Longitudinal comparison of chemokines in breastmilk early postpartum among HIV-1-infected and uninfected Kenyan women. Breastfeed Med . 2007 Sep; 2 ( 3 ): 129-38 . PMID: 17903098 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE] Bosire R, Guthrie BL, Lohman-Payne B, Mabuka

Citation:
MBORI- PROFNGACHADOROTHYA. "Longitudinal comparison of chemokines in breastmilk early postpartum among HIV-1-infected and uninfected Kenyan women. Breastfeed Med . 2007 Sep; 2 ( 3 ): 129-38 . PMID: 17903098 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE] Bosire R, Guthrie BL, Lohman-Payne B, Mabuka .". In: Breastfeed Med . 2007 Sep; 2 ( 3 ): 129-38 . Earthscan, London. 978-1-84407-469-3 (*); 2007.

Abstract:

Center for Public Health Research, Kenya Medical Research Institute, Nairobi, Kenya.
Breastmilk chemokines have been associated with increased HIV-1 RNA levels in breastmilk and altered risk of mother-to-child HIV-1 transmission. To characterize CC and CXC chemokines in breastmilk postpartum, we collected breastmilk specimens at regular intervals for 6 months after delivery from women with and without HIV-1 infection and used commercial ELISA kits to measure breastmilk concentrations of MIP-1alpha, MIP-1beta, RANTES, and SDF-1alpha. Among 54 HIV-1-infected and 26 uninfected women, mean chemokine levels were compared cross-sectionally and longitudinally at days 5 and 10, and months 1 and 3 postpartum. For both HIV-1-infected and uninfected women, breastmilk chemokine levels were highest at day 5 for MIP-1alpha, MIP-1beta, and SDF-1alpha, and subsequently decreased. RANTES levels remained constant over the follow-up period among HIV-1-uninfected women, and increased moderately among HIV-1-infected women. For MIP-1beta and RANTES, breastmilk levels were significantly higher among HIV-1-infected women compared to uninfected women early postpartum. In addition, HIV-1-infected women transmitting HIV-1 to their infant had consistently higher breastmilk RANTES levels than those who did not transmit, with the greatest difference observed at 1 month (2.68 vs. 2.21 log10 pg/mL, respectively; p = 0.007). In summary, all four chemokines were most elevated within the first month postpartum, a period of high transmission risk via breastmilk. MIP-1beta and RANTES levels in breastmilk were higher among HIV-1-infected women than among uninfected women, and breastmilk RANTES was positively associated with vertical transmission in this study, consistent with results from our earlier cohort.
PMID: 17903098 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Notes:

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