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PROF. BHATT SHRIKANTBABU M CV

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Publications


2006

M, PROFBHATTSHRIKANTBABU.  2006.  Efficacy and safety of an artesunate/mefloquine combination, (artequin) in the treatment of uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria in Kenya. East Afr Med J. 2006 May;83(5):236-42.. East Afr Med J. 2006 May;83(5):236-42.. : Taylor & Francis Abstract
BACKGROUND: Although artesunate and mefloquine have been used as monotherapies in the treatment of malaria in Kenya for a long time, there is insufficient data on the clinical outcome when used as combination therapy in this population. OBJECTIVE: To derive data on the efficacy and safety profile of artesunate-mefloquine combination in the treatment of uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Kenya. DESIGN: An open label single arm clinical trial. SETTING: Bungoma district Hospital. Study area was Bungoma District of Kenya, an endemic area of malaria. The study was conducted between January 2004 and April 2004. SUBJECTS: A total of 200 males and females with uncomplicated plasmodium falciparum malaria weighing 35kg and above were recruited in the study. RESULTS: In the evaluable patient population the day 28 cure rate was 98.4% while day 14 and 7 cure rates were 98.4% and 99.2% respectively. There was rapid relief of symptoms the median time of fever clearance was one day and the most common drug related adverse events were headache dizziness and asthenia. There was no significant derangement in the haematological, biochemical and ECG parameters in the patients on treatment. CONCLUSION: Artesunate-mefloquine combination given simultaneously was found to be highly effective and safe in the treatment of uncomplicated malaria.

2002

M, PROFBHATTSHRIKANTBABU.  2002.  The radiographic appearance of pneumococcal pneumonia in adults is unaltered by HIV-1-infection in hospitalized Kenyans. AIDS. 2002 Oct 18;16(15):2095-6.. AIDS. 2002 Oct 18;16(15):2095-6.. : Taylor & Francis Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To record the costs of hospital care for HIV-positive and -negative patients in Nairobi, and identify costs paid by patients per admission. DESIGN: Cost data were collected on inpatients enrolled in a linked clinical study using standardized costing methods. SETTING: Kenyatta National Hospital, Nairobi's main district hospital. PATIENTS: Consecutive adult medical admissions to one ward over 14 weeks who consented to enrollment; tertiary referrals were excluded. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Average length of stay and cost per patient admission. RESULTS: The hospital costs of 398 patients (163 HIV positive; 33 with clinical AIDS) were analysed. The mean length of stay was 9.3 days and the mean cost per patient admission was US$163. There was no significant difference in costs or mean lengths of stay between HIV-positive and -negative groups, nor were the costs and lengths of stay for clinical AIDS patients significantly different to those for HIV-positive patients without AIDS. The patient charges paid to the hospital per admission, recorded for 344 patients, were on average US$61; and did not differ by HIV status. CONCLUSION: The similar cost patterns for inpatient care irrespective of HIV status or clinical AIDS probably reflects the limited provision of care beyond basic clinical services. Length of stay rather than differing treatment regimes thus appears to be the main cost driver. Private costs of medical care were high and were likely to pressurize households. When resources are limited, the introduction of new, more costly therapies needs careful planning. The study provides cost information for planning care services in resource-poor settings.

M, PROFBHATTSHRIKANTBABU.  2002.  Costs of hospital care for HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients at Kenyatta National Hospital, Nairobi, Kenya. AIDS. 2002 Apr 12;16(6):901-8.. AIDS. 2002 Apr 12;16(6):901-8.. : Taylor & Francis Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To record the costs of hospital care for HIV-positive and -negative patients in Nairobi, and identify costs paid by patients per admission. DESIGN: Cost data were collected on inpatients enrolled in a linked clinical study using standardized costing methods. SETTING: Kenyatta National Hospital, Nairobi's main district hospital. PATIENTS: Consecutive adult medical admissions to one ward over 14 weeks who consented to enrollment; tertiary referrals were excluded. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Average length of stay and cost per patient admission. RESULTS: The hospital costs of 398 patients (163 HIV positive; 33 with clinical AIDS) were analysed. The mean length of stay was 9.3 days and the mean cost per patient admission was US$163. There was no significant difference in costs or mean lengths of stay between HIV-positive and -negative groups, nor were the costs and lengths of stay for clinical AIDS patients significantly different to those for HIV-positive patients without AIDS. The patient charges paid to the hospital per admission, recorded for 344 patients, were on average US$61; and did not differ by HIV status. CONCLUSION: The similar cost patterns for inpatient care irrespective of HIV status or clinical AIDS probably reflects the limited provision of care beyond basic clinical services. Length of stay rather than differing treatment regimes thus appears to be the main cost driver. Private costs of medical care were high and were likely to pressurize households. When resources are limited, the introduction of new, more costly therapies needs careful planning. The study provides cost information for planning care services in resource-poor settings.

M, PROFBHATTSHRIKANTBABU.  2002.  Bhatt K.M. and Bhatt S.M. Anthrax revisited .E.A.M.J. 2002;VOL.79 NO.7:364-367.. E.A.M.J. 2002;VOL.79 NO.7:364-367.. : Taylor & Francis Abstract
BACKGROUND: Although artesunate and mefloquine have been used as monotherapies in the treatment of malaria in Kenya for a long time, there is insufficient data on the clinical outcome when used as combination therapy in this population. OBJECTIVE: To derive data on the efficacy and safety profile of artesunate-mefloquine combination in the treatment of uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Kenya. DESIGN: An open label single arm clinical trial. SETTING: Bungoma district Hospital. Study area was Bungoma District of Kenya, an endemic area of malaria. The study was conducted between January 2004 and April 2004. SUBJECTS: A total of 200 males and females with uncomplicated plasmodium falciparum malaria weighing 35kg and above were recruited in the study. RESULTS: In the evaluable patient population the day 28 cure rate was 98.4% while day 14 and 7 cure rates were 98.4% and 99.2% respectively. There was rapid relief of symptoms the median time of fever clearance was one day and the most common drug related adverse events were headache dizziness and asthenia. There was no significant derangement in the haematological, biochemical and ECG parameters in the patients on treatment. CONCLUSION: Artesunate-mefloquine combination given simultaneously was found to be highly effective and safe in the treatment of uncomplicated malaria.

2001

M, PROFBHATTSHRIKANTBABU.  2001.  Trends in bloodstream infections among human immunodeficiency virus-infected adults admitted to a hospital in Nairobi, Kenya, during the last decade. Clin Infect Dis. 2001 Jul 15;33(2):248-56.. Clin Infect Dis. 2001 Jul 15;33(2):248-56.. : Taylor & Francis Abstract
Bloodstream infections are a frequent complication in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adults in Africa and usually associated with a poor prognosis. We evaluated bloodstream infections across a decade in 3 prospective cross-sectional surveys of consecutive medical admissions to the Kenyatta National Hospital, Nairobi, Kenya. Participants received standard clinical care throughout. In 1988-1989, 29.5% (28 of 95) of HIV-positive patients had bloodstream infections, compared with 31.9% (46 of 144) in 1992 and 21.3% (43 of 197) in 1997. Bacteremia and mycobacteremia were significantly associated with HIV infection. Infections with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, non-typhi species of Salmonella (NTS), and Streptococcus pneumoniae predominated. Fungemia exclusively due to Cryptococcus neoformans was uncommon. Clinical features at presentation remained similar. Significant improvements in the survival rate were recorded among patients with NTS bacteremia (20%-83%; P<.01) and mycobacteremia (0%-73%; P<.01). Standard clinical management can improve outcomes in resource-poor settings.
M, PROFBHATTSHRIKANTBABU.  2001.  Gilly Arthur, Videlix N. Nduba, Samuel M. Kariuki, Joseph Kimari, Bhatt S.M. and Charles F. Gilks. Trends in blood infections among human immuno deficiency virus infected adult admitted to a hospital in Nairobi during the last decade. J. Clinical infectio. J. Clinical infections disease 2001; Jul15; 33 (2): 248-56.. : Taylor & Francis Abstract
SETTING: Nairobi City Council Chest Clinic, Nairobi, Kenya. OBJECTIVE: To determine if under-reading of sputum smears is a contributing factor in the disproportionate increase in smear-negative tuberculosis in Nairobi, Kenya. METHODOLOGY: Between October 1997 and November 1998, patients fulfilling the local programme definition of smear-negative presumed pulmonary tuberculosis were enrolled in the study. Two further sputum specimens were collected for examination in a research laboratory by fluorescence microscopy. RESULTS: Of 163 adult subjects enrolled, 55% were seropositive for the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). One hundred subjects had had two pre-study sputum smears assessed before recruitment and produced two further sputum specimens for re-examination in the research laboratory; of these 19 (19%) were sputum smear-positive on re-examination and a further seven (7%) became smear-positive on second re-examination. CONCLUSIONS: Of those patients with smear-negative presumed pulmonary tuberculosis by the local programme definition, 26% were smear-positive when reexamined carefully with two repeat sputum smears. This suggests that the high rates of smear-negative tuberculosis being seen may in part be due to under-reading. This is probably as a result of the overwhelming burden of tuberculosis leading to over rapid and inaccurate sputum examination. Retraining of existing technicians and training of more technicians is likely to reduce underreading and increase the yield of smear-positive tuberculosis. This finding also stresses the need for regular quality assurance.
M, PROFBHATTSHRIKANTBABU.  2001.  M.P. Hawwken, D.W. Muhindi, J.M. Chakaya, S.M. Bhatt, L.W. Nganga, J.D.H. Porter. Under diagnosis of smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis in Nairobi, Kenya. Int. J. Tuberc. Lung Dis 2001; 5(3): 360-363 .. Int. J. Tuberc. Lung Dis 2001; 5(3): 360-363 .. : Taylor & Francis Abstract
SETTING: Nairobi City Council Chest Clinic, Nairobi, Kenya. OBJECTIVE: To determine if under-reading of sputum smears is a contributing factor in the disproportionate increase in smear-negative tuberculosis in Nairobi, Kenya. METHODOLOGY: Between October 1997 and November 1998, patients fulfilling the local programme definition of smear-negative presumed pulmonary tuberculosis were enrolled in the study. Two further sputum specimens were collected for examination in a research laboratory by fluorescence microscopy. RESULTS: Of 163 adult subjects enrolled, 55% were seropositive for the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). One hundred subjects had had two pre-study sputum smears assessed before recruitment and produced two further sputum specimens for re-examination in the research laboratory; of these 19 (19%) were sputum smear-positive on re-examination and a further seven (7%) became smear-positive on second re-examination. CONCLUSIONS: Of those patients with smear-negative presumed pulmonary tuberculosis by the local programme definition, 26% were smear-positive when reexamined carefully with two repeat sputum smears. This suggests that the high rates of smear-negative tuberculosis being seen may in part be due to under-reading. This is probably as a result of the overwhelming burden of tuberculosis leading to over rapid and inaccurate sputum examination. Retraining of existing technicians and training of more technicians is likely to reduce underreading and increase the yield of smear-positive tuberculosis. This finding also stresses the need for regular quality assurance.
M, PROFBHATTSHRIKANTBABU.  2001.  Bhatt K.M. Bhatt S.M., Oloo A.J., Jivanjee S.A., Kanja C. and Kimanzi. Evaluation of efficicacy and tolerance of . AIDS. 2002 Oct 18;16(15):2095-6.. : Taylor & Francis Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To record the costs of hospital care for HIV-positive and -negative patients in Nairobi, and identify costs paid by patients per admission. DESIGN: Cost data were collected on inpatients enrolled in a linked clinical study using standardized costing methods. SETTING: Kenyatta National Hospital, Nairobi's main district hospital. PATIENTS: Consecutive adult medical admissions to one ward over 14 weeks who consented to enrollment; tertiary referrals were excluded. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Average length of stay and cost per patient admission. RESULTS: The hospital costs of 398 patients (163 HIV positive; 33 with clinical AIDS) were analysed. The mean length of stay was 9.3 days and the mean cost per patient admission was US$163. There was no significant difference in costs or mean lengths of stay between HIV-positive and -negative groups, nor were the costs and lengths of stay for clinical AIDS patients significantly different to those for HIV-positive patients without AIDS. The patient charges paid to the hospital per admission, recorded for 344 patients, were on average US$61; and did not differ by HIV status. CONCLUSION: The similar cost patterns for inpatient care irrespective of HIV status or clinical AIDS probably reflects the limited provision of care beyond basic clinical services. Length of stay rather than differing treatment regimes thus appears to be the main cost driver. Private costs of medical care were high and were likely to pressurize households. When resources are limited, the introduction of new, more costly therapies needs careful planning. The study provides cost information for planning care services in resource-poor settings.

2000

M, PROFBHATTSHRIKANTBABU.  2000.  Autopsy study of HIV-1-positive and HIV-1-negative adult medical patients in Nairobi, Kenya. J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2000 May 1;24(1):23-9.. J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2000 May 1;24(1):23-9.. : Taylor & Francis Abstract
HIV infection has now been consistently identified as the major cause of death in young Africans in both urban and rural areas. In Africa, several studies have defined the clinical presentation of HIV disease but there have only been a limited number of autopsy studies. Because of the scarcity of autopsy data and the possibility of differing type and frequency of opportunistic infections between different geographic locations we set out to study consecutive new adult medical admissions to a tertiary referral hospital in Nairobi and perform autopsies on a sample of HIV-1-positive and HIV-1-negative patients who died in the hospital ward. Basic demographic data were collected on all patients admitted to two acute medical wards over an 11-month period. Final outcome and final clinical diagnoses were recorded at discharge or death. An autopsy examination was requested if the patient died in the ward. Autopsy examination was performed in 75 HIV-1-positive (40 men, 35 women) and 47 HIV-1-negative (28 men, 19 women) adults who died in the hospital. This represented 48.4% of all HIV-1-positive deaths and 33.3% of all HIV-1-negative deaths. Tuberculosis (TB) and bacterial and interstitial bronchopneumonia accounted for 96% of the major pathology in patients found to be HIV-1-positive at autopsy. TB was present in half the HIV-1-positive autopsy patients and was disseminated in over 80% of cases. Meningeal involvement was present in 26% of those with disseminated TB. By contrast, TB was much less common in the HIV-1-negative patients at autopsy in whom bacterial bronchopneumonia and malignancies were the most common pathologies. The type pathology found in the HIV-1-positive autopsy patients was not different than that found in other areas in Africa so far studied.
M, PROFBHATTSHRIKANTBABU.  2000.  The changing impact of HIV/AIDS on Kenyatta National Hospital, Nairobi from 1988/89 through 1992 to 1997. AIDS. 2000 Jul 28;14(11):1625-31.. AIDS. 2000 Jul 28;14(11):1625-31.. : Taylor & Francis Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Consequences of the growing HIV/AIDS epidemic for health services in sub-Saharan Africa remain poorly defined. Longitudinal data from the same centre are scarce. We aimed to describe the impact of a rapidly rising HIV/AIDS disease burden on an urban hospital over the last decade. DESIGN AND SETTING: Cross-sectional observational study in 1997, compared to similar data from 1988/89 and 1992. The study was carried out in the Kenyatta National Hospital, Nairobi, Kenya. METHOD: Consecutive adult medical patients were enrolled on admission and then followed up until death or discharge. The main outcome measures were clinical stage, HIV status, bacteraemia, length of stay, bed occupancy, final diagnosis and outcome of hospital admission. RESULTS: In 1997, 518 patients, 493 with HIV serology, were enrolled: HIV prevalence was 40.0%, bed occupancy 190%, the mean length of stay 9.5 days (SD 12) and overall mortality 18.5%. The mean number of HIV-positive admissions per day steadily rose from 4.3 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.6] patients in 1988/89, through 9.6 (95% CI, 1.4) in 1992, to 13.1 (95% CI, 2.8) or 13.9 adjusted for those enrolled without HIV serology in 1997. In contrast the mean number admitted with clinical AIDS, 1.7 in 1988/89 and 3.3 in 1992, fell to 2.6 cases per day in 1997. With HIV-negative admissions increasing by 37% and bed occupancy nearly doubling in 1997, HIV prevalence appeared to be stabilizing (19 then 39 and 40% respectively). Over time fewer HIV-infected patients were bacteraemic (26, 24 and 14%; P < 0.01); had clinical AIDS (39, 34 and 24% respectively; P < 0.01); or died (36, 35 and 22.6%; P < 0.02). HIV-negative mortality, 14% in 1988/89, rose to 23% in 1992 but fell to 15% in 1997. The mean length of hospital stay (9.5-10 days) did not differ according to HIV status nor did it change across the decade. CONCLUSION: The HIV/AIDS disease burden in Kenyatta National Hospital medical wards has risen inexorably over the last decade. Most recently, the number of HIV-uninfected patients has also risen, leading to bed occupancy figures of 190%. Despite overcrowding and irrespective of HIV status, in-patient mortality has fallen. Time trends suggest fewer clinical AIDS patients are presenting for hospital care, implying a rising community burden of chronic HIV/AIDS disease. Although widely predicted, it is not inevitable that medical services in urban African hospitals dealing with large volumes of HIV/AIDS disease, will collapse or become overwhelmed with chronic, end-stage disease and death.
M, PROFBHATTSHRIKANTBABU.  2000.  F.S. Rana, M.P. Hawken, C. Mwachari, Bhatt S.M., F. Abdullah, L.W. Nganga, C. Power, W.A. Gitui, J.D.H. Porter and S.B. Lucas. Autopsy study of HIV-I positive and HIV-negative adult medical patients in Nairobi Kenya. Journal of Aquired Immune Deficiency S. Journal of Aquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome 2000; vol. 24, 23 . : Taylor & Francis Abstract
Bloodstream infections are a frequent complication in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adults in Africa and usually associated with a poor prognosis. We evaluated bloodstream infections across a decade in 3 prospective cross-sectional surveys of consecutive medical admissions to the Kenyatta National Hospital, Nairobi, Kenya. Participants received standard clinical care throughout. In 1988-1989, 29.5% (28 of 95) of HIV-positive patients had bloodstream infections, compared with 31.9% (46 of 144) in 1992 and 21.3% (43 of 197) in 1997. Bacteremia and mycobacteremia were significantly associated with HIV infection. Infections with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, non-typhi species of Salmonella (NTS), and Streptococcus pneumoniae predominated. Fungemia exclusively due to Cryptococcus neoformans was uncommon. Clinical features at presentation remained similar. Significant improvements in the survival rate were recorded among patients with NTS bacteremia (20%-83%; P<.01) and mycobacteremia (0%-73%; P<.01). Standard clinical management can improve outcomes in resource-poor settings.
M, PROFBHATTSHRIKANTBABU, M PROFBHATTKIRNA.  2000.  January . The African Journal of Hospital Medicine. Vol.17 No. 1 pg.11-13. : Taylor & Francis Abstract
Bloodstream infections are a frequent complication in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adults in Africa and usually associated with a poor prognosis. We evaluated bloodstream infections across a decade in 3 prospective cross-sectional surveys of consecutive medical admissions to the Kenyatta National Hospital, Nairobi, Kenya. Participants received standard clinical care throughout. In 1988-1989, 29.5% (28 of 95) of HIV-positive patients had bloodstream infections, compared with 31.9% (46 of 144) in 1992 and 21.3% (43 of 197) in 1997. Bacteremia and mycobacteremia were significantly associated with HIV infection. Infections with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, non-typhi species of Salmonella (NTS), and Streptococcus pneumoniae predominated. Fungemia exclusively due to Cryptococcus neoformans was uncommon. Clinical features at presentation remained similar. Significant improvements in the survival rate were recorded among patients with NTS bacteremia (20%-83%; P<.01) and mycobacteremia (0%-73%; P<.01). Standard clinical management can improve outcomes in resource-poor settings.
M, PROFBHATTSHRIKANTBABU, M PROFBHATTKIRNA.  2000.  2000 - Evaluation of efficacy and tolerance of . Clin Infect Dis. 2001 Jul 15;33(2):248-56.. : Taylor & Francis Abstract
Bloodstream infections are a frequent complication in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adults in Africa and usually associated with a poor prognosis. We evaluated bloodstream infections across a decade in 3 prospective cross-sectional surveys of consecutive medical admissions to the Kenyatta National Hospital, Nairobi, Kenya. Participants received standard clinical care throughout. In 1988-1989, 29.5% (28 of 95) of HIV-positive patients had bloodstream infections, compared with 31.9% (46 of 144) in 1992 and 21.3% (43 of 197) in 1997. Bacteremia and mycobacteremia were significantly associated with HIV infection. Infections with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, non-typhi species of Salmonella (NTS), and Streptococcus pneumoniae predominated. Fungemia exclusively due to Cryptococcus neoformans was uncommon. Clinical features at presentation remained similar. Significant improvements in the survival rate were recorded among patients with NTS bacteremia (20%-83%; P<.01) and mycobacteremia (0%-73%; P<.01). Standard clinical management can improve outcomes in resource-poor settings.

1999

M, PROFBHATTSHRIKANTBABU.  1999.  Prevention of hearing loss in experimental pneumococcal meningitis by administration of dexamethasone and ketorolac. J Infect Dis. 1999 Jan;179(1):264-8. Erratum in: J Infect Dis 1999 Mar;179(3):753.. J Infect Dis. 1999 Jan;179(1):264-8. Erratum in: J Infect Dis 1999 Mar;179(3):753.. : Taylor & Francis Abstract
{ Pneumococcal meningitis remains a significant cause of morbidity, particularly sensorineural hearing loss. Recent literature has suggested that a vigorous host immune response to Streptococcus [corrected] pneumoniae is responsible for much of the neurologic sequelae, including deafness, after bacterial meningitis. This study used a rabbit model of hearing loss in experimental pneumococcal meningitis to evaluate the therapeutic effect of two anti-inflammatory agents, dexamethasone and ketorolac, coadministered with ampicillin. Both adjunctive drugs minimized or prevented sensorineural hearing loss compared with placebo. Dexamethasone, administered 10 min before ampicillin, was particularly effective in minimizing mean hearing threshold change compared with placebo for both clicks (dexamethasone: 6.7-dB sound pressure level [SPL] vs. placebo: 33. 4-dB SPL

1998

ADAM, PROFADAMMOHAMED, M PROFBHATTSHRIKANTBABU.  1998.  Some effects of the rising case load of adult HIV-related disease on a hospital in Nairobi. J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr Hum Retrovirol. 1998 Jul 1;18(3):234-40.. J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr Hum Retrovirol. 1998 Jul 1;18(3):234-40.. : Taylor & Francis Abstract

Increasing numbers of HIV-infected adults in Africa need hospital care. It remains unclear what impact this has on health care services or on how hospitals respond. The aim of this study was to describe the effects of a rising case load of adult HIV-related disease by comparing results from a prospective cross-sectional study of acute adult medical admissions to a government hospital in Nairobi conducted in 1992 with results from a previous study done in 1988 and 1989 in the same hospital, using the same study design and protocol. Data on age, gender, number admitted, length of stay, HIV status, clinical AIDS, final diagnosis, case mix, and outcome were compared. In 1992, 374 consecutive patients were admitted in 15 24-hour periods (24.9 patients/period) compared with the 1988 to 1989 study, which enrolled 506 patients in 22 24-hour periods (23.0 patients/period). Patients' age, gender, and length of hospital stay were similar in both studies. In 1992, 39% of patients were HIV-positive compared with 19% in 1988 to 1989 (p < 10(-6)); whereas seropositive admissions rose 123% between the two periods (p < .0001), HIV-negative admissions declined 18% (p < .05). Clinical surveillance for AIDS consistently identified <40% of HIV-positive patients. Irrespective of HIV status, tuberculosis and pneumococcal pneumonia were the leading diagnoses in both surveys. No change was found in the diagnoses recorded for HIV-positive patients, but in HIV-negative patients, reductions were significant in the case mix (p < .00001) and range of diagnoses (p < .001) seen in 1992. Outcome remained unchanged for HIV-positive patients with approximately 35% mortality in both surveys. Outcome significantly worsened, in relative and absolute terms, for HIV-negative patients: in 1992, mortality was 23%, compared with 13.9% in 1988 to 1989 (p < .005), with 3.5 deaths per 24-hour period in 1992 compared with 2.6 deaths per 24-hour period in 1988 to 1989 (p < .05, one-tailed). These data suggest that increasing selection for admission is taking place as demand for care increases because of HIV/AIDS. This process appears to favor HIV-positive patients at the expense of HIV-negative patients who seem to be crowded out and, once admitted, experience higher mortality rates. The true social costs of the HIV epidemic are underestimated by not including the effects on HIV-negative people. PIP: The impact of the escalating demand for HIV/AIDS-related care on hospital services in Nairobi, Kenya, was investigated in two prospective cross-sectional studies conducted at Kenyatta National Hospital. Data on age, gender, number of admissions, length of stay, HIV status, clinical AIDS, final diagnosis, case mix, and outcome were compared in a 1988-89 study that enrolled 506 consecutive patients in a total of 22 24-hour periods and in a 1992 study of 374 patients admitted in 15 24-hour periods. 18.7% of hospital patients in 1988-89 were HIV-positive compared with 38.5% in 1992, with a concomitant decline of 18% in the number of HIV-negative admissions. Clinical surveillance for AIDS consistently identified less than 40% of HIV-positive patients. Tuberculosis and pneumococcal pneumonia were the leading diagnoses in both surveys among HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients. Diagnoses recorded for HIV-positive patients did not change over time; however, among HIV-negative patients, there was a significant narrowing in the range of diagnoses seen. Mortality among HIV-positive patients remained constant at 35% in both surveys. Among HIV-negative patients, mortality increased from 13.9% in 1988-89 to 23% in 1992 (2.6 and 3.5 deaths per 24-hour period, respectively). These findings suggest that increasing demand for hospital care by HIV-positive patients has been accompanied by deteriorating conditions for HIV-negative patients, especially an admissions selection process that favors HIV/AIDS patients. Recommended to address the worsening crisis in health care delivery are general guidelines on admission criteria that neither crowd out HIV-negative patients nor discriminate against those with HIV/AIDS.

1996

M, PROFBHATTSHRIKANTBABU, O DRKWASATHOMASO.  1996.  Mbuya SO, Kwasa TO, Amayo EO, Kioy PG, Bhatt SM. Peripheral neuropathy in AIDS patients at Kenyatta National Hospital. East Afr Med J. 1996 Aug;73(8):538-40.. East Afr Med J. 1996 Aug;73(8):538-40.. : Taylor & Francis Abstract
Between June and December 1992 forty AIDS patients as defined by the CDC criteria, admitted to the medical wards of the Kenyatta National Hospital, were studied to determine the prevalence and pattern of peripheral neuropathy. Their mean age was 33 +/- 3 years with a range of 16 to 55 years. Clinical and laboratory assessment were carried out both to confirm peripheral neuropathy and exclude other causes of peripheral neuropathy apart from AIDS. All the patients had nerve conduction and electromyographic studies done. Eighteen patients were asymptomatic while fourteen had both signs and symptoms. The commonest symptom was painful paresthesiae of the limbs (35%) while the commonest sign was loss of vibration sense (60%). When symptoms, signs, and electrophysiological studies were combined, all the patients fitted the definition of peripheral neuropathy. The commonest type of peripheral neuropathy was distal symmetrical peripheral neuropathy (DSPN) (37.5%). PIP: In Kenya, physicians evaluated 40 AIDS patients admitted to Kenyatta National Hospital during June-December 1992 to determine the prevalence and types of peripheral neuropathy in AIDS patients. 75% were 21-40 years old. 18 (45%) of the 40 AIDS patients had symptoms of peripheral neuropathy. Symptoms included increased sensitivity to stimulation (43%), hyperpathia (15%), and muscle or limb weakness (13%). 26 AIDS patients had signs of peripheral neuropathy, especially impaired sense of vibration (60%). 14 of these patients had both signs and symptoms. Electromyographic and nerve conduction velocity revealed peripheral neuropathy in 16 (40%) AIDS patients. The types of peripheral neuropathy included distal symmetrical peripheral neuropathy (37.5%), polyneuropathy, and mononeuritis multiplex. When the symptoms, signs, and electroneurophysiological test findings were considered, all 40 AIDS patients had evidence of peripheral neuropathy.
M, PROFBHATTSHRIKANTBABU, M PROFBHATTKIRNA.  1996.  K.M. Bhatt and Bhatt S.M., Recent development in the management of opportunistic infections in AIDS. Medics 1996; vol. 15, 11 . AIDS. Medics 1996; vol. 15, 11 . : Taylor & Francis Abstract

Meningococcal meningitis has been recognised as serious problem for almost 200 years. In Africa the disease occurs in epidemics periodically during the hot and dry weather in the "meningitis belt" and in east Africa, which is outside this belt the epidemics tend to occur during the cold and dry months. The infection is mainly transmitted from person to person by nasopharyngeal carriers in crowded places like refugee camps and army barracks. The rural/urban migration, the basic structural conditions of housing in squatter settlements and slums together with an overcrowded transport system have also contributed to the transmission of meningococcal meningitis. The earlier treatment of meningococcal meningitis was by the way of repeated CSF drainage. The first important advance in the treatment was intrathecal injection of antimeningococcal serum. A major break through in the treatment was the introduction of sulphonamides which was the preferred treatment until emergence of resistance to sulphonamides in mid 1960's. Penicillin remains the drug of choice currently. Mass immunisation of selected communities using polyvalent A and C polysaccharide vaccine is a useful control measure. Chemoprophylaxis is generally not recommended during epidemics. Given the current population densities and rural/urban migration together with financial constraints, future epidemic in Kenya may be more explosive unless strict surveillance programmes are maintained.

M, PROFBHATTSHRIKANTBABU, M PROFBHATTKIRNA.  1996.  Bhatt K.M., Bhatt S.M., Omonge E, Oteko L. and Andriel M. Efficacy of a sequential Artesunate suppository . E.A.M. J. 1996; Vol. 73, 35 . : Taylor & Francis Abstract

Meningococcal meningitis has been recognised as serious problem for almost 200 years. In Africa the disease occurs in epidemics periodically during the hot and dry weather in the "meningitis belt" and in east Africa, which is outside this belt the epidemics tend to occur during the cold and dry months. The infection is mainly transmitted from person to person by nasopharyngeal carriers in crowded places like refugee camps and army barracks. The rural/urban migration, the basic structural conditions of housing in squatter settlements and slums together with an overcrowded transport system have also contributed to the transmission of meningococcal meningitis. The earlier treatment of meningococcal meningitis was by the way of repeated CSF drainage. The first important advance in the treatment was intrathecal injection of antimeningococcal serum. A major break through in the treatment was the introduction of sulphonamides which was the preferred treatment until emergence of resistance to sulphonamides in mid 1960's. Penicillin remains the drug of choice currently. Mass immunisation of selected communities using polyvalent A and C polysaccharide vaccine is a useful control measure. Chemoprophylaxis is generally not recommended during epidemics. Given the current population densities and rural/urban migration together with financial constraints, future epidemic in Kenya may be more explosive unless strict surveillance programmes are maintained.

M, PROFBHATTSHRIKANTBABU, M PROFBHATTKIRNA.  1996.  K.M. Bhatt, Bhatt S.M. and N.B. Mirza, Meningococcal meningitis E.A.M. J. 1996; Vol. 73, 35 . E.A.M. J. 1996; Vol. 73, 35 . : Taylor & Francis Abstract

Meningococcal meningitis has been recognised as serious problem for almost 200 years. In Africa the disease occurs in epidemics periodically during the hot and dry weather in the "meningitis belt" and in east Africa, which is outside this belt the epidemics tend to occur during the cold and dry months. The infection is mainly transmitted from person to person by nasopharyngeal carriers in crowded places like refugee camps and army barracks. The rural/urban migration, the basic structural conditions of housing in squatter settlements and slums together with an overcrowded transport system have also contributed to the transmission of meningococcal meningitis. The earlier treatment of meningococcal meningitis was by the way of repeated CSF drainage. The first important advance in the treatment was intrathecal injection of antimeningococcal serum. A major break through in the treatment was the introduction of sulphonamides which was the preferred treatment until emergence of resistance to sulphonamides in mid 1960's. Penicillin remains the drug of choice currently. Mass immunisation of selected communities using polyvalent A and C polysaccharide vaccine is a useful control measure. Chemoprophylaxis is generally not recommended during epidemics. Given the current population densities and rural/urban migration together with financial constraints, future epidemic in Kenya may be more explosive unless strict surveillance programmes are maintained.

1994

Bhatt, KM, Bhatt SM.  1994.  Recurrent polyneuropathy in pregnancy: a case report. Abstract

A 33-year old female patient presented with recurrent polyneuropathy during two consecutive pregnancies and recovered completely after spontaneous abortion the first time and after a normal delivery the second time. The patient has had a tubal ligation since then and has remained well up to date.

M, PROFBHATTSHRIKANTBABU.  1994.  Cryptosporidiosis in HIV positive patients at Kenyatta National Hospital, Nairobi, Kenya. East Afr Med J. 1994 May;71(5):334-5.. East Afr Med J. 1994 May;71(5):334-5.. : Taylor & Francis Abstract
Blackwater fever was an important cause of morbidity and mortality in the beginning of this century particularly in West and Central Africa. There has been a marked reduction in the incidence of blackwater fever since 1950 and only sporadic cases occur nowadays. At the Kenyatta National Hospital, three cases of blackwater fever have been seen in the past four years whereas not a single case had been reported between 1975 and 1988. Two of the patients fit into the classical description of blackwater fever and one was possibly due to drug induced haemolysis in a G6PD deficiency patient.
M, PROFBHATTSHRIKANTBABU, M PROFBHATTKIRNA.  1994.  K.M. Bhatt., Bhatt S.M., Tombe, Blackwater fever at the Kenyatta National Hospital in Kenya: E.A.M.J. 1994; Vol. 71, 755 . E.A.M.J. 1994; Vol. 71, 755 . : Taylor & Francis Abstract
Blackwater fever was an important cause of morbidity and mortality in the beginning of this century particularly in West and Central Africa. There has been a marked reduction in the incidence of blackwater fever since 1950 and only sporadic cases occur nowadays. At the Kenyatta National Hospital, three cases of blackwater fever have been seen in the past four years whereas not a single case had been reported between 1975 and 1988. Two of the patients fit into the classical description of blackwater fever and one was possibly due to drug induced haemolysis in a G6PD deficiency patient.
M, PROFBHATTSHRIKANTBABU.  1994.  Bhatt S.M., Treatment and Prevention of Plasmodium malaria. Africa J. Med. Prac1994; Vol 1, No. 1, 7 . Africa J. Med. Prac1994; Vol 1, No. 1, 7 . : Taylor & Francis Abstract
Between June and December 1992 forty AIDS patients as defined by the CDC criteria, admitted to the medical wards of the Kenyatta National Hospital, were studied to determine the prevalence and pattern of peripheral neuropathy. Their mean age was 33 +/- 3 years with a range of 16 to 55 years. Clinical and laboratory assessment were carried out both to confirm peripheral neuropathy and exclude other causes of peripheral neuropathy apart from AIDS. All the patients had nerve conduction and electromyographic studies done. Eighteen patients were asymptomatic while fourteen had both signs and symptoms. The commonest symptom was painful paresthesiae of the limbs (35%) while the commonest sign was loss of vibration sense (60%). When symptoms, signs, and electrophysiological studies were combined, all the patients fitted the definition of peripheral neuropathy. The commonest type of peripheral neuropathy was distal symmetrical peripheral neuropathy (DSPN) (37.5%). PIP: In Kenya, physicians evaluated 40 AIDS patients admitted to Kenyatta National Hospital during June-December 1992 to determine the prevalence and types of peripheral neuropathy in AIDS patients. 75% were 21-40 years old. 18 (45%) of the 40 AIDS patients had symptoms of peripheral neuropathy. Symptoms included increased sensitivity to stimulation (43%), hyperpathia (15%), and muscle or limb weakness (13%). 26 AIDS patients had signs of peripheral neuropathy, especially impaired sense of vibration (60%). 14 of these patients had both signs and symptoms. Electromyographic and nerve conduction velocity revealed peripheral neuropathy in 16 (40%) AIDS patients. The types of peripheral neuropathy included distal symmetrical peripheral neuropathy (37.5%), polyneuropathy, and mononeuritis multiplex. When the symptoms, signs, and electroneurophysiological test findings were considered, all 40 AIDS patients had evidence of peripheral neuropathy.

1993

M, PROFBHATTSHRIKANTBABU.  1993.  Progression of hearing loss in experimental pneumococcal meningitis: correlation with cerebrospinal fluid cytochemistry. J Infect Dis. 1993 Mar;167(3):675-83.. J Infect Dis. 1993 Mar;167(3):675-83.. : Taylor & Francis Abstract
The development of hearing loss and concomitant cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cytochemical changes in a model of pneumococcal meningitis were examined. Rabbits were injected intracisternally with 10(5) pneumococci. Auditory evoked potentials to clicks and to 10- and 1-kHz tone bursts were recorded hourly; CSF was analyzed every 4 h. Sensorineural hearing loss developed in all animals beginning 12 h after infection and progressed to severe deafness. The onset of hearing loss was preceded by a CSF leukocytosis of > 2000 cells/microL and elevation of CSF protein and lactate concentrations to > or = 1 mg/mL. Temporal bone histopathology showed pneumococci and leukocytes extending from the CSF to the perilymph via the cochlear aqueduct. Hearing loss can develop early in the course of meningitis and is preceded by the abrupt onset of inflammatory changes in CSF. Progression of hearing loss is rapid and proceeds from cochlear base to apex in parallel with the degree of inflammation.
M, PROFBHATTSHRIKANTBABU.  1993.  Bhatt S.M. Editorial: The changing pattern of meningococcal meningitis in East Africa. E. Afr. Med. J .1993; Vol. 70 No. 4, 193 . E. Afr. Med. J .1993; Vol. 70 No. 4, 193 . : Taylor & Francis Abstract
Blackwater fever was an important cause of morbidity and mortality in the beginning of this century particularly in West and Central Africa. There has been a marked reduction in the incidence of blackwater fever since 1950 and only sporadic cases occur nowadays. At the Kenyatta National Hospital, three cases of blackwater fever have been seen in the past four years whereas not a single case had been reported between 1975 and 1988. Two of the patients fit into the classical description of blackwater fever and one was possibly due to drug induced haemolysis in a G6PD deficiency patient.

1992

M, PROFBHATTSHRIKANTBABU.  1992.  The presentation and outcome of HIV-related disease in Nairobi Q J Med. 1992 Jan;82(297):25-32.. Q J Med. 1992 Jan;82(297):25-32.. : Taylor & Francis Abstract
The range of clinical presentations of HIV-related disease in Africa has not been adequately described, despite the fact that many hospitals have to rely heavily on clinical diagnosis. Six hundred adult medical patients seen in the Casualty Department of the main Government hospital in Nairobi were enrolled in a study of the presentation and outcome of HIV-related disease: 506 of these patients were admitted, of whom 19 per cent (95) were HIV seropositive. The remaining 94 were dealt with as outpatients: 11 percent (10) of these were seropositive. A history of prior treatment for sexually transmitted disease and, if male, being uncircumcised, were associated with being seropositive. Three presentations were strongly associated with HIV infection: acute fever with no focus except the gastrointestinal tract (enteric fever-like illness), acute cough with fever (community-acquired pneumonia) and chronic diarrhoea with wasting. The WHO clinical case definition (CCD) for AIDS missed a substantial amount of HIV-related morbidity (sensitivity 39 per cent) and misidentified many seronegative patients (positive predictive value 59 per cent). In comparison with the Centers for Disease Control surveillance definition for AIDS, the CCD was specific (91 per cent) and sensitive (79 per cent) but only had a positive predictive values of 30 per cent: the CCD may therefore be a poor surveillance tool for AIDS. Seropositive patients were much more likely to die than were seronegative patients (39 per cent vs. 15 per cent mortality). Enteric fever-like illness was the presentation which most commonly proved fatal. A wider spectrum of disease is associated with underlying HIV immunosuppression than has previously been described in Africa.
M, PROFBHATTSHRIKANTBABU.  1992.  Multiple sexually acquired diseases occurring concurrently in an HIV positive man: case report, diagnosis and management. East Afr Med J. 1992 Jun;69(6):345-6.. East Afr Med J. 1992 Jun;69(6):345-6.. : Taylor & Francis Abstract

A case of an HIV positive man with multiple sexually acquired disease occurring concurrently is described. Risk behaviours that could have predisposed him to HIV infection are discussed. The factors which might have interacted to make the sexually acquired infections severe and difficult to treat are postulated. PIP: The case of an HIV-seropositive man with gonorrhea, syphilis, genital warts, and chancroid is described. Multiple sexual partners, genital ulcer diseases, and lack of circumcision may have predisposed him to HIV infection. As indicated by his CD4/CD8 ratio of 0.5, his immunological status was not very compromised. Other factors were therefore probably behind these multiple sexually transmitted diseases (STD). This 30-year old man was inadequately treated for a long time for urethral discharge and genital ulcer disease, and ultimately collapsed on the job with a comprised central nervous system. Bacterial infection related to the multiple STDs could certainly have caused this collapse. The time demands of this man's work, the lack of medical facilities to diagnose and treat such conditions, his unprotected sexual behavior with multiple partners, and broader socioeconomic conditions which separate wage- earning males from their families in Africa conspire to produce multiply-afflicted cases such as these.

1990

M, PROFBHATTSHRIKANTBABU.  1990.  Extrapulmonary and disseminated tuberculosis in HIV-1-seropositive patients presenting to the acute medical services in Nairobi. AIDS. 1990 Oct;4(10):981-5.. AIDS. 1990 Oct;4(10):981-5.. : Taylor & Francis Abstract
We studied 506 consecutive adult acute medical admissions to hospital in Nairobi; 95 (18.8%) were seropositive for HIV-1, and 43 new cases of active tuberculosis (TB) were identified. TB was clearly associated with HIV infection, occurring in 17.9% of seropositive patients compared with 6.3% of seronegatives [odds ratio (OR) 3.2; 95% confidence limits (CL) 1.6-6.5]. Extrapulmonary disease was more common in seropositive than seronegative TB patients (nine out of 17 versus five out of 26; OR 4.7; 95% CL 1.01-23.6); this accounted for most of the excess cases of TB seen in seropositive patients. Mycobacteraemia was demonstrated in two of eight seropositive TB patients but in none of 11 seronegative TB patients. No atypical mycobacteria were isolated. The World Health Organization (WHO) clinical case definition for African AIDS did not discriminate well between seropositive and seronegative TB cases. Five out of seven seropositive women with active tuberculosis had delivered children in the preceding 6 months and were lactating, compared with only one out of eight seronegative tuberculous women. An association between recent childbirth, HIV immunosuppression and the development of TB is suggested

1987

M, PROFBHATTSHRIKANTBABU.  1987.  Adam A.M., Bhatt S.M. Behects syndrome presenting with multiple cerebral and Brainstem infarcts. E. Afr. Med. J. 1987; Vol. 64 No. 8: 558 . E. Afr. Med. J. 1987; Vol. 64 No. 8: 558 . : Taylor & Francis Abstract
We studied 506 consecutive adult acute medical admissions to hospital in Nairobi; 95 (18.8%) were seropositive for HIV-1, and 43 new cases of active tuberculosis (TB) were identified. TB was clearly associated with HIV infection, occurring in 17.9% of seropositive patients compared with 6.3% of seronegatives [odds ratio (OR) 3.2; 95% confidence limits (CL) 1.6-6.5]. Extrapulmonary disease was more common in seropositive than seronegative TB patients (nine out of 17 versus five out of 26; OR 4.7; 95% CL 1.01-23.6); this accounted for most of the excess cases of TB seen in seropositive patients. Mycobacteraemia was demonstrated in two of eight seropositive TB patients but in none of 11 seronegative TB patients. No atypical mycobacteria were isolated. The World Health Organization (WHO) clinical case definition for African AIDS did not discriminate well between seropositive and seronegative TB cases. Five out of seven seropositive women with active tuberculosis had delivered children in the preceding 6 months and were lactating, compared with only one out of eight seronegative tuberculous women. An association between recent childbirth, HIV immunosuppression and the development of TB is suggested

1985

M, PROFBHATTSHRIKANTBABU.  1985.  Klauss V. and Bhatt S.M.: Lipaemia retinales: A case report E. Afr. Med. J. 1985 Vol 62. 8: 608 . E. Afr. Med. J. 1985 Vol 62. 8: 608 . : Taylor & Francis Abstract
PIP: Malaria is the most prevalent and devastating public health problem in Africa despite much research and control effort over the last two decades. In most parts of Africa, individuals should take 200 mg of Proguanil daily together with chloroquine 5 mg/kg per week as prophylaxis. Pregnant women and individuals with underlying disease such as sickle cell making them susceptible to severe or complicated malaria, however, should take just 200 mg Proguanil daily. In hard-core multi-drug resistance areas, mefloquine 250 mg once weekly together with chloroquine 300 mg weekly is recommended as prophylaxis. Since no anti-malarial drug confers absolute protection against infection, however, using mosquito nets impregnated with permethrin, insecticides, and mosquito repellents is also advocated for those at high risk of severe malaria. The need also exists to treat cases of malaria when prevention is unsuccessful. Chloroquine in total dose 25 mg/Kg over three days is the first choice treatment of uncomplicated malaria in 4-aminoquinoline sensitive areas. Amodiaquine 25 mg/Kg over three days is the second line treatment, while pyrimethamine/sulphonamide combinations are useful in areas where there is resistance to 4-aminoquinalines. Finally, quinine 10 mg/kg every eight hours for seven days is the treatment of choice for severe and complicated malaria.
M, PROFBHATTSHRIKANTBABU.  1985.  Brycesson A.D.M., Chulay J.D., Bhatt S.M., Mugambi M., Were J.B.: Visceral leishmaniasis unresponsive to antimonial drugs. I. Clinical and immunological studies. Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 1985; 79: 700 . E. Afr. Med. J. 1987; Vol. 64 No. 8: 558 . : Taylor & Francis Abstract
We studied 506 consecutive adult acute medical admissions to hospital in Nairobi; 95 (18.8%) were seropositive for HIV-1, and 43 new cases of active tuberculosis (TB) were identified. TB was clearly associated with HIV infection, occurring in 17.9% of seropositive patients compared with 6.3% of seronegatives [odds ratio (OR) 3.2; 95% confidence limits (CL) 1.6-6.5]. Extrapulmonary disease was more common in seropositive than seronegative TB patients (nine out of 17 versus five out of 26; OR 4.7; 95% CL 1.01-23.6); this accounted for most of the excess cases of TB seen in seropositive patients. Mycobacteraemia was demonstrated in two of eight seropositive TB patients but in none of 11 seronegative TB patients. No atypical mycobacteria were isolated. The World Health Organization (WHO) clinical case definition for African AIDS did not discriminate well between seropositive and seronegative TB cases. Five out of seven seropositive women with active tuberculosis had delivered children in the preceding 6 months and were lactating, compared with only one out of eight seronegative tuberculous women. An association between recent childbirth, HIV immunosuppression and the development of TB is suggested
M, PROFBHATTSHRIKANTBABU, M PROFBHATTKIRNA.  1985.  Bhatt S.M. and Bhatt K.M.: Treatment of plasmodium falciparum malaria Medicus 1985; vol. 4 No. 8: 23 . Medicus 1985; vol. 4 No. 8: 23 . : Taylor & Francis Abstract
PIP: Malaria is the most prevalent and devastating public health problem in Africa despite much research and control effort over the last two decades. In most parts of Africa, individuals should take 200 mg of Proguanil daily together with chloroquine 5 mg/kg per week as prophylaxis. Pregnant women and individuals with underlying disease such as sickle cell making them susceptible to severe or complicated malaria, however, should take just 200 mg Proguanil daily. In hard-core multi-drug resistance areas, mefloquine 250 mg once weekly together with chloroquine 300 mg weekly is recommended as prophylaxis. Since no anti-malarial drug confers absolute protection against infection, however, using mosquito nets impregnated with permethrin, insecticides, and mosquito repellents is also advocated for those at high risk of severe malaria. The need also exists to treat cases of malaria when prevention is unsuccessful. Chloroquine in total dose 25 mg/Kg over three days is the first choice treatment of uncomplicated malaria in 4-aminoquinoline sensitive areas. Amodiaquine 25 mg/Kg over three days is the second line treatment, while pyrimethamine/sulphonamide combinations are useful in areas where there is resistance to 4-aminoquinalines. Finally, quinine 10 mg/kg every eight hours for seven days is the treatment of choice for severe and complicated malaria.

1984

M, PROFBHATTSHRIKANTBABU, M PROFBHATTKIRNA.  1984.  Bhatt K.M., Bhatt S.M., Okelo, G.B.A. & Watkings, W.H.: Chloroquin resistant falciparum malaria in local Kenya: A case report. E. Afr. Med. J .1984; Vol. 61 No. 61 No. 10: 745 . E. Afr. Med. J .1984; Vol. 61 No. 61 No. 10: 745 . : Taylor & Francis Abstract
PIP: Malaria is the most prevalent and devastating public health problem in Africa despite much research and control effort over the last two decades. In most parts of Africa, individuals should take 200 mg of Proguanil daily together with chloroquine 5 mg/kg per week as prophylaxis. Pregnant women and individuals with underlying disease such as sickle cell making them susceptible to severe or complicated malaria, however, should take just 200 mg Proguanil daily. In hard-core multi-drug resistance areas, mefloquine 250 mg once weekly together with chloroquine 300 mg weekly is recommended as prophylaxis. Since no anti-malarial drug confers absolute protection against infection, however, using mosquito nets impregnated with permethrin, insecticides, and mosquito repellents is also advocated for those at high risk of severe malaria. The need also exists to treat cases of malaria when prevention is unsuccessful. Chloroquine in total dose 25 mg/Kg over three days is the first choice treatment of uncomplicated malaria in 4-aminoquinoline sensitive areas. Amodiaquine 25 mg/Kg over three days is the second line treatment, while pyrimethamine/sulphonamide combinations are useful in areas where there is resistance to 4-aminoquinalines. Finally, quinine 10 mg/kg every eight hours for seven days is the treatment of choice for severe and complicated malaria.
M, PROFBHATTSHRIKANTBABU, M PROFBHATTKIRNA.  1984.  Bhatt K.M., Bhatt S.M., Kanja C. & Kyobe J. Urinary leucocytes in bladder schistosomiasis. E. Afr. Med. J . 1984; Vol. 61 No. 6: 446 . E. Afr. Med. J . 1984; Vol. 61 No. 6: 446 . : Taylor & Francis Abstract
PIP: Malaria is the most prevalent and devastating public health problem in Africa despite much research and control effort over the last two decades. In most parts of Africa, individuals should take 200 mg of Proguanil daily together with chloroquine 5 mg/kg per week as prophylaxis. Pregnant women and individuals with underlying disease such as sickle cell making them susceptible to severe or complicated malaria, however, should take just 200 mg Proguanil daily. In hard-core multi-drug resistance areas, mefloquine 250 mg once weekly together with chloroquine 300 mg weekly is recommended as prophylaxis. Since no anti-malarial drug confers absolute protection against infection, however, using mosquito nets impregnated with permethrin, insecticides, and mosquito repellents is also advocated for those at high risk of severe malaria. The need also exists to treat cases of malaria when prevention is unsuccessful. Chloroquine in total dose 25 mg/Kg over three days is the first choice treatment of uncomplicated malaria in 4-aminoquinoline sensitive areas. Amodiaquine 25 mg/Kg over three days is the second line treatment, while pyrimethamine/sulphonamide combinations are useful in areas where there is resistance to 4-aminoquinalines. Finally, quinine 10 mg/kg every eight hours for seven days is the treatment of choice for severe and complicated malaria.
M, PROFBHATTSHRIKANTBABU.  1984.  Ongeri S.K., Otieno L.S. Kinuthia D.M.W., Bhatt S.M.: Pattern of renal disease at Kenyatta National Hospital. The Nairobi Journal of Medicine 1984; 2: 18 . The Nairobi Journal of Medicine 1984; 2: 18 . : Taylor & Francis Abstract
PIP: Malaria is the most prevalent and devastating public health problem in Africa despite much research and control effort over the last two decades. In most parts of Africa, individuals should take 200 mg of Proguanil daily together with chloroquine 5 mg/kg per week as prophylaxis. Pregnant women and individuals with underlying disease such as sickle cell making them susceptible to severe or complicated malaria, however, should take just 200 mg Proguanil daily. In hard-core multi-drug resistance areas, mefloquine 250 mg once weekly together with chloroquine 300 mg weekly is recommended as prophylaxis. Since no anti-malarial drug confers absolute protection against infection, however, using mosquito nets impregnated with permethrin, insecticides, and mosquito repellents is also advocated for those at high risk of severe malaria. The need also exists to treat cases of malaria when prevention is unsuccessful. Chloroquine in total dose 25 mg/Kg over three days is the first choice treatment of uncomplicated malaria in 4-aminoquinoline sensitive areas. Amodiaquine 25 mg/Kg over three days is the second line treatment, while pyrimethamine/sulphonamide combinations are useful in areas where there is resistance to 4-aminoquinalines. Finally, quinine 10 mg/kg every eight hours for seven days is the treatment of choice for severe and complicated malaria.

1983

M, PROFBHATTSHRIKANTBABU.  1983.  A comparison of three dosage regimens of sodium stibogluconate in the treatment of visceral leishmaniasis in Kenya. J Infect Dis. 1983 Jul;148(1):148-55.. J Infect Dis. 1983 Jul;148(1):148-55.. : Taylor & Francis Abstract
A prospective randomized trial of three dosage regimens of sodium stibogluconate (Pentostam; Wellcome Foundation, London) to treat visceral leishmaniasis was conducted. Previously untreated patients were randomized to receive 31 doses of sodium stibogluconate (10 mg Sb/kg of body weight per dose) administered once daily for 31 days (group A), every 12 hr for 15 days (group B), or every 8 hr for 10 days (group C). Of the 29 patients who completed treatment, seven of 10 in group B and all of the patients in groups A and C responded to treatment and remained well for one year. One patient in group B failed to respond to treatment, and two others in group B initially responded to treatment but relapsed six weeks after discharge. None of the treatment regimens was toxic. Parasites disappeared from splenic aspirates most quickly and hemoglobin levels rose most rapidly in patients receiving sodium stibogluconate every 8 hr. Treatment of visceral leishmaniasis in Kenya with sodium stibogluconate at a dose of 10 mg Sb/kg every 8 hr for 10 days appears to be a safe alternative to conventional treatment. Its efficacy should be confirmed in a larger number of patients.
M, PROFBHATTSHRIKANTBABU, M PROFBHATTKIRNA.  1983.  Kager P. Rees, P.H., Manguyu, Bhatt K.M., Bhatt, S.M.: Splenic aspiration: experiences in Kenya. Trop. Geogr. Med .1983; Vol. 35, 125 . Trop. Geogr. Med .1983; Vol. 35, 125 . : Taylor & Francis Abstract

We describe the technique of splenic aspiration in 113 patients presenting with splenomegaly. It was used initially to establish a diagnosis, and in those patients with kala azar, to follow the response of the parasites to therapy until 'parasitological cure'. In all 671 aspirations were performed. No complications occurred in the 69 patients with active kala azar, who collectively had more than 600 aspirations. One patient in a moribund condition had a fatal haemorrhage. The aspirate suggested a lymphoma, confirmed at autopsy. In 68 of the 69 patients with active kala azar, the diagnosis was established at the first aspiration. The essentials of the technique are the use of a small calibre needle (21 G), and speed, the needle being in the spleen for less than a second, with the consequent procurement of a few drops of material only.

1982

M, PROFBHATTSHRIKANTBABU, M PROFBHATTKIRNA.  1982.  De Cock, K., Bhatt, K. M., Bhatt, S. M., Rees, P. H.: Management of Liver abscess Lancet 1982; vol. 2: 747.. Management of Liver abscess Lancet 1982; vol. 2: 747.. : Taylor & Francis Abstract
A prospective randomized trial of three dosage regimens of sodium stibogluconate (Pentostam; Wellcome Foundation, London) to treat visceral leishmaniasis was conducted. Previously untreated patients were randomized to receive 31 doses of sodium stibogluconate (10 mg Sb/kg of body weight per dose) administered once daily for 31 days (group A), every 12 hr for 15 days (group B), or every 8 hr for 10 days (group C). Of the 29 patients who completed treatment, seven of 10 in group B and all of the patients in groups A and C responded to treatment and remained well for one year. One patient in group B failed to respond to treatment, and two others in group B initially responded to treatment but relapsed six weeks after discharge. None of the treatment regimens was toxic. Parasites disappeared from splenic aspirates most quickly and hemoglobin levels rose most rapidly in patients receiving sodium stibogluconate every 8 hr. Treatment of visceral leishmaniasis in Kenya with sodium stibogluconate at a dose of 10 mg Sb/kg every 8 hr for 10 days appears to be a safe alternative to conventional treatment. Its efficacy should be confirmed in a larger number of patients.

1977

M, PROFBHATTSHRIKANTBABU.  1977.  Primary splenic pregnancy. Case report. Br J Obstet Gynaecol. 1977 Aug;84(8):634-5.. Br J Obstet Gynaecol. 1977 Aug;84(8):634-5.. : Taylor & Francis Abstract
A patient with a primary splenic pregnancy is described

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