Publications


Submitted

Akunda, EM, Kumar B.  Submitted.  Using internal plant water status as a criterion for scheduling irrigation in coffee in east of rift valley Kenya.. Kenya coffee vol. 47. No. 560, 281- 284.. : Kisipan, M.L. Abstract

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2011

2010

Makoude, PA, Akunda EM, Nyamongo DO, Hay FR, Oeba V.  2010.  Nature of dormancy in seeds of Sesamum latifolium (Gillet. AbstractNature of dormancy in seeds of Sesamum latifolium (Gillet

Sesamum latifolium is a progenitor of the cultivated Sesamum indicum. The plant has medicinal value, is used as forage, and is a potential donor of genes for crop improvement. The seeds of this species do not germinate readily when harvested and sown under standard conditions. Inability to germinate hampers the exploitation of this species in crop improvement programmes as well as viability assessments by genebank curators and seed stockists. Various dormancy release mechanisms were tested on the germination of seeds of Sesamum latifolium with a view to determining the nature of dormancy and the appropriate release mechanism in this species. Pre-stored and freshly harvested seeds were used. An imbibition experiment assessed the permeability of the seed coat to water. Optimum germination temperatures were determined using a two-way thermogradient plate. Effects of surgical exposure of the embryonic axis, nipping away from the embryonic axis, and gibberellic acid application were also tested. The studies revealed that the seeds of this species have non-deep physiological dormancy and require alternating temperatures together with surgical exposure of the embryonic axis, gibberellic acid, or dry after-ripening. The appropriate dormancy release procedure when testing for seed viability of this species through a germination test is recommended

2009

2002

W, AEM, C. M, S.B.B O, P. A.  2002.   Sustainable environmental management for poverty alleviation in the Lake Victoria basin.. Workshop proceedings. ISSN 1028 . : Kisipan, M.L. Abstract

Isolated mouse interstitial cells were incubated with different concentrations of khat (Catha edulis) extract (0.06 mg/ml, 0.6 mg/ml. 6 mg/ml. 30 mg/ml and 60 mg/ml) and cell viability as well as testosterone concentration measured at 30 min intervals over a 3 h incubation period. High concentrations of khat extract (30 mg/ml and 60 mg/ml) significantly inhibited testosterone production while low concentrations (0.06 mg/ml. 0.6 mg/ml and 6 mg/ml) significantly stimulated (P < 0.05) testosterone production by mouse interstitial cells. Similarly, at concentrations of 30 mg/ml and 60 mg/ml, there was a significant decrease in interstitial cell viability, whereas at 0.06 mg/ml, 0.6 mg/ml and 6 mg/ml there was no significant decrease. There was only a weak correlation (r= 0.39) between testosterone production and viable interstitial cells. We postulate that khat extract at high concentrations may cause reproductive function impairment in the user but at low concentrations. may enhance testosterone production with accompanying effects on reproductive functions in male mice. @2006 Publishedby Elsevier Ireland Ltd. Kel'lVords: In dtro; Khat; Testosterone; Interstitial cells; Mouse

2001

DR. AKUNDA, ELIJAHM.  2001.  Information seminar proposal on EARUP organizational framework implementation, protocol, interventions,. financial needs communicative channels and management plans. (2001) 25p.. : Kisipan, M.L. Abstract

Isolated mouse interstitial cells were incubated with different concentrations of khat (Catha edulis) extract (0.06 mg/ml, 0.6 mg/ml. 6 mg/ml. 30 mg/ml and 60 mg/ml) and cell viability as well as testosterone concentration measured at 30 min intervals over a 3 h incubation period. High concentrations of khat extract (30 mg/ml and 60 mg/ml) significantly inhibited testosterone production while low concentrations (0.06 mg/ml. 0.6 mg/ml and 6 mg/ml) significantly stimulated (P < 0.05) testosterone production by mouse interstitial cells. Similarly, at concentrations of 30 mg/ml and 60 mg/ml, there was a significant decrease in interstitial cell viability, whereas at 0.06 mg/ml, 0.6 mg/ml and 6 mg/ml there was no significant decrease. There was only a weak correlation (r= 0.39) between testosterone production and viable interstitial cells. We postulate that khat extract at high concentrations may cause reproductive function impairment in the user but at low concentrations. may enhance testosterone production with accompanying effects on reproductive functions in male mice. @2006 Publishedby Elsevier Ireland Ltd. Kel'lVords: In dtro; Khat; Testosterone; Interstitial cells; Mouse

DR. AKUNDA, ELIJAHM.  2001.  E. M. W. Akunda. Notes on theory of distribution and inferences in statistics for statistics in Agriculture climatology. (SAIC . : Kisipan, M.L. Abstract

Isolated mouse interstitial cells were incubated with different concentrations of khat (Catha edulis) extract (0.06 mg/ml, 0.6 mg/ml. 6 mg/ml. 30 mg/ml and 60 mg/ml) and cell viability as well as testosterone concentration measured at 30 min intervals over a 3 h incubation period. High concentrations of khat extract (30 mg/ml and 60 mg/ml) significantly inhibited testosterone production while low concentrations (0.06 mg/ml. 0.6 mg/ml and 6 mg/ml) significantly stimulated (P < 0.05) testosterone production by mouse interstitial cells. Similarly, at concentrations of 30 mg/ml and 60 mg/ml, there was a significant decrease in interstitial cell viability, whereas at 0.06 mg/ml, 0.6 mg/ml and 6 mg/ml there was no significant decrease. There was only a weak correlation (r= 0.39) between testosterone production and viable interstitial cells. We postulate that khat extract at high concentrations may cause reproductive function impairment in the user but at low concentrations. may enhance testosterone production with accompanying effects on reproductive functions in male mice. @2006 Publishedby Elsevier Ireland Ltd. Kel'lVords: In dtro; Khat; Testosterone; Interstitial cells; Mouse

DR. AKUNDA, ELIJAHM.  2001.  E. M.W Akunda. Crop yields of sorghum and soybean in an intercrop.. The journal of Food technology in Africa. Vol. 6 No. 1, 2 . : Kisipan, M.L. Abstract

Isolated mouse interstitial cells were incubated with different concentrations of khat (Catha edulis) extract (0.06 mg/ml, 0.6 mg/ml. 6 mg/ml. 30 mg/ml and 60 mg/ml) and cell viability as well as testosterone concentration measured at 30 min intervals over a 3 h incubation period. High concentrations of khat extract (30 mg/ml and 60 mg/ml) significantly inhibited testosterone production while low concentrations (0.06 mg/ml. 0.6 mg/ml and 6 mg/ml) significantly stimulated (P < 0.05) testosterone production by mouse interstitial cells. Similarly, at concentrations of 30 mg/ml and 60 mg/ml, there was a significant decrease in interstitial cell viability, whereas at 0.06 mg/ml, 0.6 mg/ml and 6 mg/ml there was no significant decrease. There was only a weak correlation (r= 0.39) between testosterone production and viable interstitial cells. We postulate that khat extract at high concentrations may cause reproductive function impairment in the user but at low concentrations. may enhance testosterone production with accompanying effects on reproductive functions in male mice. @2006 Publishedby Elsevier Ireland Ltd. Kel'lVords: In dtro; Khat; Testosterone; Interstitial cells; Mouse

DR. AKUNDA, ELIJAHM.  2001.  E. M.W Akunda. Improving Food Production by Understanding the effects of intercropping and plant population on soybean nitrogen fixing attributes.. The journal of Food technology in Africa. Vol. 6 No. 4, 110 . : Kisipan, M.L. Abstract

Isolated mouse interstitial cells were incubated with different concentrations of khat (Catha edulis) extract (0.06 mg/ml, 0.6 mg/ml. 6 mg/ml. 30 mg/ml and 60 mg/ml) and cell viability as well as testosterone concentration measured at 30 min intervals over a 3 h incubation period. High concentrations of khat extract (30 mg/ml and 60 mg/ml) significantly inhibited testosterone production while low concentrations (0.06 mg/ml. 0.6 mg/ml and 6 mg/ml) significantly stimulated (P < 0.05) testosterone production by mouse interstitial cells. Similarly, at concentrations of 30 mg/ml and 60 mg/ml, there was a significant decrease in interstitial cell viability, whereas at 0.06 mg/ml, 0.6 mg/ml and 6 mg/ml there was no significant decrease. There was only a weak correlation (r= 0.39) between testosterone production and viable interstitial cells. We postulate that khat extract at high concentrations may cause reproductive function impairment in the user but at low concentrations. may enhance testosterone production with accompanying effects on reproductive functions in male mice. @2006 Publishedby Elsevier Ireland Ltd. Kel'lVords: In dtro; Khat; Testosterone; Interstitial cells; Mouse

DR. AKUNDA, ELIJAHM.  2001.  E. M.W Akunda. Some aspect of logical way of studying dinitrogen fixation in an agroforestry context for improving food production.. The journal of Food technology in Africa. Vol. 6 No. 2, 68 . : Kisipan, M.L. Abstract

Isolated mouse interstitial cells were incubated with different concentrations of khat (Catha edulis) extract (0.06 mg/ml, 0.6 mg/ml. 6 mg/ml. 30 mg/ml and 60 mg/ml) and cell viability as well as testosterone concentration measured at 30 min intervals over a 3 h incubation period. High concentrations of khat extract (30 mg/ml and 60 mg/ml) significantly inhibited testosterone production while low concentrations (0.06 mg/ml. 0.6 mg/ml and 6 mg/ml) significantly stimulated (P < 0.05) testosterone production by mouse interstitial cells. Similarly, at concentrations of 30 mg/ml and 60 mg/ml, there was a significant decrease in interstitial cell viability, whereas at 0.06 mg/ml, 0.6 mg/ml and 6 mg/ml there was no significant decrease. There was only a weak correlation (r= 0.39) between testosterone production and viable interstitial cells. We postulate that khat extract at high concentrations may cause reproductive function impairment in the user but at low concentrations. may enhance testosterone production with accompanying effects on reproductive functions in male mice. @2006 Publishedby Elsevier Ireland Ltd. Kel'lVords: In dtro; Khat; Testosterone; Interstitial cells; Mouse

DR. AKUNDA, ELIJAHM.  2001.  E. M.W Akunda. Inter cropping and population density effects on yield component, seed quality and photosynthesis of sorgum and soybean.. The journal of Food technology in Africa. Vol. 6 No. 3, 96 . : Kisipan, M.L. Abstract

Isolated mouse interstitial cells were incubated with different concentrations of khat (Catha edulis) extract (0.06 mg/ml, 0.6 mg/ml. 6 mg/ml. 30 mg/ml and 60 mg/ml) and cell viability as well as testosterone concentration measured at 30 min intervals over a 3 h incubation period. High concentrations of khat extract (30 mg/ml and 60 mg/ml) significantly inhibited testosterone production while low concentrations (0.06 mg/ml. 0.6 mg/ml and 6 mg/ml) significantly stimulated (P < 0.05) testosterone production by mouse interstitial cells. Similarly, at concentrations of 30 mg/ml and 60 mg/ml, there was a significant decrease in interstitial cell viability, whereas at 0.06 mg/ml, 0.6 mg/ml and 6 mg/ml there was no significant decrease. There was only a weak correlation (r= 0.39) between testosterone production and viable interstitial cells. We postulate that khat extract at high concentrations may cause reproductive function impairment in the user but at low concentrations. may enhance testosterone production with accompanying effects on reproductive functions in male mice. @2006 Publishedby Elsevier Ireland Ltd. Kel'lVords: In dtro; Khat; Testosterone; Interstitial cells; Mouse

2000

1994

1990

1989

DR. AKUNDA, ELIJAHM.  1989.  P. A. Oduol and E. M. W. Akunda. Tropical rainforest tree species with Agroforesty potential.. In: trees for development in sub-Saharan Africa. (1989) p. 49 . : Kisipan, M.L. Abstract
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1988

DR. AKUNDA, ELIJAHM.  1988.  C.L. Coulson, C. J Stigter, E. M. W. Akunda and E. Floor . Trop. Agri.Vol. 65 No. 4. : Kisipan, M.L. Abstract
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1987

DR. AKUNDA, ELIJAHM.  1987.  T. Darnhofer, D. Gatama, P. A. Huxley and E. M. W. Akunda. The rainfall distribution at a tree/crop interface.. In: Meteorology and Agroforestry. (1987). p. 371 . : Kisipan, M.L. Abstract
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1986

1985

DR. AKUNDA, ELIJAHM.  1985.  Duirnal course of light interception by a groundnut crop in association with maize.. MIRCEN journal (1985) p. 4445 4454.. : Kisipan, M.L. Abstract
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1984

1983

DR. AKUNDA, ELIJAHM.  1983.  E. M. W. Akunda. Influence of plant population on growth . Paper presented at the MICREN BOARD MEETING, LILONGWE . : Kisipan, M.L. Abstract
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1982

DR. AKUNDA, ELIJAHM.  1982.  E. M. W. Akunda, S. K. Imbamba and D. Kumar. Responses of coffee Arabia to pruning in Kenya. Journal of science and technology (B) (1982) 3: 83 . : Kisipan, M.L. Abstract
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1981

1980

DR. AKUNDA, ELIJAHM.  1980.  E. M.W Akunda and D. Kumar. Studies with antitranspiratis on coffee. (Coffee Arabic L.). E. Afr. Agric. For. J. 45(3) 230 . : Kisipan, M.L. Abstract
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1979

1973

DR. AKUNDA, ELIJAHM.  1973.  E. M. W. Akunda, S. K. Imbamba and D. Kumar. High density plantings of coffee II. Adaptive changes in some plant characteristics.. E. Afri. Agri. For. J. (1979) 45(2) 133 . : Kisipan, M.L. Abstract
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