Bio

Profile

I am a Reproductive Health Specialist with expertise in Maternal Neonatal and Child Health (MNCH) with twelve years progressive experience in Nursing Practice education and consultancy in matters related to Maternal and Neonatal Health Programs ranging from training of skilled birth Attendance, PMTCT projects and research. I have seven years University teaching experience where I have taught in Masinde Muliro University, Daystar University and currently University of Nairobi as a lecturer.

Publications


2018

Ongeso, A.  2018.  Human immunodeficiency Virus seroconversion: Rate and Retesting uptake. A case of Kakamega and Nairobi Counties, Kenya. International Journal of Advanced Research. 6:4(2320-5407):599-608. Abstract

Human immunodeficiency Virus seroconversion: Rate and Retesting uptake. A case of Kakamega and Nairobi Counties, Kenya
Background: There is limited empirical data on the prevalence of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) seroconversion in late pregnancy due to the fact that majority of the women start seeking antenatal care late in pregnancy therefore rarely retest. This leaves a gap in the Elimination of Mother to Child Transmission (eMTCT) strategy thus contributing to high maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality rates in Kenya.
Objectives: To establish the rate of HIV retesting uptake in late pregnancy and HIV seroconversion rate among women attending Antenatal Clinics in Pumwani Maternity Hospital and Kakamega County Hospital.
Methodology: A longitudinal study design was employed; 1,117 women confirmed as HIV negative in early pregnancy were followed up for three months and retested to ascertain their serostatus. Sample size was obtained through Census and consecutive sampling to recruit individual respondents. Clearance to conduct the study was sought from Ethics Review Committee, Pumwani and Kakamega County Hospitals and the respondents. Researcher administered questionnaires and HIV testing was done for data collection. Descriptive data involved calculation of measures of central tendency. Findings were presented in tables, graphs and narrative.
Results: HIV retesting uptake was 1,073 (96%) and the rate of HIV serocopositivity among initially HIV negative pregnant women that retested was 8 (0.75%).
Conclusion: HIV retesting uptake is very impressive and the rate of HIV seroconversion is very low. Kenya has made good progress towards eMTCT of HIV.

Ongeso, A, Okoth B.  2018.  Factors influencing male involvement on Antenatal Care among clients attending Antenatal clinic: A case of Kenyatta National Hospital, Kenya. International Journal of Advanced Research. 6:5(2320-5407):72-82. Abstract

Factors influencing male involvement on Antenatal Care among clients attending Antenatal clinic: A case of Kenyatta National Hospital, Kenya

Background: Male participation is a crucial component in the optimization of antenatal care services. Level of male participation has been found to be low. This study aimed to identify determinants of male partners’ involvement in antenatal care services.
Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study was used. The study population included expectant women and available male partners at the antenatal clinic at Kenyatta National Hospital. A sample of 79 respondents was recruited into the study. Consecutive sampling was used to select the study participants. Data was collected using a semi structured questionnaire, analyzed using SPSS computer package version 20 and thereafter presented using descriptive methods.
Findings: Majority of participants (90%) were aged above 25 years, were more educated and had non-formal sources of employment. They knew at least 50% of the services offered and had a positive attitude towards ANC. Majority of participants (54%) stated that ANC is traditionally for women. Majority (77%) stated that the members of staff at ANC clinic are friendly and approachable.
Conclusions: Cultural beliefs and practices still hinder men’s participation as communities continue to uphold patriarchal tendencies that disregard women. Men’s attitude also determined their participation.

Ongeso, A.  2018.  Human immunodeficiency virus seroconversion in late pregnancy: Effects on pregnancy and childbirth in Kenya. International Journal of Social Science and Technology. 3-3(ISSN: 2415-6566):10-16. Abstract

Human immunodeficiency virus seroconversion in late pregnancy: Effects on pregnancy and childbirth in Kenya

Background: In Kenya, there is limited empirical data on effects of seroconversion in pregnancy and child birth due to low uptake of HIV retesting despite there being a policy directive to do so.
Objectives: To determine the effect of seroconversion in late pregnancy regarding pregnancy and childbirth among women seeking delivery services in Kakamega County Hospital and Pumwani Maternity Hospital.
Methodology: A ten month quasi experimental longitudinal study design was employed whereby 1,156 respondents consecutively sampled.
Results: HIV seroconverters had a higher chance of developing premature rupture of membranes, hemorrhage and puerperal sepsis than HIV negative women. The incidence of Mother to Child Transmission of HIV among exposed newborns was 0.09%. There was a statistically significant relationship between PEP administration, infant morbidity and mortality.
Conclusion: HIV seroconversion was associated with complications during delivery. Recommendations: There’s need to intensify retesting in late pregnancy as well as skilled birth attendance among the women seroconverting in late pregnancy.

Ongeso, A, Chite M, Kabo J.  2018.  Factors influencing high prevalence of Fresh still births in Mbagathi County Hospital, Nairobi-Kenya.. International Journal of Advanced Research. 6 No 4(2320-5407) Abstract

Background: The annual global burden of stillbirths is approximately 2.6 million, 98% of which occur in Sub Saharan Africa, (WHO, 2015). In 2016, approximately 24 still births per month occurred in Mbagathi County Hospital (MCH) representing a 33.3% increase from 2015. A third of these were Fresh Still Births (FSBs) - (Mbagathi reproductive health report 2015/2016).
Objectives: To establish factors influencing increase in FSB among women delivering at MCH.
Methodology: The study was conducted at MCH postnatal ward. A descriptive cross sectional study design was employed. Forty three respondents with FSBs were consecutively sampled. Clearance to conduct the study was sought from Ethics Review Committee, MCH and respondents. Researcher administered questionnaires were used for data collection over two months. Descriptive data involved calculation of measures of central tendency. Findings were presented in tables, graphs and narrative.
Results: Majority of the respondents were less than 20 years old, had low education level and were unemployed. Majority had preterm deliveries; prolonged premature rupture of membranes had medical conditions and attended ANC less than four times. Majority of the FSBs had complications and were delivered preterm. The facility had inadequate staffing, lacked prompt triaging equipment, and rarely used partograph to monitor labor.
Conclusion: Maternal, fetal and hospital related factors influenced high prevalence of FSB.
Recommendations: Improving uptake of focused antenatal care among women. Girl child empowerment in line with Sustainable Development Goal 5. Improve staffing ratios, develop protocol regarding triaging and labor monitoring. Availing hospital equipment for proper maternity care.

Key words: Fresh still births, developing countries, risk factors, perinatal mortality.

Ongeso, A, Omoni G.  2018.  Predisposing factors that lead to HIV seropositivity during pregnancy among women in Kakamega and Nairobi county Hospitals.. International Journal for Science and Technology.. 3 No 1(ISSN: 2415-6566) Abstract

In Kenya, there is limited empirical data on determinants of seropositivity in late pregnancy due to low uptake of HIV retesting in late pregnancy despite there being a policy directive to do so. Study objective was to determine the predisposing factors that lead to HIV seropositivity during pregnancy among women in Kakamega and Nairobi county Hospitals. A ten month longitudinal study was conducted employing both qualitative and quantitative design whereby 1,156 HIV positive and negative women were recruited in early pregnancy and followed up through pregnancy; they were interviewed, and retested.
Results showed that having multiple sex partners was associated with seropositivity. Cultural belief of men not having sex spouses in pregnancy encouraged extra marital affairs leading to seropositivity. In conclusion HIV seropositivity in pregnancy was mainly due to the risky sexual behavior. There is therefore need for behavior change to reverse retrogressive cultural beliefs and practices.

Key words Human immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Initial testing HIV Seropositivity HIV seroconversion Retesting

2017

  2017.  10th Anniversary workshop of the Understanding Development Issues in Nurse Educator (UDINE-C) network and the health educators East Midlands celebrations conference,, 22 June. 10th Anniversary workshop of the Understanding Development Issues in Nurse Educator (UDINE-C) network and the health educators East Midlands celebrations conference,. , Lincoln, UK
Maalim, H, Omuga B, Ongeso A, Okube T.  2017.  Determinants of Mode of Delivery Among Postnatal Mothers Admitted in Wajir County Referral Hospital, Kenya. EC Gynaecology. 6(4):128-138. Abstract

Background: Globally, giving birth through the natural process, ‘Vaginally’ has been widely accepted as unquestioned mode of birth. On the other hand, use of caesarean Section (CS), which involves a surgical incision, has also been utilized as a mode of delivery especially among women with medical or obstetric indications. Delivery through CS is a life saving measure which plays a crucial role in reducing maternal morbidity and mortality from direct causes such as hemorrhage, infection, hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and obstructed labor [1]. In Kenya, the National maternal mortality rate was 362/100,000. However, in the study area, Wajir county, it was 1683/100,000 [2]. Advances in technology and its adoption in reproductive health have resulted in an increase in the number of Caesarean delivery in the recent years. This has increased options for preferred mode of delivery for mothers and plays a significant role in reduction of maternal and neonatal mortality and morbidity rates. However, in most African countries, mainly in rural and marginalized areas, use of caesarian section remains low even when there is clear indication. Despite this, limited studies to establish determinants of modes of delivery have been done especially in remote rural areas such as Wajir County.
Objective: The main objective of this study was to establish determinants of mode of delivery among postnatal mothers admitted in Wajir County referral Hospital.
Materials and Methods: A hospital based descriptive cross-sectional study design was used. Mixed method of quantitative and qualitative data was employed among 178 postnatal mothers who were systematically sampled from Wajir county Referral hospital.
Quantitative data was collected using pre-tested semi-structured questionnaire and qualitative data was collected using Focus group discussion from the postnatal mothers. Descriptive analysis using means, frequency and proportions was computed. Chi-square test
(p < 0.05) with corresponding 95% confidence interval was used to determine the association between the various variables.
Results: The prevalence of Caesarian Section delivery among the respondents was 32%. Analyses with Chi-Square test of independence revealed that maternal age (p = 0.001), marital status (p = 0.016), level of education (p = 0.007), parity (p = 0.03), FGM practice
(p = 0.001) and belonging to the social health groups (p = 0.001) were the variables significantly associated with mode of delivery. A substantial number of women did not have sufficient knowledge on delivery options, benefits and risks to inform their decisions on delivery modes.
Conclusion: Vaginal Delivery is the most preferred mode of delivery even when CS is medically indicated. Caesarian section acceptance remains low due to lack of correct knowledge, poor attitude towards CS and lack of proper women counseling during ANC visits. Therefore, there is need for educational and economic empowerment of women and girls complemented with effective community sensitization and awareness campaigns on delivery-related complications, risks and alternative delivery options for emergency cases.
Keywords: Mode of Delivery; Postnatal Mothers; Wajir County Referral Hospital; Vaginal Delivery

2013

Alibiri, OA.  2013.  Incidence of HIV among initially HIV negative pregnant women in Kenya. Lambert Academic Publishers, Saarbrücken, Germany. (ISBN 978-3-659-44198-1.) Abstract

Background: Human Immune deficiency Virus (HIV) counseling and testing provides an entry point to comprehensive HIV/AIDS management. In Africa, most women attending antenatal care (ANC) clinics are counseled and tested for HIV only once; during the initial visit and yet there is documented evidence of seroconversion later in pregnancy. Failure to repeat the test leaves a gap in Prevention of Mother to Child Transmission (PMTCT).
Purpose: To identify the incidence of HIV seroconversion in pregnancy among initially HIV negative pregnant women.
Objectives: To determine the incidence of HIV seroconversion among initially HIV negative women later in pregnancy. To describe the factors associated with seroconversion among initially HIV negative women later in pregnancy. To discuss factors that influence HIV repeat counseling and testing among initially HIV negative pregnant women.
Study site: Kakamega Provincial General Hospital ANC clinics and antenatal ward (ANW).
Study design: A descriptive cross sectional study was employed.
Sampling and sample size: Three hundred and two pregnant women as per Fisher’s formula who on initial testing were HIV negative, revisiting ANC clinics or presenting in latent phase of labor at the ANW were systematically sampled for the study.
Data collection: A semi-structured questionnaire was used to collect data. Respondents were retested to identify their HIV seroconversion status.
Data analysis: Statistical Package for the Social Sciences was used for data analysis. Descriptive data were analyzed using descriptive statistics; frequency tables were generated, measures of central tendency calculated. Associations between variables were sought using chi square and significance tests. A p value of <0.05 was considered statistically significant.
Results: Among 302 women retested, 225 (74%) were married with a mean age of 24.6±5.4 years. Ninety three (30.8%) of these were house wives. Nine women (2.98%) who were retested turned HIV positive. Only 9 (2.98%) thought it was not necessary to repeat HIV testing 4 (44%) arguing that they tested HIV negative during their last test. For those who thought it was necessary to repeat testing, 91 (31.1%) thought it was part of self care. There was significant difference between women with multiple sex partners and those who did not have multiple sex partners in so far as HIV seroconversion was concerned χ2 =14.532; p = 0.008. those with multiple sex partners were almost 11 times more likely to seroconvert as compared with those without multiple sex partners (OR 95% C.I: 10.769; 2.419 – 47.942).
Conclusion: HIV seroconversion of 2.98% was clinically significant considering the fact that these women risk passing on the virus to their infants and their partners. It was realized that women still engage in risky sexual behaviors despite acknowledging that they have been taught on the need to avoid risky sexual behaviors. The government needs to strengthen repeat counseling and testing of pregnant women later in pregnancy in line with the Ministry’s new policy guidelines and aim at giving health messages which will foster behavior change so that the women avoid risky sexual behavior.

2011

A, O.  2011.  Quality audit on Diagnosis of Pre eclampsia at Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital. Kenya Nursing Journal. 41(2):45-49. Abstract

Background: Pregnancy and childbirth are usually a time of celebration in most parts of the world and is often marked with rituals in all societies. However this period of time can be the hardest of all experiences with anxiety and concern for some women. This is because a number of pregnant women end up with disabilities or even death due to pregnancy related complications. Pre eclampsia is one of the conditions that are responsible for maternal morbidity and mortality. Screening and monitoring in pregnancy are some of the strategies used by health care providers to identify high risk pregnancies so that they can provide more targeted and appropriate treatment and follow up care, and to monitor fetal well being in both low and high risk pregnancies.
Purpose: The aim of the study was to identify whether blood pressure and urinalysis are done for mothers seeking antenatal and delivery services at Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital Eldoret.
Methods: A review of records at the antenatal, labor and delivery units at Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital.
Findings: over 96% of women came for first visit and had their Blood Pressure taken, 48.7% of women came for the second visit and had their blood pressure taken, 17.8% of women came for the third visit and had their blood pressure taken and 5.6% of women came for the fourth visit and had their blood pressure taken . All women admitted to the labor ward had blood pressure measured and recorded. 40% of the women admitted to labor ward had urinalysis done.
Conclusion: Blood Pressure and urinalysis are key in the early diagnosis and management of Pre eclampsia and other hypertensive states in pregnancy. There is need that they are done as routine procedures.

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