W M, Kimenju J.W.  2013.  Farmer-Friendly Strategies of Managing Weeds in Carrot (Daucus carota L.) Production. International Journal of Farming and Allied Sciences . 2(4):78-82.abstract_farmer_friendly_strategies_in_weed_control_ojowi_ariga_et_al_2013.pdf

2012

Ita, BN, Michieka RW, Ariga ES, Muiru MW.  2012.  Comparison of the Effectiveness of Zero Tillage and Intercropping on Weed Management in Maize (Zea mays L.). Journal of Biology, Agriculture and Healthcare . 2(8):99-105.abstract_zero_tillage_and_intercropping_ita_ariga_et_al_2012.pdf
Karaya, H, Njoroge K, Mugo S, Ariga ES, Kanampiu F, Nderitu JH.  2012.  Determination of levels of Striga germination Stimulants for maize gene bank accessions and elite inbred lines. International Journal of Plant Production . 6(2):209-223.abstract_levels_of_striga_germination_maize_gene_bank_karaya_ariga_et_al_2012.pdf
Musita, CP, Ariga E.  2012.  Analysis of Determinants in Nutritional Care of Vulnerable Children Nutritional Care and Support of Children. Analysis of Determinants in Nutritional Care of Vulnerable Children Nutritional Care and Support of Children. , London: LAP Lambert Academic Publishing Abstractbook_cover_and_abstract_nutrition_care_and_support_musita_and_ariga_detailed.pdf

The impact of Human Immune Deficiency/Acquired Immuno-Deficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS) is evident in the rising numbers of those orphaned by HIV/AIDS. Apart from death, millions of children live in households with sick and dying members. These Orphans and Vulnerable Children (OVCs) affected by HIV/AIDS are stigmatized, isolated, discriminated against, disinherited and often deprived of basic education and care. This study was carried out in Kadibo Division, Kisumu District. Systematic random sampling was used. The sampling frame consisted of all the households with OVCs supported by various Community Based Organizations (CBOs) . A total of 111 households were interviewed and nutritional assessment for 322 children was done. The study was designed to assist CBOs improve their effectiveness in provision of optimal nutritional care for OVCs. Data collection applied both quantitative and qualitative methods. Pearson’s product correlation moment was applied to determine the strength of association between independent and dependent variables. Probit regression model was developed from the independent and dependent dichotomous variables.

2010

Karaya, H;, Mugo, S; Njoroge ANKK; E; J, Njoroge K;, Ariga E;, Nderitu JH;, Kanampiu.  2010.  Screening gene bank maize accessions for Straiga hermontica resistance.

2009

2007

Akelo, PA, E.S A, S. O.  2007.  Girl Child prostitution in the Context of HIV/AIDS among the Youth in Kisumu City, Kenya. Nursing Journal . 36(2):14-19.

2004

2003

E.S, A, Opiyo J, Menberu R, Odoyo J, Kaseje D.  2003.  Community Empowerment for Food and Income Security through Partnership Agriculture: An approach to sustainable food security in Abom sub location in Bondo district, Kenya., 2002. The Quest for Equity in Access to Health and Development. Scaling Up Best Practices In Decentralized District Health Systems.. , TICH, Kisumu, Kenya

2002

Ndung’u, DK;, Oswald A;, Friesen D;, Ariga ES;, Mburu M.  2002.  Effect of fodder legumes on stimulation, attachment and emergence of Striga hermonthica on maize.
B.W.K, W.  2002.   Effects of herbicides and Kikuyu grass on yield and yield quality of pyrethrum. . (E. S. Ariga, Ayiecho P.O, Eds.)., Nairobi: University of Nairobi

2001

Odhiambo, GD, Ariga ES.  2001.  Effect of intercropping maize and beans on Striga hermonthica incidence and grain yield, 11-15th February. Seventh Eastern and Southern Africa Regional Maize Conference. , Nairobi Kenyastriga_intercropping_with_maize.pdf

2000

Abayo, GO;, Ransom JK;, Oswald A;, Ariga ES;, Friesen D.  2000.  Effect Of Short-term Improved Fallow On Striga Infestation In Maize..

1999

Oluoch-Kosura, W, Okeyo AM, Waithaka MM, Kyalo AM.  1999.  Agricultural technology, economic viability and poverty alleviation in Kenya. AbstractWebsite

The major challenges facing Kenya today are poverty and unemployment. About 50% of the rural population and 30% of the urban population live below the poverty line. With 80% of the population being rural the poverty problem is overwhelming. The country has been unable to generate adequate employment and wage employment has been declining over the recent past. While in the 1970s the growth rate of employment was about 4% per annum, in the current decade, the growth rate has been about 1.9% per annum, which is below the population growth rate estimated at about 3%. The country has also witnessed declining growth in income per capita. While in the 1960s per capita income grew at 2.6% p.a. this declined to 0.4% in 1980s. Between 1990 and 95 the decline was even more dramatic at negative 0.3% (Kenya, 1997). The poverty line is defined here as the value of consumption of food and non-food items below which individuals cannot afford the recommended energy intake plus a minimum allowance for non-food consumption. The poverty line has been estimated at about US$ 200 and 300 for rural and urban areas respectively (GoK, 1998). This translates to less than one US$ per day. Of Kenya’s total land area of 57.6 million hectares, 9.4 million or about 16% is classified as high and medium potential land for agriculture. The remaining area estimated at 84% makes up the arid and semi arid lands (ASALs). Out of the ASALs 48 million hectares, about 9 million hectares can support crop production, 15 million hectares is adequate for livestock production while the rest is dry and only useful for nomadic pastoralism. The ASAL supports about 20% of the population, 50% of livestock and 3% of current agricultural output and 7% of commercial output. ASALs have low natural fertility which are prone to compaction and vulnerable to erosion. The agriculture sector dominates the economy and contributes virtually to all the stated national goals including achievement of national and household food security, industrialization by year 2020 as well as provision of employment opportunities. Currently, agriculture accounts for about one-third of the gross domestic product, employs more than two-thirds of the labour force, accounts for almost 70% of the export earnings (excluding refined petroleum), generates the bulk of the country's food requirements and provides significant proportion of raw materials for the agricultural based industrial sector. Overall, the smallholder sub-sector contributes about 75% of the total value of agricultural output, 55% of the marketed agricultural output and provides just over 85% of the total employment in agriculture. The sector’s ability to contribute effectively to the national goals hinges on identifying and implementing measures which promote high and sustainable growth rate. Mellor (1990) asserted that agricultural productivity growth is normally the major source of sustained improvements in rural welfare. Three sources of agricultural growth can be identified in Kenya. One is the expansion of cultivated area. The second is substitution or switching towards higher valued commodities. The third is intensification. The first source of agricultural growth is currently extremely limited. The cultivable land available to open up has diminished over the years with rapidly rising population estimated at about 3% per annum to the extent that the land holdings are becoming sub-optimal economic units and there is ever increasing temptation to migrate to the marginal and fragile zone. Moreover, irrigation development which could help in increasing cultivable land has been very slow due to the seemingly high cost associated with it. Commodity substitution will contribute significantly to growth only if the input and output markets function in a way to allow the producers and the private sectors respond appropriately to the market signals. This is expected to occur if the on-going structural adjustment programmes succeed in limiting government intervention to its core functions (of public good nature) and allowing the private sector to take up the production, marketing and distribution role. Most agricultural growth will therefore come from the third source: increased output per unit land area. The realization of this growth potential will hinge on shifting rapidly from resource based to science and knowledge-based agriculture. The objective of this paper is to The sector’s ability to contribute effectively to the national goals hinges on identifying and implementing measures which promote high and sustainable growth rate. Mellor (1990) asserted that agricultural productivity growth is normally the major source of sustained improvements in rural welfare. Three sources of agricultural growth can be identified in Kenya. One is the expansion of cultivated area. The second is substitution or switching towards higher valued commodities. The third is intensification. The first source of agricultural growth is currently extremely limited. The cultivable land available to open up has diminished over the years with rapidly rising population estimated at about 3% per annum to the extent that the land holdings are becoming sub-optimal economic units and there is ever increasing temptation to migrate to the marginal and fragile zone. Moreover, irrigation development which could help in increasing cultivable land has been very slow due to the seemingly high cost associated with it. Commodity substitution will contribute significantly to growth only if the input and output markets function in a way to allow the producers and the private sectors respond appropriately to the market signals. This is expected to occur if the on-going structural adjustment programmes succeed in limiting government intervention to its core functions (of public good nature) and allowing the private sector to take up the production, marketing and distribution role. Most agricultural growth will therefore come from the third source: increased output per unit land area. The realization of this growth potential will hinge on shifting rapidly from resource based to science and knowledge-based agriculture. The objective of this paper is to

1997

Ariga, ES;, Ransom JK;, Odhiambo GD;, Abayo G;, Ndungu DK.  1997.  Potential of using cotton and other trap crops for Striga hermonthica management in cereals in Kenya.
Ariga, E.  1997.  Allelopathic effects of aqueous extracts of some weeds on germination, root and shoot growth of selected crops, September, 1997. 16th Biennial Weed Science Society Conference for Eastern Africa. , Kampala, Uganda

1995

1994

1993

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